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Sample records for post-stenting intravascular brachytherapy

  1. Post-stenting Intravascular Brachytherapy Trials on Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits Using 32P Liquid Sources: Implications for Prevention of In-Stent Restenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, Krzysztof; Walichiewicz, Piotr; Petelenz, Barbara; Jachec, Wojciech; Jochem, Jerzy; Tomasik, Andrzej; Bilski, Pawel; Snietura, Miroslaw; Wodniecki, Jan

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: Liquid sources of radiation delivered in angioplasty balloons may be a convenient self-centering device used for prevention of in-stent restenosis. To test the effectiveness of this method an intravascular brachytherapy study was performed using 32P liquid sources in an animal model. Methods: The radial dose distribution around angioplasty balloons filled with solutions of Na2H32PO4 was calibrated by thermoluminescence dosimetry. The animal experiments were performed in rabbits with induced hypercholesterolemia. The balloons containing 32P were introduced into iliac arteries immediately after stent implantation. Estimated 7-49 Gy doses required 30-100 minirradiations. Radiation effects were evaluated by comparing the thickness of various components of the artery wall. Results:Doses of 7, 12, 16 or 49 Gy on the internal artery surface required 30-100 min of irradiation. The dose of 49 Gy at 'zero' distance corresponding to 16 Gy at 1.0 mm from the balloon surface reduced hypertrophy in every layer of the arterial wall: in the intima the cross-sectional areas were 0.13 versus 0.91 mm2, in the media were 0.5 versus 0.46 mm2 and in the adventitia were 0.04 versus 0.3 mm2 (p <0.05). A dose of 7 Gyat the balloon surface produced adverse irradiation effects: the intimal area of the artery was 2.087 versus 0.857 mm2, the medial area was 0.59 versus 0.282 mm2 and the adventitial area was 0.033 versus 0.209 mm2 in treated and control arteries, respectively.Conclusion: Application of a 49 Gy irradiation dose to the internal arterial surface effectively prevented in-stentrestenosis.

  2. A quality management program in intravascular brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Chakri, Abderrahim; Thomadsen, Bruce

    2002-12-01

    While simple, intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) presents a considerable potential for harm to the patient. The medical physicist maintains the responsibility to minimize the likelihood of operational problems or dosimetric errors. The principals for safe operation remain the same as with any radiotherapy treatment: to deliver the correct dose, to the correct location, safety. To develop an effective and comprehensive quality management (QM) program for IVB, a physicist should utilize proven risk assessment techniques rather than simply thinking of things to check, and follow guidances such as ISO9001:2000. The proposed QM program includes the following: Procedures designed to assure the safety of the patient. Identification of the patient; tests of the integrity and patency for the delivery catheter, operation of the source train, and patency of the catheter in the treatment position; a check for recovery preparations; and verification of source recovery. Procedures to assure positional accuracy of the treatment: Verification of the positioning the catheter in the artery and of the sources in the catheter. Procedures to assure dosimetry accuracy: Acceptance testing of the device, including verification of the source strength and uniformity, and of the treatment duration tables; verification of the treatment prescription and duration for each patient; and control measures that minimize the likelihood of errors removing the source at the correct time. PMID:12512720

  3. Improved dosimetry techniques for intravascular brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Varun

    Coronary artery disease leads to the accumulation of atheromatous plaque leading to coronary stenosis. Coronary intervention techniques such as balloon angioplasty and atherectomy are used to address coronary stenosis and establish a stable lumen thus enhancing blood flow to the myocardium. Restenosis or re-blockage of the arteries is a major limitation of the above mentioned interventional techniques. Neointimal hyperplasia or proliferation of cells in response to the vascular injury as a result of coronary intervention is considered to be one of the major causes of restenosis. Recent studies indicated that irradiation of the coronary lesion site, with radiation doses ranging from 15 to 30 Gy, leads to diminishing neointimal hyperplasia with subsequent reduction in restenosis. The radiation dose is given by catheter-based radiation delivery systems using beta-emitters 90Sr/90Y, 32P and gamma-emitting 192Ir among others. However the dose schema used for dose prescription for these sources are relatively simplistic, and are based on calculations using uniform homogenous water or tissue media and simple cylinder geometry. Stenotic coronary vessels are invariably lined with atheromatous plaque of heterogeneous composition, the radiation dose distribution obtained from such dosimetry data can cause significant variations in the actual dose received by a given patient. Such discrepancies in dose calculation can introduce relatively large uncertainties in the limits of dose window for effective and safe application of intravascular brachytherapy, and consequently in the clinical evaluation of the efficacy of this modality. In this research study we investigated the effect of different geometrical and material heterogeneities, including residual plaque, catheter non-centering, lesion eccentricity and cardiac motion on the radiation dose delivered at the lesion site. Correction factors including dose perturbation factors and dose variation factors have been calculated

  4. Dosimetric effects of source-offset in intravascular brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Chibani, Omar; Li, X Allen

    2002-04-01

    In intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT), radioactive sources can be displaced (offset) laterally from the center of the lumen and/or longitudinally from the desired location due to the cardiac motion and/or the absence of a source-centering device. The purpose of this work is to study the dosimetric impact of such a source offset. Dose effects of both lateral and longitudinal source offsets with or without the presence of a calcified plaque or a metallic stent are calculated for the three most commonly used sources (32P, 90Sr/90Y, and 192Ir). The MCNP Monte Carlo code is used in the calculation. Static and random source offsets are considered. The major results include that (a) dose can be changed significantly (by a factor of up to 4) due to a static lateral source offset; (b) this dose variation is reduced if the lateral source offset is considered as random moving within the vessel (the dose at the 2 mm reference radial distance is increased by 5-15% for the three sources in the case of the 2D random offset studied); (c) the presence of a calcified plaque and/or a metallic stent worsens the dosimetric effects; (d) the longitudinal random source offset results in a reduction (15-18%) in the effective treatment length; (e) the dose effects of source offsets for the beta source are higher than those for the gamma source. The data presented in this paper may be used for IVBT treatment planning or for dosimetric analysis of treatment outcome. The dose change due to the source offset should be considered in dose prescription. The reduction of effective treatment length should be taken into account in selection of a proper source length to ensure an adequate coverage of the treatment target. PMID:11991124

  5. Gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB), a new treatment method for intravascular brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Enger, Shirin A; Rezaei, Arash; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Restenosis is a major problem after balloon angioplasty and stent implantation. The aim of this study is to introduce gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB) as a suitable modality for treatment of stenosis. The utility of GdNCB in intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) of stent stenosis is investigated by using the GEANT4 and MCNP4B Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. To study capture rate, Kerma, absorbed dose and absorbed dose rate around a Gd-containing stent activated with neutrons, a 30 mm long, 5 mm diameter gadolinium foil is chosen. The input data is a neutron spectrum used for clinical neutron capture therapy in Studsvik, Sweden. Thermal neutron capture in gadolinium yields a spectrum of high-energy gamma photons, which due to the build-up effect gives an almost flat dose delivery pattern to the first 4 mm around the stent. The absorbed dose rate is 1.33 Gy/min, 0.25 mm from the stent surface while the dose to normal tissue is in order of 0.22 Gy/min, i.e., a factor of 6 lower. To spare normal tissue further fractionation of the dose is also possible. The capture rate is relatively high at both ends of the foil. The dose distribution from gamma and charge particle radiation at the edges and inside the stent contributes to a nonuniform dose distribution. This will lead to higher doses to the surrounding tissue and may prevent stent edge and in-stent restenosis. The position of the stent can be verified and corrected by the treatment plan prior to activation. Activation of the stent by an external neutron field can be performed days after catherization when the target cells start to proliferate and can be expected to be more radiation sensitive. Another advantage of the nonradioactive gadolinium stent is the possibility to avoid radiation hazard to personnel. PMID:16485408

  6. Gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB), a new treatment method for intravascular brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Enger, Shirin A.; Rezaei, Arash; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-01-15

    Restenosis is a major problem after balloon angioplasty and stent implantation. The aim of this study is to introduce gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB) as a suitable modality for treatment of stenosis. The utility of GdNCB in intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) of stent stenosis is investigated by using the GEANT4 and MCNP4B Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. To study capture rate, Kerma, absorbed dose and absorbed dose rate around a Gd-containing stent activated with neutrons, a 30 mm long, 5 mm diameter gadolinium foil is chosen. The input data is a neutron spectrum used for clinical neutron capture therapy in Studsvik, Sweden. Thermal neutron capture in gadolinium yields a spectrum of high-energy gamma photons, which due to the build-up effect gives an almost flat dose delivery pattern to the first 4 mm around the stent. The absorbed dose rate is 1.33 Gy/min, 0.25 mm from the stent surface while the dose to normal tissue is in order of 0.22 Gy/min, i.e., a factor of 6 lower. To spare normal tissue further fractionation of the dose is also possible. The capture rate is relatively high at both ends of the foil. The dose distribution from gamma and charge particle radiation at the edges and inside the stent contributes to a nonuniform dose distribution. This will lead to higher doses to the surrounding tissue and may prevent stent edge and in-stent restenosis. The position of the stent can be verified and corrected by the treatment plan prior to activation. Activation of the stent by an external neutron field can be performed days after catherization when the target cells start to proliferate and can be expected to be more radiation sensitive. Another advantage of the nonradioactive gadolinium stent is the possibility to avoid radiation hazard to personnel.

  7. Monte Carol-Based Dosimetry of Beta-Emitters for Intravascular Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, C.K.

    2002-06-25

    Monte Carlo simulations for radiation dosimetry and the experimental verifications of the simulations have been developed for the treatment geometry of intravascular brachytherapy, a form of radionuclide therapy for occluded coronary disease (restenosis). Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, has been used to calculate the radiation dose from the encapsulated array of B-emitting seeds (Sr/Y-source train). Solid water phantoms have been fabricated to measure the dose on the radiochromic films that were exposed to the beta source train for both linear and curved coronary vessel geometries. While the dose difference for the 5-degree curved vessel at the prescription point of f+2.0 mm is within the 10% guideline set by the AAPM, however, the difference increased dramatically to 16.85% for the 10-degree case which requires additional adjustment for the acceptable dosimetry planning. The experimental dose measurements agree well with the simulation results

  8. Use of water-equivalent plastic scintillator for intravascular brachytherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Geso, M; Robinson, N; Schumer, W; Williams, K

    2004-03-01

    Beta irradiation has recently been investigated as a possible technique for the prevention of restenosis in intravascular brachytherapy after balloon dilatation or stent implantation. Present methods of beta radiation dosimetry are primarily conducted using radiochromic film. These film dosimeters exhibit limited sensitivity and their characteristics differ from those of tissue, therefore the dose measurement readings require correction factors to be applied. In this work a novel, mini-size (2 mm diameter by 5 mm long) dosimeter element fabricated from Organic Plastic Scintillator (OPS) material was employed. Scintillation photon detection is accomplished using a precision photodiode and innovative signal amplification and processing techniques, rather than traditional photomultiplier tube methods. A significant improvement in signal to noise ratio, dynamic range and stability is achieved using this set-up. In addition, use of the non-saturating organic plastic scintillator material as the detector enables the dosimeter to measure beta radiation at very close distances to the source. In this work the plastic scintillators have been used to measure beta radiation dose at distances of less than 1 mm from an Sr-90 cardiovascular brachytherapy source having an activity of about 2.1 GBq beta radiation levels for both depth-distance and longitudinal profile of the source pellet chain, both in air and in liquid water, are measured using this system. The data obtained is compared with results from Monte Carlo simulation technique (MCNP 4B). Plastic scintillator dosimeter elements, when used in conjunction with photodiode detectors may prove to be useful dosimeters for cardiovascular brachytherapy beta sources, or other applications where precise near-source field dosimetry is required. The system described is particularly useful where measurement of actual dose rate in real time, a high level of stability and repeatability, portability, and immediate access to results are

  9. Effectiveness Evaluation of Skin Covers against Intravascular Brachytherapy Sources Using VARSKIN3 Code

    PubMed Central

    Baghani, H R; Nazempour, A R; Aghamiri, S M R; Hosseini Daghigh, S M; Mowlavi, A A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: The most common intravascular brachytherapy sources include 32P, 188Re, 106Rh and 90Sr/90Y. In this research, skin absorbed dose for different covering materials in dealing with these sources were evaluated and the best covering material for skin protection and reduction of absorbed dose by radiation staff was recognized and recommended. Method: Four materials including polyethylene, cotton and two different kinds of plastic were proposed as skin covers and skin absorbed dose at different depths for each kind of the materials was calculated separately using the VARSKIN3 code. Results: The results suggested that for all sources, skin absorbed dose was minimized when using polyethylene. Considering this material as skin cover, maximum and minimum doses at skin surface were related to 90Sr/90Y and 106Rh, respectively. Conclusion: polyethylene was found the most effective cover in reducing skin dose and protecting the skin. Furthermore, proper agreement between the results of VARSKIN3 and other experimental measurements indicated that VRASKIN3 is a powerful tool for skin dose calculations when working with beta emitter sources. Therefore, it can be utilized in dealing with the issue of radiation protection. PMID:25505758

  10. The Monte Carlo-Based Dosimetry of Beta Emitters for Intravascular Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, C.K.; Son, J.; Ye, S.J.

    2001-06-17

    Intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) is a new radiotherapy modality to prevent restenosis (re-blockage of the coronary artery) following interventional coronary angioplasty. It is estimated that the restenosis rate may drop from {approx}35 to 40% to well below 10% if radiation is delivered to the obstruction site during or after angioplasty. In traditional brachytherapy, the dose is typically specified at 1 cm from the source, and the effects of low-energy photons and secondary electrons are essentially ignored. In IVBT, however, the entire lesion may be 1 to 3 mm in thickness. A better understanding of dosimetry in the millimetre range will help in the development of optimum clinical devices and their efficacious use in different institutions using different radionuclides and devices. The actual treatment geometry consists of an encapsulated train of seeds, a guide wire, and a stent in a curved vessel. The source is a cylindrical train of 12 source seeds, each having dimensions of 0.64 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm in length, and proximal/distal gold markers. Each seed contains {sup 90}Sr/Y mixed with fired ceramic encapsulated in a 0.04-mm stainless steel wall. The Monte Carlo simulations are carried out for the trained source geometries in the linear and curved vessels with and without a stent. The stent structure is approximately modeled as a set of tori with a rotational radius of 1.92 mm from the source axis and a circular radius of 0.08 mm in cross section. Five tori are equally spaced for each seed. The stent shadows 31% of the total area of the source surface. The total activity of 70 mCi (2.59 x 10{sup 9} Bq) was chosen from manufacturer data. The corresponding mass fraction of {sup 90}Sr/Y in the source ceramic is negligible and was not explicitly included in the MCNP simulations. All tallies were multiplied with 5.83 mCi/seed x 3.7 x 10{sup 7} s/mCi for one active seed, and then the tallies that made contributions to the dose in a voxel of interest were

  11. Post-Dilatation Intravascular Brachytherapy Trials on Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits Using {sup 32}P-Phosphate Solutions in Angioplasty Balloons

    SciTech Connect

    Walichiewicz, Piotr Wilczek, Krzysztof; Petelenz, Barbara; Jachec, Wojciech; Jochem, Jerzy; Tomasik, Andrzej; Bilski, Pawel; Gaca, Pawel; Banaszczuk, Joanna; Ihnatowicz, Jerzy; Wodniecki, Jan

    2004-01-15

    Response of peripheral arteries to post-dilatation intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) using {sup 32}P liquid sources was studied in a rabbit model. The applied sources were angioplasty balloons filled with aqueous solutions of Na{sub 2}H{sup 32}PO{sub 4}, NaCl and iodinated contrast. Dose distribution was calibrated by thermoluminescence dosimetry. The uncertainty of in vitro determinations of the activity-dose dependence was {+-} 15-30%. The animal experiments were performed on rabbits with induced hypercholesterolemia. The {sup 32}P sources were introduced into a randomly chosen (left or right) iliac artery, immediately after balloon injury. Due to the low specific activity of the applied sources, the estimated 7-49 Gy doses on the internal artery surface required 30-100 min irradiations. A symmetric, balloon-occluded but non-irradiated artery of the same animal served as control. Radiation effects were evaluated by comparing the thicknesses of various components of irradiated versus untreated artery walls of each animal. The treatment was well tolerated by the animals. The effects of various dose ranges could be distinguished although differences in individual biological reactions were large. Only the 49 Gy dose at 'zero' distance (16 Gy at 1.0 mm from the balloon surface) reduced hypertrophy in every active layer of the artery wall. The cross-sectional intimal thicknesses after 7, 12, 38 and 49 Gy doses were 0.277, 0.219, 0.357 and 0.196 mm{sup 2} respectively, versus 0.114, 0.155, 0.421 and 0.256 mm{sup 2} in controls (p < 0.05). The lowest radiation dose on the intima induced the opposite effect. Edge intimal hyperplasia was not avoided, which agrees with other reports. The edge restenosis and the variability of individual response to identical treatment conditions must be considered as limitations of the post-dilatation IVBT method. Only application of highest irradiation doses was effective. The irradiation dose should be planned and calculated for

  12. Dose perturbation of a novel cobalt chromium coronary stent on {sup 32}P intravascular brachytherapy: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Mourtada, Firas; Horton, John L.

    2005-01-01

    Intravascular brachytherapy has been adopted for the indication of in-stent restenosis on the basis of results of clinical trials using mainly stainless steel stents. Recently, a new stent made of cobalt-chromium L-605 alloy (CoCr, {rho}=9.22 g/cm{sup 3}) (MULTI-LINK VISION{sup TM}) was introduced as an alternative to the 316L stainless steel stent design (SS, {rho}=7.87 g/cm{sup 3}) (MULTI-LINK PENTA{sup TM}). In this work, we used the Monte Carlo code MCNPX to compare the dose distribution for the {sup 32}P GALILEO{sup TM} source in CoCr and SS 8 mm stent models. The dose perturbation factor (DPF), defined as the ratio of the dose in water with the presence of a stent to the dose without a stent, was used to compare results. Both stent designs were virtually expanded to diameters of 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0 mm using finite element models. The complicated strut shapes of both the CoCr and SS stents were simplified using circular rings with an effective width to yield a metal-to-tissue ratio identical to that of the actual stents. The mean DPF at a 1 mm tissue depth, over the entire stented length of 8 mm, was 0.935 for the CoCr stent and 0.911 for the SS stent. The mean DPF at the intima (0.05 mm radial distance from the strut outer surface), over the entire stented length of 8 mm, was 0.950 for CoCr, and 0.926 for SS. The maximum DPFs directly behind the CoCr and SS struts were 0.689 and 0.644, respectively. All DPF estimates have a standard deviation of {+-}0.6%(k=2), approximating the 95% confidence interval. Although the CoCr stent has a higher effective atomic number and greater density than the SS stent, the DPFs for the two stents are similar, probably because the metal-to-tissue ratio and strut thickness of the CoCr stent are lower than those of the SS stent.

  13. [Brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Itami, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Brachytherapy do require a minimal expansion of CTV to obtain PTV and it is called as ultimate high precision radiation therapy. In high-dose rate brachytherapy, applicators will be placed around or into the tumor and CT or MRI will be performed with the applicators in situ. With such image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) 3-dimensional treatment planning becomes possible and DVH of the tumor and organs at risk can be obtained. It is now even possible to make forward planning satisfying dose constraints. Traditional subjective evaluation of brachytherapy can be improved to the objective one by IGBT. Brachytherapy of the prostate cancer, cervical cancer, and breast cancer with IGBT technique was described. PMID:25596048

  14. Brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... smaller area in less time than conventional external beam radiation therapy. Brachytherapy is used to treat cancers ... to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) involves high-energy x-ray ...

  15. Intravascular ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    IVUS; Ultrasound - coronary artery; Endovascular ultrasound; Intravascular echocardiography ... A tiny ultrasound wand is attached to the top of a thin tube called a catheter. This ultrasound catheter is inserted ...

  16. Intravascular OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Joseph M.; Adler, Desmond; Xu, Chenyang

    Since the first coronary angioplasty was performed in the late 1970s, imaging has played a central role in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Today more than three million PCI procedures are performed worldwide to expand narrowed arteries and to clear blood clots that can cause debilitating symptoms of myocardial ischemia or fatal heart attacks. Although X-ray angiography is still the workhorse imaging modality in the field of interventional cardiology, intravascular imaging has become an indispensable tool for guiding complex PCI procedures. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are the two most commonly used catheter-based imaging technologies in coronary procedures. Since the first commercial intravascular OCT systems were introduced in Japan and the European Union in 2004 and in the United States in 2009, the application of intravascular OCT has grown rapidly [3, 15, 16].

  17. Dose calculation formalisms and consensus dosimetry parameters for intravascular brachytherapy dosimetry: Recommendations of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 149

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Schaart, Dennis R.; Soares, Christopher G.; Nath, Ravinder

    2007-11-15

    Since the publication of AAPM Task Group 60 report in 1999, a considerable amount of dosimetry data for the three coronary brachytherapy systems in use in the United States has been reported. A subgroup, Task Group 149, of the AAPM working group on Special Brachytherapy Modalities (Bruce Thomadsen, Chair) was charged to develop recommendations for dose calculation formalisms and the related consensus dosimetry parameters. The recommendations of this group are presented here. For the Cordis {sup 192}Ir and Novoste {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y systems, the original TG-43 formalism in spherical coordinates should be used along with the consensus values of the dose rate constant, geometry function, radial dose function, and anisotropy function for the single seeds. Contributions from the single seeds should be added linearly for the calculation of dose distributions from a source train. For the Guidant {sup 32}P wire system, the modified TG-43 formalism in cylindrical coordinates along with the recommended data for the 20 and 27 mm wires should be used. Data tables for the 6, 10, 14, 18, and 22 seed trains of the Cordis system, 30, 40, and 60 mm seed trains of the Novoste system, and the 20 and 27 mm wires of the Guidant system are presented along with our rationale and methodology for selecting the consensus data. Briefly, all available datasets were compared with each other and the consensus dataset was either an average of available data or the one obtained from the most densely populated study; in most cases this was a Monte Carlo calculation.

  18. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000573.htm Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Disseminated intravascular coagulation is a serious disorder in which the proteins ...

  19. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 141. Thachil J, Toh CH. Current concepts in the management of disseminated intravascular coagulation. Thromb Res . 2012;129 ...

  20. The Value of Pre- and Post-Stenting Fractional Flow Reserve for Predicting Mid-Term Stent Restenosis Following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI)

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Alireza; Bahremand, Mostafa; Saidi, Mohammad Reza; Jalili, Zahra; Salehi, Nahid; Assareh, Marzieeh; Abarghoei, Gholamreza Amini; Kazerani, Hashem

    2016-01-01

    Measuring fractional flow reserve (FFR) in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has predictive value for PCI outcome. We decided to examine the utility of pre- and post-stenting FFR as a predictor of 6-month stent restenosis as well as MACE (major adverse cardiac events). Pre- and post-stenting FFR values were measured for 60 PCI patients. Within 6 months after stenting, all patients were followed for assessment of cardiac MACE including myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or positive exercise test. Stent restenosis was also assessed. Cut-off values for pre- and post-stenting FFR measurements were considered respectively as 0.65 and 0.92. Stent restenosis was detected in 4 patients (6.6%). All 4 patients (100%) with restenosis had pre-stenting FFR of < 0.65, while only 26 of 56 patients without restenosis (46.4%) had pre-stenting FFR value of < 0.65 (P = 0.039). Mean pre-stenting FFR in patients with restenosis was significantly lower than in those without restenosis (0.25 ± 0.01 vs. 0.53 ± 0.03, P = 0.022). Although stent restenosis was higher in patients with post-stenting FFR of < 0.92 (2 cases, 9.5%) than in those with FFR value of ≥ 0.92 (2 cases, 5.1%), the difference was not statistically (P = 0.510). Pre-stenting FFR, the use of longer stents, and history of diabetes mellitus can predict stent restenosis, but the value of post-stenting FFR for predicting restenosis was not explicit.

  1. Light intensity matching between different intravascular optical coherence tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shengnan; Eggermont, Jeroen; Nakatani, Shimpei; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2016-02-01

    Currently two commercial intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) systems are available: Illumien Optis from St. Jude Medical (SJM) and Lunawave from Terumo. Both systems store the light intensity data in a raw vendor specific polar format. However, whereas SJM uses 16-bits per pixel Terumo uses 8-bits meaning the intensity values are in different ranges. This complicates quantitative light intensity based analysis when comparing results based on data from both systems. Therefore, this work aims to find an intensity transformation function from Terumo's 8-bit OFDI data to SJM's 16-bit range. The data consists of 8 pullbacks, 4 acquired with each system in the same arteries of 2 different patents pre- and post-stenting implantation. A total of 133 matching sections without stent struts from the two sets of pullbacks were identified based on landmarks such as side-branches and calcified regions. Since the main region of interest in the image is the tissue region only the pixels within 2mm behind the lumen border are used. In order to match the SJM data range, the Terumo data was rescaled and cumulative distribution functions (CDF) were calculated based on the histogram distributions. Comparing these CDFs, the transformation function can be determined. Application of this transformation function not only improves the visual similarity of matching slices it can also be used for further quantitative analysis.

  2. Angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Tomasini, D; Berti, E

    2015-02-01

    Under the generic diagnosis of angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas are included several subtypes of lymphomas histopathologically characterized either by the predominantly endovascular-endoluminal presence of neoplastic lymphocytes of B-T or NK/T cell origin, or by a pathologic process centered around a blood vessels secondarily infiltrated and invaded by the spreading infiltrate. This group of lymphoproliferative disorders is heterogeneous regarding phenotype, but they share common features that are multiorgan involvement, worse prognosis, and, frequently Ebstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomic integration. At onset, some of these rare lymphomas, e.g. intravascular large cell lymphoma or lymphomatoid granulomatosis (Liebow dieases), are misdiagnosed as inflammatory diseases. The actual treatments of these disorders are based upon chemotherapy and/or chemotherapy plus bone marrow transplantation with variable results. Therapeutic approaches for EBV related angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas, similarly to those employed for other viral induced lymphoproliferative disease would comprise the employment of chemotherapy together with drugs able to interfere with viral infection. Such an approach has been used in rare cases of EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly, a lymphoproliferative disorders which development is linked to immunosuppression due to senescence. The present review will focus on intravascular and angiocentric lymphomas providing histopathologic, immunophenotypical and molecular data useful to overcome to a specific diagnosis and to differentiate them from other lymphoproliferative disorders showing a secondary vascular engulfment and infiltration and some vasculitides showing overlapping histopathologic features. PMID:25531150

  3. How Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Treated? Treatment for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) depends ... and treat the underlying cause. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation People who have acute DIC may have severe ...

  4. Disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Gando, Satoshi; Levi, Marcel; Toh, Cheng-Hock

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired syndrome characterized by widespread intravascular activation of coagulation that can be caused by infectious insults (such as sepsis) and non-infectious insults (such as trauma). The main pathophysiological mechanisms of DIC are inflammatory cytokine-initiated activation of tissue factor-dependent coagulation, insufficient control of anticoagulant pathways and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1-mediated suppression of fibrinolysis. Together, these changes give rise to endothelial dysfunction and microvascular thrombosis, which can cause organ dysfunction and seriously affect patient prognosis. Recent observations have pointed to an important role for extracellular DNA and DNA-binding proteins, such as histones, in the pathogenesis of DIC. The International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) established a DIC diagnostic scoring system consisting of global haemostatic test parameters. This scoring system has now been well validated in diverse clinical settings. The theoretical cornerstone of DIC management is the specific and vigorous treatment of the underlying conditions, and DIC should be simultaneously managed to improve patient outcomes. The ISTH guidance for the treatment of DIC recommends treatment strategies that are based on current evidence. In this Primer, we provide an updated overview of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of DIC and discuss the future directions of basic and clinical research in this field. PMID:27250996

  5. Image Processing in Intravascular OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhao; Wilson, David L.; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in the world. Intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is rapidly becoming a promising imaging modality for characterization of atherosclerotic plaques and evaluation of coronary stenting. OCT has several unique advantages over alternative technologies, such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), due to its better resolution and contrast. For example, OCT is currently the only imaging modality that can measure the thickness of the fibrous cap of an atherosclerotic plaque in vivo. OCT also has the ability to accurately assess the coverage of individual stent struts by neointimal tissue over time. However, it is extremely time-consuming to analyze IVOCT images manually to derive quantitative diagnostic metrics. In this chapter, we introduce some computer-aided methods to automate the common IVOCT image analysis tasks.

  6. Murine neonatal intravascular injections: Modeling newborn disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to perform murine neonatal intravascular injections likely will prove useful in studying many newborn-specific disease states that are modeled in mice. Unfortunately, effective intravascular injection in the neonatal mouse has been limited by developmental immaturity and small size. To e...

  7. 21 CFR 870.3375 - Cardiovascular intravascular filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiovascular intravascular filter. 870.3375... Cardiovascular intravascular filter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular intravascular filter is an implant that... and Revision of 2/12/90 (K90-1)” and (ii) “Guidance for Cardiovascular Intravascular Filter...

  8. 21 CFR 870.3375 - Cardiovascular intravascular filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiovascular intravascular filter. 870.3375... Cardiovascular intravascular filter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular intravascular filter is an implant that... and Revision of 2/12/90 (K90-1)” and (ii) “Guidance for Cardiovascular Intravascular Filter...

  9. 21 CFR 870.3375 - Cardiovascular intravascular filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiovascular intravascular filter. 870.3375... Cardiovascular intravascular filter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular intravascular filter is an implant that... and Revision of 2/12/90 (K90-1)” and (ii) “Guidance for Cardiovascular Intravascular Filter...

  10. 21 CFR 870.3375 - Cardiovascular intravascular filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiovascular intravascular filter. 870.3375... Cardiovascular intravascular filter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular intravascular filter is an implant that... and Revision of 2/12/90 (K90-1)” and (ii) “Guidance for Cardiovascular Intravascular Filter...

  11. 21 CFR 870.3375 - Cardiovascular intravascular filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiovascular intravascular filter. 870.3375... Cardiovascular intravascular filter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular intravascular filter is an implant that... and Revision of 2/12/90 (K90-1)” and (ii) “Guidance for Cardiovascular Intravascular Filter...

  12. [Brachytherapy for oesophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Wong, S; Hennequin, C; Quero, L

    2013-04-01

    The main indication of oesophageal brachytherapy is palliative: it can improve dysphagia in patients with a tumor not suitable for surgery or chemoradiotherapy. A randomized clinical trial showed that survival without dysphagia and quality of life was improved by endoluminal brachytherapy in comparison to self-expansible metallic stents. It also increases the duration of palliation after laser deobstruction. Its role as a curative treatment of locally advanced tumors is still discussed: in combination with external beam radiotherapy, it seems that brachytherapy increased the rate of severe toxicity (haemorrhages, fistula, stenosis). In superficial lesions, brachytherapy with or without external beam radiotherapy seems logical but large prospective studies are missing in this setting. PMID:23603254

  13. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Ru-Wen; Tsoi, Daphne T.

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy is a common cause of disseminated intravascular coagulation and usually presents as a chronic disorder in solid organ tumours. We present a rare case of recurrent acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in neuroendocrine carcinoma after manipulation, firstly, by core biopsy and, later, by cytotoxic therapy causing a release of procoagulants and cytokines from lysed tumour cells. This is reminiscent of tumour lysis syndrome where massive quantities of intracellular electrolytes and nucleic acid are released, causing acute metabolic imbalance and renal failure. This case highlights the potential complication of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation after trauma to malignant cells. PMID:23139666

  14. Disseminated intravascular coagulation after multiple honeybee stings.

    PubMed

    V, Dharma Rao; Bodepudi, Sravan Kumar; Krishna, Murali

    2014-01-01

    Honeybee venom contains apitoxin which can cause anaphylaxis, cardiovascular collapse and death. Disseminated intravascular coagulation is rare following honeybee stings. We describe the case of a farmer who developed this complication. PMID:25668084

  15. Intravascular ultrasound imaging following balloon angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Tobis, J M; Mahon, D J; Moriuchi, M; Honye, J; McRae, M

    1991-01-01

    Despite its long history and reliability, contrast angiography has several inherent limitations. Because it is a two-dimensional projection image of the lumen contour, the wall thickness cannot be measured and the plaque itself is not visualized. This results in an underestimation of the amount of atherosclerotic disease by angiography. An assessment of atherosclerosis could be improved by an imaging modality: (1) that has an inherent larger magnification than angiography and (2) that directly visualizes the plaque. Intravascular ultrasound fulfils these criteria. This presentation will provide evidence that intravascular ultrasound may prove complimentary or even superior to angiography as an imaging modality. Intravascular ultrasound demonstrates excellent representations of lumen and plaque morphology of in vitro specimens compared with histology. There is very close intraobserver and interobserver variability of measurements made from intravascular ultrasound images. Phantom studies of stenoses in a tube model demonstrate that angiography can misrepresent the severity of stenosis when the lumen contour is irregular and not a typical ellipse, whereas intravascular ultrasound reproduces the cross-sectional morphology more accurately since it images the artery from within. In vitro studies of the atherosclerotic plaque tissue characteristics compare closely with the echo representation of fibrosis, calcification, and lipid material. In addition, in vitro studies of balloon angioplasty demonstrate that intravascular ultrasound accurately represents the changes in the structure of artery segments following balloon dilatation. PMID:1833473

  16. Dosimetric audit in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-01-01

    Dosimetric audit is required for the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy and to aid optimization of treatment. The reassurance that treatment is being delivered in line with accepted standards, that delivered doses are as prescribed and that quality improvement is enabled is as essential for brachytherapy as it is for the more commonly audited external beam radiotherapy. Dose measurement in brachytherapy is challenging owing to steep dose gradients and small scales, especially in the context of an audit. Several different approaches have been taken for audit measurement to date: thimble and well-type ionization chambers, thermoluminescent detectors, optically stimulated luminescence detectors, radiochromic film and alanine. In this work, we review all of the dosimetric brachytherapy audits that have been conducted in recent years, look at current audits in progress and propose required directions for brachytherapy dosimetric audit in the future. The concern over accurate source strength measurement may be essentially resolved with modern equipment and calibration methods, but brachytherapy is a rapidly developing field and dosimetric audit must keep pace. PMID:24807068

  17. Canadian prostate brachytherapy in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Mira; Crook, Juanita; Morris, W. James; Morton, Gerard; Pickles, Tom; Usmani, Nawaid; Vigneault, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy can be used as a monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk patients or in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a form of dose escalation for selected intermediate- and high-risk patients. Prostate brachytherapy with either permanent implants (low dose rate [LDR]) or temporary implants (high dose rate [HDR]) is emerging as the most effective radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Several large Canadian brachytherapy programs were established in the mid- to late-1990s. Prostate brachytherapy is offered in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. We anticipate the need for brachytherapy services in Canada will significantly increase in the near future. In this review, we summarize brachytherapy programs across Canada, contemporary eligibility criteria for the procedure, toxicity and prostate-specific antigen recurrence free survival (PRFS), as published from Canadian institutions for both LDR and HDR brachytherapy. PMID:23671495

  18. [Safety in brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Marcié, S; Marinello, G; Peiffert, D; Lartigau, É

    2013-04-01

    No technique can now be used without previously considering the safety of patients, staff and public and risk management. This is the case for brachytherapy. The various aspects of brachytherapy are discussed for both the patient and the staff. For all, the risks must be minimized while achieving a treatment of quality. It is therefore necessary to establish a list as comprehensive as possible regardless of the type of brachytherapy (low, high, pulsed dose-rate). Then, their importance must be assessed with the help of their criticality. Radiation protection of personnel and public must take into account the many existing regulation texts. Four axes have been defined for the risk management for patients: organization, preparation, planning and implementation of treatment. For each axis, a review of risks is presented, as well as administrative, technical and medical dispositions for staff and the public. PMID:23465784

  19. Restenosis: Intracoronary Brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Drachman, Douglas E.; Simon, Daniel I.

    2002-04-01

    Though interventional strategies have revolutionized the management of patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease, in-stent restenosis has emerged as the single most important limitation of long-term success following percutaneous coronary intervention. Once present, in-stent restenosis is extraordinarily difficult to treat, with conventional revascularization techniques failing in 50% to 80% of patients. Intracoronary radiation, or brachytherapy, targets cellular proliferation within the culprit neointima. Clinical trials have demonstrated that brachytherapy is a highly effective treatment for in-stent restenosis, reducing angiographic restenosis by 50% to 60% and the need for target vessel revascularization by 40% to 50%. The benefits of intracoronary brachytherapy may be particularly pronounced in certain patient subgroups (eg, those with diabetes, long lesions, or lesions in saphenous vein bypass grafts), but comes at the cost of an increased rate of late stent thrombosis and the need for extended antiplatelet therapy. The role of brachytherapy in the arsenal of the interventional cardiologist will continue to evolve, particularly in light of the unprecedented recent advances with the use of drug-eluting stents for restenosis prevention. PMID:11858773

  20. 21 CFR 880.5440 - Intravascular administration set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intravascular administration set. 880.5440 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5440 Intravascular administration set. (a) Identification. An intravascular administration set is a device used to administer fluids from a container to a patient's vascular system...

  1. Ruthenium-106 brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Brachytherapy is the most common method for treating uveal melanoma, and currently the ruthenium-106 (Ru-106) and iodine-125 (I-125) applicators are the most frequently used. Ru-106 applicators were introduced by Prof. Peter Lommatzsch in the 1960s, and since then have been used widely by many ocular oncologists, mainly in Europe. The Ru-106 isotope is a beta ray (electron) emitter, and as such it has a limited depth of penetration. This is the reason why many experts use Ru-106 applicators for tumors with a maximal thickness of up to 7.0 mm, although others use it successfully for thicker tumors. The Ru-106 applicators are manufactured commercially and have a half-life of about 1 year. Ru-106 brachytherapy for uveal melanoma provides excellent local control rates and eye preservation with a relatively low recurrence rate. The main advantage of Ru-106 over other isotopes is the better preservation of vision in the treated eye, and less damage to the healthy parts of the eye due to its limited range of radiation. This can also be achieved by positioning the Ru-106 plaque eccentrically, away from the macula and optic nerve head. Ru-106 brachytherapy can be used in combination with other methods of treatment of uveal melanoma, such as local resection or transpupillary thermotherapy, and is sporadically combined with other isotopes, such as gamma-emitting cobalt-60 and I-125. PMID:22042011

  2. Mapping Intravascular Ultrasound Controversies in Interventional Cardiology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Maresca, David; Adams, Samantha; Maresca, Bruno; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound is a catheter-based imaging modality that was developed to investigate the condition of coronary arteries and assess the vulnerability of coronary atherosclerotic plaques in particular. Since its introduction in the clinic 20 years ago, use of intravascular ultrasound innovation has been relatively limited. Intravascular ultrasound remains a niche technology; its clinical practice did not vastly expand, except in Japan, where intravascular ultrasound is an appraised tool for guiding percutaneous coronary interventions. In this qualitative research study, we follow scholarship on the sociology of innovation in exploring both the current adoption practices and perspectives on the future of intravascular ultrasound. We conducted a survey of biomedical experts with experience in the technology, the practice, and the commercialization of intravascular ultrasound. The collected information enabled us to map intravascular ultrasound controversies as well as to outline the dynamics of the international network of experts that generates intravascular ultrasound innovations and uses intravascular ultrasound technologies. While the technology is praised for its capacity to measure coronary atherosclerotic plaque morphology and is steadily used in clinical research, the lack of demonstrated benefits of intravascular ultrasound guided coronary interventions emerges as the strongest factor that prevents its expansion. Furthermore, most of the controversies identified were external to intravascular ultrasound technology itself, meaning that decision making at the industrial, financial and regulatory levels are likely to determine the future of intravascular ultrasound. In light of opinions from the responding experts', a wider adoption of intravascular ultrasound as a stand-alone imaging modality seems rather uncertain, but the appeal for this technology may be renewed by improving image quality and through combination with complementary imaging

  3. Salvage Brachytherapy for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer following Primary Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, John M.; Wilson, William A.; Bole, Raevti; Chen, Li; Meigooni, Ali S.; Rowland, Randall G.; Clair, William H. St.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we evaluated our experience with salvage brachytherapy after discovery of biochemical recurrence after a prior brachytherapy procedure. Methods and Materials. From 2001 through 2012 twenty-one patients treated by brachytherapy within University of Kentucky or from outside centers developed biochemical failure and had no evidence of metastases. Computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated; patients who had an underseeded portion of their prostate were considered for reimplantation. Results. The majority of the patients in this study (61.9%) were low risk and median presalvage PSA was 3.49 (range 17.41–1.68). Mean follow-up was 61 months. At last follow-up after reseeding, 11/21 (52.4%) were free of biochemical recurrence. There was a trend towards decreased freedom from biochemical recurrence in low risk patients (p = 0.12). International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) increased at 3-month follow-up visits but decreased and were equivalent to baseline scores at 18 months. Conclusions. Salvage brachytherapy after primary brachytherapy is possible; however, in our experience the side-effect profile after the second brachytherapy procedure was higher than after the first brachytherapy procedure. In this cohort of patients we demonstrate that approximately 50% oncologic control, low risk patients appear to have better outcomes than others. PMID:27092279

  4. Relief of vasospasm by intravascular ultraviolet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Kanji; Morimoto, Yuji; Ito, Hirotaka; Kominami, Kimito; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1998-05-01

    We investigated the photovasorelaxation with intravascular transluminal irradiation using in vivo model. A 2.5 Fr. catheter was inserted in the femoral artery of a rabbit under anesthesia. A 400 micrometers diameter quartz fiber was inserted through the catheter. The catheter was withdrawn from the distal end to the proximal end of the exposed femoral artery without laser irradiation in order to observe the mechanical dilation by the procedure. The femoral artery lumen was irradiated by a Helium-Cadmium(He-Cd) laser (wavelength; 325 nm) with 8 mW through the fiber during 30 s. We carried out that the laser irradiation produced vasorelaxation (185% on the average) compared with mechanical vasodilation (150% on the average) with angiography. The results suggest that intravascular transluminal irradiation with low-power UV laser might be applicable to the relief of acute arterial vasospasm.

  5. Intravascular access in pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; Fischer, R

    1988-11-01

    All cases of patients aged less than 48 months who presented in cardiac arrest to the Hennepin County Medical Center's emergency department (ED) during the years 1984 to 1986 were reviewed retrospectively. The ED record, initial and subsequent chest radiographs, hospital charts, and autopsy reports were analyzed. A total of 33 cases were reviewed. The average patient age was 5 months. The average time needed to establish intravascular access was 7.9 +/- 4.2 minutes. Success rates were 77% for central venous catheterization, 81% for surgical vein cutdown, 83% for intraosseous infusion, and 17% for percutaneous peripheral catheterization. Percutaneous peripheral catheterization, when successful, and bone marrow needle placement were the fastest methods of obtaining intravascular access. There were no major immediate complications, and delayed complications were minimal. Attempts at peripheral intravenous catheter placement should be brief, with rapid progression to intraosseous infusion if peripheral attempts are not successful. PMID:3178949

  6. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Induced with Leukocyte Procoagulant

    PubMed Central

    Kociba, Gary J.; Griesemer, Richard A.

    1972-01-01

    The procoagulant activity of rabbit peritoneal leukocytes significantly increased when the leukocytes were incubated in suspension cultures at 37 C for 24 hours. Intravenous infusions of Iysates of 232 × 106 rabbit leukocytes which had been incubated in cultures at 37 C for 24 hours produced disseminated intravascular coagulation and vasculitis involving the pulmonary arteries in normal rabbits. Intraaortic infusions of lysates of 230 × 106 similarly incubated leukocytes produced renal thrombosis and renal cortical necrosis in normal rabbits. These observations suggest that the procoagulant of granulocytic leukocytes could play a role in the generalized Shwartzman reaction and other syndromes of disseminated intravascular coagulation. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 1Fig 2 PMID:5086898

  7. Techniques for Intravascular Foreign Body Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Woodhouse, Joe B.; Uberoi, Raman

    2013-08-01

    As endovascular therapies increase in frequency, the incidence of lost or embolized foreign bodies is increasing. The presence of an intravascular foreign body (IFB) is well recognized to have the potential to cause serious complications. IFB can embolize and impact critical sites such as the heart, with subsequent significant morbidity or mortality. Intravascular foreign bodies most commonly result from embolized central line fragments, but they can originate from many sources, both iatrogenic and noniatrogenic. The percutaneous approach in removing an IFB is widely perceived as the best way to retrieve endovascular foreign bodies. This minimally invasive approach has a high success rate with a low associated morbidity, and it avoids the complications related to open surgical approaches. We examined the characteristics, causes, and incidence of endovascular embolizations and reviewed the various described techniques that have been used to facilitate subsequent explantation of such materials.

  8. Intravascular photoacoustic imaging of human coronary atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Krista; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Springeling, Geert; van Beusekom, Heleen M. M.; Oosterhuis, J. Wolter; van Soest, Gijs

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate intravascular photoacoustic imaging of human coronary atherosclerotic plaque. We specifically imaged lipid content, a key factor in vulnerable plaques that may lead to myocardial infarction. An integrated intravascular photoacoustics (IVPA) and ultrasound (IVUS) catheter with an outer diameter of 1.25 mm was developed. The catheter comprises an angle-polished optical fiber adjacent to a 30 MHz single-element transducer. The ultrasonic transducer was optically isolated to eliminate artifacts in the PA image. We performed measurements on a cylindrical vessel phantom and isolated point targets to demonstrate its imaging performance. Axial and lateral point spread function widths were 110 μm and 550 μm, respectively, for PA and 89 μm and 420 μm for US. We imaged two fresh human coronary arteries, showing different stages of disease, ex vivo. Specific photoacoustic imaging of lipid content, is achieved by spectroscopic imaging at different wavelengths between 1180 and 1230 nm.

  9. Intravascular iodinated contrast media and the anaesthetist.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, M C; Kam, P C A

    2008-06-01

    The use of intravascular iodinated contrast media (ICM) in radiological investigations is common. Increasingly, anaesthetists and intensivists are involved in the care of patients undergoing these investigations. Whilst the use of ICM is generally safe there are important adverse effects that need to be recognised and measures instigated to prevent or treat these effects. In patients at risk of developing adverse reactions it is important to consider alternative modes of imaging so that ICM can be avoided. Strategies for the prevention of ICM nephropathy should be considered in all patients receiving ICM. Currently intravascular volume expansion with 0.9% saline has the strongest evidence base. The use of isotonic sodium bicarbonate combined with N-acetylcysteine appears promising in providing further benefits. Although the use of N-acetylcysteine alone has not been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of ICM nephropathy it is cheap, has few adverse effects and it would seem reasonable to continue its use in conjunction with intravascular volume expansion. The routine use of corticosteroid and antihistamine premedication is not always effective in preventing general adverse reactions. PMID:18477275

  10. Hypothesis: Disseminated Intravascular Inflammation as the Inflammatory Counterpart to Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Brian S.; Bull, Maureen H.

    1994-08-01

    We have identified a leukocyte activation syndrome that is occasionally associated with the transfusion of intraoperatively recovered erythrocytes. This syndrome appears to result from intravascular damage caused by leukocytes activated during the erythrocyte salvage process. We hypothesize that this syndrome is part of a larger disease grouping: disseminated intravascular inflammation (DII). DII is the analog of the coagulation disorder disseminated intravascular coagulation. In disseminated intravascular coagulation, the organ damage results from uncontrolled activation of the clotting pathway; in DII the damage is caused by leukocytes that have become activated by direct contact with bacteria or in rare instances-such as erythrocyte salvage-in the absence of bacteria and bacterial products. Recent studies of the hazards associated with intraoperative blood salvage indicate that activation of leukocytes can be achieved by exposure to activated platelets alone. If such activated leukocytes are reinfused along with the washed erythrocytes, widespread organ damage may result. The lung is the organ most severely affected by activated leukocytes. Adult respiratory distress syndrome is one outcome. It is likely that DII is a presently unrecognized pathophysiological process that complicates a variety of primary disease states and increases their lethality.

  11. Hypothesis: disseminated intravascular inflammation as the inflammatory counterpart to disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, B S; Bull, M H

    1994-01-01

    We have identified a leukocyte activation syndrome that is occasionally associated with the transfusion of intraoperatively recovered erythrocytes. This syndrome appears to result from intravascular damage caused by leukocytes activated during the erythrocyte salvage process. We hypothesize that this syndrome is part of a larger disease grouping: disseminated intravascular inflammation (DII). DII is the analog of the coagulation disorder disseminated intravascular coagulation. In disseminated intravascular coagulation, the organ damage results from uncontrolled activation of the clotting pathway; in DII the damage is caused by leukocytes that have become activated by direct contact with bacteria or in rare instances--such as erythrocyte salvage--in the absence of bacteria and bacterial products. Recent studies of the hazards associated with intraoperative blood salvage indicate that activation of leukocytes can be achieved by exposure to activated platelets alone. If such activated leukocytes are reinfused along with the washed erythrocytes, widespread organ damage may result. The lung is the organ most severely affected by activated leukocytes. Adult respiratory distress syndrome is one outcome. It is likely that DII is a presently unrecognized pathophysiological process that complicates a variety of primary disease states and increases their lethality. Images PMID:8058778

  12. Multi-Frequency Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng; Yu, Mingyue; Chen, Zeyu; Fei, Chunlong; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is frequently associated with the sudden rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque within the coronary artery. Several unique physiological features, including a thin fibrous cap accompanied by a necrotic lipid core, are the targeted indicators for identifying the vulnerable plaques. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), a catheter-based imaging technology, has been routinely performed in clinics for more than 20 years to describe the morphology of the coronary artery and guide percutaneous coronary interventions. However, conventional IVUS cannot facilitate the risk assessment of ACS because of its intrinsic limitations, such as insufficient resolution. Renovation of the IVUS technology is essentially needed to overcome the limitations and enhance the coronary artery characterization. In this paper, a multi-frequency intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging system was developed by incorporating a higher frequency IVUS transducer (80 to 150 MHz) with the conventional IVUS (30–50 MHz) system. The newly developed system maintains the advantage of deeply penetrating imaging with the conventional IVUS, while offering an improved higher resolution image with IVUS at a higher frequency. The prototyped multi-frequency catheter has a clinically compatible size of 0.95 mm and a favorable capability of automated image co-registration. In vitro human coronary artery imaging has demonstrated the feasibility and superiority of the multi-frequency IVUS imaging system to deliver a more comprehensive visualization of the coronary artery. This ultrasonic-only intravascular imaging technique, based on a moderate refinement of the conventional IVUS system, is not only cost-effective from the perspective of manufacturing and clinical practice, but also holds the promise of future translation into clinical benefits. PMID:25585394

  13. Positron autoradiography for intravascular imaging: feasibility evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Xu, Tong; Ducote, Justin L.; Easwaramoorthy, Balasubramaniam; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-02-01

    Approximately 70% of acute coronary artery disease is caused by unstable (vulnerable) plaques with an inflammation of the overlying cap and high lipid content. A rupturing of the inflamed cap of the plaque results in propagation of the thrombus into the lumen, blockage of the artery and acute ischaemic syndrome or sudden death. Morphological imaging such as angiography or intravascular ultrasound cannot determine inflammation status of the plaque. A radiotracer such as 18F-FDG is accumulated in vulnerable plaques due to higher metabolic activity of the inflamed cap and could be used to detect a vulnerable plaque. However, positron emission tomography (PET) cannot detect the FDG-labelled plaques because of respiratory and heart motions, small size and low activity of the plaques. Plaques can be detected using a miniature particle (positron) detector inserted into the artery. In this work, a new detector concept is investigated for intravascular imaging of the plaques. The detector consists of a storage phosphor tip bound to the end of an intravascular catheter. It can be inserted into an artery, absorb the 18F-FDG positrons from the plaques, withdrawn from the artery and read out. Length and diameter of the storage phosphor tip can be matched to the length and the diameter of the artery. Monte Carlo simulations and experimental evaluations of coronary plaque imaging with the proposed detector were performed. It was shown that the sensitivity of the storage phosphor detector to the positrons of 18F-FDG is sufficient to detect coronary plaques with 1 mm and 2 mm sizes and 590 Bq and 1180 Bq activities in the arteries with 2 mm and 3 mm diameters, respectively. An experimental study was performed using plastic tubes with 2 mm diameter filled with an FDG solution, which simulates blood. FDG spots simulating plaques were placed over the surface of the tube. A phosphor tip was inserted into the tube and imaged the plaques. Exposure time was 1 min in all simulations and

  14. Intravascular imaging with a storage phosphor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Petrek, Peter; Matthews, Kenneth L., II; Fritz, Shannon G.; Bujenovic, L. Steven; Xu, Tong

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and test an intravascular positron imaging system based on a storage phosphor detector for imaging and detecting vulnerable plaques of human coronary arteries. The radiotracer F18-FDG accumulates in vulnerable plaques with inflammation of the overlying cap. The vulnerable plaques can, therefore, be imaged by recording positrons emitted from F18-FDG with a detector inserted into the artery. A prototype intravascular detector was constructed based on storage phosphor. The detector uses a flexible storage phosphor tube with 55 mm length, 2 mm diameter and 0.28 mm wall thickness. The intravascular detector is guided into the vessel using x-ray fluoroscopy and the accumulated x-ray signal must be erased prior to positron imaging. For this purpose, a light diffuser, 0.9 mm in diameter and 55 mm in length, was inserted into the detector tube. The light diffuser was connected to a laser source through a 2 m long optical fiber. The diffuser redirected the 0.38 W laser light to the inner surface of the phosphor detector to erase it. A heart phantom with 300 cm3 volume and three coronary arteries with 3.2 mm diameter and with several plaques was constructed. FDG solution with 0.5 µCi cm-3 activity concentration was filled in the heart and coronary arteries. The detector was inserted in a coronary artery and the signal from the plaques and surrounding background activity was recorded for 2 min. Then the phosphor detector was extracted and read out using a storage phosphor reader. The light diffuser erased the signal resulting from fluoroscopic exposure to level below that encountered during positron imaging. Vulnerable plaques with area activities higher than 1.2 nCi mm-2 were visualized by the detector. This activity is a factor of 10-20 lower than that expected in human vulnerable plaques. The detector was able to image the internal surface of the coronary vessels with 50 mm length and 360° circumference. Spatial resolution was 0

  15. Fast integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Changhoon; Cho, Seunghee; Kim, Taehoon; Park, Sungjo; Park, Hyoeun; Kim, Jinmoo; Lee, Seunghoon; Kang, Yeonsu; Jang, Kiyuk; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    In cardiology, a vulnerable plaque is considered to be a key subject because it is strongly related to atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction. Because conventional intravascular imaging devices exhibit several limitations with regard to vulnerable plaque detection, the need for an effective lipid imaging modality has been continuously suggested. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a medical imaging technique with a high level of ultrasound (US) resolution and strong optical contrast. In this study, we successfully developed an integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound (IV-PAUS) imaging system with a catheter diameter of 1.2 mm for lipid-rich atherosclerosis imaging. An Nd:YAG pulsed laser with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm was utilized. IV-PAUS offers 5-mm depth penetration and axial and lateral PA imaging resolutions of 94 μm and 203 μm, respectively, as determined by imaging a 6-μm carbon fiber. We initially obtained 3-dimensional (3D) co-registered PA/US images of metal stents. Subsequently, we successfully obtained 3D coregistered PA/US ex vivo images using an iliac artery from a rabbit atherosclerosis model. Accordingly, lipid-rich plaques were sufficiently differentiated from normal tissue in the ex vivo experiment. We validated these findings histologically to confirm the lipid content.

  16. New intravascular flow sensor using fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenow, Erik N. D.

    1994-12-01

    A new sensor using fiber optics is suggested for blood flow measurements in small vessels. The sensor principle and a first evaluation on a flow model are presented. The new sensor uses small CO2 gas bubbles as flow markers for optical detection. When the bubbles pass an optical window, light emitted from one fiber is reflected and scattered into another fiber. The sensor has been proven to work in a 3 mm flow model using two 110 micrometers optical fibers and a 100 micrometers steel capillary inserted into a 1 mm guide wire. The evaluation of a sensor archetype shows that the new sensor provides a promising method for intravascular blood flow measurement in small vessels. The linearity for steady state flow is studied in the flow interval 30 - 130 ml/min. comparison with ultrasound Doppler flowmetry was performed for pulsatile flow in the interval 25 - 125 ml/min. with a pulse length between 0.5 and 2 s. The use of intravascular administered CO2 in small volumes is harmless because the gas is rapidly dissolved in whole blood.

  17. Wilms’ tumor with intravascular extension: A review article

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Suzanne; Carachi, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular extension of Wilms’ tumor is a well-recognized phenomenon. Intravascular extension into the vena cava occurs in only 4-8% of patients with Wilms’ tumors and intraatrial extension occurs in around 1-3% of patients. This review of the published literature in this cohort aims to summarize the findings of different case series to provide an optimum management plan. A literature search was performed and index papers were retrieved for review. The search included the following terms: Intracaval, intravascular, intraatrial and intracardiac extension of Wilms’ tumor or nephroblastoma. The management of patients with intravascular tumor thrombus in Wilms’ tumor is complex. A skilled multi-disciplinary team at a tertiary referral center with cardiothoracic surgery available should manage these patients. Multi-modal diagnostic and preoperative imaging are required to confirm and define the extent of the extension. Preoperative chemotherapy is advocated for all but exceptional circumstances and must be followed closely. Surgical resection should be planned according to the stage of intravascular extension with possible need for cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia with cardiac arrest if required. Surgical complications are more common in this group of patients, but outcome is comparable to those without intravascular extension, and is more closely correlated with the histological subtype then stage of intravascular extension. Operative imaging are required to confirm and define the extent of the extension. PMID:25336800

  18. Quinine-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Every drug comes with some side effect. It is the benefit/risk ratio that determines the medical use of the drug. Quinine, a known antimalarial drug, has been used for nocturnal leg cramps since the 1930s; it is associated with severe life-threatening hematological and cardiovascular side effects. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), albeit rare, is a known coagulopathy associated with Quinine. It is imperative to inquire about the Quinine intake in medication history in patients with coagulopathy, as most patients still consider it a harmless home remedy for nocturnal leg cramps. In this report, we present a case of coagulopathy in a middle-aged woman, who gave a history of taking Quinine for nocturnal leg cramps, as her home remedy. Early identification of the offending agent led to the diagnosis, prompt discontinuation of the medication, and complete recovery and prevented the future possibility of recurrence. PMID:27293443

  19. Quinine-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Abed, Firas; Baniya, Ramkaji; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    Every drug comes with some side effect. It is the benefit/risk ratio that determines the medical use of the drug. Quinine, a known antimalarial drug, has been used for nocturnal leg cramps since the 1930s; it is associated with severe life-threatening hematological and cardiovascular side effects. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), albeit rare, is a known coagulopathy associated with Quinine. It is imperative to inquire about the Quinine intake in medication history in patients with coagulopathy, as most patients still consider it a harmless home remedy for nocturnal leg cramps. In this report, we present a case of coagulopathy in a middle-aged woman, who gave a history of taking Quinine for nocturnal leg cramps, as her home remedy. Early identification of the offending agent led to the diagnosis, prompt discontinuation of the medication, and complete recovery and prevented the future possibility of recurrence. PMID:27293443

  20. Intravascular extra-digital glomus tumor of the forearm

    PubMed Central

    Muneer, Mohammed; Alkhafaji, Ali; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Hetmi, Talal; Al-Basti, Habib; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular glomus tumor in the forearm is very rare and usually presents with persistent pain and focal tenderness. The diagnosis of this condition can be easily missed or delayed. There is no successful treatment so far other than surgical excision in most of cases. We presented a 45-year-old female presented with intravascular glomus tumor in her left forearm. The swelling was excised and the post-operative course was uneventful. Intravascular glomus tumor of the forearm is extremely rare and the persistent pain and tenderness are very suspicious. Diagnostic imaging may not be indicated in every case. PMID:27421300

  1. Remote Temperature Estimation in Intravascular Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sethuraman, Shriram; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Smalling, Richard W.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2008-01-01

    Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging is based on the detection of laser-induced acoustic waves generated within the arterial tissue under pulsed laser irradiation. Generally, laser radiant energy levels are kept low (20 mJ/cm2) during photoacoustic imaging to conform to general standards for safe use of lasers on biological tissues. However, safety standards in intravascular photoacoustic imaging are not yet fully established. Consequently, monitoring spatio-temporal temperature changes associated with laser-tissue interaction is important to address thermal safety of IVPA imaging. In this study we utilize the IVUS based strain measurements to estimate the laser induced temperature increase. Temporal changes in temperature were estimated in a phantom modeling a vessel with an inclusion. A cross-correlation based time delay estimator was used to assess temperature induced strains produced by different laser radiant energies. The IVUS based remote measurements revealed temperature increases of 0.7±0.3°C, 2.9±0.2 °C and 5.0±0.2 °C, for the laser radiant energies of 30 mJ/cm2, 60 mJ/cm2 and 85 mJ/cm2 respectively. The technique was then used in imaging of ex vivo samples of a normal rabbit aorta. For arterial tissues, a temperature elevation of 1.1°C was observed for a laser fluence of 60 mJ/cm2 and lesser than 1°C for lower energy levels normally associated with IVPA imaging. Therefore, the developed ultrasound technique can be used to monitor temperature during IVPA imaging. Furthermore, the analysis based on the Arrhenius thermal damage model indicates no thermal injury in the arterial tissue; suggesting the safety of IVPA imaging PMID:17935861

  2. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a... intravascular occluding catheter shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a... intravascular occluding catheter shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before...

  4. Intravascular laser therapy in different forms of lung diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, M. N.; Reshetnikov, V. A.; Kazhekin, O. A.; Shepelenko, A. F.

    1993-06-01

    The potentions of laser intravascular therapy in elimination of pyogenic and inflammatory intoxication in cases of acute pneumonia, pyo-destructive diseases (including posttraumatic diseases) of the lungs are studied clinically.

  5. Brachytherapy dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, L. M.; Castro, I. F. C.; Peralta, L.; Abreu, M. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2015-07-01

    In-vivo and in-situ measurement of the radiation dose administered during brachytherapy faces several technical challenges, requiring a very compact, tissue-equivalent, linear and highly sensitive dosimeter, particularly in low-dose rate brachytherapy procedures, which use radioactive seeds with low energy and low dose deposition rate. In this work we present a scintillating optical fiber dosimeter composed of a flexible sensitive probe and a dedicated electronic readout system based on silicon photomultiplier photodetection, capable of operating both in pulse and current modes. The performance of the scintillating fiber optic dosimeter was evaluated in low energy regimes, using an X-ray tube operating at voltages of 40-50 kV and currents below 1 mA, to assess minimum dose response of the scintillating fiber. The dosimeter shows a linear response with dose and is capable of detecting mGy dose variations like an ionization chamber. Besides fulfilling all the requirements for a dosimeter in brachytherapy, the high sensitivity of this device makes it a suitable candidate for application in low-dose rate brachytherapy. According to Peralta and Rego [1], the BCF-10 and BCF-60 scintillating optical fibers used in dosimetry exhibit high variations in their sensitivity for photon beams in the 25-100 kVp energy range. Energy linearity for energies below 50 keV needs to be further investigated, using monochromatic X-ray photons.

  6. Intravascular probe for detection of vulnerable plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Tull, Carolyn R.; Janecek, Martin; Hoffman, Edward J.; Strauss, H. William; Tsugita, Ross; Ghazarossian, Vartan

    2001-12-01

    Coronary angiography is unable to define the status of the atheroma, and only measures the luminal dimensions of the blood vessel, without providing information about plaque content. Up to 70% of heart attacks are caused by minimally obstructive vulnerable plaques, which are too small to be detected adequately by angiography. We have developed an intravascular imaging detector to identify vulnerable coronary artery plaques. The detector works by sensing beta or conversion electron radiotracer emissions from plaque-binding radiotracers. The device overcomes the technical constraints of size, sensitivity and conformance to the intravascular environment. The detector at the distal end of the catheter uses six 7mm long by 0.5mm diameter scintillation fibers coupled to 1.5m long plastic fibers. The fibers are offset from each other longitudinally by 6mm and arranged spirally around a guide wire in the catheter. At the proximal end of the catheter the optical fibers are coupled to an interface box with a snap on connector. The interface box contains a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) to decode the individual fibers. The whole detector assembly fits into an 8-French (2.7 mm in diameter) catheter. The PSPMT image is further decoded with software to give a linear image, the total instantaneous count rate and an audio output whose tone corresponds to the count rate. The device was tested with F-18 and Tl-204 sources. Spectrometric response, spatial resolution, sensitivity and beta to background ratio were measured. System resolution is 6 mm and the sensitivity is >500 cps / micrometers Ci when the source is 1 mm from the detector. The beta to background ratio was 11.2 for F-18 measured on a single fiber. The current device will lead to a system allowing imaging of labeled vulnerable plaque in coronary arteries. This type of signature is expected to enable targeted and cost effective therapies to prevent acute coronary artery diseases such as: unstable angina

  7. Image-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargo, John A; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide; definitive radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy is the accepted standard of care for patients with node positive or locally advanced tumors > 4 cm. Brachytherapy is an important part of definitive radiotherapy shown to improve overall survival. While results for two-dimensional X-ray based brachytherapy have been good in terms of local control especially for early stage disease, unexplained toxicities and treatment failures remain. Improvements in brachytherapy planning have more recently paved the way for three-dimensional image-based brachytherapy with volumetric optimization which increases tumor control, reduces toxicity, and helps predict outcomes. Advantages of image-based brachytherapy include: improved tumor coverage (especially for large volume disease), decreased dose to critical organs (especially for small cervix), confirmation of applicator placement, and accounting for sigmoid colon dose. A number of modalities for image-based brachytherapy have emerged including: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), CT-MRI hybrid, and ultrasound with respective benefits and outcomes data. For practical application of image-based brachytherapy the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Working Group and American Brachytherapy Society working group guideline serve as invaluable tools, additionally here-in we outline our institutional clinical integration of these guidelines. While the body of literature supporting image-based brachytherapy continues to evolve a number of uncertainties and challenges remain including: applicator reconstruction, increasing resource/cost demands, mobile four-dimensional targets and organs-at-risk, and accurate contouring of “grey zones” to avoid marginal miss. Ongoing studies, including the prospective EMBRACE (an international study of MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced

  8. Cardiac phase detection in intravascular ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Monica M. S.; Lemos, Pedro Alves; Yoneyama, Takashi; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi

    2008-03-01

    Image gating is related to image modalities that involve quasi-periodic moving organs. Therefore, during intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) examination, there is cardiac movement interference. In this paper, we aim to obtain IVUS gated images based on the images themselves. This would allow the reconstruction of 3D coronaries with temporal accuracy for any cardiac phase, which is an advantage over the ECG-gated acquisition that shows a single one. It is also important for retrospective studies, as in existing IVUS databases there are no additional reference signals (ECG). From the images, we calculated signals based on average intensity (AI), and, from consecutive frames, average intensity difference (AID), cross-correlation coefficient (CC) and mutual information (MI). The process includes a wavelet-based filter step and ascendant zero-cross detection in order to obtain the phase information. Firstly, we tested 90 simulated sequences with 1025 frames each. Our method was able to achieve more than 95.0% of true positives and less than 2.3% of false positives ratio, for all signals. Afterwards, we tested in a real examination, with 897 frames and ECG as gold-standard. We achieved 97.4% of true positives (CC and MI), and 2.5% of false positives. For future works, methodology should be tested in wider range of IVUS examinations.

  9. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Syndromes in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, F Gary; Nelson, David B

    2015-11-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome that can be initiated by a myriad of medical, surgical, and obstetric disorders. Also known as consumptive coagulopathy, DIC is a common contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality and is associated with up to 25% of maternal deaths. The etiopathogenesis of DIC is complex and currently thought to be initiated by tissue factor or thromboplastin, which is released from trophoblastic or fetal tissue, or maternal decidua or endothelium. Tissue factor activates the coagulation sequence to cause fibrin clotting and its dissolution by the fibrinolysin system. The result of this process can range from mild, clinically insignificant laboratory derangements to marked coagulopathy with bleeding at sites of minimal trauma. Although clinical recognition varies by disease severity, several organizations have attempted to standardize the diagnosis through development of scoring systems. Several important--albeit not necessarily common--obstetric disorders associated with DIC include placental abruption, amniotic fluid embolism, sepsis syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. More common disorders include severe preeclampsia, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome, and massive obstetric hemorrhage. Importantly, many of these disorders either cause or are associated with substantive obstetric hemorrhage. Treatment of DIC is centered on two principles. The first is identification and treatment of the underlying disorder. Because many women with consumptive coagulopathy also have massive hemorrhage, the second tenet of treatment is that obstetric complications such as uterine atony or lacerations must be controlled simultaneously with prompt blood and component replacement for a salutary outcome. PMID:26444122

  10. Immunological characterization of pulmonary intravascular macrophages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chitko-McKown, C. G.; Reddy, D. N.; Chapes, S. K.; McKown, R. D.; Blecha, F.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) are lung macrophages found apposed to the endothelium of pulmonary capillaries. In many species, they are responsible for the clearance of blood-borne particulates and pathogens; however, little else is known about their roles as immunologic effector cells. We compared PIMs with pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) to determine the relative immunological activities of these two cell populations. Our results suggested that both populations possess similar phagocytic and bactericidal activities. In assays measuring cytotoxicity, PIMs were more cytotoxic than PAMs against virally infected target cells; however, differences between these macrophage populations were not as marked when noninfected targets were used. LPS-stimulated PIMs produced more T-cell proliferative cytokines than PAMs, and both populations of nonstimulated macrophages produced similar amounts of the cytokines. In contrast, PAMs produced more TNF alpha and NO2- than PIMs when both populations were stimulated with LPS; however, nonstimulated PAMs and PIMs produced similar amounts of TNF alpha and NO2. These data suggest that bovine PIMs are immunologically active. Differences between the degrees of activity of PIMs and PAMs indicate that these macrophage populations may have different roles in lung surveillance.

  11. Disseminated intravascular coagulation following administration of sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    OLIVO, ANAËLLE; NOËL, NICOLAS; BESSE, BENJAMIN; TABURET, ANNE-MARIE; LAMBOTTE, OLIVIER

    2016-01-01

    Sunitinib is an increasingly used, orally administered targeted therapy, approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of various types of cancer, including gastrointestinal stromal tumor unresectable or metastatic disease, following disease progression or intolerance to imatinib, and advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma, progressive well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic disease. Sunitinib inhibits several tyrosine kinases, including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor. Tyrosine kinases inhibitor therapies are generally well-tolerated; nonetheless, they are not void of side effects. The majority of patients reported are grade 1 or 2, and include common and unspecific adverse events, including fatigue, gastrointestinal disorders, skin discoloration, altered taste, cough and dyspnea. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events, including bleeding and hemorrhage, are less frequent. The present study presented the first case of disseminated intravascular coagulation associated with the administration of sunitinib, shortly following the increase of sunitinib dosage. PMID:27330781

  12. Rotational multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound: bimodal system for intravascular applications

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marcu, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report the development and validation of a hybrid intravascular diagnostic system combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for cardiovascular imaging applications. A prototype FLIm system based on fluorescence pulse sampling technique providing information on artery biochemical composition was integrated with a commercial IVUS system providing information on artery morphology. A customized 3-Fr bimodal catheter combining a rotational side-view fiberoptic and a 40-MHz IVUS transducer was constructed for sequential helical scanning (rotation and pullback) of tubular structures. Validation of this bimodal approach was conducted in pig heart coronary arteries. Spatial resolution, fluorescence detection efficiency, pulse broadening effect, and lifetime measurement variability of the FLIm system were systematically evaluated. Current results show that this system is capable of temporarily resolving the fluorescence emission simultaneously in multiple spectral channels in a single pullback sequence. Accurate measurements of fluorescence decay characteristics from arterial segments can be obtained rapidly (e.g., 20 mm in 5 s), and accurate co-registration of fluorescence and ultrasound features can be achieved. The current finding demonstrates the compatibility of FLIm instrumentation with in vivo clinical investigations and its potential to complement conventional IVUS during catheterization procedures. PMID:24898604

  13. An Open System for Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Weibao; Chen, Yan; Li, Xiang; Yu, Yanyan; Cheng, Wang Fai; Tsang, Fu Keung; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Dai, Jiyan; Sun, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Visualization of the blood vessels can provide valuable morphological information for diagnosis and therapy strategies for cardiovascular disease. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is able to delineate internal structures of vessel wall with fine spatial resolution. However, the developed IVUS is insufficient to identify the fibrous cap thickness and tissue composition of atherosclerotic lesions. Novel imaging strategies have been proposed, such as increasing the center frequency of ultrasound or using a modulated excitation technique to improve the accuracy of diagnosis. Dual-mode tomography combining IVUS with optical tomography has also been developed to determine tissue morphology and characteristics. The implementation of these new imaging methods requires an open system that allows users to customize the system for various studies. This paper presents the development of an IVUS system that has open structures to support various imaging strategies. The system design is based on electronic components and printed circuit board, and provides reconfigurable hardware implementation, programmable image processing algorithms, flexible imaging control, and raw RF data acquisition. In addition, the proposed IVUS system utilized a miniaturized ultrasound transducer constructed using PMN-PT single crystal for better piezoelectric constant and electromechanical coupling coefficient than traditional lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics. Testing results showed that the IVUS system could offer a minimum detectable signal of 25 μV, allowing a 51 dB dynamic range at 47 dB gain, with a frequency range from 20 to 80 MHz. Finally, phantom imaging, in vitro IVUS vessel imaging, and multimodality imaging with photoacoustics were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the open system. PMID:23143570

  14. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aronowitz, Jesse N.

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  15. A Review of Intravascular Ultrasound–Based Multimodal Intravascular Imaging: The Synergistic Approach to Characterizing Vulnerable Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng; Zhou, Bill; Hsiai, Tzung K.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Catheter-based intravascular imaging modalities are being developed to visualize pathologies in coronary arteries, such as high-risk vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques known as thin-cap fibroatheroma, to guide therapeutic strategy at preventing heart attacks. Mounting evidences have shown three distinctive histopathological features—the presence of a thin fibrous cap, a lipid-rich necrotic core, and numerous infiltrating macrophages—are key markers of increased vulnerability in atherosclerotic plaques. To visualize these changes, the majority of catheter-based imaging modalities used intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as the technical foundation and integrated emerging intravascular imaging techniques to enhance the characterization of vulnerable plaques. However, no current imaging technology is the unequivocal “gold standard” for the diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. Each intravascular imaging technology possesses its own unique features that yield valuable information although encumbered by inherent limitations not seen in other modalities. In this context, the aim of this review is to discuss current scientific innovations, technical challenges, and prospective strategies in the development of IVUS-based multi-modality intravascular imaging systems aimed at assessing atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. PMID:26400676

  16. A Review of Intravascular Ultrasound-based Multimodal Intravascular Imaging: The Synergistic Approach to Characterizing Vulnerable Plaques.

    PubMed

    Ma, Teng; Zhou, Bill; Hsiai, Tzung K; Shung, K Kirk

    2016-09-01

    Catheter-based intravascular imaging modalities are being developed to visualize pathologies in coronary arteries, such as high-risk vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques known as thin-cap fibroatheroma, to guide therapeutic strategy at preventing heart attacks. Mounting evidences have shown three distinctive histopathological features-the presence of a thin fibrous cap, a lipid-rich necrotic core, and numerous infiltrating macrophages-are key markers of increased vulnerability in atherosclerotic plaques. To visualize these changes, the majority of catheter-based imaging modalities used intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as the technical foundation and integrated emerging intravascular imaging techniques to enhance the characterization of vulnerable plaques. However, no current imaging technology is the unequivocal "gold standard" for the diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. Each intravascular imaging technology possesses its own unique features that yield valuable information although encumbered by inherent limitations not seen in other modalities. In this context, the aim of this review is to discuss current scientific innovations, technical challenges, and prospective strategies in the development of IVUS-based multi-modality intravascular imaging systems aimed at assessing atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. PMID:26400676

  17. Testicular shielding in penile brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Arpita; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Ghadi, Yogesh; Murthy, Vedang; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penile cancer, although rare, is one of the common genitourinary cancers in India affecting mostly aged uncircumcised males. For patients presenting with small superficial lesions < 3 cm restricted to glans, surgery, radical external radiation or brachytherapy may be offered, the latter being preferred as it allows organ and function preservation. In patients receiving brachytherapy, testicular morbidity is not commonly addressed. With an aim to minimize and document the doses to testis after adequate shielding during radical interstitial brachytherapy for penile cancers, we undertook this study in 2 patients undergoing brachytherapy and forms the basis of this report. Material and methods Two patients with early stage penile cancer limited to the glans were treated with radical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using interstitial implant. A total of 7-8 tubes were implanted in two planes, parallel to the penile shaft. A total dose of 44-48 Gy (55-60 Gy EQD2 doses with α/β = 10) was delivered in 11-12 fractions of 4 Gy each delivered twice daily. Lead sheets adding to 11 mm (4-5 half value layer) were interposed between the penile shaft and scrotum. The testicular dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each patient, dosimetry was done for 3 fractions and mean calculated. Results The cumulative testicular dose to left and right testis was 31.68 cGy and 42.79 cGy for patient A, and 21.96 cGy and 23.28 cGy for patient B. For the same patients, the mean cumulative dose measured at the posterior aspect of penile shaft was 722.15 cGy and 807.72 cGy, amounting to 16.4% and 16.8% of the prescribed dose. Hence, the application of lead shield 11 mm thick reduced testicular dose from 722-808 cGy to 21.96-42.57 cGy, an “absolute reduction” of 95.99 ± 1.5%. Conclusions With the use of a simple lead shield as described, we were able to effectively reduce testicular dose from “spermicidal” range to “oligospermic” range with possible

  18. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  19. Intravascular MRI for Plaque Characterization: Are We Close to Reality?

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, João L; Larose, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive external magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of large vessel atherosclerosis is a robust and promising imaging modality that can be applied for the evaluation of the atherosclerotic process in large vessels. However, it requires expertise for setup and time for data acquisition and analysis. Intravascular MRI is a promising tool, but its use remains at the pre-clinical stage within selected research groups. In this review, the current status and future role of intravascular MRI for atherosclerotic plaque characterization are summarized, along with important challenges which will be necessary to overcome prior to the wide adoption of this technique. PMID:27448403

  20. 21 CFR 880.5970 - Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular... and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5970 Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter. (a) Identification. A percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter is a device...

  1. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  2. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  3. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  6. Incidence of intravascular penetration in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Furman, Michael B; Giovanniello, Michael T; O'Brien, Erin M

    2003-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN A prospective, observational, human, study was conducted. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the incidence of vascular penetration during fluoroscopically guided, contrast-enhanced transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, and to determine whether the observation of blood in the needle hub can be used to predict a vascular injection. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA Incorrectly placed intravascular cervical spinal injections result in medication flow systemically and not to the desired target. A recently published study demonstrates a high incidence of intravascular injections in transforaminal lumbosacral epidural injections. No studies so far have evaluated the incidence of vascular injections in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, nor have they calculated the ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict a vascular injection in the cervical spine.METHODS The incidence of fluoroscopically confirmed intravascular uptake of contrast was prospectively observed in 337 patients treated with cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections. The ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict intravascular injection was also investigated. For each subject, the injection level was chosen on the basis of the clinical scenario including history, physical examination, and review of imaging studies. Some patients had multilevel injections. Using fluoroscopic guidance, the authors placed a 25-gauge needle into the epidural space using a transforaminal approach according to accepted standard technique. Needle tip location was confirmed with biplanar imaging. The presence or absence of blood in the needle hub spontaneously ("flash") and after attempted aspiration by pulling back on the syringe's plunger was documented. Contrast then was injected under real-time fluoroscopy to determine whether the location of the needle tip was intravascular. The results were recorded in a prospective manner indicating the presence or absence of blood

  7. Acute disseminated intravascular coagulation following ICD lead extraction

    PubMed Central

    Shariff, Nasir; Singh, Madhurmeet; Shalaby, Alaa

    2014-01-01

    We present an unusual case of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) complicating percutaneous laser-assisted lead extraction. DIC has not been previously reported in association with lead extraction. It is possible to have occurred following the denudement of venous endothelium and exposure of underlying fibrous tissue. Practitioners need to be aware of this rare but potentially fatal complication of transvenous lead extraction. PMID:24599427

  8. Clinical implementation of a new electronic brachytherapy system for skin brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ballester-Sánchez, Rosa; Celada-Álvarez, Francisco Javier; Candela-Juan, Cristian; García-Martínez, Teresa; Llavador-Ros, Margarita; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Barker, Christopher A.; Ballesta, Antonio; Tormo-Micó, Alejandro; Rodríguez, Silvia; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Although surgery is usually the first-line treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancers, radiotherapy (RT) may be indicated in selected cases. Radiation therapy as primary therapy can result in excellent control rates, cosmetics, and quality of life. Brachytherapy is a radiation treatment modality that offers the most conformal option to patients. A new modality for skin brachytherapy is electronic brachytherapy. This involves the placement of a high dose rate X-ray source directly in a skin applicator close to the skin surface, and therefore combines the benefits of brachytherapy with those of low energy X-ray radiotherapy. The Esteya electronic brachytherapy system is specifically designed for skin surface brachytherapy procedures. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the clinical implementation of the new Esteya electronic brachytherapy system, which may provide guidance for users of this system. The information covered includes patient selection, treatment planning (depth evaluation and margin determination), patient marking, and setup. The justification for the hypofractionated regimen is described and compared with others protocols in the literature. Quality assurance (QA) aspects including daily testing are also included. We emphasize that these are guidelines, and clinical judgment and experience must always prevail in the care of patients, as with any medical treatment. We conclude that clinical implementation of the Esteya brachytherapy system is simple for patients and providers, and should allow for precise and safe treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancers. PMID:25834587

  9. Effects of perioperative fasting on haemodynamics and intravascular volumes.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Matthias; Chappell, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Maintaining cardiac preload throughout the perioperative period is a generally accepted target. As perioperative fasting is believed to cause intravascular hypovolaemia it traditionally triggers aggressive preemptive intravenous fluid infusion. Physiology suggests that extracellular losses via urinary output and evaporation decrease the extracellular compartment. Representing a relevant part of the latter, the intravascular space is also affected, even without blood loss. Measurements in humans, however, have revealed that even a prolonged fasting period does not decrease absolute blood volume. Beyond that, modern fasting guidelines recommend to refrain from clear liquids only two hours prior to surgery. Nevertheless, an intravenous colloid challenge can increase stroke volume after induction of anaesthesia in the majority of surgical patients. While perioperative stroke volume maximisation in high-risk surgery probably improves outcome, the implication of this observation for the routine patient remains unclear. It appears as though there are two important targets to preserve cardiac preload: normovolaemia and vasotension. PMID:23351229

  10. Characterization of coronary atherosclerosis by intravascular imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Honda, Satoshi; Kataoka, Yu; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Noguchi, Teruo; Ogawa, Hisao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is highly prevalent in Western countries and is associated with morbidity, mortality, and a significant economic burden. Despite the development of anti-atherosclerotic medical therapies, many patients still continue to suffer from coronary events. This residual risk indicates the need for better risk stratification and additional therapies to achieve more reductions in cardiovascular risk. Recent advances in imaging modalities have contributed to visualizing atherosclerotic plaques and defining lesion characteristics in vivo. This innovation has been applied to refining revascularization procedure, assessment of anti-atherosclerotic drug efficacy and the detection of high-risk plaques. As such, intravascular imaging plays an important role in further improvement of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CAD. The current article reviews available intravascular imaging modalities with regard to its method, advantage and disadvantage. PMID:27500094

  11. Intravascular multispectral optoacoustic tomography of atherosclerosis: prospects and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Amir; Jaffer, Farouc A; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    The progression of atherosclerosis involves complex changes in the structure, composition and biology of the artery wall. Currently, only anatomical plaque burden is routinely characterized in living patients, whereas compositional and biological changes are mostly inaccessible. However, anatomical imaging alone has proven to be insufficient for accurate diagnostics of the disease. Multispectral optoacoustic tomography offers complementary data to anatomical methods and is capable of imaging both tissue composition and, via the use of molecular markers, the biological activity therein. In this paper we review recent progress in multispectral optoacoustic tomography imaging of atherosclerosis with specific emphasis on intravascular applications. The potential capabilities of multispectral optoacoustic tomography are compared with those of established intravascular imaging techniques and current challenges on the road towards a clinically viable imaging modality are discussed. PMID:23144663

  12. Characterization of coronary atherosclerosis by intravascular imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Satoshi; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Noguchi, Teruo; Ogawa, Hisao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is highly prevalent in Western countries and is associated with morbidity, mortality, and a significant economic burden. Despite the development of anti-atherosclerotic medical therapies, many patients still continue to suffer from coronary events. This residual risk indicates the need for better risk stratification and additional therapies to achieve more reductions in cardiovascular risk. Recent advances in imaging modalities have contributed to visualizing atherosclerotic plaques and defining lesion characteristics in vivo. This innovation has been applied to refining revascularization procedure, assessment of anti-atherosclerotic drug efficacy and the detection of high-risk plaques. As such, intravascular imaging plays an important role in further improvement of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CAD. The current article reviews available intravascular imaging modalities with regard to its method, advantage and disadvantage. PMID:27500094

  13. Intravascular photoacoustic tomography for characterization of atherosclerotic lipid and inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Qin, Huan; Shi, Yujiao; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a fast growing imaging technology depending on its high optical resolution of optics while taking the advantage of the high penetration depth of ultrasound. In this paper, we demonstrate the new progress in the photoacoustic imaging. Atherosclerosis is characterized by a progressive build-up of lipid in the arterial wall, which is known as plaque. Histological studies demonstrate that the primary cause of acute cardiovascular events is the rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Lipid and inflammation within the plaque are related to influence the propensity of plaques to disrupt. Photoacoustic intravascular tomography (IVPAT) holds a great advantage in providing comprehensive morphological and functional information of plaques. Lipid relative concentration maps of atherosclerotic aorta were obtained and compared with histology. Furthermore, by selectively targeting the intravascular inflammatory cytokines, IVPAT is also capable of mapping the inflamed area and determining the degree of inflammation.

  14. Look away: arterial and venous intravascular embolisation following shotgun injury.

    PubMed

    Vedelago, John; Dick, Elizabeth; Thomas, Robert; Jones, Brynmor; Kirmi, Olga; Becker, Jennifer; Alavi, Afshin; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw

    2014-01-01

    We describe two cases of intravascular embolization of shotgun pellets found distant to the entry site of penetrating firearm injury. The cases demonstrate antegrade embolization of a shotgun pellet from neck to right middle cerebral artery, and antegrade followed by retrograde venous embolization through the left lower limb to pelvis. Radiologists and Trauma Physicians should be aware that post shotgun injury, the likelihood of an embolised shot pellet is increased compared to other types of firearm missile injury, and should therefore search away from the site of injury to find such missiles. Shotgun pellets may travel in an antegrade or a retrograde intravascular direction - both were seen in these cases - and may not be clinically obvious. This underscores the importance of a meticuluous search through all images, including CT scout images, for evidence of their presence. PMID:25926869

  15. Treatment of Vertebro-Basilar Dissecting Aneurysms Using Intravascular Stents

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Kawano, Y.; Yoshimura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Hara, M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Endovascular surgery is an established primary therapeutic modality for dissecting aneurysms at vertebro-basilar arteries. Intravascular stents can be used to treat the dissecting aneurysms for which simple obliteration procedures cannot be used. In such cases, stent implantation alone or a combination of stents and coils need to be selected properly by taking into consideration the site and shape of dissections. In this report, three patterns of stent application are described and their method of selection is discussed. PMID:20569619

  16. Disseminated intravascular coagulation and hepatocellular necrosis due to clove oil.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Biggerstaff, J; Savidge, G F

    1992-10-01

    We describe the case of a 2-year-old child who suffered from disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and hepatocellular necrosis, following ingestion of clove oil. The patient was treated with heparin and fresh frozen plasma, and, following specific haemostasis assays, with appropriate coagulation factor and inhibitor concentrates. The case demonstrates how this approach can be successfully used in the management of DIC with coexisting liver failure. PMID:1450336

  17. Central Venous Catheter Intravascular Malpositioning: Causes, Prevention, Diagnosis, and Correction

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos J.; Paniagua, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Despite the level of skill of the operator and the use of ultrasound guidance, central venous catheter (CVC) placement can result in CVC malpositioning, an unintended placement of the catheter tip in an inadequate vessel. CVC malpositioning is not a complication of central line insertion; however, undiagnosed CVC malpositioning can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this review were to describe factors associated with intravascular malpositioning of CVCs inserted via the neck and chest and to offer ways of preventing, identifying, and correcting such malpositioning. A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and MD Consult was performed in June 2014. By searching for “Central line malposition” and then for “Central venous catheters intravascular malposition,” we found 178 articles written in English. Of those, we found that 39 were relevant to our objectives and included them in our review. According to those articles, intravascular CVC malpositioning is associated with the presence of congenital and acquired anatomical variants, catheter insertion in left thoracic venous system, inappropriate bevel orientation upon needle insertion, and patient’s body habitus variants. Although plain chest radiography is the standard imaging modality for confirming catheter tip location, signs and symptoms of CVC malpositioning even in presence of normal or inconclusive conventional radiography findings should prompt the use of additional diagnostic methods to confirm or rule out CVC malpositioning. With very few exceptions, the recommendation in cases of intravascular CVC malpositioning is to remove and relocate the catheter. Knowing the mechanisms of CVC malpositioning and how to prevent, identify, and correct CVC malpositioning could decrease harm to patients with this condition. PMID:26587087

  18. Options for intravascular access during resuscitation of adults.

    PubMed

    Cairney, Kevin; Ibrahim, Matthew

    2012-04-01

    For most emergency care teams, initial intravascular access is performed intravenously, despite the challenges posed by low cardiac output physiology. Intraosseous (IO) access has been included in recent Resuscitation Council UK (2010) adult advanced life support (ALS) guidelines for cases in which intravenous access is difficult or unavailable. This article discusses how the use of IO access devices can improve ALS therapy for patients who are in, or who are at risk of, cardiac arrest. PMID:22690475

  19. Dosimetric Characteristics for Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    DeWerd, Larry A.; Davis, Stephen D.

    2011-05-05

    Brachytherapy sources are characterized by the dosimetric parameters in a protocol such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43. The air-kerma strength is measured and traceable to a primary standard. Then the parameters such as dose-rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function are measured and related back to the primary standard. This is normally accomplished with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Since radial dose function and anisotropy function are relative parameters, some of the dosimetric corrections are negligible. For the dose-rate constant, parameters such as the energy dependence compared with a calibration beam such as {sup 60}Co need to be accounted for. A description of the primary standard measurements and TLD measurements will be discussed.

  20. Dosimetric Characteristics for Brachytherapy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWerd, Larry A.; Davis, Stephen D.

    2011-05-01

    Brachytherapy sources are characterized by the dosimetric parameters in a protocol such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43. The air-kerma strength is measured and traceable to a primary standard. Then the parameters such as dose-rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function are measured and related back to the primary standard. This is normally accomplished with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Since radial dose function and anisotropy function are relative parameters, some of the dosimetric corrections are negligible. For the dose-rate constant, parameters such as the energy dependence compared with a calibration beam such as 60Co need to be accounted for. A description of the primary standard measurements and TLD measurements will be discussed.

  1. Brachytherapy next generation: robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacsó, Alex Cristian; Pisla, Doina; Kacsó, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    In a field dominated by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), both the therapeutic and technical possibilities of brachytherapy (BT) are underrated, shadowed by protons and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Decreasing expertise and indications, as well as increasing lack of specific BT training for radiation therapy (RT) residents led to the real need of shortening its learning curve and making it more popular. Developing robotic BT devices can be a way to mitigate the above issues. There are many teams working at custom-made robotic BT platforms to perfect and overcome the limitations of the existing systems. This paper provides a picture of the current state-of-the-art in robotic assisted BT, as it also conveys the author's solution to the problem, a parallel robot that uses CT-guidance. PMID:26816510

  2. Brachytherapy next generation: robotic systems

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacsó, Alex Cristian; Pisla, Doina

    2015-01-01

    In a field dominated by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), both the therapeutic and technical possibilities of brachytherapy (BT) are underrated, shadowed by protons and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Decreasing expertise and indications, as well as increasing lack of specific BT training for radiation therapy (RT) residents led to the real need of shortening its learning curve and making it more popular. Developing robotic BT devices can be a way to mitigate the above issues. There are many teams working at custom-made robotic BT platforms to perfect and overcome the limitations of the existing systems. This paper provides a picture of the current state-of-the-art in robotic assisted BT, as it also conveys the author's solution to the problem, a parallel robot that uses CT-guidance. PMID:26816510

  3. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35.406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all...

  4. Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy associated with intravascular occlusive fibrin thrombi.

    PubMed

    Salama, Samih; Chorneyko, Kathy; Belovic, Brian

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy (CCV) is a rare cutaneous microangiopathy that clinically resembles generalized essential telangiectasia with only 12 cases reported to date. The perivascular fibrosis is thought to be due to production of abnormal collagen by veil cells in the outer vessel walls as a result of unknown factors. This report is of an 84-year-old male with progressive telangiectasia. Biopsies showed characteristic features of CCV. In addition, there were multiple intravascular fibrin thrombi, some organizing and associated with endothelial cell hyperplasia with recanalization reminiscent of glomeruloid bodies and simulating reactive angioendotheliomatosis (RAE). Histochemically and ultrastructurally fibrin was noted within the vessel walls integrating into the fibrous tissue around the vessels; however, the patient had no evidence of coagulation disorder, cryoglobulinemia or cold agglutinemia. Immunofluorescence showed fibrinogen within the vessel walls but no immunoglobulins or C3. As well, there were minimal inflammatory cells. This suggests pauci-inflammatory injury to the endothelial cells by unknown angiogenic factors causing local intravascular fibrin thrombi with fibrin leaking and incorporating into the vessel walls, eventually leading to reparative perivascular fibrosis. This case suggests that some cases of CCV are related to a primary local intravascular occlusive thrombotic microangiopathy. However, the primary triggering factor causing the endothelial cell damage has yet to be elucidated. PMID:24350781

  5. Renal denervation by intravascular ultrasound: Preliminary in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Yegor; McClain, Steve; Zou, Yong; Smith, David; Warnking, Reinhard

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound denervation has recently become a subject of intense research in connection with the treatment of complex medical conditions including neurological conditions, development of pain management, reproduction of skin sensation, neuropathic pain and spasticity. The objective of this study is to investigate the use of intravascular ultrasound to produce nerve damage in renal sympathetic nerves without significant injury to the renal artery. This technique may potentially be used to treat various medical conditions, such as hypertension. The study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Ultrasound was applied to renal nerves of the swine model for histopathological evaluation. Therapeutic ultrasound energy was delivered circumferentially by an intravascular catheter maneuvered into the renal arteries. Fluoroscopic imaging was conducted pre-and post-ultrasound treatment. Animals were recovered and euthanized up to 30 hours post procedure, followed by necropsy and tissue sample collection. Histopathological examination showed evidence of extensive damage to renal nerves, characterized by nuclear pyknosis, hyalinization of stroma and multifocal hemorrhages, with little or no damage to renal arteries. This study demonstrates the feasibility of intravascular ultrasound as a minimally invasive renal denervation technique. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of this technique and its related clinical significance.

  6. Vascular wall stress during intravascular optical coherence tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Yang, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Biomechanical properties of arterial wall is crucial for understanding the changes in the cardiovascular system. Catheters are used during intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) imaging. The presence of a catheter alters the flow field, pressure distribution and frictional resistance to flow in an artery. In this paper, we first study the transmural stress distribution of the catheterized vessel. COMSOL (COMSOL 4.4) was used to simulate the blood flow induced deformation in a catheterized vessel. Blood is modeled as an incompressible Newtonian fluid. Stress distribution from an three-layer vascular model with an eccentric catheter are simulated, which provides a general idea about the distribution of the displacement and the stress. Optical coherence elastography techniques were then applied to porcine carotid artery samples to look at the deformation status of the vascular wall during saline or water injection. Preliminary simulation results show nonuniform stress distribution in the circumferential direction of the eccentrically catheterized vascular model. Three strain rate methods were tested for intravascular OCE application. The tissue Doppler method has the potential to be further developed to image the vascular wall biomechnical properties in vivo. Although results in this study are not validated quantitatively, the experiments and methods may be valuable for intravascular OCE studies, which may provide important information for cardiovascular disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

  7. {sup 106}Ruthenium Brachytherapy for Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzeid, Hana; Moeckli, Raphael; Gaillard, Marie-Claire; Beck-Popovic, Maja; Pica, Alessia; Zografos, Leonidas; Balmer, Aubin; Pampallona, Sandro; Munier, Francis L.

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of {sup 106}Ru plaque brachytherapy for the treatment of retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed a retrospective, noncomparative case series of 39 children with retinoblastoma treated with {sup 106}Ru plaques at the Jules-Gonin Eye Hospital between October 1992 and July 2006, with 12 months of follow-up. Results: A total of 63 tumors were treated with {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy in 41 eyes. The median patient age was 27 months. {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy was the first-line treatment for 3 tumors (4.8%), second-line treatment for 13 (20.6%), and salvage treatment for 47 tumors (74.6%) resistant to other treatment modalities. Overall tumor control was achieved in 73% at 1 year. Tumor recurrence at 12 months was observed in 2 (12.5%) of 16 tumors for which {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy was used as the first- or second-line treatment and in 15 (31.9%) of 47 tumors for which {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy was used as salvage treatment. Eye retention was achieved in 76% of cases (31 of 41 eyes). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no statistically significant risk factors for tumor recurrence. Radiation complications included retinal detachment in 7 (17.1%), proliferative retinopathy in 1 (2.4%), and subcapsular cataract in 4 (9.7%) of 41 eyes. Conclusion: {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy is an effective treatment for retinoblastoma, with few secondary complications. Local vitreous seeding can be successfully treated with {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy.

  8. Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Guo Mengye; Mitra, Nandita; Metz, James M.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the role of brachytherapy in the treatment of cholangiocarcinomas in a relatively large group of patients. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database, a total of 193 patients with cholangiocarcinoma treated with brachytherapy were identified for the period 1988-2003. The primary analysis compared patients treated with brachytherapy (with or without external-beam radiation) with those who did not receive radiation. To try to account for confounding variables, propensity score and sensitivity analyses were used. Results: There was a significant difference between patients who received radiation (n = 193) and those who did not (n = 6859) with regard to surgery (p < 0.0001), race (p < 0.0001), stage (p < 0.0001), and year of diagnosis (p <0.0001). Median survival for patients treated with brachytherapy was 11 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 9-13 months), compared with 4 months for patients who received no radiation (p < 0.0001). On multivariable analysis (hazard ratio [95% CI]) brachytherapy (0.79 [0.66-0.95]), surgery (0.50 [0.46-0.53]), year of diagnosis (1998-2003: 0.66 [0.60-0.73]; 1993-1997: (0.96 [0.89-1.03; NS], baseline 1988-1992), and extrahepatic disease (0.84 [0.79-0.89]) were associated with better overall survival. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the largest dataset reported for the treatment of cholangiocarcinomas with brachytherapy. The results of this retrospective analysis suggest that brachytherapy may improve overall survival. However, because of the limitations of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database, these results should be interpreted cautiously, and future prospective studies are needed.

  9. Design, construction, and validation of a rotary multifunctional intravascular diagnostic catheter combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Bec, Julien; Xie, Hongtao; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We report the development and validation of an intravascular rotary catheter for bimodal interrogation of arterial pathologies. This is based on a point-spectroscopy scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy technique enabling reconstruction of fluorescence lifetime images (FLIm) and providing information on arterial intima composition and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) providing information on arterial wall morphology. The catheter design allows for independent rotation of the ultrasonic and optical channels within an 8 Fr outer diameter catheter sheath and integrates a low volume flushing channel for blood removal in the optical pathways. In the current configuration, the two channels consist of (a) a standard 3 Fr IVUS catheter with single element transducer (40 MHz) and (b) a side-viewing fiber optic (400 μm core). Experiments conducted in tissue phantoms showed the ability of the catheter to operate in an intraluminal setting and to generate coregistered FLIm and IVUS in one pull-back scan. Current results demonstrate the feasibility of the catheter for simultaneous bimodal interrogation of arterial lumen and for generation of robust fluorescence lifetime data under IVUS guidance. These results facilitate further development of a FLIm-IVUS technique for intravascular diagnosis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases including vulnerable plaques. PMID:23224011

  10. Design, construction, and validation of a rotary multifunctional intravascular diagnostic catheter combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bec, Julien; Xie, Hongtao; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph; Marcu, Laura

    2012-10-01

    We report the development and validation of an intravascular rotary catheter for bimodal interrogation of arterial pathologies. This is based on a point-spectroscopy scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy technique enabling reconstruction of fluorescence lifetime images (FLIm) and providing information on arterial intima composition and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) providing information on arterial wall morphology. The catheter design allows for independent rotation of the ultrasonic and optical channels within an 8 Fr outer diameter catheter sheath and integrates a low volume flushing channel for blood removal in the optical pathways. In the current configuration, the two channels consist of (a) a standard 3 Fr IVUS catheter with single element transducer (40 MHz) and (b) a side-viewing fiber optic (400 μm core). Experiments conducted in tissue phantoms showed the ability of the catheter to operate in an intraluminal setting and to generate coregistered FLIm and IVUS in one pull-back scan. Current results demonstrate the feasibility of the catheter for simultaneous bimodal interrogation of arterial lumen and for generation of robust fluorescence lifetime data under IVUS guidance. These results facilitate further development of a FLIm-IVUS technique for intravascular diagnosis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases including vulnerable plaques.

  11. Image guided Brachytherapy: The paradigm of Gynecologic and Partial Breast HDR Brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantopoulos, S.; Kantemiris, I.; Konidari, A.; Zaverdinos, P.

    2015-09-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy uses high strength radioactive sources and temporary interstitial implants to conform the dose to target and minimize the treatment time. The advances of imaging technology enable accurate reconstruction of the implant and exact delineation of high-risk CTV and the surrounding critical structures. Furthermore, with sophisticated treatment planning systems, applicator devices and stepping source afterloaders, brachytherapy evolved to a more precise, safe and individualized treatment. At the Radiation Oncology Department of Metropolitan Hospital Athens, MRI guided HDR gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with brachytherapy are performed routinely. Contouring and treatment planning are based on the recommendations of the GEC - ESTRO Working group. The task of this presentation is to reveal the advantages of 3D image guided brachytherapy over 2D brachytherapy. Thus, two patients treated at our department (one GYN and one APBI) will be presented. The advantage of having adequate dose coverage of the high risk CTV and simultaneous low doses to the OARs when using 3D image- based brachytherapy will be presented. The treatment techniques, equipment issues, as well as implantation, imaging and treatment planning procedures will be described. Quality assurance checks will be treated separately.

  12. Contrast-induced acute kidney injury following iodine opacification other than by intravascular injection

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Tilman; Hemett, Ould Maouloud; Menth, Markus; Descombes, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) classically occurs following the intravascular administration of iodinated contrast medium (CM). However, some cases of iodine-induced nephrotoxicity have been reported in patients who did not receive intravascular CM, as a consequence of iodine absorption through mucosae, burned skin or interstitial tissues. Recently, we observed the first case of CI-AKI occurring after an enteroclysis without any direct intravascular injection of CM. Here, we report this case, and review other clinical situations in which renal toxicity has been reported following the non-intravascular use of iodinated compounds. PMID:24175084

  13. Dosimetry characterization of 32P intravascular brachytherapy source wires using Monte Carlo codes PENELOPE and GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Torres, Javier; Buades, Manuel J; Almansa, Julio F; Guerrero, Rafael; Lallena, Antonio M

    2004-02-01

    Monte Carlo calculations using the codes PENELOPE and GEANT4 have been performed to characterize the dosimetric parameters of the new 20 mm long catheter-based 32P beta source manufactured by the Guidant Corporation. The dose distribution along the transverse axis and the two-dimensional dose rate table have been calculated. Also, the dose rate at the reference point, the radial dose function, and the anisotropy function were evaluated according to the adapted TG-60 formalism for cylindrical sources. PENELOPE and GEANT4 codes were first verified against previous results corresponding to the old 27 mm Guidant 32P beta source. The dose rate at the reference point for the unsheathed 27 mm source in water was calculated to be 0.215 +/- 0.001 cGy s(-1) mCi(-1), for PENELOPE, and 0.2312 +/- 0.0008 cGy s(-1) mCi(-1), for GEANT4. For the unsheathed 20 mm source, these values were 0.2908 +/- 0.0009 cGy s(-1) mCi(-1) and 0.311 0.001 cGy s(-1) mCi(-1), respectively. Also, a comparison with the limited data available on this new source is shown. We found non-negligible differences between the results obtained with PENELOPE and GEANT4. PMID:15000615

  14. AB012. Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yong; Yang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the security and effect of brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods Forty five patients with Tl–T2 prostate cancer were treated with real-time transperineal ultrasound-guide 125I seeds prostate implantation. Results The median operation time was 90 min, the median number of I seeds used was 56. The follow up time was 12–48 months, the cases of PSA <1 µg/L were 29, PSA 1–2 µg/L were 11 and PSA ≥2 µg/L were 5. Conclusions Brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer is safe and effective.

  15. Overaggressive stent expansion without intravascular imaging: impact on restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Yohan; Chan, Richard; Haladyn, J Kimberly; Lim, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aggressive stent expansion is required for optimal strut apposition, but risk of stent deformation, fracture and subsequent restenosis is potentially greater when performed without intravascular imaging guidance. We investigated how frequently stents are ‘overexpanded’ and whether this correlates with restenosis. Design and setting Single-centre prospective database study at a high-volume tertiary university hospital. Patients 243 patients undergoing single-vessel stenting for de novo stenosis in 277 lesions. Exclusion criteria were bifurcational, graft or left main disease and intravascular imaging use. All had ischaemia-driven repeat coronary angiography up to 48 months later. Degree of stent overexpansion was the difference between nominal and final stent size. Results Stents were expanded above nominal in 99% of cases and above rated burst pressure in 52%. Stents were expanded >20% above nominal in 12% of cases. Stents overexpanded by >20% were smaller (2.87 vs 3.19 mm), longer (24 vs 19 mm) and more often drug-eluting (53% vs 27%). Angiographic restenosis was observed in 80 lesions (29%). There was no correlation between degree of overexpansion and per cent angiographic restenosis across the whole group (R2=−0.01; p=0.09), in those with stent overexpansion >20% (p=0.31) or small stents <3 mm (p=0.71). Indeed, in the group with stent overexpansion >25%, the greater the overexpansion, the less the per cent angiographic restenosis (p=0.02). Conclusions In this real-world population undergoing non-complex percutaneous coronary intervention without intravascular imaging, any tendency to overaggressive stent expansion did not predispose at all to restenosis.

  16. Overview: Five decades of brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, F.

    1986-01-01

    Brachytherapy started in 1930. Ra-226 was the radioisotope for cancer therapy at that time and much has been learned about its properties since then. One of the major findings at that time was output. When the author started, there was no T factor. People did not know how many R units were produced by 1.0 mg of radium filtered by 0.5 mm of platinum at 1.0 cm. So one was in a bit of chaos from that point of view. Eventually, that was settled in the 1930's. It was very exciting to find out that, although the national laboratories of the U.S., England, France and Germany had had values of this T factor varying from about five to seven (when they're only supposed to have less than 1% error); the value was really 8.3 and it was quite a landmark. This led to an improved knowledge of dose and effects. Developments over the next five decades are discussed in detail.

  17. [Catheter-related thrombosis during intravascular temperature management].

    PubMed

    Kerz, T; Beyer, C; Oswald, S; Moringlane, R

    2016-07-01

    We report on a case of catheter-related thrombosis after 7‑day catheter placement during intravascular temperature management (IVTM), in spite of the use of prophylactic anticoagulants. There were no clinical sequelae. According to the literature, occult thrombosis during ITVM could be more frequent than previously reported and dedicated monitoring for potential thrombosis may be indicated. However, a study comparing IVTM with surface cooling found no differences in clinical outcome. Therefore, n either of the methods can be recommended over the other. Further studies should evaluate the rate of occult thrombosis during the use of both cooling methods. PMID:27316589

  18. Why Have So Many Intravascular Glucose Monitoring Devices Failed?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, John L.; Rice, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Secondary to the inherent limitations of both point-of-care and central laboratory glucose technologies, continuous glucose measurement has recently enjoyed a high level of investment. Because of the perceived advantages by some of measuring in the intravascular space compared to the subcutaneous tissue, a number of technologies have been developed. In this review, we evaluate nine systems that have shown promise, although only one of these has been cleared for sale in the United States. The detection methodology, regulatory status, technical issues, and company circumstance surrounding each technology are examined. PMID:26129733

  19. Autopsy-Proven Intravascular Lymphoma Presenting as Rapidly Recurrent Strokes

    PubMed Central

    Usuda, Daisuke; Arahata, Masahisa; Temaru, Rie; Iinuma, Yoshitsugu; Kanda, Tsugiyasu; Hayashi, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    We present a 79-year-old Japanese woman diagnosed with cerebral infarction. In spite of enough antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy, she presented rapidly recurrent strokes three times for 3 months. Magnetic resonance imaging showed progression of bilateral cerebral infarcts, and chest-abdominal computed tomography showed multiple bilateral nodular lesions in the lung and multiple tumor lesions in the liver. Autopsy revealed diagnosis of intravascular lymphoma (IVL). This case indicates that IVL is rare and usually goes undiagnosed until time of autopsy because of its protean neurological manifestations; hence, it should be considered as a possible etiology if multiple strokes occur in a short period of time. PMID:27065845

  20. Removal of Chronic Intravascular Blood Clots using Liquid Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae-Chul; Choi, Myeong; Koo, Il; Yu, Zengqi; Collins, George

    2011-10-01

    An electrical embolectomy device for removing chronic intravascular blood clots using liquid plasma under saline environment was demonstrated. We employed a proxy experimental blood clot model of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and actual equine blood clot. Thermal damage to contiguous tissue and the collagen denaturing via the plasma irradiation were investigated by histological analysis using birefringence of the tissue and verified by FT-IR spectroscopic study, respectively, which showed the high removal rate up to 2 mm per minute at room temperature and small thermal damage less than 200 μm.

  1. Artery phantoms for intravascular optical coherence tomography: healthy arteries.

    PubMed

    Bisaillon, Charles-Étienne; Dufour, Marc L; Lamouche, Guy

    2011-09-01

    We present a method to make phantoms of coronary arteries for intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT). The phantoms provide a calibrated OCT response similar to the layered structure of arteries. The optical properties of each layer are achieved with specific concentrations of alumina and carbon black in a silicone matrix. This composition insures high durability and also approximates the elastic properties of arteries. The phantoms are fabricated in a tubular shape by the successive deposition and curing of liquid silicone mixtures on a lathe setup. PMID:21991552

  2. Venous gas embolism - Time course of residual pulmonary intravascular bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, B. D.; Luehr, S.; Katz, J.

    1989-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the time course of residual pulmonary intravascular bubbles after embolization with known amounts of venous air, using an N2O challenge technique. Attention was also given to the length of time that the venous gas emboli remained as discrete bubbles in the lungs with 100 percent oxygen ventilation. The data indicate that venous gas emboli can remain in the pulmonary vasculature as discrete bubbles for periods lasting up to 43 + or - 10.8 min in dogs ventilated with oxygen and nitrogen. With 100 percent oxygen ventilation, these values are reduced significantly to 19 + or - 2.5 min.

  3. Plasma fibronectin concentrations in dogs with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Feldman, B F; Thomson, D B; O'Neill, S

    1985-05-01

    Plasma fibronectin concentrations were significantly (P less than 0.001) below the reference range in dogs with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) secondary to nonlymphomatous neoplasia, acute necrotizing pancreatitis, sepsis, chronic active hepatitis, and heat stroke. There was no statistical evidence of a group effect. Decrease in fibronectin concentration was associated with severe DIC, although no attempt was made to correlate fibronectin concentration with prognosis. These findings parallel those reported for severely ill human beings with diseases associated with DIC. They exemplify the potential of spontaneous diseases in animals as models for the study of human disease. PMID:4003893

  4. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation after Surgery for Facial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Hirohiko; Ishikawa, Shigeo; Yusa, Kazuyuki; Kitabatake, Kenichirou; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A case of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) presenting after surgery for facial trauma associated with multiple facial bone fractures is described. With regard to the oral and maxillofacial region, DIC has been described in the literature following head trauma, infection, and metastatic disease. Until now, only 5 reports have described DIC after surgery for facial injury. DIC secondary to facial injury is thus rare. The patient in this case was young and had no medical history. Preoperative hemorrhage or postoperative septicemia may thus induce DIC. PMID:27313913

  5. 21 CFR 880.5970 - Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...: “Guidance on Premarket Notification Submission for Short-Term and Long-Term Intravascular Catheters.” ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular... and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5970 Percutaneous, implanted, long-term...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5970 - Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...: “Guidance on Premarket Notification Submission for Short-Term and Long-Term Intravascular Catheters.” ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular... and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5970 Percutaneous, implanted, long-term...

  7. 21 CFR 880.5970 - Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...: “Guidance on Premarket Notification Submission for Short-Term and Long-Term Intravascular Catheters.” ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular... and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5970 Percutaneous, implanted, long-term...

  8. 21 CFR 880.5970 - Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...: “Guidance on Premarket Notification Submission for Short-Term and Long-Term Intravascular Catheters.” ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular... and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5970 Percutaneous, implanted, long-term...

  9. Adaptive windowing in contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Martin, K Heath; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A

    2016-08-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is one of the most commonly-used interventional imaging techniques and has seen recent innovations which attempt to characterize the risk posed by atherosclerotic plaques. One such development is the use of microbubble contrast agents to image vasa vasorum, fine vessels which supply oxygen and nutrients to the walls of coronary arteries and typically have diameters less than 200μm. The degree of vasa vasorum neovascularization within plaques is positively correlated with plaque vulnerability. Having recently presented a prototype dual-frequency transducer for contrast agent-specific intravascular imaging, here we describe signal processing approaches based on minimum variance (MV) beamforming and the phase coherence factor (PCF) for improving the spatial resolution and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in IVUS imaging. These approaches are examined through simulations, phantom studies, ex vivo studies in porcine arteries, and in vivo studies in chicken embryos. In phantom studies, PCF processing improved CTR by a mean of 4.2dB, while combined MV and PCF processing improved spatial resolution by 41.7%. Improvements of 2.2dB in CTR and 37.2% in resolution were observed in vivo. Applying these processing strategies can enhance image quality in conventional B-mode IVUS or in contrast-enhanced IVUS, where signal-to-noise ratio is relatively low and resolution is at a premium. PMID:27161022

  10. Dominant neurologic symptomatology in intravascular large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kubisova, K; Martanovic, P; Sisovsky, V; Tomleinova, Z; Steno, A; Janega, P; Rychly, B; Babal, P

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a rare variant of extranodal large B-cell lymphoma and it is characterized by selective intravascular proliferation of malignant cells. Typical features of the disease include aggressive behavior, rapid and frequently fatal course. Clinical picture is non-specific and heterogeneous, depending on the affected organ. It is not uncommon that this unique type of lymphoma is diagnosed post mortem. Herein, we report two cases of IVLBCL with neurologic symptomatology. In our clinical study patient 1 was an 80-year-old male with mixed paraparesis of lower extremities and difficulties with sphincter control. Patient 2 (56-year-old male) had vision malfunction, mental status changes and defect in phatic and motor functions. In both cases definite diagnosis was established by histological examination of necroptic material. We propose to include IVLBCL in differential diagnostic considerations in patients presenting with gradually impairing neurological status and spinal cord damage of unknown etiology (Fig. 2, Ref. 9). PMID:27546361

  11. Fatal Cryocrystalglobulinemia With Intravascular and Renal Tubular Crystalline Deposits.

    PubMed

    DeLyria, Paul A; Avedschmidt, Sarah E; Yamada, Chisa; Farkash, Evan A

    2016-05-01

    Cryocrystalglobulinemia is a rare variant of cryoglobulinemia in which monoclonal immunoglobulins self-assemble into crystalline arrays. We report a case of a 53-year-old man who presented with systemic thrombotic microangiopathy causing multiorgan failure, including decreased kidney, lung, and gastrointestinal function; skin necrosis; and mental status changes. Skin and kidney biopsy specimens showed intravascular thrombi, along with intravascular, intratubular, and periglomerular crystalline deposits. Typical morphologic features of cryoglobulinemia, such as a leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pseudothrombi, were absent. Spindled crystals precipitated in the cryoglobulin assay, and immunofixation showed them to be composed of monoclonal immunoglobulin G κ light chains. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated deposits to have an array-like substructure. The patient was successfully treated with a combination of plasmapheresis, steroids, and bortezomib, but experienced a relapse and died 12 months after his initial diagnosis. Cryocrystalglobulinemia causes significant morbidity and mortality and should be classified as a monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance when it occurs in patients not meeting diagnostic criteria for multiple myeloma. PMID:26775022

  12. Virtual histology and color flow intravascular ultrasound in peripheral interventions.

    PubMed

    Diethrich, Edward B; Irshad, Khalid; Reid, Donald B

    2006-09-01

    The quality and interpretation of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging has been revolutionized in recent years by two new and major advances: virtual histology and color flow IVUS. Virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VHIVUS) is a catheter-based technology where IVUS is generated from the transducer on the catheter tip and the reflected signals from the artery wall produce a color-coded map of the arterial disease. Different histological constituents of the plaque produce different reflected signals and these are assigned different colors (dark green, fibrous; yellow/green, fibrofatty; white, calcified; red, necrotic lipid core plaque). This color-coded map assists the interventionalist in understanding more fully how the lesion will behave at the moment of treatment, whether it will resist complete stent deployment or be liable to embolization. Originally introduced for coronary interventions, VHIVUS is now being applied to peripheral situations. Because it provides a detailed and close-proximity view of plaque, its potential to improve the safety and efficacy of carotid endoluminal repair is stimulating substantial interest. Similarly, color flow IVUS provides greater understanding for the operator of blood flow, and the interface between the vessel wall and the blood stream, lumen size, and success of treatment. Color flow IVUS does not use the Doppler effect, but creates real-time images that resemble color flow Doppler ultrasound. These two technological advances in IVUS have greatly improved the ability of the endovascular specialist to understand the arterial disease they are treating and to assess the completion of treatment. PMID:16996418

  13. Dual-element needle transducer for intravascular ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Min Gon; Williams, Jay A.; Yoon, Changhan; Kang, Bong Jin; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor; Shung, K. Kirk; Kim, Hyung Ham

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A dual-element needle transducer for intravascular ultrasound imaging has been developed. A low-frequency element and a high-frequency element were integrated into one device to obtain images which conveyed both low- and high-frequency information from a single scan. The low-frequency element with a center frequency of 48 MHz was fabricated from the single crystal form of lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate solid solution with two matching layers (MLs) and the high frequency element with a center frequency of 152 MHz was fabricated from lithium niobate with one ML. The measured axial and lateral resolutions were 27 and 122  μm, respectively, for the low-frequency element, and 14 and 40  μm, respectively, for the high-frequency element. The performance of the dual-element needle transducer was validated by imaging a tissue-mimicking phantom with lesion-mimicking area, and ex vivo rabbit aortas in water and rabbit whole blood. The results suggest that a low-frequency element effectively provides depth resolved images of the whole vessel and its adjacent tissue, and a high-frequency element visualizes detailed structure near the surface of the lumen wall in the presence of blood within the lumen. The advantages of a dual-element approach for intravascular imaging are also discussed. PMID:26158118

  14. Focused intravascular ultrasonic probe using dimpled transducer elements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Qiu, W B; Lam, K H; Liu, B Q; Jiang, X P; Zheng, H R; Luo, H S; Chan, H L W; Dai, J Y

    2015-02-01

    High-frequency focused intravascular ultrasonic probes were fabricated in this study using dimple technique based on PMN-PT single crystal and lead-free KNN-KBT-Mn ceramic. The center frequency, bandwidth, and insertion loss of the PMN-PT transducer were 34 MHz, 75%, and 22.9 dB, respectively. For the lead-free probe, the center frequency, bandwidth, and insertion loss were found to be 40 MHz, 72%, and 28.8 dB, respectively. The ultrasonic images of wire phantom and vessels with good resolution were obtained to evaluate the transducer performance. The -6 dB axial and lateral resolutions of the PMN-PT probe were determined to be 58 μm and 131 μm, respectively. For the lead-free probe, the axial and lateral resolutions were found to be 44 μm and 125 μm, respectively. These results suggest that the mechanical dimpling technique has good potential in preparing focused transducers for intravascular ultrasound applications. PMID:25108608

  15. Primary effusion lymphoma presenting as a cutaneous intravascular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Xian, Rena R.; Burns, Kathleen H.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.; Taube, Janis M.

    2015-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare and aggressive lymphoma that arises in the context of immunosuppression and is characterized by co-infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus-8/Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (HHV-8/KSHV). It was originally described as arising in body cavity effusions, but presentation as a mass lesion (extracavitary PEL) is now recognized. Here, we describe a case of PEL with an initial presentation as an intravascular lymphoma with associated skin lesions. The patient was a 53-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) who presented with fevers, weight loss and skin lesions concerning for Kaposi sarcoma (KS). A skin biopsy revealed no evidence of KS; however, dermal vessels contained large atypical cells that expressed CD31 and plasma cell markers but lacked most B- and T-cell antigens. The atypical cells expressed EBV and HHV-8. The patient subsequently developed a malignant pleural effusion containing the same neoplastic cell population. The findings in this case highlight the potential for unusual intravascular presentations of PEL in the skin as well as the importance of pursuing microscopic diagnosis of skin lesions in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:25355615

  16. Thyroid Storm Complicated by Bicytopenia and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Tokushima, Yoshinori; Sakanishi, Yuta; Nagae, Kou; Tokushima, Midori; Tago, Masaki; Tomonaga, Motosuke; Yoshioka, Tsuneaki; Hyakutake, Masaki; Sugioka, Takashi; Yamashita, Shu-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 23 Final Diagnosis: Thyroid storm Symptoms: Delirium • diarrhea • fever • hypertension • hyperventilation • tachycardia • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Endocrinology and Metabolic Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: The clinical presentation of thyroid storm includes fever, tachycardia, hypertension, and neurological abnormalities. It is a serious condition with a high mortality rate. Furthermore, some other complications affect the clinical course of thyroid storm. Although it is reported that prognosis is poor when thyroid storm is complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome (DIC) and leukopenia, reports of such cases are rare. Case Report: A 23-year-old man presented with delirium, high pyrexia, diarrhea, and weight loss of 18 kg over 2 months. According to the criteria of Burch and Wartofsky, he was diagnosed with thyroid storm on the basis of his symptom-complex and laboratory data that confirmed the presence of hyperthyroidism. Investigations also found leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and disseminated intravascular coagulation, all of which are very rare complications of thyroid storm. We successfully treated him with combined therapy including anti-thyroid medication, despite leukopenia. Conclusions: Early diagnosis and treatment are essential in ensuring a good outcome for patients with this rare combination of medical problems. PMID:25072662

  17. High speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging of atherosclerotic arteries (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Zhonglie; Ma, Teng; Qu, Yueqiao; Li, Jiawen; Yu, Mingyue; He, Youmin; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the industrialized nations. Accurate quantification of both the morphology and composition of lipid-rich vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque are essential for early detection and optimal treatment in clinics. In previous works, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging for detection of lipid-rich plaque within coronary artery walls has been demonstrated in ex vivo, but the imaging speed is still limited. In order to increase the imaging speed, a high repetition rate laser is needed. In this work, we present a high speed integrated IVPA/US imaging system with a 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator laser at 1725 nm. A miniature catheter with 1.0 mm outer diameter was designed with a 200 μm multimode fiber and an ultrasound transducer with 45 MHz center frequency. The fiber was polished at 38 degree and enclosed in a glass capillary for total internal reflection. An optical/electrical rotary junction and pull-back mechanism was applied for rotating and linearly scanning the catheter to obtain three-dimensional imaging. Atherosclerotic rabbit abdominal aorta was imaged as two frame/second at 1725 nm. Furthermore, by wide tuning range of the laser wavelength from 1680 nm to 1770 nm, spectroscopic photoacoustic analysis of lipid-mimicking phantom and an human atherosclerotic artery was performed ex vivo. The results demonstrated that the developed IVPA/US imaging system is capable for high speed intravascular imaging for plaque detection.

  18. Early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Wagner; Nag; Young; Bahnson

    2000-12-15

    Introduction: Transperineal prostate brachytherapy is gaining popularity as a treatment for clinically localized carcinoma of the prostate. Very little prospective data exists addressing the issue of complications associated with this procedure. We present an analysis of the early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: Forty-six consecutive patients who underwent Palladium-103 (Pd-103) seed placement for clinically localized prostate carcinoma were evaluated prospectively for any morbidity associated with the procedure. Twenty-three patients completed an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire preoperatively, at their first postoperative visit, and at their second postoperative visit. The total IPSS, each of the seven individual components, and the "bother" score were evaluated separately for each visit, and statistical significance was determined. Results: Urinary retention occurred in 7/46 patients (15%). Of these, 5 were able to void spontaneously after catheter removal. One patient is maintained with a suprapubic tube, and one patient is currently on continuous intermittent catheterization. Baseline IPSS was 7.1 and this went to 20.0 at the first postoperative visit (p<0.001). By the second postoperative visit, the IPSS was 8.0. Conclusions: In our experience, prostate brachytherapy for localized carcinoma of the prostate is associated with a 15% catheterization rate and a significant increase in the IPSS (7.1 to 20.0). This increase in the IPSS seems to be self-limited. Patients need to be educated on these issues prior to prostate brachytherapy. PMID:11113369

  19. Gadolinium-153 as a brachytherapy isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enger, Shirin A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to present the fundamental dosimetric characteristics of a hypothetical 153Gd brachytherapy source using the AAPM TG-43U1 dose-calculation formalism. Gadolinium-153 is an intermediate-energy isotope that emits 40-100 keV photons with a half-life of 242 days. The rationale for considering 153Gd as a brachytherapy source is for its potential of patient specific shielding and to enable reduced personnel shielding requirements relative to 192Ir, and as an isotope for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT). A hypothetical 153Gd brachytherapy source with an active core of 0.84 mm diameter, 10 mm length and specific activity of 5.55 TBq of 153Gd per gram of Gd was simulated with Geant4. The encapsulation material was stainless steel with a thickness of 0.08 mm. The radial dose function, anisotropy function and photon spectrum in water were calculated for the 153Gd source. The simulated 153Gd source had an activity of 242 GBq and a dose rate in water 1 cm off axis of 13.12 Gy h-1, indicating that it would be suitable as a low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The beta particles emitted have low enough energies to be absorbed in the source encapsulation. Gadolinium-153 has an increasing radial dose function due to multiple scatter of low-energy photons. Scattered photon dose takes over with distance from the source and contributes to the majority of the absorbed dose. The anisotropy function of the 153Gd source decreases at low polar angles, as a result of the long active core. The source is less anisotropic at polar angles away from the longitudinal axes. The anisotropy function increases with increasing distance. The 153Gd source considered would be suitable as an intermediate-energy low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The source could provide a means for I-RSBT delivery and enable brachytherapy treatments with patient specific shielding and reduced personnel shielding requirements relative to

  20. Gadolinium-153 as a brachytherapy isotope.

    PubMed

    Enger, Shirin A; Fisher, Darrell R; Flynn, Ryan T

    2013-02-21

    The purpose of this work was to present the fundamental dosimetric characteristics of a hypothetical (153)Gd brachytherapy source using the AAPM TG-43U1 dose-calculation formalism. Gadolinium-153 is an intermediate-energy isotope that emits 40-100 keV photons with a half-life of 242 days. The rationale for considering (153)Gd as a brachytherapy source is for its potential of patient specific shielding and to enable reduced personnel shielding requirements relative to (192)Ir, and as an isotope for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT). A hypothetical (153)Gd brachytherapy source with an active core of 0.84 mm diameter, 10 mm length and specific activity of 5.55 TBq of (153)Gd per gram of Gd was simulated with Geant4. The encapsulation material was stainless steel with a thickness of 0.08 mm. The radial dose function, anisotropy function and photon spectrum in water were calculated for the (153)Gd source. The simulated (153)Gd source had an activity of 242 GBq and a dose rate in water 1 cm off axis of 13.12 Gy h(-1), indicating that it would be suitable as a low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The beta particles emitted have low enough energies to be absorbed in the source encapsulation. Gadolinium-153 has an increasing radial dose function due to multiple scatter of low-energy photons. Scattered photon dose takes over with distance from the source and contributes to the majority of the absorbed dose. The anisotropy function of the (153)Gd source decreases at low polar angles, as a result of the long active core. The source is less anisotropic at polar angles away from the longitudinal axes. The anisotropy function increases with increasing distance. The (153)Gd source considered would be suitable as an intermediate-energy low-dose-rate or pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The source could provide a means for I-RSBT delivery and enable brachytherapy treatments with patient specific shielding and reduced personnel

  1. Brachytherapy in pelvic malignancies: a review for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Vicens, Rafael A; Rodriguez, Joshua; Sheplan, Lawrence; Mayo, Cody; Mayo, Lauren; Jensen, Corey

    2015-10-01

    Brachytherapy, also known as sealed source or internal radiation therapy, involves placement of a radioactive source immediately adjacent to or within tumor, thus enabling delivery of a localized high dose of radiation. Compared with external beam radiation which must first pass through non-target tissues, brachytherapy results in less radiation dose to normal tissues. In the past decade, brachytherapy use has markedly increased, thus radiologists are encountering brachytherapy devices and their associated post-treatment changes to increasing degree. This review will present a variety of brachytherapy devices that radiologists may encounter during diagnostic pelvic imaging with a focus on prostate and gynecologic malignancies. The reader will become familiar with the function, correct position, and potential complications of brachytherapy devices in an effort to improve diagnostic reporting and communication with clinicians. PMID:25820802

  2. Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging of Peripheral Arteries as an Adjunct to Balloon Angioplasty and Atherectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Korogi, Yukunori; Hirai, Toshinori; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    1996-11-15

    This article reviews many of the applications of intravascular ultrasound (US) imaging for peripheral arterial diseases. In vitro studies demonstrate an excellent correlation between ultrasound measurements of lumen and plaque crossectional area compared with histologic sections. In vivo clinical studies reveal the enhanced diagnostic capabilities of this technology compared with angiography. Intravascular US imaging can provide valuable information on the degree, eccentricity, and histologic type of stenosis before intervention, and on the morphological changes in the arterial wall and the extent of excision after intervention. Intravascular US may also serve as a superior index for gauging the diameter of balloon, stent, laser probe, and/or atherectomy catheter appropriate for a proposed intervention. Significant new insights into the mechanisms of balloon angioplasty and atherectomy have been established by intravascular US findings. Intravascular US imaging has been shown to be a more accurate method than angiography for determining the cross-sectional area of the arterial lumen, and for assessing severity of stenosis. Quantitative assessment of the luminal cross-sectional area after the balloon dilatation should be more accurate than angiography as intimal tears or dissections produced by the dilatation may not be accurately evaluated with angiography. At the present time, intravascular US is still a controversial imaging technique. Outcome studies are currently being organized to assess the clinical value and cost effectiveness of intravascular ultrasound in the context of these interventional procedures.

  3. Intravascular ultrasound imaging of peripheral arteries as an adjunct to balloon angioplasty and atherectomy.

    PubMed

    Korogi, Y; Hirai, T; Takahashi, M

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews many of the applications of intravascular ultrasound (US) imaging for peripheral arterial diseases. In vitro studies demonstrate an excellent correlation between ultrasound measurements of lumen and plaque cross-sectional area compared with histologic sections. In vivo clinical studies reveal the enhanced diagnostic capabilities of this technology compared with angiography. Intravascular US imaging can provide valuable information on the degree, eccentricity, and histologic type of stenosis before intervention, and on the morphological changes in the arterial wall and the extent of excision after intervention. Intravascular US may also serve as a superior index for gauging the diameter of balloon, stent, laser probe, and/or atherectomy catheter appropriate for a proposed intervention. Significant new insights into the mechanisms of balloon angioplasty and atherectomy have been established by intravascular US findings. Intravascular US imaging has been shown to be a more accurate method than angiography for determining the cross-sectional area of the arterial lumen, and for assessing severity of stenosis. Quantitative assessment of the luminal cross-sectional area after the balloon dilatation should be more accurate than angiography as intimal tears or dissections produced by the dilatation may not be accurately evaluated with angiography. At the present time, intravascular US is still a controversial imaging technique. Outcome studies are currently being organized to assess the clinical value and cost effectiveness of intravascular ultrasound in the context of these interventional procedures. PMID:8653738

  4. Current status and extended applications of intravascular stents.

    PubMed

    Hallisey, M J; Parker, B C; van Breda, A

    1992-08-01

    The introduction of several novel techniques and mechanical devices to interventional radiology has expanded the range of therapies for a variety of medical disorders. Intravascular metallic stents have received widespread acclaim and may possess the most potential of all the newest devices available to the interventionist. The addition of metallic stents to the percutaneous therapeutic arsenal provides the interventionist with a device that can resist the elastic recoil of a stenotic vessel or support a newly created vascular tract. Peripheral artery metallic stent placement holds great promise for the treatment of selected patients; other applications of stents, including transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunts are likely to have a great impact in patient management. We review the techniques, appropriate indications, and recent clinical results of vascular stents for percutaneous intervention and therapy. PMID:1627454

  5. Basic studies on intravascular low-intensity laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Duan, Rui; Wang, Shuang-Xi; Liu, Jiang; Cui, Li-Ping; Jin, Hua; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-09-01

    Intravascular low intensity laser therapy (ILILT) was originally put forward in USA in 1982, but popularized in Russia in 1980s and in China in 1990s, respectively. A randomized placebo-controlled study has shown ILILT clinical efficacy in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. As Chinese therapeutic applications of ILILT were the most widely in the world, its basic research, such as intracellular signal transduction research, blood research in vitro, animal blood research in vivo, human blood research in vivo and traditional Chinese medicine research, was also very progressive in China. Its basic studies will be reviewed in terms of the biological information model of photobiomodulation in this paper. ILILT might work in view of its basic studies, but the further randomized placebo-controlled trial and the further safety research should be done.

  6. Acute renal failure and intravascular hemolysis following henna ingestion.

    PubMed

    Qurashi, Hala E A; Qumqumji, Abbas A A; Zacharia, Yasir

    2013-05-01

    The powder of henna plant (Lawsonia inermis Linn.) is extensively used as a decorative skin paint for nail coloring and as a hair dye. Most reports of henna toxicity have been attributed to adding a synthetic dye para-phenylenediamine (PPD). PPD is marketed as black henna added to natural henna to accentuate the dark color and shorten the application time. PPD toxicity is well known and extensively reported in medical literature. We report a case of a young Saudi male who presented with characteristic features of acute renal failure and intravascular hemolysis following ingestion of henna mixture. Management of PPD poisoning is only supportive and helpful only if instituted early. Diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion, as the clinical features are quite distinctive. PMID:23640630

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rukhlenko, Oleksii S.; Dudchenko, Olga A.; Zlobina, Ksenia E.; Guria, Georgy Th.

    2015-01-01

    Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines. PMID:26222505

  8. Spectroscopic intravascular photoacoustic imaging of neovasculature: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jimmy L.; Wang, Bo; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2009-02-01

    An acceleration of angiogenesis in the adventitial vasa-vasorum is usually associated with vulnerable, thin-cap fibroatheroma in atherosclerotic plaques. Angiogenesis creates microvasculature too small to be detected and differentiated using conventional imaging techniques. However, by using spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging, we take advantage of the wavelength-dependent optical absorption properties of blood. We used a vessel-mimicking phantom with micro blood vessels. The phantom was imaged with intravascular photoacoustic imaging across a range of wavelengths. The image intensities were cross-correlated with the known absorption spectra of blood. The resulting cross-correlation image was able to reveal the location of the artificial blood vessels differentiated from non-blood vessel components.

  9. Pulmonary intravascular macrophages and lung health: what are we missing?

    PubMed

    Schneberger, David; Aharonson-Raz, Karin; Singh, Baljit

    2012-03-15

    Pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) are constitutively found in species such as cattle, horse, pig, sheep, goat, cats, and whales and can be induced in species such as rats, which normally lack them. It is believed that human lung lacks PIMs, but there are previous suggestions of their induction in patients suffering from liver dysfunction. Recent data show induction of PIMs in bile-duct ligated rats and humans suffering from hepato-pulmonary syndrome. Because constitutive and induced PIMs are pro-inflammatory in response to endotoxins and bacteria, there is a need to study their biology in inflammatory lung diseases such as sepsis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, or hepato-pulmonary syndrome. We provide a review of PIM biology to make an argument for increased emphasis and better focus on the study of human PIMs to better understand their potential role in the pathophysiology and mechanisms of pulmonary diseases. PMID:22227203

  10. Magnetizable intravascular stents for sequestration of systemically circulating magnetic nano- and microspheres.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Kaminski, M. D.; Ebner, A. D.; Ritter, J. A.; Rosengart, A. J.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of South Carolina; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2005-01-01

    A 2-D theoretical model was established and used to evaluate the sequestration of blood borne magnetic nano- and microspheres by a magnetizable intravascular stent system. Furthermore, an in vitro flow model system examined the efficiency of a prototype magnetizable intravascular stent to sequestrate the nano- and microspheres from arterial and/or venous blood flow. Comparisons of experimental and corresponding modeling data verified theoretical predictions. The results suggest that the magnetizable intravascular stents can be developed as an effective magnetic drug-targeting tool with potential medical applications.

  11. Intravascular gas in the transplanted kidney: a sign of extensive graft necrosis.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Kousei; Olsen, Kim M; Hammet, Bradley K; Katz, Daniel A; Wu, You Min

    2004-04-01

    We encountered a case of transplanted kidney necrosis, with computed tomography (CT) demonstrating multiple areas of intravascular gas within the allograft. The intravascular gas represented air emboli from gas liberated from fermentation by gas-forming organisms in a perinephric abscess. Arterial bleeding accelerated by the wound infection and the resultant large perinephric hematoma caused renal infarction. Gas-forming infection of transplanted organs is associated with a poor graft outcome, which can present as a fulminant clinical course. Intravascular gas should be distinguished from collecting system gas because the former could represent extensive necrosis of the transplanted kidney. PMID:15290479

  12. A Case of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    I report a hemorrhagic complication due to disseminated intravascular coagulation after thoracic endovascular aortic repair for a dissecting aortic aneurysm. A 74-year-old man underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair and carotid-carotid artery bypass to close the primary entry site of the dissecting aortic aneurysm. Postoperatively, he developed a gradually expanding cervical hematoma. Laboratory data showed disseminated intravascular coagulation. He could not extubated until postoperative day 6 because of the risk of airway obstruction. He was treated with transfusion to replenish the coagulation factor. Disseminated intravascular coagulation may occur secondary to thrombus formation in the false lumen after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:26730263

  13. The Development of a Continuous Intravascular Glucose Monitoring Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Barry C.; Barwell, Nicholas P.; Gopal, Palepu; Gopichand, Mannam; Higgs, Timothy; James, Tony D.; Jones, Christopher M.; Mackenzie, Alasdair; Mulavisala, Krishna Prasad; Paterson, William

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glycemic control in hospital intensive care units (ICU) has been the subject of numerous research publications and debate over the past 2 decades. There have been multiple studies showing the benefit of ICU glucose control in reducing both morbidity and mortality. GlySure Ltd has developed a glucose monitor based on a diboronic acid receptor that can continuously measure plasma glucose concentrations directly in a patient’s vascular system. The goal of this study was to validate the performance of the GlySure CIGM system in different patient populations. Methods: The GlySure Continuous Intravascular Glucose Monitoring (CIGM) System was evaluated in both the Cardiac ICU (33 patients) and MICU setting (14 patients). The sensor was placed through a custom CVC and measured the patients’ blood glucose concentration every 15 seconds. Comparison blood samples were taken at 2 hourly then 4 hourly intervals and measured on a YSI 2300 STAT Plus or an i-STAT. Results: Consensus error grid analysis of the data shows that the majority of the data (88.2% Cardiac, and 95.0% MICU) fell within zone A, which is considered to be clinically accurate and all data points fell within zones A and B. The MARD of the Cardiac trial was 9.90% and the MICU trial had a MARD of 7.95%. Data analysis showed no significant differences between data generated from Cardiac and MICU patients or by time or glucose concentration. Conclusions: The GlySure CIGM System has met the design challenges of measuring intravascular glucose concentrations in critically ill patients with acceptable safety and performance criteria and without disrupting current clinical practice. The accuracy of the data is not affected by the patients’ condition. PMID:26033921

  14. Modern head and neck brachytherapy: from radium towards intensity modulated interventional brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) is a modern development of classical interventional radiation therapy (brachytherapy), which allows the application of a high radiation dose sparing severe adverse events, thereby further improving the treatment outcome. Classical indications in head and neck (H&N) cancers are the face, the oral cavity, the naso- and oropharynx, the paranasal sinuses including base of skull, incomplete resections on important structures, and palliation. The application type can be curative, adjuvant or perioperative, as a boost to external beam radiation as well as without external beam radiation and with palliative intention. Due to the frequently used perioperative application method (intraoperative implantation of inactive applicators and postoperative performance of radiation), close interdisciplinary cooperation between surgical specialists (ENT-, dento-maxillary-facial-, neuro- and orbital surgeons), as well interventional radiotherapy (brachytherapy) experts are obligatory. Published results encourage the integration of IMBT into H&N therapy, thereby improving the prognosis and quality of life of patients. PMID:25834586

  15. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only brachytherapy sources...

  16. The evolution of brachytherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Venselaar, Jack L. M.; Beaulieu, Luc

    2009-06-15

    Brachytherapy is a mature treatment modality that has benefited from technological advances. Treatment planning has advanced from simple lookup tables to complex, computer-based dose-calculation algorithms. The current approach is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism with recent advances in acquiring single-source dose distributions. However, this formalism has clinically relevant limitations for calculating patient dose. Dose-calculation algorithms are being developed based on Monte Carlo methods, collapsed cone, and solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation. In addition to improved dose-calculation tools, planning systems and brachytherapy treatment planning will account for material heterogeneities, scatter conditions, radiobiology, and image guidance. The AAPM, ESTRO, and other professional societies are working to coordinate clinical integration of these advancements. This Vision 20/20 article provides insight into these endeavors.

  17. Radiochromic dye film studies for brachytherapy applications.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Dávalos, A; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M; Díaz-Perches, R; Arzamendi-Pérez, S

    2002-01-01

    Commercial radiochromic dye films have been used in recent years to quantify absorbed dose in several medical applications. In this study we present the characterisation of the GafChromic MD-55-2 dye film, a double sensitive layer film suitable for photon irradiation in brachytherapy applications. Dose measurements were carried out with a low dose rate 137Cs brachytherapy source, which produces very steep dose gradients in its vicinity, and therefore requires the capability of producing high spatial resolution isodose curves. Quantification of the dose rate in water per unit air kerma strength was obtained using a high-resolution transmission commercial scanner (Agfa DuoScan T1200 with the capability of digitising up to 600 x 1200 pixels per inch using 36 bits per pixel, together with optical density measurements. The Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements compared well in the 0-50 Gy dose interval used in this study. PMID:12382798

  18. Erectile Function Durability Following Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Kurko, Brian S.; Anderson, Richard; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term changes in erectile function following prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 226 patients with prostate cancer and preimplant erectile function assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function-6 (IIEF-6) who underwent brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003. Median follow-up was 6.4 years. Pre- and postbrachytherapy potency was defined as IIEF-6 >= 13 without pharmacologic or mechanical support. The relationship among clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters and erectile function was examined. Results: The 7-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 55.6% with median postimplant IIEF of 22 in potent patients. Potent patients were statistically younger (p = 0.014), had a higher preimplant IIEF (p < 0.001), were less likely to be diabetic (p = 0.002), and were more likely to report nocturnal erections (p = 0.008). Potency preservation in men with baseline IIEF scores of 29-30, 24-28, 18-23, and 13-17 were 75.5% vs. 73.6%, 51.7% vs. 44.8%, 48.0% vs. 40.0%, and 23.5% vs. 23.5% in 2004 vs. 2008. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, preimplant IIEF, hypertension, diabetes, prostate size, and brachytherapy dose to proximal penis strongly predicted for potency preservation. Impact of proximal penile dose was most pronounced for men with IIEF of 18-23 and aged 60-69. A significant minority of men who developed postimplant impotence ultimately regained erectile function. Conclusion: Potency preservation and median IIEF scores following brachytherapy are durable. Thoughtful dose sparing of proximal penile structures and early penile rehabilitation may further improve these results.

  19. Brachytherapy needle deflection evaluation and correction

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Gang; Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2005-04-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, an 18-gauge needle is used to implant radioactive seeds. This thin needle can be deflected from the preplanned trajectory in the prostate, potentially resulting in a suboptimum dose pattern and at times requiring repeated needle insertion to achieve optimal dosimetry. In this paper, we report on the evaluation of brachytherapy needle deflection and bending in test phantoms and two approaches to overcome the problem. First we tested the relationship between needle deflection and insertion depth as well as whether needle bending occurred. Targeting accuracy was tested by inserting a brachytherapy needle to target 16 points in chicken tissue phantoms. By implanting dummy seeds into chicken tissue phantoms under 3D ultrasound guidance, the overall accuracy of seed implantation was determined. We evaluated methods to overcome brachytherapy needle deflection with three different insertion methods: constant orientation, constant rotation, and orientation reversal at half of the insertion depth. Our results showed that needle deflection is linear with needle insertion depth, and that no noticeable bending occurs with needle insertion into the tissue and agar phantoms. A 3D principal component analysis was performed to obtain the population distribution of needle tip and seed position relative to the target positions. Our results showed that with the constant orientation insertion method, the mean needle targeting error was 2.8 mm and the mean seed implantation error was 2.9 mm. Using the constant rotation and orientation reversal at half insertion depth methods, the deflection error was reduced. The mean needle targeting errors were 0.8 and 1.2 mm for the constant rotation and orientation reversal methods, respectively, and the seed implantation errors were 0.9 and 1.5 mm for constant rotation insertion and orientation reversal methods, respectively.

  20. Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Song, Qi; Liu, Yunlong; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-06-01

    In this treatment planning study, the potential benefits of a rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) technique based on a partially-shielded electronic brachytherapy source were assessed for treating cervical cancer. Conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), intracavitary plus supplementary interstitial (IS+ICBT), and RSBT treatment plans for azimuthal emission angles of 180° (RSBT-180) and 45° (RSBT-45) were generated for five patients. For each patient, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) (α/β = 10 Gy) was escalated until bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon tolerance EQD2 values were reached. External beam radiotherapy dose (1.8 Gy × 25) was accounted for, and brachytherapy was assumed to have been delivered in 5 fractions. IS+ICBT provided a greater HR-CTV D90 (minimum EQD2 to the hottest 90%) than ICBT. D90 was greater for RSBT-45 than IS+ICBT for all five patients, and greater for RSBT-180 than IS+ICBT for two patients. When the RSBT-45/180 plan with the lowest HR-CTV D90 that was greater than the D90 the ICBT or IS+ICBT plan was selected, the average (range) of D90 increases for RSBT over ICBT and IS+ICBT were 16.2 (6.3-27.2)and 8.5 (0.03-20.16) Gy, respectively. The average (range) treatment time increase per fraction of RSBT was 34.56 (3.68-70.41) min over ICBT and 34.59 (3.57-70.13) min over IS+ICBT. RSBT can increase D90 over ICBT and IS+ICBT without compromising organ-at-risk sparing. The D90 and treatment time improvements from RSBT depend on the patient and shield emission angle.

  1. Magnetite nanoparticles for nonradionuclide brachytherapy1

    PubMed Central

    Safronov, Victor; Sozontov, Evgeny; Polikarpov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles possess several properties that can make them useful for targeted delivery of radiation to tumors for the purpose of brachytherapy. Such particles are biodegradable and magnetic and can emit secondary radiation when irradiated by an external source. In this work, the dose distribution around a magnetite particle of 10 nm diameter being irradiated by monochromatic X-rays with energies in the range 4–60 keV is calculated. PMID:26089761

  2. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  3. Myths and fallacies in permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Wayne M.; Merrick, Gregory S

    2003-09-30

    Because there are competing modalities to treat early-stage prostate cancer, the constraints or deficiencies of one modality may be erroneously applied to others. Some valid concerns arising from surgery and external beam therapy, which have been falsely transferred to brachytherapy, are constraints based on patient age, clinical and pathological parameters, patient weight, and size of prostate. Although the constraints have a valid basis in one modality, knowledge of the origin and mechanism of the constraint has provided a means to circumvent or overcome it in brachytherapy. Failures as measured by biochemical no-evidence of disease (bNED) survival may be attributed to extracapsular disease extension. Such extension often expresses itself in surrogate parameters such as a high percentage of positive biopsies, perineural invasion, or the dominant pattern in Gleason score histology. Failures due to such factors may be prevented by implanting with consistent extracapsular dosimetric margins. Some presumed limitations on prostate brachytherapy originated from data on patients implanted in the first few years the procedure was being developed. Most of the urinary morbidity and a significant part of the decrease in sexual function observed may be avoided by controlling the dosimetry along the prostatic and membranous urethra and at the penile bulb.

  4. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432... § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the first medical use of a... licensee making its own measurements as required in paragraph (a) of this section, the licensee may...

  5. Ultrasound use in gynecologic brachytherapy: Time to focus the beam.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, Sylvia; Schneider, Michal; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Bernshaw, David; Narayan, Kailash

    2015-01-01

    There is wide disparity in the practice of brachytherapy for cervical cancer around the world. Although select well-resourced centers advocate use of MRI for all insertions, planar X-ray imaging remains the most commonly used imaging modality to assess intracavitary implants, particularly where the burden of cervical cancer is high. Incorporating soft tissue imaging into brachytherapy programs has been shown to improve the technical accuracy of implants, which in turn has led to improved local control and decreased toxicity. These improvements have a positive effect on the quality of life of patients undergoing brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Finding an accessible soft tissue imaging modality is essential to enable these improvements to be available to all patients. A modality that has good soft tissue imaging capabilities, is widely available, portable, and economical, is needed. Ultrasound fulfils these requirements and offers the potential of soft tissue image guidance to a much wider brachytherapy community. Although use of ultrasound is the standard of care in brachytherapy for prostate cancer, it only seems to have limited uptake in gynecologic brachytherapy. This article reviews the role of ultrasound in gynecologic brachytherapy and highlights the potential applications for use in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. PMID:25620161

  6. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy... Association of Physicists in Medicine that are made in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section. (c)...

  7. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy... Association of Physicists in Medicine that are made in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section. (c)...

  8. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy... Association of Physicists in Medicine that are made in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section. (c)...

  9. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy... Association of Physicists in Medicine that are made in accordance with paragraph (a) of this section. (c)...

  10. Directional interstitial brachytherapy from simulation to application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liyong

    Organs at risk (OAR) are sometimes adjacent to or embedded in or overlap with the clinical target volume (CTV) to be treated. The purpose of this PhD study is to develop directionally low energy gamma-emitting interstitial brachytherapy sources. These sources can be applied between OAR to selectively reduce hot spots in the OARs and normal tissues. The reduction of dose over undesired regions can expand patient eligibility or reduce toxicities for the treatment by conventional interstitial brachytherapy. This study covers the development of a directional source from design optimization to construction of the first prototype source. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to simulate the radiation transport for the designs of directional sources. We have made a special construction kit to assemble radioactive and gold-shield components precisely into D-shaped titanium containers of the first directional source. Directional sources have a similar dose distribution as conventional sources on the treated side but greatly reduced dose on the shielded side, with a sharp dose gradient between them. A three-dimensional dose deposition kernel for the 125I directional source has been calculated. Treatment plans can use both directional and conventional 125I sources at the same source strength for low-dose-rate (LDR) implants to optimize the dose distributions. For prostate tumors, directional 125I LDR brachytherapy can potentially reduce genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities and improve potency preservation for low risk patients. The combination of better dose distribution of directional implants and better therapeutic ratio between tumor response and late reactions enables a novel temporary LDR treatment, as opposed to permanent or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the intermediate risk T2b and high risk T2c tumors. Supplemental external-beam treatments can be shortened with a better brachytherapy boost for T3 tumors. In conclusion, we have successfully finished the

  11. Penile brachytherapy: Results for 49 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita M. . E-mail: juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Jezioranski, John; Grimard, Laval; Esche, Bernd; Pond, G.

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: To report results for 49 men with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis treated with primary penile interstitial brachytherapy at one of two institutions: the Ottawa Regional Cancer Center, Ottawa, and the Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Methods and Materials: From September 1989 to September 2003, 49 men (mean age, 58 years; range, 22-93 years) had brachytherapy for penile SCC. Fifty-one percent of tumors were T1, 33% T2, and 8% T3; 4% were in situ and 4% Tx. Grade was well differentiated in 31%, moderate in 45%, and poor in 2%; grade was unspecified for 20%. One tumor was verrucous. All tumors in Toronto had pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy (n = 23), whereas those in Ottawa had either Iridium wire (n 22) or seeds (n = 4). Four patients had a single plane implant with a plastic tube technique, and all others had a volume implant with predrilled acrylic templates and two or three parallel planes of needles (median, six needles). Mean needle spacing was 13.5 mm (range, 10-18 mm), mean dose rate was 65 cGy/h (range, 33-160 cGy/h), and mean duration was 98.8 h (range, 36-188 h). Dose rates for PDR brachytherapy were 50-61.2 cGy/h, with no correction in total dose, which was 60 Gy in all cases. Results: Median follow-up was 33.4 months (range, 4-140 months). At 5 years, actuarial overall survival was 78.3% and cause-specific survival 90.0%. Four men died of penile cancer, and 6 died of other causes with no evidence of recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate for never having experienced any type of failure at 5 years was 64.4% and for local failure was 85.3%. All 5 patients with local failure were successfully salvaged by surgery; 2 other men required penectomy for necrosis. The soft tissue necrosis rate was 16% and the urethral stenosis rate 12%. Of 8 men with regional failure, 5 were salvaged by lymph node dissection with or without external radiation. All 4 men with distant failure died of disease. Of 49 men, 42 had an intact

  12. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma: A Difficult Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Khan, Maria S; McCubbin, Mark; Nand, Sucha

    2014-01-01

    Case Presentation. A 69-year-old Hispanic male, with a past history of diabetes and coronary disease, was admitted for fever, diarrhea, and confusion of 4 weeks duration. Physical examination showed a disoriented patient with multiple ecchymoses, possible ascites, and bilateral scrotal swelling. Hemoglobin was 6.7, prothrombin time (PT) 21.4 seconds with international normalized ratio 2.1, partial thromboplastin time (PTT) 55.6 seconds, fibrin split 10 µg/L, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) 1231 IU/L. Except for a positive DNA test for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, extensive diagnostic workup for infections, malignancy, or a neurological cause was negative. Mixing studies revealed a nonspecific inhibitor of PT and PTT but Factor VIII levels were normal. The patient was empirically treated with antibiotics but developed hypotension and died on day 27 of admission. At autopsy, patient was found to have intravascular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving skin, testes, lung, and muscles. The malignant cells were positive for CD20, CD791, Mum-1, and Pax-5 and negative for CD3, CD5, CD10, CD30, and Bcl-6. The malignant cells were 100% positive for Ki-67. Discussion. Intravascular large cell B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is rare form of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and tends to proliferate within small blood vessels, particularly capillaries and postcapillary venules. The cause of its affinity for vascular bed remains unknown. In many reports, IVLBCL was associated with HIV, HHV8, and EBV infections. The fact that our case showed evidence of EBV infection lends support to the association of this diagnosis to viral illness. The available literature on this subject is scant, and in many cases, the diagnosis was made only at autopsy. The typical presentation of this disorder is with B symptoms, progressive neurologic deficits, and skin findings. Bone marrow, spleen, and liver are involved in a minority of patients. Nearly all patients have elevated LDH, and about 65% are

  13. Three-Dimensional Imaging in Gynecologic Brachytherapy: A Survey of the American Brachytherapy Society

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Erickson, Beth A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to three-dimensional (3D) imaging for gynecologic brachytherapy among American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) members. Methods and Materials: Registered physician members of the ABS received a 19-item survey by e-mail in August 2007. This report excludes physicians not performing brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Results: Of the 256 surveys sent, we report results for 133 respondents who perform one or more implantations per year for locally advanced cervical cancer. Ultrasound aids 56% of physicians with applicator insertion. After insertion, 70% of physicians routinely obtain a computed tomography (CT) scan. The majority (55%) use CT rather than X-ray films (43%) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 2%) for dose specification to the cervix. However, 76% prescribe to Point A alone instead of using a 3D-derived tumor volume (14%), both Point A and tumor volume (7%), or mg/h (3%). Those using 3D imaging routinely contour the bladder and rectum (94%), sigmoid (45%), small bowel (38%), and/or urethra (8%) and calculate normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis parameters including the D2cc (49%), D1cc (36%), D0.1cc (19%), and/or D5cc (19%). Respondents most commonly modify the treatment plan based on International Commission on Radiation Units bladder and/or rectal point dose values (53%) compared with DVH values (45%) or both (2%). Conclusions: More ABS physician members use CT postimplantation imaging than plain films for visualizing the gynecologic brachytherapy apparatus. However, the majority prescribe to Point A rather than using 3D image based dosimetry. Use of 3D image-based treatment planning for gynecologic brachytherapy has the potential for significant growth in the United States.

  14. Disseminated intravascular coagulation involving the brain: a topographical study.

    PubMed

    Fan, K J; Scott-Cora, J W

    1982-05-01

    Histopathological study on 723 brains from routine necropsies was performed. Ten brains (1.38 percent) were found to have histological lesions of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) with multiple fresh fibrin and/or platelet thrombi in the cerebral microcirculation. Among them, premortem diagnosis was made in only one case, and only two cases also showed evidence of visceral involvement. Microthrombi were found most frequently in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamic region and in the cerebral white matter, brain stem, and cerebellum, in descending order. Neurological symptoms and signs, including lethargy, coma and seizure, were detected in all cases. The abnormal body temperature and/or urinary output observed in most patients appeared to be related to the frequent hypothalamic involvement by DIC. The exclusive or predominant involvement of the brain by multiple microthrombi may be considered as a localized form of DIC. It is probably related to cerebral ischemia since severe acute neuronal ischemic changes also were noted in most brains. PMID:7120479

  15. Heartbeat OCT: in vivo intravascular megahertz-optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianshi; Pfeiffer, Tom; Regar, Evelyn; Wieser, Wolfgang; van Beusekom, Heleen; Lancee, Charles T; Springeling, Geert; Krabbendam, Ilona; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Huber, Robert; van Soest, Gijs

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac motion artifacts, non-uniform rotational distortion and undersampling affect the image quality and the diagnostic impact of intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT). In this study we demonstrate how these limitations of IV-OCT can be addressed by using an imaging system that we called "Heartbeat OCT", combining a fast Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser, fast pullback, and a micromotor actuated catheter, designed to examine a coronary vessel in less than one cardiac cycle. We acquired in vivo data sets of two coronary arteries in a porcine heart with both Heartbeat OCT, working at 2.88 MHz A-line rate, 4000 frames/s and 100 mm/s pullback speed, and with a commercial system. The in vivo results show that Heartbeat OCT provides faithfully rendered, motion-artifact free, fully sampled vessel wall architecture, unlike the conventional IV-OCT data. We present the Heartbeat OCT system in full technical detail and discuss the steps needed for clinical translation of the technology. PMID:26713214

  16. Surfactant effects on the dynamics of an intravascular bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Eckmann, David; Ayyaswamy, P. S.

    2004-11-01

    The effects of a surfactant on the dynamics of gas bubble behavior in the arteriolar vasculature are numerically investigated. The equations for momentum in the bulk fluid (blood) and the bubble, and the convection-diffusion equations for mass transport both in the bulk fluid and on the gas-liquid interface are numerically solved using a front tracking method. Both soluble and insoluble surfactants are considered. The adsorption/desorption dynamics of the soluble surfactant is accurately resolved. For a nearly occluded bubble, a faster rate of depletion of the surfactant from the region adjacent to the wall of the vessel is observed. In several cases studied here, the bulk medium is treated as non-Newtonian (power law, Casson), although the majority of cases treat blood as Newtonian. Results show that the adsorbed surfactant serves to prevent blood proteins and other macromolecules from occupying the interface. This prevents clotting or adhesion of the bubble to the vessel wall. The results obtained have significance in the study of intravascular gas embolism. Supported by NIH R01 HL67986

  17. Quantitative recovery of pulmonary intravascular macrophages from sheep lungs.

    PubMed

    Rogers, R A; Tasat, D R; Warner, A E; Brain, J D

    1994-12-01

    Pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) adhere to the endothelium of lung capillaries and sequester circulating particles and pathogens from the blood. Iron oxide (gamma Fe2O3) 5 mg/kg, administered intravenously, specifically labeled PIMs in situ within the living sheep. Attempts to isolate gamma Fe2O3-labeled PIMs using vascular perfusion (VP) procedures yielded few cells. To improve recovery of PIMs, a proteolytic lung digestion (PLD) procedure was developed. Following PLD, gamma Fe2O3-containing PIMs were recovered by magnets and the amount of gamma Fe2O3 present measured by fluxgate magnetometry. Proteolytic lung digestion recovered 34% of the total gamma Fe2O3 in lung samples and yielded 2 x 10(5) PIMs/g lung with 95% viability. In contrast, VP recovered only 3% of the total gamma Fe2O3 in the lung; furthermore, less than 2% of the recovered gamma Fe2O3 was cell associated. Proteolytic lung digestion followed by magnetic separation is an effective way to recover viable sheep PIMs for in vitro study. PMID:7996045

  18. [Massive intravascular hemolysis secondary to sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens].

    PubMed

    Pita Zapata, E; Sarmiento Penide, A; Bautista Guillén, A; González Cabano, M; Agulla Budiño, J A; Camba Rodríguez, M A

    2010-05-01

    Massive hemolysis secondary to sepsis caused by Clostridium perfringens is a rare entity but appears fairly often in the literature. In nearly all published reports, the clinical course is rapid and fatal. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman with diabetes who was admitted with symptoms consistent with acute cholecystitis. Deteriorating hemodynamics and laboratory findings were consistent with intravascular hemolysis, coagulation disorder, and renal failure. Gram-positive bacilli of the Clostridium species were detected in blood along with worsening indicators of hemolysis. In spite of antibiotic and surgical treatment, hemodynamic support and infusion of blood products, the patient continued to decline and died in the postoperative recovery unit 14 hours after admission. Mortality ranges from 70% to 100% in sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens, and risk of death is greater if massive hemolysis is present, as in the case we report. Only a high degree of clinical suspicion leading to early diagnosis and treatment can improve the prognosis. This bacterium should therefore be considered whenever severe sepsis and hemolysis coincide. PMID:20527348

  19. Strain imaging with intravascular ultrasound: An in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrey, Christian; Ermert, Helmut; Bojara, Waldemar; Holt, Stephan; Lindstaedt, Michael

    2001-05-01

    The evaluation of mechanical properties of coronary plaques is of high interest for the assessment of coronary diseases. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) can be used to visualize strain in coronary tissue. In this study, strain imaging is performed using an IVUS system with a 40-MHz rotating single-element transducer. Radio frequency (rf) data are acquired during in vivo examinations and sampled at 100 MHz. Image frames are stored consecutively during 3 s at a frame rate of 30/s. Data are recorded at different levels of tissue compression. The required pressure difference is caused by natural pulsatile blood flow. The strain imaging algorithm estimates radial strain from rf data based on frame-to-frame correlation. Rotating transducers often show nonuniform rotational distortion (NURD), which leads to misaligned echo lines in consecutive frames. This results in lateral motion artifacts and causes decorrelation. This effect is reduced by lateral motion correction based on block-matching algorithms. Results show that strain imaging can successfully be performed in vivo with data acquired predominantly in diastole. Different coronary tissue regions can be identified by local strain variations. If NURD is present, strain image quality is degraded. In some cases NURD is reduced by repositioning the transducer.

  20. Sensor materials for an intravascular fiber optic nitric oxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soller, Babs R.; Parikh, Bhairavi R.; Stahl, Russell F.

    1996-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulatory molecule in physiological processes including neurotransmission and the control of blood pressure. It is produced in excess during septic shock, the profound hypotensive state which accompanies severe infections. In-vivo measurement of NO would enhance the understanding of its varied biological roles. Our goal is the development of an intravascular fiber-optic sensor for the continuous measurement of NO. This study evaluated nitric oxide sensitive compounds as potential sensing materials in the presence and absence of oxygen. Using absorption spectroscopy we studied both the Fe II and Fe III forms of three biologically active hemes known to rapidly react with NO: hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochrome-c. The Fe II forms of hemoglobin and myoglobin and the Fe III form of cytochrome-c were found to have the highest sensitivity to NO. Cytochrome c (Fe III) is selective for NO even at high oxygen levels, while myoglobin is selective only under normal oxygen levels. NO concentrations as low as 1 (mu) M can be detected with our fiber-optic spectrometer using cytochrome c, and as low as 300 nM using myoglobin. Either of these materials would be adequate to monitor the increase in nitric oxide production during the onset of septic shock.

  1. Heartbeat OCT: in vivo intravascular megahertz-optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianshi; Pfeiffer, Tom; Regar, Evelyn; Wieser, Wolfgang; van Beusekom, Heleen; Lancee, Charles T.; Springeling, Geert; Krabbendam, Ilona; van der Steen, Antonius F.W.; Huber, Robert; van Soest, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac motion artifacts, non-uniform rotational distortion and undersampling affect the image quality and the diagnostic impact of intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT). In this study we demonstrate how these limitations of IV-OCT can be addressed by using an imaging system that we called “Heartbeat OCT”, combining a fast Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser, fast pullback, and a micromotor actuated catheter, designed to examine a coronary vessel in less than one cardiac cycle. We acquired in vivo data sets of two coronary arteries in a porcine heart with both Heartbeat OCT, working at 2.88 MHz A-line rate, 4000 frames/s and 100 mm/s pullback speed, and with a commercial system. The in vivo results show that Heartbeat OCT provides faithfully rendered, motion-artifact free, fully sampled vessel wall architecture, unlike the conventional IV-OCT data. We present the Heartbeat OCT system in full technical detail and discuss the steps needed for clinical translation of the technology. PMID:26713214

  2. Mechanical properties and imaging characteristics of remanufactured intravascular ultrasound catheters.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, R; Haager, P; Mintz, G; Klues, H

    2000-02-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) as a routine device in interventional cardiology is handicapped by its high price. 19 factory-made, 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters which consist of sterilized, used phased-array IVUS transducers inserted into a new catheter shaft were compared with 23 new IVUS catheters. 3 mechanical and 4 imaging characteristics were assessed on a 5 point scale (1 = unacceptable, 5 = excellent). Mechanical as well as imaging properties of 'remanufactured' IVUS catheter were comparable to new catheters with excellent ratings for each of the evaluated characteristics in 38 to 94% of 'remanufactured' catheters and 50 to 96% of new catheters. The initial failure rate for 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters was 31.6% vs. 4.3% for new catheters (P < 0.05). Overall failure rate was 47.3% for "remanufactured" catheters vs. 8.7% for new catheters (P < 0.05). The failure was due to an electronic connecting problem occurring during mechanical stress to the IVUS catheter. In conclusion, 'remanufactured' IVUS catheters offer mechanical and imaging characteristics which are comparable to new catheters. Improvements in the 'remanufacturing' process to resolve the high rate of electronic connecting problems may make this a promising approach to substantially lower the price of IVUS catheters. PMID:10832621

  3. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in cattle with abomasal displacement.

    PubMed

    Irmak, K; Turgut, K

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate haemostatic function in cattle with abomasal displacement (AD) and to reflect the occurrence of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Ten adult cattle with left displacement of abomasum (LDA) (group I), 10 adult cattle with right displacement of abomasum with volvulus (RDA) (group II) and 10 clinically healthy adult cattle (control group) were used as material. Numbers of platelets (PLT) and coagulation tests (activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), thrombin time (TT), serum fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs), fibrinogen) were measured before the surgical treatment of cattle with LDA and RDA. APTT was prolonged only in group II compared with the control and group I (p<0.05). However, when the individual values of coagulation profiles of each cow were evaluated, two cattle in group I and three cattle in group II had at least three abnormal coagulation profiles, which reflect the occurrence of DIC. These cattle died after surgical treatment. The two cattle with LDA had abnormal APTT, FDPs and PLT values; three cattle with RDA had abnormal APTT, PT, TT, FDPs and PLT values. APTT (5 cases), FDPs (5 cases) and thrombocytopenia (5 cases) were the three most common abnormal tests on coagulation profile in the cattle with LDA and RDA. The results of the study indicate that cattle with AD had a spectrum of haemostatic dysfunction and that DIC was a significant risk factor for mortality. PMID:15727292

  4. High-resolution gel dosimetry of a HDR brachytherapy source using normoxic polymer gel dosimeters: Preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, C.; McLucas, C.; Pedrazzini, G.; Baldock, C.

    2006-09-01

    Polymer gel dosimetry has been shown to be an effective tool in the analysis of radiotherapy treatments in cancer therapy, being used to map the dose distribution around an irradiation pattern of a polymer gel dosimeter. Combined with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), polymer gel dosimetry can be an effective dosimetry tool to map dose distributions with high spatial resolution (˜100 μm). Previously polyacrylamide polymer gel dosimetry required a strict hypoxic environment to protect the gel from oxygen infiltration as oxygen inhibits the polymerization reaction used to correlate to absorbed dose. However, with the advent of normoxic polymer gels, a strict hypoxic environment is not required. Normoxic polymer gel dosimeters can be manufactured under normal atmospheric conditions. This study assessed the use of a MAGIC normoxic polymer gel dosimeter to accurately map the dose distribution of a single-line irradiation and a point source irradiation from a brachytherapy radiation source administered through a nylon catheter inserted into the gel dosimeter. The phantoms were irradiated to a dose of 10 Gy at 2 mm from the source center and imaged using high-resolution MRI with an in-plane pixel size of 0.1055 mm/pixel. Good agreement was found between the dose points predicted by the computer treatment-planning system and the measured normalized dose profiles in the gel dosimeter. The use of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters with high-resolution MRI evaluation shows promise as an effective tool in applications requiring accurate dose distributions in high resolution, such as intravascular brachytherapy.

  5. Recent developments and best practice in brachytherapy treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy has evolved over many decades, but more recently, there have been significant changes in the way that brachytherapy is used for different treatment sites. This has been due to the development of new, technologically advanced computer planning systems and treatment delivery techniques. Modern, three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities have been incorporated into treatment planning methods, allowing full 3D dose distributions to be computed. Treatment techniques involving online planning have emerged, allowing dose distributions to be calculated and updated in real time based on the actual clinical situation. In the case of early stage breast cancer treatment, for example, electronic brachytherapy treatment techniques are being used in which the radiation dose is delivered during the same procedure as the surgery. There have also been significant advances in treatment applicator design, which allow the use of modern 3D imaging techniques for planning, and manufacturers have begun to implement new dose calculation algorithms that will correct for applicator shielding and tissue inhomogeneities. This article aims to review the recent developments and best practice in brachytherapy techniques and treatments. It will look at how imaging developments have been incorporated into current brachytherapy treatment and how these developments have played an integral role in the modern brachytherapy era. The planning requirements for different treatments sites are reviewed as well as the future developments of brachytherapy in radiobiology and treatment planning dose calculation. PMID:24734939

  6. The dosimetry of brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M

    2003-12-31

    There is emerging evidence that brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) is technique-related and may be minimized by careful attention to source placement. Herein, we review the relationship between radiation doses to the prostate gland/surrounding structures and the development of brachytherapy-induced ED. The permanent prostate brachytherapy literature was reviewed using MEDLINE searches to ensure completeness. Although the site-specific structure associated with brachytherapy-induced ED remains unknown, there is an increasing body of data implicating the proximal penis. With day 0 CT-based dosimetry, the dose to 50% (D{sub 50}) and 25% (D{sub 25}) of the bulb of the penis should be maintained below 40% and 60% mPD, respectively, while the crura D{sub 50} should be maintained below 28% mPD to maximize post-brachytherapy potency. To date, there is no data to suggest that either radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles or choice of isotope is associated with brachytherapy-induced ED, while conflicting data has been reported regarding radiation dose to the prostate and the use of supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Although the etiology of brachytherapy-induced ED is likely multifactorial, the available data supports the proximal penis as an important site-specific structure. Refinements in implant technique, including preplanning and intraoperative seed placement, will result in lower radiation doses to the proximal penis with potential improvement in potency preservation.

  7. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dadkhah, Hossein; Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T.; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  8. A Novel MRI Marker for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J. Stafford, R. Jason; Bankson, James A.; Li Chun; Swanson, David A.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Martirosyan, Karen S.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the optimal imaging modality for the prostate and surrounding critical organ structures. However, on MRI, the titanium radioactive seeds used for brachytherapy appear as black holes (negative contrast) and cannot be accurately localized. We sought to develop an encapsulated contrast agent marker (ECAM) with high-signal intensity on MRI to permit accurate localization of radioactive seeds with MRI during and after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We investigated several agents with paramagnetic and superparamagnetic properties. The agents were injected into titanium, acrylic, and glass seeds, which were linked together in various combinations and imaged with MRI. The agent with the greatest T1-weighted signal was tested further in a canine prostate and agarose phantom. Studies were performed on a 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner. Results: The cobalt-chloride complex contrast (C4) agent with stoichiometry (CoCl{sub 2}){sub 0.8}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NO{sub 2}){sub 0.2} had the greatest T1-weighted signal (positive contrast) with a relaxivity ratio >1 (r{sub 2}/r{sub 1} = 1.21 {+-} 0.29). Acrylic-titanium and glass-titanium seed strands were clearly visualized with the encapsulated contrast agent marker. Conclusion: We have developed a novel ECAM that permits positive identification of the radioactive seeds used for prostate brachytherapy on MRI. Preclinical in vitro phantom studies and in vivo canine studies are needed to further optimize MRI sequencing techniques to facilitate MRI-based dosimetry.

  9. Phantom size in brachytherapy source dosimetric studies.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Calatayud, J; Granero, D; Ballester, F

    2004-07-01

    An important point to consider in a brachytherapy dosimetry study is the phantom size involved in calculations or experimental measurements. As pointed out by Williamson [Med. Phys. 18, 776-786 (1991)] this topic has a relevant influence on final dosimetric results. Presently, one-dimensional (1-D) algorithms and newly-developed 3-D correction algorithms are based on physics data that are obtained under full scatter conditions, i.e., assumed infinite phantom size. One can then assume that reference dose distributions in source dosimetry for photon brachytherapy should use an unbounded phantom size rather than phantom-like dimensions. Our aim in this paper is to study the effect of phantom size on brachytherapy for radionuclide 137Cs, 192Ir, 125I and 103Pd, mainly used for clinical purposes. Using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code, we can ascertain effects on derived dosimetry parameters and functions to establish a distance dependent difference due to the absence of full scatter conditions. We have found that for 137Cs and 192Ir, a spherical phantom with a 40 cm radius is the equivalent of an unbounded phantom up to a distance of 20 cm from the source, as this size ensures full scatter conditions at this distance. For 125I and 103Pd, the required radius for the spherical phantom in order to ensure full scatter conditions at 10 cm from the source is R = 15 cm. A simple expression based on fits of the dose distributions for various phantom sizes has been developed for 137Cs and 192Ir in order to compare the dose rate distributions published for different phantom sizes. Using these relations it is possible to obtain radial dose functions for unbounded medium from bounded phantom ones. PMID:15305460

  10. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Robyn; Kamrava, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer. PMID:24920937

  11. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Fulkerson, Regina K.; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR 192Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and 192Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose

  12. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, Regina K. Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally

  13. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in inoperable endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Petsuksiri, J; Chansilpa, Y; Hoskin, P J

    2014-01-01

    Inoperable endometrial cancer may be treated with curative aim using radical radiotherapy alone. The radiation techniques are external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) alone, EBRT plus brachytherapy and brachytherapy alone. Recently, high-dose-rate brachytherapy has been used instead of low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Image-guided brachytherapy enables sufficient coverage of tumour and reduction of dose to the organs at risk, thus increasing the therapeutic ratio of treatment. Local control rates with three-dimensional brachytherapy appear better than with conventional techniques (about 90–100% and 70–90%, respectively). PMID:24807067

  14. Imminent cardiac risk assessment via optical intravascular biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, David L; Wetzel, Louis H; Wetzel, Mark D; Lodder, Robert A

    2009-06-01

    Heart disease is by far the biggest killer in the United States, and type II diabetes, which affects 8% of the U.S. population, is on the rise. In many cases, the acute coronary syndrome and/or sudden cardiac death occurs without warning. Atherosclerosis has known behavioral, genetic and dietary risk factors. However, our laboratory studies with animal models and human post-mortem tissue using FT-IR microspectroscopy reveal the chemical microstructure within arteries and in the arterial walls themselves. These include spectra obtained from the aortas of ApoE-/- knockout mice on sucrose and normal diets showing lipid deposition in the former case. Also pre-aneurysm chemical images of knockout mouse aorta walls, and spectra of plaque excised from a living human patient are shown for comparison. In keeping with the theme of the SPEC 2008 conference 'Spectroscopic Diagnosis of Disease...' this paper describes the background and potential value of a new catheter-based system to provide in vivo biochemical analysis of plaque in human coronary arteries. We report the following: (1) results of FT-IR microspectroscopy on animal models of vascular disease to illustrate the localized chemical distinctions between pathological and normal tissue, (2) current diagnostic techniques used for risk assessment of patients with potential unstable coronary syndromes, and (3) the advantages and limitations of each of these techniques illustrated with patent care histories, related in the first person, by the physician coauthors. Note that the physician comments clarify the contribution of each diagnostic technique to imminent cardiac risk assessment in a clinical setting, leading to the appreciation of what localized intravascular chemical analysis can contribute as an add-on diagnostic tool. The quality of medical imaging has improved dramatically since the turn of the century. Among clinical non-invasive diagnostic tools, laboratory tests of body fluids, EKG, and physical examination

  15. Imminent Cardiac Risk Assessment via Optical Intravascular Biochemical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, D.; Wetzel, L; Wetzel, M; Lodder, R

    2009-01-01

    Heart disease is by far the biggest killer in the United States, and type II diabetes, which affects 8% of the U.S. population, is on the rise. In many cases, the acute coronary syndrome and/or sudden cardiac death occurs without warning. Atherosclerosis has known behavioral, genetic and dietary risk factors. However, our laboratory studies with animal models and human post-mortem tissue using FT-IR microspectroscopy reveal the chemical microstructure within arteries and in the arterial walls themselves. These include spectra obtained from the aortas of ApoE-/- knockout mice on sucrose and normal diets showing lipid deposition in the former case. Also pre-aneurysm chemical images of knockout mouse aorta walls, and spectra of plaque excised from a living human patient are shown for comparison. In keeping with the theme of the SPEC 2008 conference Spectroscopic Diagnosis of Disease this paper describes the background and potential value of a new catheter-based system to provide in vivo biochemical analysis of plaque in human coronary arteries. We report the following: (1) results of FT-IR microspectroscopy on animal models of vascular disease to illustrate the localized chemical distinctions between pathological and normal tissue, (2) current diagnostic techniques used for risk assessment of patients with potential unstable coronary syndromes, and (3) the advantages and limitations of each of these techniques illustrated with patent care histories, related in the first person, by the physician coauthors. Note that the physician comments clarify the contribution of each diagnostic technique to imminent cardiac risk assessment in a clinical setting, leading to the appreciation of what localized intravascular chemical analysis can contribute as an add-on diagnostic tool. The quality of medical imaging has improved dramatically since the turn of the century. Among clinical non-invasive diagnostic tools, laboratory tests of body fluids, EKG, and physical examination are

  16. HHV-8 and EBV-positive intravascular lymphoma: an unusual presentation of extracavitary primary effusion lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Shirley, Courtney M.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Kasamon, Yvette L.; Taube, Janis M.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular lymphomas are rare and aggressive hematolymphoid tumors. Here we describe a human herpesvirus type-8/Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (HHV-8/KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive intravascular lymphoma. The patient was a 59 year-old HIV-positive man who presented with diarrhea, abdominal pain, fevers, night sweats, and weight loss. Radiographic studies of the abdomen and pelvis revealed numerous subcentimeter nodules within the subcutaneous fat that lacked connection to the skin. An excisional biopsy demonstrated large atypical cells within vessels in the deep subcutaneous fat, and many of the vessels contained extensive organizing thrombi. The atypical cells lacked strong expression of most B-cell markers but were positive for MUM-1 and showed partial expression of several T-cell markers. An immunohistochemical stain for HHV-8 and an in situ hybridization for EBV were both positive in the neoplastic cells. The disease had a rapidly progressive and fatal course. This lymphoma appears to represent an entirely intravascular form of primary effusion lymphoma, and highlights the propensity for HHV-8 and EBV-positive lymphoid neoplasms to show aberrant expression of T-cell markers, illustrates the utility of skin biopsies for the diagnosis of intravascular lymphoma, and suggests that biopsies to evaluate for intravascular lymphoma should be relatively deep and include subcutaneous fat. PMID:24525514

  17. Percutaneous Retrieval of Misplaced Intravascular Foreign Objects with the Dormia Basket: An Effective Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, Rahul Someshwar, Vimal; Warawdekar, Gireesh

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. We report our experience of the retrieval of intravascular foreign body objects by the percutaneous use of the Gemini Dormia basket. Methods. Over a period of 2 years we attempted the percutaneous removal of intravascular foreign bodies in 26 patients. Twenty-six foreign bodies were removed: 8 intravascular stents, 4 embolization coils, 9 guidewires, 1 pacemaker lead, and 4 catheter fragments. The percutaneous retrieval was achieved with a combination of guide catheters and the Gemini Dormia basket. Results. Percutaneous retrieval was successful in 25 of 26 patients (96.2%). It was possible to remove all the intravascular foreign bodies with a combination of guide catheters and the Dormia basket. No complication occurred during the procedure, and no long-term complications were registered during the follow-up period, which ranged from 6 months to 32 months (mean 22.4 months overall). Conclusion. Percutaneous retrieval is an effective and safe technique that should be the first choice for removal of an intravascular foreign body.

  18. Protection against high intravascular pressure in giraffe legs.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karin K; Hørlyck, Arne; Ostergaard, Kristine H; Andresen, Joergen; Broegger, Torbjoern; Skovgaard, Nini; Telinius, Niklas; Laher, Ismael; Bertelsen, Mads F; Grøndahl, Carsten; Smerup, Morten; Secher, Niels H; Brøndum, Emil; Hasenkam, John M; Wang, Tobias; Baandrup, Ulrik; Aalkjaer, Christian

    2013-11-01

    The high blood pressure in giraffe leg arteries renders giraffes vulnerable to edema. We investigated in 11 giraffes whether large and small arteries in the legs and the tight fascia protect leg capillaries. Ultrasound imaging of foreleg arteries in anesthetized giraffes and ex vivo examination revealed abrupt thickening of the arterial wall and a reduction of its internal diameter just below the elbow. At and distal to this narrowing, the artery constricted spontaneously and in response to norepinephrine and intravascular pressure recordings revealed a dynamic, viscous pressure drop along the artery. Histology of the isolated median artery confirmed dense sympathetic innervation at the narrowing. Structure and contractility of small arteries from muscular beds in the leg and neck were compared. The arteries from the legs demonstrated an increased media thickness-to-lumen diameter ratio, increased media volume, and increased numbers of smooth muscle cells per segment length and furthermore, they contracted more strongly than arteries from the neck (500 ± 49 vs. 318 ± 43 mmHg; n = 6 legs and neck, respectively). Finally, the transient increase in interstitial fluid pressure following injection of saline was 5.5 ± 1.7 times larger (n = 8) in the leg than in the neck. We conclude that 1) tissue compliance in the legs is low; 2) large arteries of the legs function as resistance arteries; and 3) structural adaptation of small muscle arteries allows them to develop an extraordinary tension. All three findings can contribute to protection of the capillaries in giraffe legs from a high arterial pressure. PMID:24005251

  19. Mechanotransductional Basis of Endothelial Cell Response to Intravascular Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Alexandra L.; Pichette, Benjamin; Sobolewski, Peter; Eckmann, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular air embolism resulting from too rapid decompression is a well-known risk in deep-sea diving, aviation and space travel. It is also a common complication during surgery or other medical procedures when air or other endogenously administered gas is entrained in the circulation. Preventive and post-event treatment options are extremely limited for this dangerous condition, and none of them address the poorly understood pathophysiology of endothelial response to intravascular bubble presence. Using a novel apparatus allowing precise manipulation of microbubbles in real time fluorescence microscopy studies, we directly measure human umbilical vein endothelial cell responses to bubble contact. Strong intracellular calcium transients requiring extracellular calcium are observed upon cell-bubble interaction. The transient is eliminated both by the presence of the stretch activated channel inhibitor, gadolinium, and the transient receptor potential vanilliod family inhibitor, ruthenium red. No bubble induced calcium upsurge occurs if the cells are pretreated with an inhibitor of actin polymerization, cytochalasin-D. This study explores the biomechanical mechanisms at play in bubble interfacial interactions with endothelial surface layer (ESL) macromolecules, reassessing cell response after selective digestion of glycocalyx glycosoaminoglycans, hyaluran (HA) and heparin sulfate (HS). HA digestion causes reduction of cell-bubble adherence and a more rapid induction of calcium influx after contact. HS depletion significantly decreases calcium transient amplitudes, as does pharmacologically induced sydencan ectodomain shedding. The surfactant perfluorocarbon oxycyte abolishes any bubble induced calcium transient, presumably through direct competition with ESL macromolecules for interfacial occupancy, thus attenuating the interactions that trigger potentially deleterious biochemical pathways. PMID:21931900

  20. Improving photoacoustic imaging contrast of brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Leo; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu; Tang, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy for treating prostate cancer where the radiation sources are seeds inserted into the prostate. Accurate localization of seeds during prostate brachytherapy is essential to the success of intraoperative treatment planning. The current standard modality used in intraoperative seeds localization is transrectal ultrasound. Transrectal ultrasound, however, suffers in image quality due to several factors such speckle, shadowing, and off-axis seed orientation. Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic phenomenon, is an emerging imaging modality. The contrast generating mechanism in photoacoustic imaging is optical absorption that is fundamentally different from conventional B-mode ultrasound which depicts changes in acoustic impedance. A photoacoustic imaging system is developed using a commercial ultrasound system. To improve imaging contrast and depth penetration, absorption enhancing coating is applied to the seeds. In comparison to bare seeds, approximately 18.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio as well as a doubling of imaging depth are achieved. Our results demonstrate that the coating of the seeds can further improve the discernibility of the seeds.

  1. Adjuvant brachytherapy in the treatment of soft-tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Crownover, R L; Marks, K E

    1999-06-01

    For many patients with STS, administering adjuvant radiation treatments in the form of interstitial brachytherapy provides an excellent alternative to a protracted course of EBRT. Ideal patients are those with intermediate- or high-grade tumors amenable to en bloc resection. Attractive features of this approach include an untainted pathologic specimen, expeditious completion of treatment, reduction in wound complications, and improved functional outcome. Brachytherapy can permit definitive reirradiation by tightly localizing the high dose radiation exposure. It is also useful in patients who are known to have or be at high risk of metastatic disease, for whom the rapid completion of local treatment allows systemic therapy to begin quickly. Introduction of HDR techniques has shifted the delivery of brachytherapy from inpatient solitary confinement to an outpatient setting. Early reports using HDR brachytherapy for treatment of adult and pediatric STS are quite encouraging. The clinical equivalence between hyperfractionated HDR schedules and traditional LDR techniques is gaining acceptance. PMID:10432432

  2. Patient release criteria for low dose rate brachytherapy implants.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Dale E; Sheetz, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    A lack of consensus regarding a model governing the release of patients following sealed source brachytherapy has led to a set of patient release policies that vary from institution to institution. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued regulatory guidance on patient release in NUREG 1556, Volume 9, Rev. 2, Appendix U, which allows calculation of release limits following implant brachytherapy. While the formalism presented in NUREG is meaningful for the calculation of release limits in the context of relatively high energy gamma emitters, it does not estimate accurately the effective dose equivalent for the common low dose rate brachytherapy sources Cs, I, and Pd. NUREG 1556 states that patient release may be based on patient-specific calculations as long as the calculation is documented. This work is intended to provide a format for patient-specific calculations to be used for the consideration of patients' release following the implantation of certain low dose rate brachytherapy isotopes. PMID:23439145

  3. Brachytherapy in India – a long road ahead

    PubMed Central

    Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy can play a very important role in the definitive cure by radiation therapy in India. However, except for in a handful of centres, the majority of hospitals use it only for intracavitary treatment. The most probable reasons for such are the lack of logistical resources in terms of trained personal and supporting staff, rather than lack of radiotherapy machines and equipment. In this article, the authors look into the various aspects of brachytherapy in India: from its beginning to present days. The authors point out the resources available, shortcomings, and some possible solutions to make use of brachytherapy more popular and effective. Apart from presenting a picture of the present scenario, the article pays attention to the positive signs of brachytherapy becoming more popular in the near future. PMID:25337139

  4. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harkenrider, Matthew M. Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R.; Small, William

    2015-07-15

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy.

  5. Dose characterization in the near-source region for two high dose rate brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruqing; Li, X Allen

    2002-08-01

    High dose rate (HDR) 192Ir sources are currently used in intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) for the peripheral arterial system. This poses a demand on evaluating accurate dose parameters in the near-source region for such sources. The purpose of this work is to calculate the dose parameters for the old VariSource HDR 192Ir source and the new microSelectron HDR 192Ir source, using Monte Carlo electron and photon transport simulation. The two-dimensional (2D) dose rate distributions and the air kerma strengths for the two HDR sources were calculated by EGSnrc and EGS4 Monte Carlo codes. Based on these data, the dose parameters proposed in the AAPM TG-60 protocol were derived. The dose rate constants obtained are 13.119+/-0.028 cGy h(-1) U(-1) for the old VariSource source, and 22.751+/-0.031 cGy h(-1) U(-1) for the new microSelectron source at the reference point (r0 = 2 mm, theta = pi/2). The 2D dose rate distributions, the radial dose functions, and the anisotropy functions presented for the two sources cover radial distances ranging from 0.5 to 10 mm. In the near-source region on the transverse plane, the dose effects of the charged particle nonequilibrium and the beta-particle dose contribution were studied. It is found that at radial distances ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm, these effects increase the calculated dose rates by up to 29% for the old VariSource source, and by up to 12% for the new microSelectron source, which, in turn, change values of the radial dose function and the anisotropy function. The present dose parameters, which account for the charged particle nonequilibrium and the beta particle contribution, may be used for accurate IVB dose calculation. PMID:12201413

  6. Intravascular pillars and pruning in the extraembryonic vessels of chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Lee, Grace S; Filipovic, Nenad; Lin, Miao; Gibney, Barry C; Simpson, Dinee C; Konerding, Moritz A; Tsuda, Akira; Mentzer, Steven J

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the local mechanical forces associated with intravascular pillars and vessel pruning, we studied the conducting vessels in the extraembryonic circulation of the chick embryo. During the development days 13-17, intravascular pillars and blood flow parameters were identified using fluorescent vascular tracers and digital time-series video reconstructions. The geometry of selected vessels was confirmed by corrosion casting and scanning electron microscopy. Computational simulations of pruning vessels suggested that serial pillars form along pre-existing velocity streamlines; blood pressure demonstrated no obvious spatial relationship with the intravascular pillars. Modeling a Reynolds number of 0.03 produced 4 pillars at approximately 20-μm intervals matching the observed periodicity. In contrast, a Reynolds number of 0.06 produced only 2 pillars at approximately 63-μm intervals. Our modeling data indicated that the combination of wall shear stress and gradient of shear predicted the location, direction, and periodicity of developing pillars. PMID:21448976

  7. High-sensitivity intravascular photoacoustic imaging of lipid–laden plaque with a collinear catheter design

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yingchun; Hui, Jie; Kole, Ayeeshik; Wang, Pu; Yu, Qianhuan; Chen, Weibiao; Sturek, Michael; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    A highly sensitive catheter probe is critical to catheter-based intravascular photoacoustic imaging. Here, we present a photoacoustic catheter probe design on the basis of collinear alignment of the incident optical wave and the photoacoustically generated sound wave within a miniature catheter housing for the first time. Such collinear catheter design with an outer diameter of 1.6 mm provided highly efficient overlap between optical and acoustic waves over an imaging depth of >6 mm in D2O medium. Intravascular photoacoustic imaging of lipid-laden atherosclerotic plaque and perivascular fat was demonstrated, where a lab-built 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator outputting nanosecond optical pulses at a wavelength of 1.7 μm was used for overtone excitation of C-H bonds. In addition to intravascular imaging, the presented catheter design will benefit other photoacoustic applications such as needle-based intramuscular imaging. PMID:27121894

  8. High-sensitivity intravascular photoacoustic imaging of lipid-laden plaque with a collinear catheter design.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yingchun; Hui, Jie; Kole, Ayeeshik; Wang, Pu; Yu, Qianhuan; Chen, Weibiao; Sturek, Michael; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    A highly sensitive catheter probe is critical to catheter-based intravascular photoacoustic imaging. Here, we present a photoacoustic catheter probe design on the basis of collinear alignment of the incident optical wave and the photoacoustically generated sound wave within a miniature catheter housing for the first time. Such collinear catheter design with an outer diameter of 1.6 mm provided highly efficient overlap between optical and acoustic waves over an imaging depth of >6 mm in D2O medium. Intravascular photoacoustic imaging of lipid-laden atherosclerotic plaque and perivascular fat was demonstrated, where a lab-built 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator outputting nanosecond optical pulses at a wavelength of 1.7 μm was used for overtone excitation of C-H bonds. In addition to intravascular imaging, the presented catheter design will benefit other photoacoustic applications such as needle-based intramuscular imaging. PMID:27121894

  9. [Recent progress in intravascular neurosurgery for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Hyodo, A; Harakuni, T; Shingaki, T; Tsurushima, H; Saito, A; Yoshii, Y

    2000-12-01

    With the recent advances in the devices and techniques in intravascular neurosurgery such as microcatheters or a digital subtraction angiography, intravascular neurosurgery plays an important role for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease. We describe here, a recent progress in intravascular neurosurgery for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease. As a treatment of cerebrovascular disease, we discuss the treatment of cerebral aneurysm using Guglielmi detachable coils (GDC), and the treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular disease such as the thrombolytic therapy for the acute embolic occlusion of the cerebral artery, and a percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) or a stenting for the stenotic lesion of the cerebral arteries. Embolization of the cerebral aneurysm using GDC is less invasive method compare to the standard neurosurgical clipping of aneurysm. So, recently it becomes one of standard methods of the treatment of cerebral aneurysm. Thrombolytic therapy, PTA and stenting also become an important treatment for the ischemic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:11464467

  10. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome Confirmed with the Use of Intravascular Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    de Lara, Fernando Vazquez; Higgins, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome, a rarely reported condition, is characterized by postprandial abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. Its cause is unclear. We present the case of a 45-year-old woman who had intermittent chronic positional abdominal pain without weight loss. Magnetic resonance angiograms and computed tomograms revealed stenosis of the celiac artery. Ostial compression was confirmed on catheter angiographic and intravascular ultrasonographic images. Intravascular ultrasound revealed far greater stenosis than did the initial imaging methods and confirmed a diagnosis of median arcuate ligament syndrome. In lieu of surgery, the patient underwent a celiac ganglion block procedure that substantially relieved her symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of intravascular ultrasound in the diagnosis of median arcuate ligament syndrome. We recommend using this imaging method preoperatively in other suspected cases of the syndrome, to better identify patients who might benefit from corrective surgery. PMID:24512402

  11. High versus Low-Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Sonali S.; Tergas, Ana I.; Deutsch, Israel; Burke, William M.; Hou, June Y.; Ananth, Cande V.; Huang, Yongmei; Neugut, Alfred I.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Wright, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of cervical cancer. While small trials have shown comparable survival outcomes between high (HDR) and low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, little data is available in the US. We examined the utilization of HDR brachytherapy and analyzed the impact of type of brachytherapy on survival for cervical cancer. Methods Women with stage IB2–IVA cervical cancer treated with primary (external beam and brachytherapy) radiotherapy between 2003–2011 and recorded in the National Cancer Database (NCDB) were analyzed. Generalized linear mixed models and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to examine predictors of HDR brachytherapy use and the association between HDR use and survival. Results A total of 10,564 women including 2681 (25.4%) who received LDR and 7883 (74.6%) that received HDR were identified. Use of HDR increased from 50.2% in 2003 to 83.9% in 2011 (P<0.0001). In a multivariable model, year of diagnosis was the strongest predictor of use of HDR. While patients in the Northeast were more likely to receive HDR therapy, there were no other clinical or socioeconomic characteristics associated with receipt of HDR. In a multivariable Cox model, survival was similar between the HDR and LDR groups (HR=0.93; 95% 0.83–1.03). Similar findings were noted in analyses stratified by stage and histology. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated no difference in survival based on type of brachytherapy for stage IIB (P=0.68), IIIB (P=0.17), or IVA (P=0.16) tumors. Conclusions The use of HDR therapy has increased rapidly. Overall survival is similar for LDR and HDR brachytherapy. PMID:25575481

  12. Parameterization of brachytherapy source phase space file for Monte Carlo-based clinical brachytherapy dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Zou, W.; Chen, T.; Kim, L.; Khan, A.; Haffty, B.; Yue, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    A common approach to implementing the Monte Carlo method for the calculation of brachytherapy radiation dose deposition is to use a phase space file containing information on particles emitted from a brachytherapy source. However, the loading of the phase space file during the dose calculation consumes a large amount of computer random access memory, imposing a higher requirement for computer hardware. In this study, we propose a method to parameterize the information (e.g., particle location, direction and energy) stored in the phase space file by using several probability distributions. This method was implemented for dose calculations of a commercial Ir-192 high dose rate source. Dose calculation accuracy of the parameterized source was compared to the results observed using the full phase space file in a simple water phantom and in a clinical breast cancer case. The results showed the parameterized source at a size of 200 kB was as accurate as the phase space file represented source of 1.1 GB. By using the parameterized source representation, a compact Monte Carlo job can be designed, which allows an easy setup for parallel computing in brachytherapy planning.

  13. Chronic biliary obstruction induces pulmonary intravascular phagocytosis and endotoxin sensitivity in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S W; Ohara, N

    1994-01-01

    Endotoxin sensitivity varies among animal species and appears to correlate with the presence of pulmonary intravascular macrophage (PIM). In rats, which lack PIM, we investigated the hypothesis that chronic cholestatic liver injury leads to induction of PIM and endotoxin sensitivity. Rats were randomized to either common bile duct ligation (BDL) or sham-surgery and studied at 1 wk (acute cholestasis), 2 wk (cholestasis, early cirrhosis), and 4 wk (cholestasis, established cirrhosis) after surgery. Intravascularly injected fluorescent latex microspheres (1 micron diameter) were taken up by large phagocytic cells in lung parenchyma of BDL rats (at 2 and 4 wk), while no uptake was observed in lungs from control rats. Electronmicroscopy revealed accumulation of large, mononuclear, macrophage-like cells containing ingested latex particles within the pulmonary capillaries. Pulmonary intravascular phagocytosis, as reflected in lung uptake of 99mTc microaggregated albumin (Microlite, mean particle diameter = 1 micron), averaged 0.7 +/- 0.1% (mean +/- SEM) of total injected dose in 13 control rats and progressively increased with time after BDL (1 wk, 1.7 +/- 0.2%; 2 wk, 10.0 +/- 3.0%; 4 wk 35.1 +/- 5.9%). Rats with biliary cirrhosis were markedly sensitive to the lethal effects of low dose endotoxin and demonstrated marked lung edema at the time of death. Furthermore, the lung uptake of intravascular 125I-lipopolysaccharide was increased five-fold in cirrhotic rats. We conclude that chronic biliary obstruction leads to the induction of pulmonary intravascular phagocytes and enhances endotoxin sensitivity in rats. Pulmonary intravascular phagocytosis in patients with advanced cirrhosis may account for their increased susceptibility to sepsis-induced adult respiratory distress syndrome. Images PMID:7962547

  14. The evolution of computerized treatment planning for brachytherapy: American contributions

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To outline the evolution of computerized brachytherapy treatment planning in the United States through a review of technological developments and clinical practice refinements. Material and methods A literature review was performed and interviews were conducted with six participants in the development of computerized treatment planning for brachytherapy. Results Computerized brachytherapy treatment planning software was initially developed in the Physics Departments of New York's Memorial Hospital (by Nelson, Meurk and Balter), and Houston's M. D. Anderson Hospital (by Stovall and Shalek). These public-domain programs could be used by institutions with adequate computational resources; other clinics had access to them via Memorial's and Anderson's teletype-based computational services. Commercial brachytherapy treatment planning programs designed to run on smaller computers (Prowess, ROCS, MMS), were developed in the late 1980s and early 1990s. These systems brought interactive dosimetry into the clinic and surgical theatre. Conclusions Brachytherapy treatment planning has evolved from systems of rigid implant rules to individualized pre- and intra-operative treatment plans, and post-operative dosimetric assessments. Brachytherapy dose distributions were initially calculated on public domain programs on large regionally located computers. With the progression of computer miniaturization and increase in processor speeds, proprietary software was commercially developed for microcomputers that offered increased functionality and integration with clinical practice. PMID:25097560

  15. Leiomyosarcoma of the Uterus with Intravascular Tumor Extension and Pulmonary Tumor Embolism

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Douglas K.; Kalva, Sanjeeva P. Fan, C.-M.; Vasilyev, Aleksandr

    2007-02-15

    We report the case of a 48-year-old woman presenting with recurrent uterine leiomyosarcoma (LMS) associated with right iliac vein and inferior vena cava (IVC) invasion and left lower lobe pulmonary tumor embolus. Because the prognosis and treatment differ from that of thrombotic pulmonary emboli, the differentiating imaging characteristics of intravascular tumor embolism are reviewed. To our knowledge, only two other cases of intravenous uterine leiomyosarcomatosis have been described in the existing literature, and this is the first reported case of the entity with associated intravascular tumor embolism.

  16. Perioperative Intravascular Fluid Assessment and Monitoring: A Narrative Review of Established and Emerging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sumit; Kuschner, Ware G.; Lighthall, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    Accurate assessments of intravascular fluid status are an essential part of perioperative care and necessary in the management of the hemodynamically unstable patient. Goal-directed fluid management can facilitate resuscitation of the hypovolemic patient, reduce the risk of fluid overload, reduce the risk of the injudicious use of vasopressors and inotropes, and improve clinical outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the strengths and limitations of a spectrum of noninvasive and invasive techniques for assessing and monitoring intravascular volume status and fluid responsiveness in the perioperative and critically ill patient. PMID:21785588

  17. Virtual Intravascular Endoscopy Visualization of Calcified Coronary Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Sun, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using 3D virtual intravascular endoscopy (VIE) as a novel approach for characterization of calcified coronary plaques with the aim of differentiating superficial from deep calcified plaques, thus improving assessment of coronary stenosis. A total of 61 patients with suspected coronary artery disease were included in the study. Minimal lumen diameter (MLD) was measured and compared between coronary CT angiography (CCTA) (≥64-slice) and invasive coronary angiography (ICA) with regard to the measurement bias, whereas VIE findings were correlated with CCTA with respect to the diagnostic performance of coronary stenosis and the area under the curve (AUC) by receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis (ROC). In all 3 coronary arteries, the CCTA consistently underestimated the MLD relative to the ICA (P < 0.001). On a per-vessel assessment, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value and 95% confidence interval (CI) were 94% (95% CI: 61%, 100%), 27% (95% CI: 18%, 38%), 33% (95% CI: 23%, 43%), and 92% (95% CI: 74%, 99%) for CCTA, and 100% (95% CI: 89%, 100%), 85% (95% CI: 75%, 92%), 71% (95% CI: 56%, 84%), and 100% (95% CI: 95%, 100%) for VIE, respectively. The AUC by ROC analysis for VIE demonstrated significant improvement in analysis of left anterior descending calcified plaques compared with CCTA (0.99 vs 0.60, P < 0.001), with better performance in the left circumflex and right coronary arteries (0.98 vs 0.84 and 0.77 vs 0.77, respectively; P = 0.07 and P = 0.96, respectively). There are no significant differences between 64-, 128-, and 640-slice CCTA and VIE in terms of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value in the diagnosis of coronary stenosis. This study shows the feasibility of using VIE for characterizing morphological features of calcified plaques, therefore, significantly improving assessment of

  18. Meta-analysis on intravascular low energy laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-Dong; Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Wang, Yan-Fang; Liu, Song-Hao

    2008-12-01

    Intravascular low energy laser therapy (ILELT) was put forward for cardiocirculatory diseases in USA in 1982, was popular in Russia in 1980s, and then in China in 1990s. The therapeutic effects of ILELT and drugs in comparison with drugs only on Chinese patients and their blood parameters were analyzed with meta-analyses and reported as (OR, 95%CI) for patient improvement and (WMD, 95% CI) for blood parameter improvement, where 95%CI, OR and WMD denoted 95% confidence intervals, odds ratio and weighted mean difference, respectively. It was found that the patients of cerebral infarction (2.39, 2.09~2.74) and cerebrovascular diseases (2.97, 1.69~2.53) were cured, respectively, (P < 0.01), and the symptom improvement of patients of cerebral infarction, cerebrovascular diseases and diabetes were significant (3.13, 2.79~3.51), (4.92, 3.39~7.14) , and (3.80, 2.79~5.18), and mild (3.66, 3.15~4.24), (4.95, 2.77~8.84), and (7.11, 4.54~11.13), respectively, (P < 0.01). It was also found that the blood parameters such as cholesterol (-0.78, -1.32~-0.24), total cholesterol (-1.08, -1.80~-0.36), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (-0.6, -1.01~-0.19), triacylglycerol (0.63, -0.83~-0.42), high density lipoprotein (0.34, 0.10~0.59), erythrocyte aggregation index (-0.24, -0.27~-0.21), erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (-4.57, -7.26~-1.89), fibrinogen (-0.76, -1.31~-0.21), whole blood contrast viscosity (-0.40, -0.69~-0.12), low cut blood viscosity (-1.2, -1.93~-0.48), high cut blood viscosity (-0.62, -0.92~-0.32), whole blood viscosity(-1.2, -1.85~-0.54) and plasma blood contrast viscosity(-0.07, -0.12~-0.03) were found improved (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the patients of cerebral infarction, cerebrovascular diseases and diabetes might be improved with ILELT, which might be mediated by blood parameter improvement.

  19. Predictors of Metastatic Disease After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, Kevin; Burri, Ryan; Stone, Nelson; Stock, Richard G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of metastatic disease after brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients who received either brachytherapy alone (implant) or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer at The Mount Sinai Hospital between June 1990 and March 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed on the following variables: risk group, Gleason score (GS), clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, post-treatment prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), treatment type (implant vs. implant plus external beam radiation therapy), treatment era, total biological effective dose, use of androgen deprivation therapy, age at diagnosis, and race. PSA-DT was analyzed in the following ordinate groups: 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 180 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days. Results: We included 1,887 patients in this study. Metastases developed in 47 of these patients. The 10-year freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM) rate for the entire population was 95.1%. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 2-15 years). The only two significant predictors of metastatic disease by multivariable analyses were GS and PSA-DT (p < 0.001 for both variables). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for GS of 6 or less, GS of 7, and GS of 8 or greater were 97.9%, 94.3%, and 76.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated FFDM rates for PSA-DT of 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 181 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days were 17.5%, 67.9%, 74%, and 94.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 98.6%, 96.2%, and 86.7%, respectively. A demographic shift to patients presenting with higher-grade disease in more recent years was observed. Conclusions: GS and post-treatment PSA-DT are both statistically significant independent predictors of metastatic

  20. An overview of interstitial brachytherapy and hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, B.B.; Harney, J.

    1989-11-01

    Interstitial thermoradiotherapy, an experimental cancer treatment that combines interstitial radiation implants (brachytherapy) and interstitial hyperthermia, is in the early stages of investigation. In accordance with the procedure used in a current national trial protocol, a 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered after catheters are placed into the tumor area while the patient is under general anesthesia. This is immediately followed by loading of radioactive Iridium-192 seeds into the catheters for a defined period of time. Once the prescribed radiation dose is delivered, the radioactive sources are removed and a second, 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered. Clinical trials with hyperthermia in combination with radiation have increased in recent years. Nurses caring for these patients need to become more knowledgeable about this investigational therapy. This paper provides an overview of the biologic rationale for this therapy, as well as a description of the delivery method and clinical application. Specific related nursing interventions are defined in a nursing protocol.23 references.

  1. Harmony search optimization for HDR prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, Aditya

    In high dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, multiple catheters are inserted interstitially into the target volume. The process of treating the prostate involves calculating and determining the best dose distribution to the target and organs-at-risk by means of optimizing the time that the radioactive source dwells at specified positions within the catheters. It is the goal of this work to investigate the use of a new optimization algorithm, known as Harmony Search, in order to optimize dwell times for HDR prostate brachytherapy. The new algorithm was tested on 9 different patients and also compared with the genetic algorithm. Simulations were performed to determine the optimal value of the Harmony Search parameters. Finally, multithreading of the simulation was examined to determine potential benefits. First, a simulation environment was created using the Python programming language and the wxPython graphical interface toolkit, which was necessary to run repeated optimizations. DICOM RT data from Varian BrachyVision was parsed and used to obtain patient anatomy and HDR catheter information. Once the structures were indexed, the volume of each structure was determined and compared to the original volume calculated in BrachyVision for validation. Dose was calculated using the AAPM TG-43 point source model of the GammaMed 192Ir HDR source and was validated against Varian BrachyVision. A DVH-based objective function was created and used for the optimization simulation. Harmony Search and the genetic algorithm were implemented as optimization algorithms for the simulation and were compared against each other. The optimal values for Harmony Search parameters (Harmony Memory Size [HMS], Harmony Memory Considering Rate [HMCR], and Pitch Adjusting Rate [PAR]) were also determined. Lastly, the simulation was modified to use multiple threads of execution in order to achieve faster computational times. Experimental results show that the volume calculation that was

  2. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M.; Dadkhah, Hossein; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  3. Automatic Brachytherapy Seed Placement Under MRI Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Muntener, Michael; Mazilu, Dumitru; Schär, Michael; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a robotic method of performing low dose rate prostate brachytherapy under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The design and operation of a fully automated MR compatible seed injector is presented. This is used with the MrBot robot for transperineal percutaneous prostate access. A new image-registration marker and algorithms are also presented. The system is integrated and tested with a 3T MRI scanner. Tests compare three different registration methods, assess the precision of performing automated seed deployment, and use the seeds to assess the accuracy of needle targeting under image guidance. Under the ideal conditions of the in vitro experiments, results show outstanding image-guided needle and seed placement accuracy. PMID:17694871

  4. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy... Records § 35.2432 Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by § 35.432 for 3 years after...

  5. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. 35.490 Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.490 Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require an authorized user of...

  6. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. 35.490 Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.490 Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require an authorized user of...

  7. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. 35.490 Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.490 Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require an authorized user of...

  8. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. 35.490 Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.490 Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require an authorized user of...

  9. 10 CFR 35.490 - Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. 35.490 Section 35.490 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.490 Training for use of manual brachytherapy sources. Except as provided in § 35.57, the licensee shall require an authorized user of...

  10. A Novel Device for Intravaginal Electronic Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Frank Fuchs, Holger; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Steil, Volker; Ziglio, Francesco; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Postoperative intravaginal brachytherapy for endometrial carcinoma is usually performed with {sup 192}Ir high-dose rate (HDR) afterloading. A potential alternative is treatment with a broadband 50kV X-ray point source, the advantage being its low energy and the consequential steep dose gradient. The aim of this study was to create and evaluate a homogeneous cylindrical energy deposition around a newly designed vaginal applicator. Methods and Materials: To create constant isodose layers along the cylindrical plastic vaginal applicator, the source (INTRABEAM system) was moved in steps of 17-19.5 mm outward from the tip of the applicator. Irradiation for a predetermined time was performed at each position. The axial shift was established by a stepping mechanism that was mounted on a table support. The total dose/dose distribution was determined using film dosimetry (Gafchromic EBT) in a 'solid water' phantom. The films were evaluated with Mathematica 5.2 and OmniPro-I'mRT 1.6. The results (dose D0/D5/D10 in 0/5/10 mm tissue depth) were compared with an {sup 192}Ir HDR afterloading plan for multiple sampling points around the applicator. Results: Three different dose distributions with lengths of 3.9-7.3 cm were created. The irradiation time based on the delivery of 5/7 Gy to a 5 mm tissue depth was 19/26 min to 27/38 min. D0/D5/D10 was 150%/100%/67% for electronic brachytherapy and 140%/100%/74% for the afterloading technique. The deviation for repeated measurements in the phantom was <7%. Conclusions: It is possible to create a homogeneous cylindrical dose distribution, similar to {sup 192}Ir HDR afterloading, through the superimposition of multiple spherical dose distributions by stepping a kilovolt point source.

  11. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jimmy L.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Hazle, John D.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy seed therapy is an increasingly common way to treat prostate cancer through localized radiation. The current standard of care relies on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for imaging guidance during the seed placement procedure. As visualization of individual metallic seeds tends to be difficult or inaccurate under TRUS guidance, guide needles are generally tracked to infer seed placement. In an effort to improve seed visualization and placement accuracy, the use of photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which is highly sensitive to metallic objects in soft tissue, was investigated for this clinical application. The PA imaging properties of bare (i.e., embedded in pure gelatin) and tissue-embedded (at depths of up to 13 mm) seeds were investigated with a multi-wavelength (750 to 1090 nm) PA imaging technique. Results indicate that, much like ultrasonic (US) imaging, an angular dependence (i.e., seed orientation relative to imaging transducer) of the PA signal exists. Despite this shortcoming, however, PA imaging offers improved contrast, over US imaging, of a seed in prostate tissue if sufficient local fluence is achieved. Additionally, although the PA signal of a bare seed is greatest for lower laser wavelengths (e.g., 750 nm), the scattering that results from tissue tends to favor the use of higher wavelengths (e.g., 1064 nm, which is the primary wavelength of Nd:YAG lasers) when the seed is located in tissue. A combined PA and US imaging approach (i.e., PAUS imaging) shows strong potential to visualize both the seed and the surrounding anatomical environment of the prostate during brachytherapy seed placement procedures. PMID:21833361

  12. [Salvage 125I brachytherapy of locally recurrent prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Gesztesi, László; Ágoston, Péter; Major, Tibor; Gődény, Mária; Andi, Judit; Lengyel, Zsolt; Polgár, Csaba

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to report a case of salvage low dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy in a patient with locally recurrent prostate cancer, four years after his first treatment with combined external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. A 61-year-old man was treated with 1x10 Gy HDR brachytherapy and a total of 60 Gy EBRT for an organ confined intermediate risk carcinoma of the prostate in 2009. The patient's tumor had been in regression with the lowest PSA level of 0.09 ng/ml, till the end of 2013. After slow but continuous elevation, his PSA level had reached 1.46 ng/ml by February 2014. Pelvis MRI and whole body acetate PET/CT showed recurrent tumor in the dorsal-right region of the prostate. Bone scan was negative. After discussing the possible salvage treatment options with the patient, he chose LDR brachytherapy. In 2014, in spinal anesthesia 21 125I "seeds" were implanted with transrectal ultrasound guidance into the prostate. The prescribed dose to the whole prostate was 100 Gy, to the volume of the recurrent tumor was 140 Gy. The patient tolerated the salvage brachytherapy well. The postimplant dosimetry was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography (MR-CT) fusion and appeared satisfactory. PSA level decreased from the pre-salvage value of 1.46 ng/ml to 0.42 ng/ml by one month and 0.18 ng/ml by two months after the brachytherapy. No gastrointestinal side effects appeared, the patient's urination became slightly more frequent. In selected patients, salvage LDR brachytherapy can be a good choice for curative treatment of locally recurrent prostate cancer, after primary radiation therapy. Multiparametric MRI is fundamental, acetate PET/CT can play an important role when defining the localization of the recurrent tumor. PMID:25260087

  13. Intravascular contrast agent improves magnetic resonance angiography of carotid arteries in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Lin, W; Abendschein, D R; Celik, A; Dolan, R P; Lauffer, R B; Walovitch, R C; Haacke, E M

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to optimize three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) sequences and to determine whether contrast-enhanced MRA could improve the accuracy of lumen definition in stenosed carotid arteries of minipigs. 3D TOF MRA was acquired with use of either an intravascular (n = 13) and/or an extravascular contrast agent (n = 5) administrated at 2 to 4 weeks after balloon-induced injury to a carotid artery in 16 minipigs. Vascular contrast, defined as signal intensity differences between blood vessels and muscle normalized to the signal intensity of muscle, was compared before and after the injection of each contrast agent and between the two agents. Different vascular patencies were observed among the animals, including completely occluded vessels (n = 5), stenotic vessels (n = 3), and vessels with no visible stenosis (n = 8). Superior vascular contrast improvement was observed for small arteries and veins and for large veins with the intravascular contrast agent when compared with the extravascular contrast agent. In addition, preliminary studies in two of the animals showed a good correlation for the extent of luminal stenosis defined by digital subtraction angiography compared with MRA obtained after administration of the intravascular contrast agent (R2 = .71, with a slope of .96 +/- .04 by a linear regression analysis). We concluded that use of an intravascular contrast agent optimizes 3D TOF MRA and may improve its accuracy compared with digital subtraction angiography. PMID:9400838

  14. Gender differences in exercise--induced intravascular haemolysis during race training in thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Cywinska, Anna; Szarska, Ewa; Kowalska, Agnieszka; Ostaszewski, Piotr; Schollenberger, Antoni

    2011-02-01

    Exercise-induced intravascular haemolysis and "sport anemia" are widely reported in human sports medicine. It has been recognized also in horses, however, the clinical importance and the onset of this condition seem different than in human. In this study we investigated the episodes of intravascular haemolysis, indicated by the increase in plasma haemoglobin and the decrease in serum haptoglobin levels, after routine training sessions in race horses. Heart rate and changes in haematological parameters confirmed, that the exertion was relatively high. Intravascular haemolysis did not appear in stallions but was detected in mares after two training sessions. It has been determined that serum haptoglobin levels were higher in mares than in stallions before and after all training sessions. It is postulated that intravascular haemolysis induced by training is of limited clinical importance because it occurred only in mares which are better adapted due to higher haptoglobin level at rest, and it had no cumulative effect. Therefore gender differences should be taken into consideration in experiments with athletic horses. PMID:20553886

  15. Microfluidics in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Device Fabrication and an Experiment to Mimic Intravascular Gas Embolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jablonski, Erin L.; Vogel, Brandon M.; Cavanagh, Daniel P.; Beers, Kathryn L.

    2010-01-01

    A method to fabricate microfluidic devices and an experimental protocol to model intravascular gas embolism for undergraduate laboratories are presented. The fabrication process details how to produce masters on glass slides; these masters serve as molds to pattern channels in an elastomeric polymer that can be adhered to a substrate, resulting in…

  16. Low-level He-Ne laser in intravascular irradiation treatment of schizophrenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu-Xue; Fu, Zheng-Hua

    1998-11-01

    Intravascular low level He-Ne laser irradiation is a new therapy developed in recent years. In our hospital it was applied in the treatment and observation of 220 cases of schizophrenia, among which certain effect was achieved and about which the detail was collated and elaborated.

  17. Research of epidermal cellular vegetal cycle of intravascular low level laser irradiation in treatment of psoriasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Bao, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Mei-Jue

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To research epidermal cellular vegetal cycle and the difference of DNA content between pre and post Intravascular Low Level Laser Irradiation treatment of psoriasis. Method: 15 patients suffered from psoriasis were treated by intravascular low level laser irradiation (output power: 4-5mw, 1 hour per day, a course of treatment is 10 days). We checked the different DNA content of epidermal cell between pre and post treatment of psoriasis and 8 natural human. Then the percentage of each phase among the whole cellular cycle was calculated and the statistical analysis was made. Results: The mean value of G1/S phase is obviously down while G2+M phase increased obviously. T test P<0.05.The related statistical analysis showed significant difference between pre and post treatments. Conclusions: The Intravascular Low Level Laser Irradiation (ILLLI) in treatment of psoriasis is effective according to the research of epidermal cellular vegetal cycle and the difference DNA content of Intravascular Low Level Laser Irradiation between pre and post treatment of psoriasis

  18. Thermal response of intravascular and rectal tissue to temperature changes and chemical conditions in the rumen of sheep

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, V. E.; Raghavan, G. V.

    1966-01-01

    1. Experiments were conducted with two wether sheep which were fitted with rumen cannulae and chronically implanted intravascular thermocouples. An attempt was made to study the thermal response of intravascular and rectal tissue to temperature changes and chemical conditions in the rumen. 2. When ice or hot water were placed in the rumen there was an immediate fall or rise in the intravascular temperature accompanied by a similar change in rectal temperature. The intravascular temperatures returned to their precooling or preheating level of 40° C within 130 min, the rectal temperatures required 6-8 hr to return to their pretreatment values. 3. When 0·5 M acetic acid was infused into the rumen there was a marked rise in the intravascular temperature, over and above the diurnal rhythm but not in rectal temperatures. Infusion of mixtures of acetic plus propionic or acetic plus n-butyric acids caused an intravascular temperature rise on feeding within the range of the diurnal pattern. In fasted animals, infusions of volatile fatty acids resulted in no rise in intravascular temperature. PMID:5937414

  19. Asphyxia by Drowning Induces Massive Bleeding Due To Hyperfibrinolytic Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Schwameis, Michael; Schober, Andreas; Schörgenhofer, Christian; Sperr, Wolfgang Reinhard; Schöchl, Herbert; Janata-Schwatczek, Karin; Kürkciyan, Erol Istepan; Sterz, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To date, no study has systematically investigated the impact of drowning-induced asphyxia on hemostasis. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that asphyxia induces bleeding by hyperfibrinolytic disseminated intravascular coagulation. Design: Observational study. Setting: A 2,100-bed tertiary care facility in Vienna, Austria, Europe. Patients: All cases of drowning-induced asphyxia (n = 49) were compared with other patients with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (n = 116) and to patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (n = 83). Six drowning victims were investigated prospectively. To study the mechanism, a forearm-ischemia model was used in 20 volunteers to investigate whether hypoxia releases tissue plasminogen activator. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Eighty percent of patients with drowning-induced asphyxia developed overt disseminated intravascular coagulation within 24 hours. When compared with nondrowning cardiac arrest patients, drowning patients had a 13 times higher prevalence of overt disseminated intravascular coagulation at admission (55% vs 4%; p < 0.001). Despite comparable disseminated intravascular coagulation scores, acute promyelocytic leukemia patients had higher fibrinogen but lower d-dimer levels and platelet counts than drowning patients (p < 0.001). Drowning victims had a three-fold longer activated partial thromboplastin time (124 s; p < 0.001) than both nondrowning cardiac arrest and acute promyelocytic leukemia patients. Hyperfibrinolysis was reflected by up to 1,000-fold increased d-dimer levels, greater than 5-fold elevated plasmin antiplasmin levels, and a complete absence of thrombelastometric clotting patterns, which was reversed by antifibrinolytics and heparinase. Thirty minutes of forearm-ischemia increased tissue plasminogen activator 31-fold (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The vast majority of drowning patients develops overt hyperfibrinolytic disseminated intravascular coagulation, partly caused by

  20. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Grace L.; Huo, Jinhai; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  1. Treatment planning of a skin-sparing conical breast brachytherapy applicator using conventional brachytherapy software

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yun; Melhus, Christopher S.; Sioshansi, Shirin; Rivard, Mark J.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: AccuBoost is a noninvasive image-guided technique for the delivery of partial breast irradiation to the tumor bed and currently serves as an alternate to conventional electron beam boost. To irradiate the target volume while providing dose sparing to the skin, the round applicator design was augmented through the addition of an internally truncated conical shield and the reduction of the source to skin distance. Methods: Brachytherapy dose distributions for two types of conical applicators were simulated and estimated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods for radiation transport and a conventional treatment planning system (TPS). MC-derived and TPS-generated dose volume histograms (DVHs) and dose distribution data were compared for both the conical and round applicators for benchmarking purposes. Results: Agreement using the gamma-index test was {>=}99.95% for distance to agreement and dose accuracy criteria of 2 mm and 2%, respectively. After observing good agreement, TPS DVHs and dose distributions for the conical and round applicators were obtained and compared. Brachytherapy dose distributions generated using Pinnacle{sup 3} for ten CT data sets showed that the parallel-opposed beams of the conical applicators provided similar PTV coverage to the round applicators and reduced the maximum dose to skin, chest wall, and lung by up to 27%, 42%, and 43%, respectively. Conclusions: Brachytherapy dose distributions for the conical applicators have been generated using MC methods and entered into the Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS via the Tufts technique. Treatment planning metrics for the conical AccuBoost applicators were significantly improved in comparison to those for conventional electron beam breast boost.

  2. Brachytherapy for malignancies of the vagina in the 3D era

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal cancer is an uncommon malignancy and can be either recurrent or primary. In both cases, brachytherapy places a central role in the overall treatment course. Recent technological advances have led to more advanced brachytherapy techniques, which in turn have translated to improved outcomes for patients with malignancies of the vagina. The aim of this manuscript is to outline the incorporation of modern brachytherapy into the treatment of patients with vaginal cancer including patient selection along with the role of brachytherapy in conjunction with other treatment modalities, various brachytherapy techniques, treatment planning, dose fractionation schedules, and normal tissue tolerance. PMID:26622234

  3. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wallner, K; Smathers, S; Sutlief, S; Corman, J; Ellis, W

    2000-06-20

    Our aim was to document the technical and clinical course of prostate brachytherapy patients with radiographic evidence of median lobe hyperplasia (MLH). Eight patients with MLH were identified during our routine brachytherapy practice, representing 9% of the 87 brachytherapy patients treated during a 6-month period. No effort was made to avoid brachytherapy in patients noted to have MLH on diagnostic work-up. Cystoscopic evaluation was not routinely performed. Postimplant axial computed tomographic (CT) images of the prostate were obtained at 0.5 cm intervals. Preimplant urinary obstructive symptoms were quantified by the criteria of the American Urologic Association (AUA). Each patient was contacted during the writing of this report to update postimplant morbidity information. There was no apparent association between the degree of MLH and preimplant prostate volume or AUA score. Intraoperatively, we were able to visualize MLH by transrectal ultrasound and did not notice any particular difficulty placing sources in the MLH tissue or migration of sources out of the tissue. The prescription isodose covered from 81% to 99% of the postimplant CT-defined target volume, achieving adequate dose to the median lobe tissue in all patients. Two of the eight patients developed acute, postimplant urinary retention. The first patient required intermittent self-catheterization for 3 months and then resumed spontaneous urination. MLH does not appear to be a strong contraindication to prostate brachytherapy, and prophylactic resection of hypertrophic tissue in such patients is probably not warranted. Int. J. Cancer (Radiat. Oncol. Invest.) 90, 152-156 (2000). PMID:10900427

  4. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Quentin E. Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Enger, Shirin A.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq{sup 153}Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D{sub 98%}), I-RSBT reduced urethral D{sub 0.1cc} below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq {sup 153}Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed{sup 153}Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29

  5. Brachytherapy in the treatment of skin cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Skowronek, Janusz

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of skin cancer worldwide is constantly growing and it is the most frequently diagnosed tumor. Brachytherapy (BT) in particular localizations is a valuable tool of the exact radiation depot inside the tumor mass. In localizations such as the face, skull skin and inoperable tumors, relapses after surgery, radiotherapy are usually not suitable for primary or secondary invasive treatment. Brachytherapy is a safe procedure for organs at risk according to rapid fall of a dose outside the axis of the applicator with satisfactory dose localization inside the target. The complications rate is acceptable and treatment costs are low. In some tumors (great skin lesions in the scalp, near eyes or on the nose) BT allows for a great dose reduction in surrounding healthy tissues. Brachytherapy provides minimal dose delivery to surrounding healthy tissue, thus enabling good functional and cosmetic results. Treatment is possible almost in all cases on an outpatient basis. PMID:26759545

  6. Optimizing methods for the study of intravascular lipid metabolism in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kan; Wang, Chang-Qian; Fan, Yu-Qi; Xie, Yu-Shui; Yin, Zhao-Fang; Xu, Zuo-Jun; Zhang, Hui-Li; Cao, Jia-Tian; Han, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Yue; Song, Dong-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a useful vertebrate model for use in cardiovascular drug discovery. The present study aimed to construct optimized methods for the study of intravascular lipid metabolism of zebrafish. The lipophilic dye, Oil Red O, was used to stain fasting zebrafish one to eight days post-fertilization (dpf) and to stain 7-dpf zebrafish incubated in a breeding system containing 0.1% egg yolk as a high-fat diet (HFD) for 48 h. Three-dpf zebrafish were kept in CholEsteryl boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) 542/563 C11 water for 24 h which indicated the efficiency of CholEsteryl BODIPY 542/563 C11 intravascular cholesterol staining. Subsequently, 7-dpf zebrafish were incubated in water containing the fluorescent probe CholEsteryl BODIPY 542/563 C11 and fed a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) for 10 d. Two groups of 7-dpf zebrafish were incubated in regular breeding water and fed with a regular or HCD containing CholEsteryl BODIPY 542/563 C11 for 10 d. Finally, blood lipids of adult zebrafish fed with regular or HFD for seven weeks were measured. Oil Red O was not detected in the blood vessels of 7-8-dpf zebrafish. Increased intravascular lipid levels were detected in 7-dpf zebrafish incubated in 0.1% egg yolk, indicated by Oil Red O staining. Intravascular cholesterol was efficiently stained in 3-dpf zebrafish incubated in breeding water containing CholEsteryl BODIPY 542/563 C11; however, this method was inappropriate for the calculation of intravascular fluorescence intensity in zebrafish >7‑dpf. In spite of this, intra-aortic fluorescence intensity of zebrafish fed a HCD containing CholEsteryl BODIPY 542/563 C11 was significantly higher (P<0.05) than that of those fed a regular diet containing CholEsteryl BODIPY 542/563 C11. The serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels of adult zebrafish fed a HFD were markedly increased compared to those of the control group (P<0.05). In conclusion, the use of Oil Red O staining and CholEsteryl BODIPY 542/563 C11 may

  7. Current state of the art brachytherapy treatment planning dosimetry algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Pantelis, E; Karaiskos, P

    2014-01-01

    Following literature contributions delineating the deficiencies introduced by the approximations of conventional brachytherapy dosimetry, different model-based dosimetry algorithms have been incorporated into commercial systems for 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning. The calculation settings of these algorithms are pre-configured according to criteria established by their developers for optimizing computation speed vs accuracy. Their clinical use is hence straightforward. A basic understanding of these algorithms and their limitations is essential, however, for commissioning; detecting differences from conventional algorithms; explaining their origin; assessing their impact; and maintaining global uniformity of clinical practice. PMID:25027247

  8. Dosimetric characteristics of a new unit for electronic skin brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Chan, Jan-Pieter; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Brachytherapy with radioactive high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir source is applied to small skin cancer lesions, using surface applicators, i.e. Leipzig or Valencia type. New developments in the field of radiotherapy for skin cancer include electronic brachytherapy. This technique involves the placement of an HDR X-ray source close to the skin, therefore combining the benefits of brachytherapy with the reduced shielding requirements and targeted energy of low energy X-rays. Recently, the Esteya® Electronic Brachytherapy System (Esteya EBS, Elekta AB-Nucletron, Stockholm, Sweden) has been developed specifically for HDR brachytherapy treatment of surface lesions. The system provides radionuclide free HDR brachytherapy by means of a small 69.5 kV X-ray source. The purpose of this study is to obtain the dosimetric characterization required for clinical implementation, providing the detailed methodology to perform the commissioning. Material and methods Flatness, symmetry and penumbra, percentage of depth dose (PDD), kV stability, HVL, output, spectrum, linearity, and leakage have been evaluated for a set of applicators (from 10 mm to 30 mm in diameter). Results Flatness and symmetry resulted better than 5% with around 1 mm of penumbra. The depth dose gradient is about 7%/mm. A kV value of 68.4 ± 1.0 kV (k = 1) was obtained, in good agreement with manufacturer data (69.5 kV). HVL was 1.85 mm Al. Dose rate for a typical 6 Gy to 7 Gy prescription resulted about 3.3 Gy/min and the leakage value was < 100 µGy/min. Conclusions The new Esteya® Electronic Brachytherapy System presents excellent flatness and penumbra as with the Valencia applicator case, combined with an improved PDD, allowing treatment of lesions of up to a depth of 5 mm in combination with reduced treatment duration. The Esteya unit allows HDR brachytherapy superficial treatment within a minimally shielded environment due its low energy. PMID:24790622

  9. Imaging method for monitoring delivery of high dose rate brachytherapy

    DOEpatents

    Weisenberger, Andrew G; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2012-10-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring both the balloon/cavity and the radioactive source in brachytherapy treatment utilizing using at least one pair of miniature gamma cameras to acquire separate images of: 1) the radioactive source as it is moved in the tumor volume during brachytherapy; and 2) a relatively low intensity radiation source produced by either an injected radiopharmaceutical rendering cancerous tissue visible or from a radioactive solution filling a balloon surgically implanted into the cavity formed by the surgical resection of a tumor.

  10. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy for recurrent colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S. )

    1991-05-01

    Radical surgical excision of locoregional recurrence of colorectal carcinoma usually produces the best survival and should be attempted whenever possible. However, recurrences are often unresectable; hence palliative local therapy may be indicated. There are several options for the radiation therapy of local, unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic colorectal cancer. Whole pelvis irradiation of 4,000-5,000 cGy followed by a coned-down boost of 1,000-1,500 cGy generally provides good symptomatic palliation in 80-90% of patients, but long-term control or cure is rarely achieved. External beam irradiation of 2,000-3,000 cGy to the whole liver with or without concurrent chemotherapy may be used for palliation of metastatic disease to the liver. A combination of intraoperative radiation therapy applied directly to the tumor bed and external beam irradiation may improve local control and survival rates. Multiple options are available for the intraoperative use of brachytherapy which can deliver high radiation doses to the residual tumor, or tumor bed, sparing normal tissue.

  11. Intervention on the left main coronary artery. Importance of periprocedural and follow-up intravascular ultrasonography guidance

    PubMed Central

    Chmielak, Zbigniew; Pręgowski, Jerzy; Rewicki, Marek; Karcz, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Periprocedural intravascular ultrasonography guidance for left main coronary artery stenting is well established. However, the role of this tool is also important at follow-up interventions. We present a case of a patient with previous history of left main coronary artery angioplasty. During a recent attempt to treat tight stenosis in the left anterior descending coronary artery, it was not possible to advance the stent into the left main coronary artery. Intravascular ultrasonography explained the difficulties encountered. PMID:25061462

  12. [Intravascular biocompatibility of decellularized xenogenic vascular scaffolds/PHBHHx hybrid material for cardiovascular tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Wu, Song; Liu, Yinglong; Cui, Bin; Tang, Yue; Wang, Qiang; Qu, Xianghua; Chen, Guoqiang

    2008-04-01

    Poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate, PHBHHx) has superior mechanical and biocompatibility that may enable it to meet cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. We developed hybrid materials based on decellularized xenogenic vascular scaffolds that were coated with PHBHHx to investigate the intravascular biocompatibility. The hybrid patches were implanted in the rabbit abdominal aorta (hybrid patch, n = 12). Only decellularized xenogenic vascular scaffolds were implanted without coating as control (uncoated patch, n = 12). The patches were explanted and examined histologically, and biochemically at 1, 4 and 12 weeks after the surgery. The hybrid patches maintained original shapes, covered by confluent layer of cells and had less calcification than uncoated control. The results indicated that PHBHHx coating reduced calcification, promoted the repopulation of hybrid patch with recipients cells. In conclusion, PHBHHx showed remarkable intravascular biocompatibility and would benefit endothelization which would be a useful candidate for lumen of cardiovascular tissue engineering. PMID:18616171

  13. [Intravascular lymphoma treated with anti CD20 monoclonal antibodies. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Jorge; Espinoza, Arturo; Manŕiquez, María; Moyano, Leonor; González, Néstor; Larrondo, Milton; Figueroa, Gastón

    2004-11-01

    We report a 78 year old male with prostatism, that was subjected to a prostate biopsy. The pathological study showed a microvascular lymphocytic infiltration. Four months later, the patients presented with reduced alertness, cough, dyspnea, fever and elevation of lactic dehydrogenase and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Chest and abdominal CAT scans, bone marrow aspirate, protein electrophoresis and prostate specific antigen were normal. A re-evaluation of prostate biopsy showed an intravascular lymphoid infiltration, positive for CD45 and CD20, compatible with the diagnosis of intravascular lymphoma. Chemotherapy was started, but it was not tolerated by the patient and the response was partial. Therefore, treatment with monoclonal antibodies anti CD20 (Rituximab) was started. The tumor had a complete and prolonged (24 months) remission after the treatment PMID:15693204

  14. Enhanced glucose tolerance by intravascularly administered piceatannol in freely moving healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Oritani, Yukihiro; Okitsu, Teru; Nishimura, Eisaku; Sai, Masahiko; Ito, Tatsuhiko; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2016-02-12

    Piceatannol is a phytochemical in the seeds of passion fruit that has a hypoglycemic effect when orally administered. To elucidate the contribution of intact and metabolites of piceatannol after gastro-intestinal absorption to hypoglycemic effect, we examined the influence of piceatannol and isorhapontigenin on blood glucose concentrations during fasting and glucose tolerance tests by administering them intravascularly to freely moving healthy rats. We found that intravascularly administered piceatannol reduced the blood glucose concentrations during both fasting and glucose tolerance tests, but isorhapontigenin did not during either of them. Furthermore, we found that piceatannol increased the insulinogenic index during glucose tolerance tests and that piceatannol had no influence on insulin sensitivity by performing hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamping tests. These results suggest that piceatannol orally intaken may enhance glucose tolerance by the effect of intact piceatannol through enhanced early-phase secretion of insulin. Therefore, oral intake of piceatannol might contribute to proper control of postprandial glycemic excursions in healthy subjects. PMID:26773506

  15. Intravascular ultrasound-guided central vein angioplasty and stenting without the use of radiographic contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Ray; Thomas, Joseph

    2008-05-01

    Patients with contraindications to iodinated radiographic contrast agents present a significant challenge during endovascular intervention. A 46-year-old man with end-stage renal disease and a normally functioning left upper extremity arteriovenous fistula presented with severe left arm edema. The patient's history included repeated severe anaphylactoid reactions with severe respiratory distress upon exposure to iodinated contrast. In an attempt to avoid the use of iodinated contrast, angioplasty and stent placement of a severe central venous stenosis were performed using only fluoroscopy and intravascular sonography. In patients unable to receive iodinated contrast secondary to anaphylactoid reactions, intravascular sonography can be used to guide angioplasty and stenting of central venous stenosis. PMID:18286503

  16. Intravascular fasciitis: report of two intraoral cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kuklani, Riya; Robbins, James L; Chalk, Evan C; Pringle, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Two unusual cases of intravascular fasciitis arising in a 25-year-old female and a 26-year-old male are presented here. The lesions apparently presented as firm, raised, submucosal nodules on the tongue. Intravascular fasciitis (IVF) shares the microscopic features of nodular fasciitis (NF), but with intraluminal, intramural, and extramural involvement of small- to medium-sized veins and arteries with a multinodular or serpentine growth pattern along the course of affected blood vessels. NF is a benign lesion occurring on the trunk and upper extremities with a strong predilection for young adults 20 to 40 years of age. Intraoral NF is uncommon, and intraoral IVF is extremely rare, with only sporadic reports in the literature. In both of our cases, the patient's main concern was rapid growth of the lesion, which was nontender, on the tongue. The clinical, histologic, and immunohistochemical features and treatment are presented, along with a review of the literature. PMID:26163438

  17. Intravascular ATP and the regulation of blood flow and oxygen delivery in humans.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Dinenno, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of vascular tone is a complex response that integrates multiple signals that allow for blood flow and oxygen supply to match oxygen demand appropriately. Here, we discuss the potential role of intravascular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a primary factor in these responses and put forth the hypothesis that deficient ATP release contributes to impairments in vascular control exhibited in aged and diseased populations. PMID:25390296

  18. Evaluation of intravascular microdialysis for continuous blood glucose monitoring in hypoglycemia: an animal model.

    PubMed

    Schierenbeck, Fanny; Wallin, Mats; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Liska, Jan

    2014-07-01

    We have previously shown that intravascular microdialysis in a central vein is an accurate method for continuous glucose monitoring in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, no hypoglycemia occurred in our earlier studies, prompting further evaluation of the accuracy of intravascular microdialysis in the hypoglycemic range. Thus, this animal study was performed. A porcine model was developed; hypoglycemia was induced using insulin injections. The pigs were monitored with intravascular microdialysis integrated in a triple-lumen central venous catheter. As reference, venous blood gas samples were taken every 5 minutes and analyzed in a blood gas analyzer. Ethical permission for the animal experiments was obtained from the Stockholm Regional Ethical Committee, reference no N397/09. A total of 213 paired samples were obtained for analysis, and 126 (59.2%) of these were in the hypoglycemic range (<74 mg/dl). Using Clarke error grid analysis, 100% of the paired samples were in region AB and 99% in region A. The ISO standard (ISO15197) was met. Bland-Altman analysis showed bias (mean difference) ± limits of agreement was -0.18 ± 16.2 mg/dl. No influence from glucose infusions was seen. The microdialysis monitoring system was found to be very responsive in rapid changes in blood glucose concentration. This study shows that intravascular microdialysis in a central vein is an accurate method for continuous glucose monitoring in hypoglycemia in a porcine experimental model. Furthermore, the system was not influenced by glucose administration and was found to be responsive in rapid blood glucose fluctuations. PMID:24876424

  19. Double-cladding-fiber-based detection system for intravascular mapping of fluorescent molecular probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razansky, R. Nika; Rozental, Amir; Mueller, Mathias S.; Deliolanis, Nikolaos; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Koch, Alexander W.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2011-03-01

    Early detection of high-risk coronary atherosclerosis remains an unmet clinical challenge. We have previously demonstrated a near-infrared fluorescence catheter system for two-dimensional intravascular detection of fluorescence molecular probes [1]. In this work we improve the system performance by introducing a novel high resolution sensor. The main challenge of the intravascular sensor is to provide a highly focused spot at an application relevant distance on one hand and a highly efficient collection of emitted light on the other. We suggest employing a double cladding optical fiber (DCF) in combination with focusing optics to provide a sensor with both highly focused excitation light and highly efficient fluorescent light collection. The excitation laser is coupled into the single mode core of DCF and guided through a focusing element and a right angle prism. The resulting side-fired beam exhibits a small spot diameter (50 μm) throughout a distance of up to 2 mm from the sensor. This is the distance of interest for intravascular coronary imaging application, determined by an average human coronary artery diameter. At the blood vessel wall, an activatable fluorescence molecular probe is excited in the diseased lesions. Next light of slightly shifted wavelength emits only in the places of the inflammations, associated with dangerous plaques [2]. The emitted light is collected by the cladding of the DCF, with a large collection angle (NA=0.4). The doublecladding acts as multimodal fiber and guides the collected light to the photo detection elements. The sensor automatically rotates and pulled-back, while each scanned point is mapped according to the amount of detected fluorescent emission. The resulting map of fluorescence activity helps to associate the atherosclerotic plaques with the inflammation process. The presented detection system is a valuable tool in the intravascular plaque detection and can help to differentiate the atherosclerotic plaques based on

  20. Laparoscopic Manipulation of a Probe-based Confocal Laser Endomicroscope Using a Steerable Intravascular Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Adrien E.; Gurusamy, Kurinchi; Hawkes, David J.; Davidson, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy is an emerging imaging modality that enables visualization of histologic details during endoscopy and surgery. A method of guiding the probe with millimeter accuracy is required to enable imaging in all regions of the abdomen accessed during laparoscopy. On the basis of a porcine model of laparoscopic liver resection, we report our experience of using a steerable intravascular catheter to guide a probe-based confocal laser endomicroscope. PMID:25807277

  1. Imaging findings for intravascular large B-cell lymphoma of the liver

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jungmin; Park, Ha Young

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a rare subtype of extranodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that most commonly involves the central nervous system and skin. To our knowledge, no state-of-the art imaging findings have been reported for hepatic IVLBCL in the English literature. We report the first case of hepatic involvement of IVLBCL along with a literature review. PMID:26523272

  2. Comparison of intravascular (nondiffusible) and diffusible radiotracers in diagnosis of testicular-scrotal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Skarzynski, J.J.; Rosenberg, R.J.; Sziklas, J.J.; Walzak, M.P.; Karimeddini, M.K.; Spencer, R.P.

    1985-05-01

    The radionuclide approach to testicular-scrotal lesions has been described in the literature in terms of dynamic and static images. However, there has been little consideration of which radiopharmaceutical to utilize. In essence, the desired procedure is to estimate relative blood flow to each testicular-scrotal area. An intravascular (nondiffusible) radiolabel may therefore be advantageous. We reviewed 18 consecutive radionuclide studies that were performed for suspected testicular-scrotal pathology. Three radiopharmaceuticals were utilized; 7 with Tc-99m-RBC or HSA, 7 with Tc-99m-pertechnetate, and 4 with Tc-99m-DTPA. Studies were read ''blind'' as to the agent employed and rated on a scale of 1+ (least satisfactory) to 4+. Criteria included ability to delineate the testes-scrotum, background activity, and clarity of the dynamic phase. Studies with the intravascular labels (6 with tagged RBC and 1 with labeled HSA) had a mean rating of 3.6 out of 4. Pertechnetate studies had a rating of 3.0. Those performed with DTPA received a rating of 2.0. The major problems with DTPA studies were rapid entry into soft tissue (likely extracellular fluid), which created a high background; in addition, bladder counts detracted from imaging the testicular-scrotal region. Intravascular labels appear to be a distinct improvement over Tc-99m-pertechnetate for testicular-scrotal imaging.

  3. Lead-Free Intravascular Ultrasound Transducer Using BZT-50BCT Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xingwei; Lam, Kwok Ho; Li, Xiang; Chen, Ruimin; Ren, Wei; Ren, Xiaobing; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the fabrication and evaluation of a high-frequency ultrasonic transducer based on a new lead-free piezoelectric material for intravascular imaging application. Lead-free 0.5Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3−0.5(Ba0.7Ca0.3)TiO3 (BZT-50BCT) ceramic with a high dielectric constant (~2800) was employed to develop a high-frequency (~30 MHz) needle-type ultrasonic transducer. With superior piezoelectric performance (piezoelectric coefficient d33 ~ 600 pC/N), the lead-free transducer was found to exhibit a −6-dB bandwidth of 53% with an insertion loss of 18.7 dB. In vitro intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging of a human cadaver coronary artery was performed to demonstrate the potential of the lead-free transducer for biomedical imaging applications. This is the first time that a lead-free transducer has been used for IVUS imaging application. The experimental results suggest that the BZT-50BCT ceramic is a promising lead-free piezoelectric material for high-frequency intravascular imaging applications. PMID:25004492

  4. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence catheter with ultrasound guidance and blood attenuation correction

    PubMed Central

    Hossack, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging offers a new approach for characterizing atherosclerotic plaque, but random catheter positioning within the vessel lumen results in variable light attenuation and can yield inaccurate measurements. We hypothesized that NIRF measurements could be corrected for variable light attenuation through blood by tracking the location of the NIRF catheter with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). In this study, a combined NIRF-IVUS catheter was designed to acquire coregistered NIRF and IVUS data, an automated image processing algorithm was developed to measure catheter-to-vessel wall distances, and depth-dependent attenuation of the fluorescent signal was corrected by an analytical light propagation model. Performance of the catheter sensing distance correction method was evaluated in coronary artery phantoms and ex vivo arteries. The correction method produced NIRF estimates of fluorophore concentrations, in coronary artery phantoms, with an average root mean square error of 17.5%. In addition, the correction method resulted in a statistically significant improvement in correlation between spatially resolved NIRF measurements and known fluorophore spatial distributions in ex vivo arteries (from r=0.24 to 0.69, p<0.01, n=6). This work demonstrates that catheter-to-vessel wall distances, measured from IVUS images, can be employed to compensate for inaccuracies caused by variable intravascular NIRF sensing distances. PMID:23698320

  5. Selective Reduction Using Intravascular Potassium Chloride Injection after Laser Surgery for Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chmait, Ramen H; Kontopoulos, Eftichia V; Jackson, Marc; Horenstein, Janet; Timor-Tritsch, Ilan; Quintero, Rubén A

    2016-01-01

    Selective reduction (SR) via intravascular potassium chloride (KCl) injection is contraindicated in monochorionic twins due to the presence of placental vascular communications, which may serve as a conduit for inter-twin passage of KCl or allow exsanguination of the living twin into the demised twin. After successful selective laser photocoagulation of communicating vessels (SLPCV) for twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS), the twins' circulatory systems are rendered independent. Theoretically, intravascular KCl injection into one twin after successful SLPCV should not result in passage of the feticidal agent nor cause hemodynamic alterations in the co-twin. We describe 3 cases of 1,069 patients (0.3%) that underwent SLPCV for TTTS between 2003 and 2013 and subsequent SR. SLPCV was successfully completed at 180, 226, and 230 weeks' gestational age for Quintero stages III, IV, and III TTTS, respectively. SR via intravascular KCl injection was later performed at maternal request due to the risk of neurological compromise in one twin at 226, 254, and 236 weeks' gestational age. All co-twins survived after SR, and no neurological sequelae were suspected after birth. Further study is necessary before SR can be routinely considered after laser surgery for TTTS. PMID:26067899

  6. Intravascular haemolysis during prolonged running on asphalt and natural grass in long and middle distance runners.

    PubMed

    Janakiraman, Kamal; Shenoy, Shweta; Sandhu, Jaspal Singh

    2011-09-01

    Surface features such as uneven playing surfaces, low impact absorption capacity and inappropriate friction/traction characteristics are connected with injury prevalence whereas force impact during foot strike has been suggested to be an important mechanism of intravascular haemolysis during running. We aimed to evaluate intravascular haemolysis during running and compare the effect of running on two different types of surfaces on haemolysis. We selected two surfaces (asphalt and grass) on which these athletes usually run. Participants were randomly assigned to group A (asphalt) or group B (grass) with 10 athletes in each group. Each athlete completed one hour of running at the calculated target heart rate (60-70%). Venous blood samples were collected before and immediately after running. We measured unconjugated bilirubin (UBR) (mg · dl(-1)), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (μ · ml(-1)), haemoglobin (g · l(-1)) and serum ferritin (ng · ml(-1)) as indicators of haemolysis. Athletes who ran on grass demonstrated an increase in the haematological parameters (UBR: P < 0.01, LDH: P < 0.05) when compared to athletes who ran on asphalt (UBR: P < 0.05, LDH: P = 0.241). Our findings indicate that intravascular haemolysis occurs significantly after prolonged running. Furthermore, we conclude that uneven grass surface results in greater haemolysis compared to asphalt road. PMID:21751854

  7. A novel dual-frequency imaging method for intravascular ultrasound applications.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Chen, Yan; Wong, Chi-Man; Liu, Baoqiang; Dai, Jiyan; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-03-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), which is able to delineate internal structures of vessel wall with fine spatial resolution, has greatly enriched the knowledge of coronary atherosclerosis. A novel dual-frequency imaging method is proposed in this paper for intravascular imaging applications. A probe combined two ultrasonic transducer elements with different center frequencies (36 MHz and 78 MHz) is designed and fabricated with PMN-PT single crystal material. It has the ability to balance both imaging depth and resolution, which are important imaging parameters for clinical test. A dual-channel imaging platform is also proposed for real-time imaging, and this platform has been proven to support programmable processing algorithms, flexible imaging control, and raw RF data acquisition for IVUS applications. Testing results show that the -6 dB axial and lateral imaging resolutions of low-frequency ultrasound are 78 and 132 μm, respectively. In terms of high-frequency ultrasound, axial and lateral resolutions are determined to be as high as 34 and 106 μm. In vitro intravascular imaging on healthy swine aorta is conducted to demonstrate the performance of the dual-frequency imaging method for IVUS applications. PMID:25454093

  8. High frame-rate intravascular optical frequency-domain imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Han Saem; Jang, Sun-Joo; Kim, Kyunghun; Dan-Chin-Yu, Alexey V.; Shishkov, Milen; Bouma, Brett E.; Oh, Wang-Yuhl

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular optical frequency-domain imaging (OFDI), a second-generation optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology, enables imaging of the three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of the vessel wall following a short and nonocclusive clear liquid flush. Although 3D vascular visualization provides a greater appreciation of the vessel wall and intraluminal structures, a longitudinal imaging pitch that is several times bigger than the optical imaging resolution of the system has limited true high-resolution 3D imaging, mainly due to the slow scanning speed of previous imaging catheters. Here, we demonstrate high frame-rate intravascular OFDI in vivo, acquiring images at a rate of 350 frames per second. A custom-built, high-speed, and high-precision fiber-optic rotary junction provided uniform and high-speed beam scanning through a custom-made imaging catheter with an outer diameter of 0.87 mm. A 47-mm-long rabbit aorta was imaged in 3.7 seconds after a short contrast agent flush. The longitudinal imaging pitch was 34 μm, comparable to the transverse imaging resolution of the system. Three-dimensional volume-rendering showed greatly enhanced visualization of tissue microstructure and stent struts relative to what is provided by conventional intravascular imaging speeds. PMID:24466489

  9. Cerebral aneurysms treated with flow-diverting stents: Computational models using intravascular blood flow measurements

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Michael R; McGah, Patrick M; Aliseda, Alberto; Mourad, Pierre D; Nerva, John D; Vaidya, Sandeep S; Morton, Ryan P; Ghodke, Basavaraj V; Kim, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Computational fluid dynamics modeling is useful in the study of the hemodynamic environment of cerebral aneurysms, but patient-specific measurements of boundary conditions, such as blood flow velocity and pressure, have not been previously applied to the study of flow-diverting stents. We integrated patient-specific intravascular blood flow velocity and pressure measurements into computational models of aneurysms before and after treatment with flow-diverting stents to determine stent effects on aneurysm hemodynamics. Methods Blood flow velocity and pressure were measured in peri-aneurysmal locations using an intravascular dual-sensor pressure and Doppler velocity guidewire before and after flow-diverting stent treatment of four unruptured cerebral aneurysms. These measurements defined inflow and outflow boundary conditions for computational models. Intra-aneurysmal flow rates, wall shear stress and wall shear stress gradient were calculated. Results Measurements of inflow velocity and outflow pressure were successful in all four patients. Computational models incorporating these measurements demonstrated significant reductions in intra-aneurysmal wall shear stress and wall shear stress gradient, and a trend in reduced intra-aneurysmal blood flow. Conclusions Integration of intravascular dual-sensor guidewire measurements of blood flow velocity and blood pressure provided patient-specific computational models of cerebral aneurysms. Aneurysm treatment with flow-diverting stents reduces blood flow and hemodynamic shear stress in the aneurysm dome. PMID:23868162

  10. Automated Framework for Detecting Lumen and Media-Adventitia Borders in Intravascular Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhifan; Hau, William Kongto; Lu, Minhua; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Wu, Wanqing; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-07-01

    An automated framework for detecting lumen and media-adventitia borders in intravascular ultrasound images was developed on the basis of an adaptive region-growing method and an unsupervised clustering method. To demonstrate the capability of the framework, linear regression, Bland-Altman analysis and distance analysis were used to quantitatively investigate the correlation, agreement and spatial distance, respectively, between our detected borders and manually traced borders in 337 intravascular ultrasound images in vivo acquired from six patients. The results of these investigations revealed good correlation (r = 0.99), good agreement (>96.82% of results within the 95% confidence interval) and small average distance errors (lumen border: 0.08 mm, media-adventitia border: 0.10 mm) between the borders generated by the automated framework and the manual tracing method. The proposed framework was found to be effective in detecting lumen and media-adventitia borders in intravascular ultrasound images, indicating its potential for use in routine studies of vascular disease. PMID:25922134

  11. Integrated intravascular ultrasound and optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy with a 1-mm-diameter catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaosong; Gong, Xiaojing; Lin, Riqiang; Hau, William; Song, Liang

    2014-03-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) plays a vital role in assessing the severity of atherosclerosis and has greatly enriched our knowledge on atherosclerotic plaques. However, it mainly reveals the structural information of plaques. In contrast, spectroscopic and molecular photoacoustic imaging can potentially improve plaque composition identification, inflammation detection, and ultimately the stratification of plaque vulnerability and risk. In this work, we developed an integrated intravascular ultrasound and optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (IVUS-PAM) system with a single catheter as small as 1 mm in diameter, comparable to that of existing clinical IVUS catheters. In addition, by using a GRIN lens to focus the excitation laser pulse, the system provides an optical-diffraction limited photoacoustic lateral resolution as fine as 19.6 micrometers, ~10-fold finer than that of conventional intravascular photoacoustic imaging and existing IVUS technology. The system employs a custom-made miniaturized single-element ultrasonic transducer with a dimension of ~0.5 mm, a centre frequency of ~40 MHz, and a fractional bandwidth of ~60%. The IVUS-PAM can simultaneously acquire co-registered IVUS images with an axial resolution of ~40 micrometers and a lateral resolution of ~200 micrometers. In the future, IVUS-PAM may open up new opportunities for improved high-resolution vulnerable plaque imaging and image-guided stent deployment.

  12. Lead-free intravascular ultrasound transducer using BZT-50BCT ceramics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xingwei; Lam, Kwok Ho; Li, Xiang; Chen, Ruimin; Ren, Wei; Ren, Xiaobing; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-06-01

    This paper reports the fabrication and evaluation of a high-frequency ultrasonic transducer based on a new lead-free piezoelectric material for intravascular imaging application. Lead-free 0.5Ba(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3-0.5(Ba0.7Ca0.3)TiO4(BZT-50BCT) ceramic with a high dielectric constant (~2800) was employed to develop a high-frequency (~30 MHz) needle-type ultrasonic transducer. With superior piezoelectric performance (piezoelectric coefficient d33 ~ 600 pC/N), the lead-free transducer was found to exhibit a -6-dB bandwidth of 53% with an insertion loss of 18.7 dB. In vitro intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging of a human cadaver coronary artery was performed to demonstrate the potential of the lead-free transducer for biomedical imaging applications. This is the first time that a lead-free transducer has been used for IVUS imaging application. The experimental results suggest that the BZT-50BCT ceramic is a promising lead-free piezoelectric material for high-frequency intravascular imaging applications. PMID:25004492

  13. The intravascular low level laser irradiation (ILLLI) in treatment of psoriasis clinically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Nie, Fan; Shi, Hong-Min

    2005-07-01

    Objective: The title is research curative effect of intravascular low level laser irradiation (ILLLI) in treatment of psoriasis. Method: 478 patients with psoriasis from five groups to observe their efficacy. Group1 were treated by He-Ne laser combined with drug. Group 2 were treated by semi-conductor laser combined with drug. Group 3 were treated only by He-He laser. Group 4 were treated by semi-conductor laser. Group 5 were treated only by drug. The Ridit statistical analysis was applied to all of these data. The treatment of intravascular low level laser irradiation is as follow: laser power:4-5mw, 1 hour per day and 10 days as a period combined with vit C 2.0 g iv and inhalation of O2. Results: The clinical results: the near efficient rate was 100%, in group1-4, if combined with drugs it would be better. Ridit statistical analysis showed no significant difference between group1-4, p>0.05. The efficient rate 72.97% in group5.There were showed very significant difference with group1-4, p<0.01. 2.There were no significant differences between He-Ne laser (632.8nm) and semiconductor laser(650nm); 3.The efficacy of ILLLI in psoriasis was positive correlation to the ILLLI times. Conclusions: It can improve curative effect of intravascular low levellaser irradiation (ILLLI) in treatment of psoriasis.

  14. Verification of Oncentra brachytherapy planning using independent calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safian, N. A. M.; Abdullah, N. H.; Abdullah, R.; Chiang, C. S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the verification technique of treatment plan quality assurance for brachytherapy. It is aimed to verify the point doses in 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy between Oncentra Masterplan brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent calculation software at a region of rectum, bladder and prescription points for both pair ovoids and full catheter set ups. The Oncentra TPS output text files were automatically loaded into the verification programme that has been developed based on spreadsheets. The output consists of source coordinates, desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell time of a patient plan. The source strength and reference dates were entered into the programme and then dose point calculations were independently performed. The programme shows its results in a comparison of its calculated point doses with the corresponding Oncentra TPS outcome. From the total of 40 clinical cases that consisted of two fractions for 20 patients, the results that were given in term of percentage difference, it shows an agreement between TPS and independent calculation are in the range of 2%. This programme only takes a few minutes to be used is preferably recommended to be implemented as the verification technique in clinical brachytherapy dosimetry.

  15. Introduction of Transperineal Image-Guided Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aronowitz, Jesse N.

    2014-07-15

    The modern prostate brachytherapy procedure is characterized by ultrasound guidance, template assistance, and a return to a “closed” transperineal approach. This review traces the introduction and evolution of these elements and charts the development of the procedure from the ashes of previous, failed efforts.

  16. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730 Section 892.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide...

  17. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730 Section 892.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide...

  18. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730 Section 892.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide...

  19. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730 Section 892.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide...

  20. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds with transurethral light delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel approach to photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds utilizing an existing urinary catheter for transurethral light delivery. Two canine prostates were surgically implanted with brachyther- apy seeds under transrectal ultrasound guidance. One prostate was excised shortly after euthanasia and fixed in gelatin. The second prostate was imaged in the native tissue environment shortly after euthanasia. A urinary catheter was inserted in the urethra of each prostate. A 1-mm core diameter optical fiber coupled to a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into the urinary catheter. Light from the fiber was either directed mostly parallel to the fiber axis (i.e. end-fire fire) or mostly 90° to the fiber axis (i.e. side-fire fiber). An Ultrasonix SonixTouch scanner, transrectal ultrasound probe with curvilinear (BPC8-4) and linear (BPL9-5) arrays, and DAQ unit were utilized for synchronized laser light emission and photoacoustic signal acquisition. The implanted brachytherapy seeds were visualized at radial distances of 6-16 mm from the catheter. Multiple brachytherapy seeds were si- multaneously visualized with each array of the transrectal probe using both delay-and-sum (DAS) and short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming. This work is the first to demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds using a transurethral light delivery method.

  1. Three-dimensional ultrasound system for guided breast brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    De Jean, Paul; Beaulieu, Luc; Fenster, Aaron

    2009-11-15

    Breast-conserving surgery combined with subsequent radiation therapy is a standard procedure in breast cancer treatment. The disadvantage of whole-breast beam irradiation is that it requires 20-25 treatment days, which is inconvenient for patients with limited mobility or who reside far from the treatment center. However, interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is an irradiation method requiring only 5 treatment days and that delivers a lower radiation dose to the surrounding healthy tissue. It involves delivering radiation through {sup 192}Ir seeds placed inside the catheters, which are inserted into the breast. The catheters are attached to a HDR afterloader, which controls the seed placement within the catheters and irradiation times to deliver the proper radiation dose. One disadvantage of using HDR brachytherapy is that it requires performing at least one CT scan during treatment planning. The procedure at our institution involves the use of two CT scans. Performing CT scans requires moving the patient from the brachytherapy suite with catheters inserted in their breasts. One alternative is using three-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) to image the patient. In this study, the authors developed a 3DUS translation scanning system for use in breast brachytherapy. The new system was validated using CT, the current clinical standard, to image catheters in a breast phantom. Once the CT and 3DUS images were registered, the catheter trajectories were then compared. The results showed that the average angular separation between catheter trajectories was 2.4 deg., the average maximum trajectory separation was 1.0 mm, and the average mean trajectory separation was found to be 0.7 mm. In this article, the authors present the 3DUS translation scanning system's capabilities as well as its potential to be used as the primary treatment planning imaging modality in breast brachytherapy.

  2. Attitude and practice of brachytherapy in India: a study based on the survey amongst attendees of Annual Meeting of Indian Brachytherapy Society

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Daya Nand; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Rath, Goura Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We performed a survey amongst attendees of the 4th Annual Meeting of Indian Brachytherapy Society to study the patterns of brachytherapy practice and attitude towards brachytherapy use. Material and methods A 19-point questionnaire was designed and e-mailed to the attendees immediately after the conference. Descriptive analysis of the responses were done and satisfaction index was used as a tool for evaluation of the program effectiveness. Binomial test was used to assess the difference between distributions of responses and Mann-Whitney U test was used to assess the correlation between responses. P value (2-tailed) of < 0.05 was taken significant for all statistical analysis. Results Of a total of 202 attendees, 90 responded to the survey (response rate: 44.5%). Seventy-two percent belonged to an academic institute while 28% belonged to non-academic institutes. Eighty-six percent were radiation oncologists and 10% were medical physicists. Eighty-nine percent respondents used high-dose-rate, 14% – pulse-dose-rate, and 13% used low-dose-rate brachytherapy facility. Orthogonal X-rays, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging was used for brachytherapy planning by 56%, 69%, and 14%, respectively. Ninety-three percent of them thought that lack of training is a hurdle in practicing brachytherapy and 92% opined that brachytherapy dedicated meetings can change their perception about brachytherapy. Seventy percent respondents admitted to make some changes in their practice patterns after attending this meeting. Ninety-seven percent of them would like to attend future meetings and 98% felt the need to include live workshops, hands on demonstrations, and video presentations in the scientific programme. Conclusions The survey highlights a positive attitude towards increasing brachytherapy use, and may serve as an important guiding tool in designing teaching and training programmes; thus overcoming the hurdles in successful and widespread use of a quality

  3. Quality Assurance Issues for Computed Tomography-, Ultrasound-, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cormack, Robert A.

    2008-05-01

    The requirements of quality assurance (QA) for both brachytherapy and imaging devices are well-defined, but image-guided brachytherapy has raised new issues. Image guidance in brachytherapy involves the transition from reference point dosimetry using films to volumetric imaging such as computed tomography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging for treatment planning and guidance of applicator, needle, or seed placement. The QA of these devices might not reflect the conditions of use in brachytherapy or the requirements of brachytherapy treatment planning. Image interpretation becomes much more important with image-guided brachytherapy. The success of a procedure could depend on the interpretation of a single image in a calibration phase done under the time pressures of the operative setting. This change has implications at the level of treatment, the process, and the field of brachytherapy as a whole. The QA concerns arising from brachytherapy procedures using ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging guidance are discussed, as are the problems associated with using imaging in an interventional setting. This report was intended to indicate the QA concerns arising from the convergence of brachytherapy and imaging-highlighting areas in which technical improvements are needed.

  4. A Feasibility Study of an Intravascular Imaging Antenna to Image Atherosclerotic Plaques in Swine Using 3.0 T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Zhao, Lei; Ma, Xiaohai; Zhang, Zhaoqi; Fan, Zhanming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of an intravascular imaging antenna to image abdominal aorta atherosclerotic plaque in swine using 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Atherosclerotic model was established in 6 swine. After 8 months, swine underwent an MR examination, which was performed using an intravascular imaging guide-wire, and images of the common iliac artery and the abdominal aorta were acquired. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was performed in the right femoral artery; images at the same position as for the MR examination were obtained. The luminal border and external elastic membrane of the targeted arteries were individually drawn in the MR and IVUS images. After co-registering these images, the vessel, lumen, and vessel wall areas and the plaque burden in the same lesions imaged using different modalities were calculated and compared. The diagnostic accuracy of intravascular MR examination in delineating the vessel wall and detecting plaques were analyzed and compared using IVUS. Results Compared with IVUS, good agreement was found between MRI and IVUS for delineating vessel, lumen, and vessel wall areas and plaque burden (r value: 0.98, 0.95, 0.96 and 0.91, respectively; P<0.001). Conclusion Compared with IVUS, using an intravascular imaging guide-wire to image deep seated arteries allowed determination of the vessel, lumen and vessel wall areas and plaque size and burden. This may provide an alternative method for detecting atherosclerotic plaques in the future. PMID:25259585

  5. An electro-responsive hydrogel for intravascular applications: an in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Verbrugghe, Peter; Verhoeven, Jelle; Coudyzer, Walter; Verbeken, Eric; Dubruel, Peter; Mendes, Eduardo; Stam, Frank; Meuris, Bart; Herijgers, Paul

    2015-11-01

    There is a growing interest in using hydrogels for biomedical applications, because of more favourable characteristics. Some of these hydrogels can be activated by using particular stimuli, for example electrical fields. These stimuli can change the hydrogel shape in a predefined way. It could make them capable of adaptation to patient-specific anatomy even post-implantation. This is the first paper aiming to describe in vivo studies of an electro-responsive, Pluronic F127 based hydrogel, for intravascular applications. Pluronic methacrylic acid hydrogel (PF127/MANa) was in vitro tested for its haemolytic and cytotoxic effects. Minimal invasive implantation in the carotid artery of sheep was used to evaluate its medium-term biological effects, through biochemical, macroscopic, radiographic, and microscopic evaluation. Indirect and direct testing of the material gave no indication of the haemolytic effects of the material. Determination of fibroblast viability after 24 h of incubation in an extract of the hydrogel showed no cytotoxic effects. Occlusion was obtained within 1 h following in vivo implantation. Evaluation at time of autopsy showed a persistent occlusion with no systemic effects, no signs of embolization and mild effects on the arterial wall. An important proof-of-concept was obtained showing biocompatibility and effectiveness of a pluronic based electro-responsive hydrogel for obtaining an arterial occlusion with limited biological impact. So the selected pluronic-methacrylic acid based hydrogel can be used as an endovascular occlusion device. More importantly it is the first step in further development of electro-active hydrogels for a broad range of intra-vascular applications (e.g. system to prevent endoleakage in aortic aneurysm treatment, intra-vascular drug delivery). PMID:26474577

  6. All-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colchester, Richard J.; Noimark, Sacha; Mosse, Charles A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-02-01

    High frequency ultrasound probes such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters can be invaluable for guiding minimally invasive medical procedures in cardiology such as coronary stent placement and ablation. With current-generation ultrasound probes, ultrasound is generated and received electrically. The complexities involved with fabricating these electrical probes can result in high costs that limit their clinical applicability. Additionally, it can be challenging to achieve wide transmission bandwidths and adequate wideband reception sensitivity with small piezoelectric elements. Optical methods for transmitting and receiving ultrasound are emerging as alternatives to their electrical counterparts. They offer several distinguishing advantages, including the potential to generate and detect the broadband ultrasound fields (tens of MHz) required for high resolution imaging. In this study, we developed a miniature, side-looking, pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging, with fibre-optic transmission and reception. The axial resolution was better than 70 microns, and the imaging depth in tissue was greater than 1 cm. Ultrasound transmission was performed by photoacoustic excitation of a carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite material; ultrasound reception, with a fibre-optic Fabry-Perot cavity. Ex vivo tissue studies, which included healthy swine tissue and diseased human tissue, demonstrated the strong potential of this technique. To our knowledge, this is the first study to achieve an all-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging. The potential for performing all-optical B-mode imaging (2D and 3D) with virtual arrays of transmit/receive elements, and hybrid imaging with pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic sensing are discussed.

  7. Frequency-Domain Intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography of the Femoropopliteal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Karnabatidis, Dimitris Katsanos, Konstantinos; Paraskevopoulos, Ioannis; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Siablis, Dimitris

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a catheter-based imaging method that employs near-infrared light to produce high-resolution intravascular images. The authors report the safety and feasibility and illustrate common imaging findings of frequency-domain OCT (FD-OCT) imaging of the femoropopliteal artery in a series of 20 patients who underwent infrainguinal angioplasty. Methods: After crossing the lesion of interest, OCT was performed with a dextrose saline flush technique with simultaneous obstructive manual groin compression. An automatic pullback FD-OCT device was employed (each scan acquiring 54 mm of vessel lumen in 271 consecutive frames). OCT images were acquired before and after balloon dilatation and following provisional stenting if necessary and were evaluated for baseline characteristics of plaque or in-stent restenosis (ISR), vessel wall trauma after angioplasty, presence of thrombus, stent apposition, and tissue prolapse. Imaging follow-up was not included in this study's protocol. Results: Twenty-seven obstructive lesions (18 cases of de novo atherosclerosis and 9 of ISR) of the femoropopliteal artery were imaged and 148 acquisitions were analyzed in total. High-resolution intravascular OCT imaging with effective blood clearance was achieved in 93.9%. Failure was mainly attributed to preocclusive proximal lesions and/or collateral flow. Mixed features of lipid pool areas, calcium deposits, necrotic core, and fibrosis were identified in all of the imaged atherosclerotic lesions, whereas ISR was purely fibrotic. After balloon angioplasty, OCT identified extensive intimal tears in all cases and one case of severe dissection that biplane subtraction angiography failed to identify. Conclusions: Infrainguinal frequency-domain optical coherence tomography is safe and feasible and may provide intravascular high-resolution imaging of the femoropopliteal artery during infrainguinal angioplasty procedures.

  8. Endovascular Management of Lost or Misplaced Intravascular Objects: Experiences of 12 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Florian Schernthaner, Ruediger Egbert; Dirisamer, Albert; Schoder, Maria; Funovics, Martin; Kettenbach, Joachim; Langenberger, Herbert; Stadler, Alfred; Loewe, Christian; Lammer, Johannes; Cejna, Manfred

    2008-05-15

    This paper reports our experience with endovascular techniques for the retrieval of lost or misplaced intravascular objects. Over 12 years, 78 patients were referred for interventional retrieval of intravascular foreign objects. In this retrospective study, radiological procedure records and patients' medical records were reviewed to determine the exact removal procedure in every case, to report success rates, and to identify significant procedure-related complications. Written, informed consent was obtained from all patients prior to the intervention; this retrospective analysis was performed according to the guidelines of the Institutional Review Board. Thirty-six of seventy-eight foreign objects (46%) were located in the venous system, 27 of 78 (35%) in the right heart, and 15 of 78 (19%) in the pulmonary arteries. For foreign object removal, in 71 of 78 (91%) cases a snare loop was used, in 6 of 78 (8%) cases a sidewinder catheter combined with a snare loop was used, and in 1 case (1%) a sidewinder catheter alone was used for foreign object removal. In 68 of 78 (87%) cases, primary success was achieved. In 3 of 78 cases (4%), foreign objects were successfully mobilized to the femoral vessels and surgically removed. In 7 of 78 cases (9%), complete removal of the foreign object was not possible. In 5 of 78 cases (6%), minor complications occurred during the removal procedure. In conclusion, endovascular retrieval of lost or misplaced intravascular objects is highly effective, with relatively few minor complications. On the basis of our findings, these techniques should be considered as the therapy of choice.

  9. Trends in the Utilization of Brachytherapy in Cervical Cancer in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Kathy; Milosevic, Michael; Fyles, Anthony; Pintilie, Melania; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the trends in brachytherapy use in cervical cancer in the United States and to identify factors and survival benefits associated with brachytherapy treatment. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 7359 patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) between 1988 and 2009. Propensity score matching was used to adjust for differences between patients who received brachytherapy and those who did not from 2000 onward (after the National Cancer Institute alert recommending concurrent chemotherapy). Results: Sixty-three percent of the 7359 women received brachytherapy in combination with EBRT, and 37% received EBRT alone. The brachytherapy utilization rate has decreased from 83% in 1988 to 58% in 2009 (P<.001), with a sharp decline of 23% in 2003 to 43%. Factors associated with higher odds of brachytherapy use include younger age, married (vs single) patients, earlier years of diagnosis, earlier stage and certain SEER regions. In the propensity score-matched cohort, brachytherapy treatment was associated with higher 4-year cause-specific survival (CSS; 64.3% vs 51.5%, P<.001) and overall survival (OS; 58.2% vs 46.2%, P<.001). Brachytherapy treatment was independently associated with better CSS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.71), and OS (HR 0.66; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.74). Conclusions: This population-based analysis reveals a concerning decline in brachytherapy utilization and significant geographic disparities in the delivery of brachytherapy in the United States. Brachytherapy use is independently associated with significantly higher CSS and OS and should be implemented in all feasible cases.

  10. Percutaneous retrograde revascularization of the occluded celiac artery for chronic mesenteric ischemia using intravascular ultrasound guidance.

    PubMed

    Jain, Gagan; Pandit, Bhagya Narayan; Goyal, Mayank; Trehan, Vijaya Kumar

    2013-07-01

    A 47-year-old male presented with a triad of postprandial abdominal pain, food fear and significant weight loss since 1 year suggestive of chronic mesenteric ischemia. CT angiogram revealed chronic total occlusion of the celiac artery (CA), inferior mesenteric artery and 80-90 % stenosis of the proximal superior mesenteric artery (SMA). After SMA stenting, successful retrograde recanalisation of chronically occluded CA through pancreatico-duodenal arcade using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance was done when standard tools failed. The role of IVUS in such challenging lesions is described in the following case report. PMID:23526494

  11. Stiff fingers as an unwanted side effect of intravascular tadalafil gel abuse.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, E M; Yeung, D; West, C C; Tadros, A; Curnier, A

    2014-03-01

    The internet provides the public with unregulated access to a wide range of medications. We present the case of a 43-year-old man who purchased oral tadalafil gel on the internet and injected it into his left radial artery. He presented 48 hours after injection with signs of ischaemia distal to the injection site requiring a combination of medical and surgical treatment. This unique case highlights the potential dangers of unregulated access to medication and the consequences of intravascular injection of oral gels. PMID:24780660

  12. Acute kidney injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation due to mercuric chloride poisoning.

    PubMed

    Dhanapriya, J; Gopalakrishnan, N; Arun, V; Dineshkumar, T; Sakthirajan, R; Balasubramaniyan, T; Haris, M

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic heavy metal and occurs in organic and inorganic forms. Inorganic mercury includes elemental mercury and mercury salts. Mercury salts are usually white powder or crystals, and widely used in indigenous medicines and folk remedies in Asia. Inorganic mercury poisoning causes acute kidney injury (AKI) and gastrointestinal manifestations and can be life-threatening. We describe a case with unknown substance poisoning who developed AKI and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis. Later, the consumed substance was proven to be mercuric chloride. His renal failure improved over time, and his creatinine normalized after 2 months. PMID:27194836

  13. Intestinal Intravascular Large B-cell Lymphoma Mimicking Ulcerative Colitis with Secondary Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kaneyuki, Daisuke; Komeno, Yukiko; Yoshimoto, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Naoki; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman with ulcerative colitis (UC) was admitted to our hospital for renal dysfunction and progressive anemia. Colonoscopy revealed intestinal lesions and pathological findings showed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL). According to the polymerase chain reaction analysis of sequential rectal specimens, we concluded that she suffered from intestinal BCL, not UC. After chemotherapy, her renal function progressed to nephrotic syndrome. The pathological findings of renal biopsy specimens indicated membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN). Chemotherapy was continued and led to the remission of BCL and MPGN. We herein describe the first case of intestinal IVLBCL mimicking UC with secondary MPGN. PMID:27580553

  14. Intravascular Papillary Endothelial Hyperplasia: Diagnostic Sequence and Literature Review of an Orofacial Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Guledgud, Mahima V.; Patil, Karthikeya; Saikrishna, Degala; Yelamali, Tejesh

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia or Masson's tumor is a rare reactive disease of vascular origin characterized by exuberant proliferation of endothelial cells notably occurring within blood vessels of head, neck, and extremities. The importance of this entity is its ability to mimic a variety of diseases both benign and malignant in the orofacial region. Here, we present a case of Masson's tumor within the masseter muscle in a 40-year-old female with emphasis on the sequential investigative procedures performed to diagnose this entity. PMID:24891960

  15. Multispectral scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) technique for intravascular diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongtao; Bec, Julien; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Lam, Matthew; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Marcu, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) system designed to continuously acquire fluorescence emission and to reconstruct fluorescence lifetime images (FLIM) from a luminal surface by using a catheter-based optical probe with rotary joint and pull-back device. The ability of the system to temporally and spectrally resolve the fluorescence emission from tissue was validated using standard dyes and tissue phantoms (e.g., ex vivo pig aorta phantom). Current results demonstrate that this system is capable to reliably resolve the fluorescence emission of multiple fluorophores located in the lumen; and suggest its potential for intravascular detection of distinct biochemical features of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:22808425

  16. Specific imaging of atherosclerotic plaque lipids with two-wavelength intravascular photoacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Jansen, Krista; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; van Soest, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    The lipid content in plaques is an important marker for identifying atherosclerotic lesions and disease states. Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging can be used to visualize lipids in the artery. In this study, we further investigated lipid detection in the 1.7-µm spectral range. By exploiting the relative difference between the IVPA signal strengths at 1718 and 1734 nm, we could successfully detect and differentiate between the plaque lipids and peri-adventitial fat in human coronary arteries ex vivo. Our study demonstrates that IVPA imaging can positively identify atherosclerotic plaques using only two wavelengths, which could enable rapid data acquisition in vivo. PMID:26417500

  17. Stiff fingers as an unwanted side effect of intravascular tadalafil gel abuse

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, EM; Yeung, D; Tadros, A; Curnier, A

    2014-01-01

    The internet provides the public with unregulated access to a wide range of medications. We present the case of a 43-year-old man who purchased oral tadalafil gel on the internet and injected it into his left radial artery. He presented 48 hours after injection with signs of ischaemia distal to the injection site requiring a combination of medical and surgical treatment. This unique case highlights the potential dangers of unregulated access to medication and the consequences of intravascular injection of oral gels. PMID:24780660

  18. Surgical removal of an intravascular ultrasonography catheter captured in a stent after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hiroya; Asada, Tatsuro; Gan, Kunio; Yamada, Akitoshi; Sato, Masanobu

    2011-03-01

    A-79-year-old woman underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to the right coronary artery (RCA) for effort angina, followed by intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS) to ascertain stent expansion. The IVUS catheter became entangled in the stent and could not be withdrawn from the outside. The patient was transferred to our hospital for its surgical removal. For the emergent surgery, we opened the stent region in the RCA and directly removed the IVUS catheter with the twisted stent. Additional coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) involving three vessels was performed. She was discharged 42 days after surgery. PMID:21448795

  19. Prostate Cancer-Associated Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation with Excessive Fibrinolysis Treated with Degarelix

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Shawn Y.; Taverna, Josephine; Jokerst, Clint; Enzler, Thomas; Hammode, Emad; Rogowitz, Elisa; Green, Myke R.; Babiker, Hani M.

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) with excessive fibrinolysis (XFL) is a rare and acute life-threatening variant of DIC in patients with prostate cancer. Patients present with coagulopathy, hypofibrinogenemia, and systemic bleeding. We describe a case of DIC XFL caused by prostate cancer (PC) successfully treated with a single injection of degarelix, a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor antagonist. This led to prompt control of the patient's coagulopathy within ten days of treatment. Our case highlights features of this rare and devastating hemorrhagic complication of PC along with a fast-acting and effective therapeutic drug option. PMID:26613055

  20. Rash, disseminated intravascular coagulation and legionella: Episode 10 and a rewind into the past

    PubMed Central

    Thalanayar, Prashanth M.; Holguin, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the most common cause of legionellosis and is one of the organisms causing atypical pneumonia. We report the presentation of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and skin rash in a single case of severe Legionella pneumonia. The unique clinical presentation of a diffuse rash diagnosed as purpura fulminans and the unpredictable variations encountered during the diagnostic work-up of the case make this write-up crucial. This article synthesizes all reported cases of L. pneumonia associated with cutaneous manifestations as well as cases presenting with DIC. Furthermore, this manuscript illustrates the correlation between cutaneous and coagulopathic manifestations, and morbidity and mortality from L. pneumonia. PMID:26236615

  1. Acute kidney injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation due to mercuric chloride poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Dhanapriya, J.; Gopalakrishnan, N.; Arun, V.; Dineshkumar, T.; Sakthirajan, R.; Balasubramaniyan, T.; Haris, M.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic heavy metal and occurs in organic and inorganic forms. Inorganic mercury includes elemental mercury and mercury salts. Mercury salts are usually white powder or crystals, and widely used in indigenous medicines and folk remedies in Asia. Inorganic mercury poisoning causes acute kidney injury (AKI) and gastrointestinal manifestations and can be life-threatening. We describe a case with unknown substance poisoning who developed AKI and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis. Later, the consumed substance was proven to be mercuric chloride. His renal failure improved over time, and his creatinine normalized after 2 months. PMID:27194836

  2. A Case of Cystic Adventitial Degeneration of the Left Popliteal Artery Diagnosed by Intravascular Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Niizeki, Takeshi; Ishino, Mitsunori; Kitahara, Tatsuro; Yamauchi, So; Ikeno, Eiichiro; Kubota, Isao

    2016-01-01

    An 87-year-old male was admitted with intermittent claudication of the left calf. We performed lower extremity angiography, which revealed stenosis of the left popliteal artery. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) image correctly identified the cystic appearance of visualized extravascular hypodensity, causing extrinsic compression of the lumen. We diagnosed the condition as cystic adventitial degeneration (CAD) of the popliteal artery. We operated a resection of a cyst with the artery and replaced the autovein graft (saphenous vein). After surgery, the patient was free of symptoms. CAD is a rare disease; thus, our IVUS findings may provide unique diagnostic clues in patients with CAD. PMID:26949345

  3. Thrombotic Occlusion during Intravascular Ultrasonography-Guided Percutaneous Coronary Intervention of Stumpless Chronic Total Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Un Joo; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Cheolhyun; Kim, Kwang-Yeol; Kim, Weon

    2014-12-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of stumpless chronic total occlusion (CTO) lesions with a side branch stemming from the occlusion have a significantly lower treatment success rate because physicians cannot identify an accurate entry point with only conventional angiographic images. An intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS)-guided wiring technique might be useful for the penetration of stumpless CTO. We recently experienced thrombotic occlusion during an IVUS-guided stumpless CTO procedure. The cause of the thrombosis is not completely understood; the thrombosis may have been associated with the long use of the IVUS catheter. Special precautions should be taken to prevent thrombus in such cases. PMID:25568847

  4. Physical analysis of intravascular low-reation-lever laser irradiation therapy on improving the hemorheologic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoran; Lu, Jian; Wang, Yawei; Ni, Xiaowu

    1999-09-01

    Many clinical results showed that intravascular low-reaction- lever laser irradiation therapy (ILLLI) could improve the hemorheologic characteristics. The red blood cell (RBC) aggregation index, the blood viscosity and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were reduced significantly by treatment with ILLLI. In this paper, a physical process is proposed that laser makes the H-bond parted, which would give rise to a decrease in the RBC aggregation index. According to the principle of hemorheologic characteristics, the blood viscosity and the ESR reduce with the decrease in the RBC aggregation index.

  5. Intravascular low-level laser irradiation in the treatment of psoriasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Shi, Hong-Min; Zhang, Hui-Guo; Zhang, Mei-Jue; Xu, Jian; Zhou, Min; Hu, Guo-Qiang

    1998-11-01

    Liu TCY et al have put forward the biological information model on low intensity laser irradiation (BIML): low intensity laser irradiation couples with intracellular messenger through the chromophore absorption in the cell membrane: hot-color laser irradiation activates cAMP phosphodiestererase through Gi protein, or activates phosphoinositide phospholipase C through G protein, or activates one of receptor-associated kinases: cAMP; cold- color laser irradiation activates adenylate cyclase through Gs protein: cAMP$ARUP. In this paper, under the guidance of BIML, we applied the intravascular low intensity He-He laser irradiation on blood to a patient of idiopathic edema, and succeeded.

  6. Iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain tumours - a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Iodine-125 brachytherapy has been applied to brain tumours since 1979. Even though the physical and biological characteristics make these implants particularly attractive for minimal invasive treatment, the place for stereotactic brachytherapy is still poorly defined. An extensive review of the literature has been performed, especially concerning indications, results and complications. Iodine-125 seeds have been implanted in astrocytomas I-III, glioblastomas, metastases and several other tumour entities. Outcome data given in the literature are summarized. Complications are rare in carefully selected patients. All in all, for highly selected patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent primary or metastatic tumours, this method provides encouraging survival rates with relatively low complication rates and a good quality of life. PMID:22394548

  7. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Zamdborg, Leonid; Sebastian, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy procedures using magnetic resonance images and electromagnetic tracking. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction, imaging artifacts, and other notable properties of plastic and titanium applicators in gynecologic treatments are reviewed. The accuracy, noise performance, and limitations of electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction are discussed. Several newly developed applicators for accelerated partial breast irradiation and gynecologic treatments are also reviewed. New hypofractionated high dose rate treatment schemes in prostate cancer and accelerated partial breast irradiation are presented. PMID:26203277

  8. Image-Guided Radiotherapy and -Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  9. Cataract extraction after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, G.E.; Jost, B.F.; Snyder, W.I.; Fuller, D.G.; Birch, D.G. )

    1991-05-01

    Thirteen eyes of 55 consecutive patients treated with brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid developed postirradiation cataracts. Cataract development was more common in older patients and in patients with larger and more anterior tumors. Eleven eyes had extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Initial visual improvement occurred in 91% of eyes, with an average improvement of 5.5 lines. Visual acuity was maintained at 20/60 or better in 55% of the eyes over an average period of follow-up of 24 months (range, 6 to 40 months). These data suggest that, visually, cataract extraction can be helpful in selected patients who develop a cataract after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid.

  10. [Basic principles and results of brachytherapy in gynecological oncology].

    PubMed

    Kanaev, S V; Turkevich, V G; Baranov, S B; Savel'eva, V V

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental basics of contact radiation therapy (brachytherapy) for gynecological cancer are presented. During brachytherapy the principles of conformal radiotherapy should be implemented, the aim of which is to sum the maximum possible dose of radiation to the tumor and decrease the dose load in adjacent organs and tissues, which allows reducing the frequency of radiation damage at treatment of primary tumors. It is really feasible only on modern technological level, thanks to precision topometry preparation, optimal computer dosimetrical and radiobiological planning of each session and radiotherapy in general. Successful local and long-term results of the contact radiation therapy for cancer of cervix and endometrium are due to optimal anatomical and topometrical ratio of the tumor localization, radioactive sources, and also physical and radiobiological laws of distribution and effects of ionizing radiation, the dose load accounting rules. PMID:25552060

  11. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  12. High speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging with fast optical parametric oscillator laser at 1.7 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Zhonglie; Ma, Teng; Li, Jiawen; Wiedmann, Maximilian T.; Huang, Shenghai; Yu, Mingyue; Kirk Shung, K.; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-08-01

    Intravascular photoacoustic imaging at 1.7 μm spectral band has shown promising capabilities for lipid-rich vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque detection. In this work, we report a high speed catheter-based integrated intravascular photoacoustic/intravascular ultrasound (IVPA/IVUS) imaging system with a 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator laser at 1725 nm. A lipid-mimicking phantom and atherosclerotic rabbit abdominal aorta were imaged at 1 frame per second, which is two orders of magnitude faster than previously reported in IVPA imaging with the same wavelength. Clear photoacoustic signals by the absorption of lipid rich deposition demonstrated the ability of the system for high speed vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques detection.

  13. An Elderly Lady with Fever of Unknown Etiology and Severe Pulmonary Hypertension: Intravascular Lymphoma—An Elusive Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lantigua, Luis; Niazi, Masooma; Diaz-Fuentes, Gilda

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with malignancy, especially adenocarcinoma, is a well-known entity and is included in group V of the WHO classification. Intravascular lymphoma is a rare type of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, characterized by selective intravascular growth of malignant lymphocytes, aggressive behavior, and often a fatal course. Most of the time, diagnosis is postmortem due to the rarity and the protean manifestations of the disease. We present a rare case of an elderly patient presenting with severe pulmonary hypertension, fever of unknown etiology (FUO), and lymphadenopathy. Extensive evaluation searching for the etiology of her FUO and PH was noncontributory. The diagnosis of intravascular lymphoma was finally reached by the performance of a random abdominal fat pad biopsy and the patient was started on immunochemotherapy. She continues the follow up after 6 cycles of R-CHOP with no further febrile episodes and steady improvement in exercise tolerance. PMID:24454389

  14. Integral-transport-based deterministic brachytherapy dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi

    2003-01-01

    We developed a transport-equation-based deterministic algorithm for computing three-dimensional brachytherapy dose distributions. The deterministic algorithm has been based on the integral transport equation. The algorithm provided us with the capability of computing dose distributions for multiple isotropic point and/or volumetric sources in a homogenous/heterogeneous medium. The algorithm results have been benchmarked against the results from the literature and MCNP results for isotropic point sources and volumetric sources.

  15. Brachytherapy dosimetry parameters calculated for a new 103Pd source.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Mark J; Melhus, Christopher S; Kirk, Bernadette L

    2004-09-01

    A new brachytherapy source having 103Pd adsorbed onto silver beads has been designed. The dose distributions of this source have been characterized using version 5 of the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These results are presented in terms of the updated AAPM Task Group No. 43 (TG-43U1) formalism, dosimetry parameters, and recommended calculation methodology. PMID:15487726

  16. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase {>=}25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease {>=}25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  17. Cable attachment for a radioactive brachytherapy source capsule

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Ian G; Pierce, Larry A

    2006-07-18

    In cancer brachytherapy treatment, a small californium-252 neutron source capsule is attached to a guide cable using a modified crimping technique. The guide cable has a solid cylindrical end, and the attachment employs circumferential grooves micromachined in the solid cable end. The attachment was designed and tested, and hardware fabricated for use inside a radioactive hot cell. A welding step typically required in other cable attachments is avoided.

  18. Computerized Tomography: Its Role in Interstitial Brachytherapy of Pelvic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Taylor, Judith; Jones, E.O.; McAnulty, Bruce

    1986-01-01

    The advantages of computerized tomography (CT) in the treatment planning of external beam radiation therapy have been shown in several studies. The authors extended the use of CT to the interstitial brachytherapy treatment planning of pelvic malignancies. CT was found to be invaluable in localizing pelvic tumors, selecting implant techniques, and checking the accuracy of the implant. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:3950985

  19. Brachytherapy in Lip Carcinoma: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Guibert, Mireille; David, Isabelle; Vergez, Sebastien; Rives, Michel; Filleron, Thomas; Bonnet, Jacques; Delannes, Martine

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for local control and relapse-free survival in squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas of the lips. We compared two groups: one with tumors on the skin and the other with tumors on the lip. Patients and methods: All patients had been treated at Claudius Regaud Cancer Centre from 1990 to 2008 for squamous cell or basal cell carcinoma. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy was performed with iridium 192 wires according to the Paris system rules. On average, the dose delivered was 65 Gy. Results: 172 consecutive patients were included in our study; 69 had skin carcinoma (squamous cell or basal cell), and 92 had squamous cell mucosal carcinoma. The average follow-up time was 5.4 years. In the skin cancer group, there were five local recurrences and one lymph node recurrence. In the mucosal cancer group, there were ten local recurrences and five lymph node recurrences. The 8-year relapse-free survival for the entire population was 80%. The 8-year relapse-free survival was 85% for skin carcinoma 75% for mucosal carcinoma, with no significant difference between groups. The functional results were satisfactory for 99% of patients, and the cosmetic results were satisfactory for 92%. Maximal toxicity observed was Grade 2. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate brachytherapy can be used to treat lip carcinomas at Stages T1 and T2 as the only treatment with excellent results for local control and relapse-free survival. The benefits of brachytherapy are also cosmetic and functional, with 91% of patients having no side effects.

  20. 3-T MR-guided brachytherapy for gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Tina; Egger, Jan; Damato, Antonio; Schmidt, Ehud J; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2012-11-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Standard treatment for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancer cases includes external-beam radiation followed by brachytherapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is beneficial in diagnostic evaluation, in mapping the tumor location to tailor radiation dose and in monitoring the tumor response to treatment. Initial studies of MR guidance in gynecologic brachytherapy demonstrate the ability to optimize tumor coverage and reduce radiation dose to normal tissues, resulting in improved outcomes for patients. In this article, we describe a methodology to aid applicator placement and treatment planning for 3 Tesla (3-T) MR-guided brachytherapy that was developed specifically for gynecologic cancers. This methodology has been used in 18 cases from September 2011 to May 2012 in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating (AMIGO) suite at Brigham and Women's Hospital. AMIGO comprises state-of-the-art tools for MR imaging, image analysis and treatment planning. An MR sequence using three-dimensional (3D)-balanced steady-state free precession in a 3-T MR scanner was identified as the best sequence for catheter identification with ballooning artifact at the tip. 3D treatment planning was performed using MR images. Items in development include software designed to support virtual needle trajectory planning that uses probabilistic bias correction, graph-based segmentation and image registration algorithms. The results demonstrate that 3-T MR image guidance has a role in gynecologic brachytherapy. These novel developments have the potential to improve targeted treatment to the tumor while sparing the normal tissues. PMID:22898699

  1. PSA Kinetics and PSA Bounce Following Permanent Seed Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita Gillan, Caitlin B.Sc.; Yeung, Ivan Ph.D.; Austen, Lynette; McLean, Michael; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence, timing, and magnitude of the benign prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy and correlate the bounce with clinical and/or dosimetric factors. Methods and Materials: From March 1999 to August 2003, a total of 292 men received {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy without androgen deprivation or supplemental beam radiotherapy and have PSA follow-up >30 months. Implants were preplanned using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and performed under transrectal ultrasound/fluoroscopy guidance using preloaded needles. A PSA bounce is defined as an increase {>=}0.2 ng/ml with spontaneous return to prebounce level or lower. Results: Resolved PSA bounces were seen in 40% of men with follow-up >30 months. Median onset was 15 months, and median magnitude was 0.76 ng/ml. Magnitude >2 ng/ml was seen in 15%. The only clinical or dosimetric factor predictive of bounce in multivariate analysis was younger age. Median time to increasing PSA level indicative of failure was 30 months. Conclusions: Benign PSA bounces are common after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy, especially in younger men. An increase >2 ng/ml above the nadir was seen in 15%. Magnitude of increase does not distinguish bounce from failure. Time to the start of the PSA increase can be helpful, but is not absolute. The PSA bounce does not predict subsequent failure. Caution is advised in interpreting an early increasing PSA level in the first 30 months after {sup 125}I brachytherapy in favorable-risk patients.

  2. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  3. Accelerated partial breast irradiation utilizing brachytherapy: patient selection and workflow.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chirag; Wobb, Jessica; Manyam, Bindu; Khan, Atif; Vicini, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) represents an evolving technique that is a standard of care option in appropriately selected woman following breast conserving surgery. While multiple techniques now exist to deliver APBI, interstitial brachytherapy represents the technique used in several randomized trials (National Institute of Oncology, GEC-ESTRO). More recently, many centers have adopted applicator-based brachytherapy to deliver APBI due to the technical complexities of interstitial brachytherapy. The purpose of this article is to review methods to evaluate and select patients for APBI, as well as to define potential workflow mechanisms that allow for the safe and effective delivery of APBI. Multiple consensus statements have been developed to guide clinicians on determining appropriate candidates for APBI. However, recent studies have demonstrated that these guidelines fail to stratify patients according to the risk of local recurrence, and updated guidelines are expected in the years to come. Critical elements of workflow to ensure safe and effective delivery of APBI include a multidisciplinary approach and evaluation, optimization of target coverage and adherence to normal tissue guideline constraints, and proper quality assurance methods. PMID:26985202

  4. Accelerated partial breast irradiation utilizing brachytherapy: patient selection and workflow

    PubMed Central

    Wobb, Jessica; Manyam, Bindu; Khan, Atif; Vicini, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) represents an evolving technique that is a standard of care option in appropriately selected woman following breast conserving surgery. While multiple techniques now exist to deliver APBI, interstitial brachytherapy represents the technique used in several randomized trials (National Institute of Oncology, GEC-ESTRO). More recently, many centers have adopted applicator-based brachytherapy to deliver APBI due to the technical complexities of interstitial brachytherapy. The purpose of this article is to review methods to evaluate and select patients for APBI, as well as to define potential workflow mechanisms that allow for the safe and effective delivery of APBI. Multiple consensus statements have been developed to guide clinicians on determining appropriate candidates for APBI. However, recent studies have demonstrated that these guidelines fail to stratify patients according to the risk of local recurrence, and updated guidelines are expected in the years to come. Critical elements of workflow to ensure safe and effective delivery of APBI include a multidisciplinary approach and evaluation, optimization of target coverage and adherence to normal tissue guideline constraints, and proper quality assurance methods. PMID:26985202

  5. Implicit active contours for automatic brachytherapy seed segmentation in fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moult, Eric; Burdette, Clif; Song, Danny; Fichtinger, Gabor; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2012-02-01

    Motivation: In prostate brachytherapy, intra-operative dosimetry would be ideal to allow for rapid evaluation of the implant quality while the patient is still in the treatment position. Such a mechanism, however, requires 3-D visualization of the currently deposited seeds relative to the prostate. Thus, accurate, robust, and fully-automatic seed segmentation is of critical importance in achieving intra-operative dosimetry. Methodology: Implanted brachytherapy seeds are segmented by utilizing a region-based implicit active contour approach. Overlapping seed clusters are then resolved using a simple yet effective declustering technique. Results: Ground-truth seed coordinates were obtained via a published segmentation technique. A total of 248 clinical C-arm images from 16 patients were used to validate the proposed algorithm resulting in a 98.4% automatic detection rate with a corresponding 2.5% false-positive rate. The overall mean centroid error between the ground-truth and automatic segmentations was measured to be 0.42 pixels, while the mean centroid error for overlapping seed clusters alone was measured to be 0.67 pixels. Conclusion: Based on clinical data evaluation and validation, robust, accurate, and fully-automatic brachytherapy seed segmentation can be achieved through the implicit active contour framework and subsequent seed declustering method.

  6. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in a dog naturally infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi from Rio de Janeiro – Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired disorder characterized by the activation of intravascular coagulation and excessive fibrin formation. It always occurs in association with other clinical conditions, including parasitic diseases. DIC has been described as a unusual complication in human and canine visceral leishmaniasis. Case presentation DIC was found in a seven-year-old male mongrel dog naturally infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi. Haemostasis parameters demonstrated changes in primary and secondary haemostasis and fibrinolysis. Conclusion DIC is a unusual condition described in canine visceral leishmaniasis and it seems to be associated with several immunological and pathological mechanisms involved in the disease. PMID:23497531

  7. A compilation of current regulations, standards and guidelines in remote afterloading brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, J.P.; Simion, G.P.; Kozlowski, S.D.

    1994-10-01

    Over a dozen government and professional organizations in the United States and Europe have issued regulations and guidance concerning quality management in the practice of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Information from the publications of these organizations was collected and collated for this report. This report provides the brachytherapy licensee access to a broad field of quality management information in a single, topically organized document.

  8. Secondary sarcoma of bone post-prostate brachytherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Allison Y.; Conway, Jessica; Peacock, Michael; Clarkson, Paul W.; Lee, Cheng-Han; Simmons, Christine; Weir, Lorna; McKenzie, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Malignancies associated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer are largely unreported in the literature. We report a case of post-brachytherapy osteogenic sarcoma in the pelvis 6 years after permanent 125I implant for intermediate-risk prostate cancer. The patient was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, limb-sparing surgical resection and postoperative radiation therapy for unexpected positive margins. PMID:25024811

  9. NIR fluorescence lifetime sensing through a multimode fiber for intravascular molecular probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingelberts, H.; Hernot, S.; Debie, P.; Lahoutte, T.; Kuijk, M.

    2016-04-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) contributes to millions of deaths each year. The identification of vulnerable plaques is essential to the diagnosis of CAD but is challenging. Molecular probes can improve the detection of these plaques using intravascular imaging methods. Fluorescence lifetime sensing is a safe and robust method to image these molecular probes. We present two variations of an optical system for intravascular near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence lifetime sensing through a multimode fiber. Both systems are built around a recently developed fast and efficient CMOS detector, the current-assisted photonic sampler (CAPS) that is optimized for sub-nanosecond NIR fluorescence lifetime sensing. One system mimics the optical setup of an epifluorescence microscope while the other uses a practical fiber optic coupler to separate fluorescence excitation and emission. We test both systems by measuring the lifetime of several NIR dyes in DMSO solutions and we show that these systems are capable of detecting lifetimes of solutions with concentrations down to 370 nM and this with short acquisition times. These results are compared with time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) measurements for reference.

  10. INTRAVASCULAR LYMPHOMA OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM PRESENTING AS MULTIPLE CEREBRAL INFARCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    MOMOTA, HIROYUKI; NARITA, YOSHITAKA; MIYAKITA, YASUJI; SHIBUI, SOICHIRO

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 67-year-old woman presented with an acute onset of left-sided weakness. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed multiple cerebral infarctions and gadolinium-enhanced lesions in both cerebral hemispheres. Her symptoms once improved after starting steroid treatment; however, soon developed consciousness disturbance and hemiparesis on the left side. She was referred to our hospital where she underwent stereotactic needle biopsy, that revealed an intravascular large B-cell lymphoma in the cerebrum. She received high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy followed by whole-brain radiation therapy, and the MR findings improved. However, her medical condition gradually worsened, and she died 6 months after disease onset. Intravascular lymphoma (IVL) limited to the central nervous system (CNS) is very rare, and the optimal treatment for this medical condition has not been established yet. IVLs showing only neurologic manifestations might be overlooked or misdiagnosed as cerebral infarctions. Here, we present a case of CNS IVL, with its radiographic and pathologic features and treatment with high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy. PMID:23092108

  11. Use of an Intravascular Fluorescent Continuous Glucose Sensor in Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Romey, Matthew; Jovanovič, Lois; Bevier, Wendy; Markova, Kateryna; Strasma, Paul; Zisser, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Background Stress hyperglycemia in the critically ill is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Continuous glucose monitoring offers a solution to the difficulties of dosing intravenous insulin properly to maintain glycemic control. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an intravascular continuous glucose monitoring (IV-CGM) system with a sensing element based on the concept of quenched fluorescence. Method A second-generation intravascular continuous glucose sensor was evaluated in 13 volunteer subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus. There were 21 study sessions of up to 24 h in duration. Sensors were inserted into peripheral veins of the upper extremity, up to two sensors per subject per study session. Sensor output was compared with temporally correlated reference measurements obtained from venous samples on a laboratory glucose analyzer. Results Data were obtained from 23 sensors in 13 study sessions with 942 paired reference values. Fourteen out of 23 sensors (60.9%) had a mean absolute relative difference ≤ 10%. Eighty-nine percent of paired points were in the clinically accurate A zone of the Clarke error grid and met ISO 15197 performance criteria. Adequate venous blood flow was identified as a necessary condition for accuracy when local sensor readings are compared with venous blood glucose. Conclusions The IV-CGM system was capable of achieving a high level of glucose measurement accuracy. However, superficial peripheral veins may not provide adequate blood flow for reliable indwelling blood glucose monitoring. PMID:23294770

  12. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging and Intravascular Ultrasound: Co-Registration Study Using Ex Vivo Human Coronaries

    PubMed Central

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Bec, Julien; Ma, Dinglong; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Qi, Jinyi

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) has demonstrated potential for robust assessment of atherosclerotic plaques biochemical composition and for complementing conventional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), which provides information on plaque morphology. The success of such a bi-modal imaging modality depends on accurate segmentation of the IVUS images and proper angular registration between these two modalities. This paper reports a novel IVUS segmentation methodology addressing this issue. The image preprocessing consisted of denoising, using the Wiener filter, followed by image smoothing, implemented through the application of the alternating sequential filter on the edge separability metric images. Extraction of the lumen/intima and media/adventitia boundaries was achieved by tracing the gray-scale peaks over the A-lines of the IVUS preprocessed images. Cubic spline interpolation, in both cross-sectional and longitudinal directions, ensured boundary smoothness and continuity. The detection of the guide-wire artifact in both modalities is used for angular registration. Intraluminal studies were conducted in 13 ex vivo segments of human coronaries. The IVUS segmentation accuracy was assessed against independent manual tracings, providing 91.82% sensitivity and 97.55% specificity. The proposed methodology makes the bi-modal FLIM and IVUS approach feasible for comprehensive intravascular diagnosis by providing co-registered biochemical and morphological information of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:25163056

  13. Vascular plaque characterization using intravascular ultrasound elastography and NIR Raman spectroscopy in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Korte, Chris L.; Buschman, Hendrik P. J.; van de Poll, Sweder W. E.; van der Steen, Anton F. W.; Puppels, Gerwin J.; van der Laarse, Arnoud

    2000-04-01

    The composition and morphology of the atherosclerotic lesion are considered to be important determinants of acute coronary ischemic syndromes. We investigated the potentials of a combination of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) elastography and intravascular Near Infrared Raman (NIR) spectroscopy, to assess the physical and chemical composition of the vessel wall and plaque. Intact human coronary arteries were mounted in an in vitro pressurized perfusion setup and investigated with a 20 MHz VisionsR IVUS catheter. At selected cross- sections, two echo-frames were acquired at intraluminal pressures of 80 and 100 mmHg to strain the tissue in order to obtain elastograms. Next, Raman spectra were obtained during 30 seconds at 4 angles (0, 90, 180 and 270 degrees) using a sideways viewing probe. Spectra were modeled to obtain quantitative chemical information, while leaving the specimens intact. Calcified areas were identifiable on the echograms, elastograms and Raman spectra. A combination of geometric information provided by the echogram, chemical information as obtained with Raman spectroscopy, and high stress regions determined by the elastogram, may prove to be a valuable tool to identify plaque vulnerability.

  14. Fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound: co-registration study using ex vivo human coronaries.

    PubMed

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Bec, Julien; Ma, Dinglong; Yankelevich, Diego R; Qi, Jinyi; Marcu, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) has demonstrated potential for robust assessment of atherosclerotic plaques biochemical composition and for complementing conventional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), which provides information on plaque morphology. The success of such a bi-modal imaging modality depends on accurate segmentation of the IVUS images and proper angular registration between these two modalities. This paper reports a novel IVUS segmentation methodology addressing this issue. The image preprocessing consisted of denoising, using the Wiener filter, followed by image smoothing, implemented through the application of the alternating sequential filter on the edge separability metric images. Extraction of the lumen/intima and media/adventitia boundaries was achieved by tracing the gray-scale peaks over the A-lines of the IVUS preprocessed images. Cubic spline interpolation, in both cross-sectional and longitudinal directions, ensured boundary smoothness and continuity. The detection of the guide-wire artifact in both modalities is used for angular registration. Intraluminal studies were conducted in 13 ex vivo segments of human coronaries. The IVUS segmentation accuracy was assessed against independent manual tracings, providing 91.82% sensitivity and 97.55% specificity. The proposed methodology makes the bi-modal FLIM and IVUS approach feasible for comprehensive intravascular diagnosis by providing co-registered biochemical and morphological information of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:25163056

  15. Quantitative analysis for lumen and media-adventitia border detection in intravascular ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Yu, Daoyin; Chen, Xiaodong; An, Zhiyong

    2008-12-01

    Therosclerosis causes partial or total obstruction of human arteries. Early quantitative analysis and accurate assessment of plaque position and volume are essential for the selection of the appropriate treatment. Several imaging techniques can be used for the estimation of the severity of the disease in vivo. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is a commonly used diagnostic tool, which provides real-time visualization of plaque morphology and detection of typical plaque components, such as calcium, quantification of plaque eccentricity and wall thickness. In this paper, we firstly used a spatio-temporal filter to reduce the effect of speckles and enhance the image. Then we translated the problem of image segmentation to the problem of the minimum resolution of energy function. using an improved deformable models, we detected the border of lumen and media-adventitia in sequential intravascular ultrasound frames, and optimized it by dynamic programming. Finally, through the identification of the internal and external elastic lamina and the plaque-lumen interface, we figured out the parameter of plaque load, maximal and minimal diameters of the internal and external elastic lamina and so on. The obtained results demonstrate that our method is statistically accurate, reproducible, and capable to identify the regions of interest in sequences of IVUS frames.

  16. Pressure-Flow Experimental Performance of New Intravascular Blood Pump Designs for Fontan Patients.

    PubMed

    Chopski, Steven G; Fox, Carson S; Riddle, Michelle L; McKenna, Kelli L; Patel, Jay P; Rozolis, John T; Throckmorton, Amy L

    2016-03-01

    An intravascular axial flow pump is being developed as a mechanical cavopulmonary assist device for adolescent and adult patients with dysfunctional Fontan physiology. Coupling computational modeling with experimental evaluation of prototypic designs, this study examined the hydraulic performance of 11 impeller prototypes with blade stagger or twist angles varying from 100 to 600 degrees. A refined range of twisted blade angles between 300 and 400 degrees with 20-degree increments was then selected, and four additional geometries were constructed and hydraulically evaluated. The prototypes met performance expectations and produced 3-31 mm Hg for flow rates of 1-5 L/min for 6000-8000 rpm. A regression analysis was completed with all characteristic coefficients contributing significantly (P < 0.0001). This analysis revealed that the impeller with 400 degrees of blade twist outperformed the other designs. The findings of the numerical model for 300-degree twisted case and the experimental results deviated within approximately 20%. In an effort to simplify the impeller geometry, this work advanced the design of this intravascular cavopulmonary assist device closer to preclinical animal testing. PMID:26333131

  17. Lipid detection by intravascular photoacoustic imaging with flexible catheter at 20 fps (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Min; Daeichin, Verya; Springeling, Geert; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; van Soest, Gijs

    2016-02-01

    Intravascular Photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging is a promising new technology to assess lipid content of coronary atherosclerotic plaque, an important determinant of the risk associated with the plaque triggering a heart attack. Clinical translation of IVPA imaging requires real-time image acquisition, which has been a technological challenge. In this work, we demonstrate a high-speed, dual-wavelength IVPA imaging system at 1.7 µm wavelength, operating with a flexible catheter of 1.2 mm outer diameter (including outer sheath). The catheter was custom designed and fabricated, and used a 40 MHz transducer for intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and IVPA imaging. The optical excitation is provided by a dual OPO system, pumped by CW diode-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers, with a repetition rate of 5 kHz. Each OPO can be tuned to a custom wavelength between 1690 and 1750 nm; two wavelengths only are needed to discriminate between plaque lipids and adipose tissue. The pulse energy is about 80 µJ. We tested the imaging performance of the presented system in a polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA) vessel mimicking phantom and human coronary arteries ex vivo. IVPA identified lipid deposits inside atherosclerotic plaque, while IVUS showed tissue structure. We demonstrated IVPA imaging at a speed of 20 frames per second, with 250 A-scans per frame. This is significantly faster than previous IVPA imaging systems, and will enable the translation of IVPA imaging into clinical practice.

  18. Intravascular Ultrasound Catheter to Enhance Microbubble-Based Drug Delivery via Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Kilroy, Joseph P.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Wamhoff, Brian R.; Hossack, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that acoustic radiation force enhances intravascular microbubble adhesion to blood vessels in the presence of flow for molecular-targeted ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. A prototype acoustic radiation force intravascular ultrasound (ARFIVUS) catheter was designed and fabricated to displace a microbubble contrast agent in flow representative of conditions encountered in the human carotid artery. The prototype ARFIVUS transducer was designed to match the resonance frequency of 1.4- to 2.6-μm-diameter microbubbles modeled by an experimentally verified 1-D microbubble acoustic radiation force translation model. The transducer element was an elongated Navy Type I (hard) lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic designed to operate at 3 MHz. Fabricated devices operated with center frequencies of 3.3 and 3.6 MHz with −6-dB fractional bandwidths of 55% and 50%, respectively. Microbubble translation velocities as high as 0.86 m/s were measured using a high-speed streak camera when insonating with the ARFIVUS transducer. Finally, the prototype was used to displace microbubbles in a flow phantom while imaging with a commercial 45-MHz imaging IVUS transducer. A sustained increase of 31 dB in average video intensity was measured following insonation with the ARFIVUS, indicating microbubble accumulation resulting from the application of acoustic radiation force. PMID:23143566

  19. Influence of distance and incident angle on light intensities in intravascular optical coherence tomography pullback runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shengnan; Eggermont, Jeroen; Wolterbeek, Ron; Lelieveldy, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2016-02-01

    Intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is an intravascular imaging modality which enables the visualization arterial structures at the micro-structural level. The interpretations of these structures is mainly on the basis of relative image intensities. However, even for homogeneous tissue light intensities can differ. In this study the incident light intensity is modeled to be related to the catheter position. Two factors, the distance between catheter and inner lumen wall as well as the incident angle of the light upon the lumen wall, are considered. A three-level hierarchical model is constructed to statistically validate this model to include the potential effect of different pullbacks and/or frame numbers. The model is solved using 169 images out of 9 pull-backs recorded with a St.Jude Medical IVOCT system. F-tests results indicate that both the distance and the incident angle contribute to the model statistically significantly with p < 0.001. Based on the results from the statistical analysis, a potential compensation method is introduced to normalize the IVOCT intensities for the catheter position effects and small shadows.

  20. [Optical coherence tomography of coronary arteries--a novel intravascular imaging modality].

    PubMed

    Mrevlje, B; Legutko, J; Jąkała, J; Noč, M; Dudek, D; Birkemeyer, R; Aboukoura, M; Nienaber, C

    2014-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the latest intravascular imaging modality for the investigation of coronary arteries. It can be used in patients with stable coronary artery disease as well as in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Its almost microscope-like resolution of 10-20 μm (10-times greater than intravascular ultrasound) gives us the most detailed insight into the coronary artery wall in vivo so far.Optical coherence tomography can be used for accurate qualitative and quantitative assessment of stenoses in stable coronary artery disease and accurate guidance of percutaneous coronary interventions as well as accurate postprocedural control. In patients with acute coronary syndrome it can be used for the detection of culprit of the culprit lesion (vulnerable plaque) which allows the operator to cover not only angiographically tightest stenosis (angiographic culprit lesion, caused in most cases by thrombus only) but most importantly the vulnerable plaque, which led to the acute event, as well. Furthermore, optical coherence tomography allows accurate assessment of thrombotic burden, stent apposition/malapposition, edge dissections and tissue prolaps or thrombus protrusions throught stent struts, etc. PMID:25225864

  1. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for the design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers.

  2. Elimination of Bloodstream Infections Associated with Candida albicans Biofilm in Intravascular Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Freshta; Kjellerup, Birthe Veno

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular catheters are among the most commonly inserted medical devices and they are known to cause a large number of catheter related bloodstream infections (BSIs). Biofilms are associated with many chronic infections due to the aggregation of microorganisms. One of these organisms is the fungus Candida albicans. It has shown to be one of the leading causes of catheter-related BSIs. The presence of biofilm on intravascular catheters provide increased tolerance against antimicrobial treatments, thus alternative treatment strategies are sought. Traditionally, many strategies, such as application of combined antimicrobials, addition of antifungals, and removal of catheters, have been practiced, but they were not successful in eradicating BSIs. Since these fungal infections can result in significant morbidity, mortality, and increased healthcare cost, other promising preventive strategies, including antimicrobial lock therapy, chelating agents, alcohol, and biofilm disruptors, have been applied. In this review, current success and failure of these new approaches, and a comparison with the previous strategies are discussed in order to understand which preventative treatment is the most effective in controlling the catheter-related BSIs. PMID:26131615

  3. Evaluation of catheter-manometer systems for adequate intravascular blood pressure measurements in small animals.

    PubMed

    Idvall, J; Aronsen, K F; Lindström, K; Ulmsten, U

    1977-09-30

    Various catheter-manometer systems possible for intravascular blood pressure measurments on rats have been elaborated and tested in vitro and in vivo. Using a pressure-step calibrator, it was observed from in vitro studies that microtransducers had superior frequency response compared to conventional transducers. Of the catheters tested, Pe-90 tapered to a 40 mm tip with an inner diameter of 0.3 mm had the best frequency response as judged from fall and settling times. Because of the damping effect, tapering increased fall time to 1.8 ms, which was still quite acceptable. By the same token settling time was minimized to 22.4 ms. With a special calculation method the theoretical percentile fault of the recordings was estimated to be 9.66%. When the measurement error was calculated from the actual in vivo recordings, it was found to be no more than 2.7%. These results show that the technique described is adequate for continuous intravascular blood pressure recordings on small animals. Finally it is emphasized that careful handling of the catheters and avoidance of stopcocks and air bubbles are essential for obtaining accurate and reproducible values. PMID:928971

  4. Plasma volume and intravascular protein masses in trained boys and fit young men.

    PubMed

    Koch, G; Röcker, L

    1977-12-01

    Plasma volumes and intravascular protein masses were measured in eight well-trained boys (VO2 max = 59.6 +/- 6.5 ml/kg body wt) aged 13-15 yr and compared with two groups of adult athletes aged 17-20 yr (VO2 max = 61.8 +/- 3.4 ml/kg body wt) and 24-30 yr (VO2 max = 63.3 +/- 4.1 ml/kg body wt), respectively. The trained boys had larger plasma volumes and increased intravascular masses of albumin and hepatogenic globulins as compared with values available for children with normal physical activity. There was no significant difference between the boys and the adults concerning maximal oxygen uptake, plasma volume, albumin, immunoglobins, and haptoglobin, when allowance was made for differences in body dimensions; probably due to the young age, however, the boys had considerably higher relative alpha2-macroglobulin and transferrin masses. Endurance training apparently elicits the same response of the plasma protein system regardless of age, at least after pubertal age has been attained. The overall effect of these changes implies an increase of the water binding capacity of the plasma PMID:75204

  5. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A; Shung, K Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for the design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers. PMID:25856384

  6. Design factors of intravascular dual frequency transducers for super-harmonic contrast imaging and acoustic angiography

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianguo; Martin, K. Heath; Li, Yang; Dayton, Paul A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of coronary vasa vasorum may lead to assessment of the vulnerable plaque development in diagnosis of atherosclerosis diseases. Dual frequency transducers capable of detection of microbubble super-harmonics have shown promise as a new contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound (CE-IVUS) platform with the capability of vasa vasorum imaging. Contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in CE-IVUS imaging can be closely associated with the low frequency transmitter performance. In this paper, transducer designs encompassing different transducer layouts, transmitting frequencies, and transducer materials are compared for optimization of imaging performance. In the layout selection, the stacked configuration showed superior super-harmonic imaging compared with the interleaved configuration. In the transmitter frequency selection, a decrease in frequency from 6.5 MHz to 5 MHz resulted in an increase of CTR from 15 dB to 22 dB when receiving frequency was kept constant at 30 MHz. In the material selection, the dual frequency transducer with the lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) 1-3 composite transmitter yielded higher axial resolution compared to single crystal transmitters (70 μm compared to 150 μm pulse length). These comparisons provide guidelines for design of intravascular acoustic angiography transducers. PMID:25856384

  7. Release of Plasmid DNA from Intravascular Stents Coated with Ultrathin Multilayered Polyelectrolyte Films

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, Christopher M.; Zhang, Jingtao; Fredin, Nathaniel J.; Wolff, Matthew R.; Hacker, Timothy A.; Lynn, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Materials that permit control over the release of DNA from the surfaces of topologically complex implantable devices, such as intravascular stents, could contribute to the development of new approaches to the localized delivery of DNA. We report the fabrication of ultrathin, multilayered polyelectrolyte films that permit both the immobilization and controlled release of plasmid DNA from the surfaces of stainless steel intravascular stents. Our approach makes use of an aqueous-based, layer-by-layer method for the assembly of nanostructured thin films consisting of alternating layers of plasmid DNA and a hydrolytically degradable polyamine. Characterization of coated stents using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated that stents were coated uniformly with an ultrathin film ca. 120 nm thick that adhered conformally to the surfaces of stent struts. These ultrathin films did not crack, peel, or delaminate substantially from the surface after exposure to a range of mechanical challenges representative of those encountered during stent deployment (e.g., balloon expansion). Stents coated with eight bilayers of degradable polyamine and a plasmid encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein sustained the release of DNA into solution for up to four days when incubated in phosphate buffered saline at 37 °C, and coated stents were capable of mediating the expression of EGFP in a mammalian cell line without the aid of additional transfection agents. The approach reported here could, with further development, contribute to the development of localized gene-based approaches to the treatment of cardiovascular diseases or related conditions. PMID:16961308

  8. Computational analysis of the effectiveness of blood flushing with saline injection from an intravascular diagnostic catheter

    PubMed Central

    Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph C.; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Optical techniques including fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy have demonstrated potential as a tool for study and diagnosis of arterial vessel pathologies. However, their application in the intravascular diagnostic procedures has been hampered by the presence of blood hemoglobin that affects the light delivery to and the collection from the vessel wall. We report a computational fluid dynamics model that allows for the optimization of blood flushing parameters in a manner that minimizes the amount of saline needed to clear the optical field of view and reduces any adverse effects caused by the external saline jet. A 3D turbulence (k−ω) model was employed for Eulerian–Eulerian two-phase flow to simulate the flow inside and around a side-viewing fiber-optic catheter. Current analysis demonstrates the effects of various parameters including infusion and blood flow rates, vessel diameters, and pulsatile nature of blood flow on the flow structure around the catheter tip. The results from this study can be utilized in determining the optimal flushing rate for given vessel diameter, blood flow rate, and maximum wall shear stress that the vessel wall can sustain and subsequently in optimizing the design parameters of optical-based intravascular catheters. PMID:24953876

  9. An intravascular loopless monopole antenna for vessel wall MR imaging at 3.0 T.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongyang; Lv, Xing; Ma, Xiaohai; Zhang, Rui; Fu, Youyi; Yang, Xuedong; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Zhaoqi; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel intravascular loopless monopole antenna (ILMA) design specifically for imaging of small vessel walls. The ILMA consisted of an unshielded, low-friction guide wire and a tuning/matching box. The material of the guide wire was nitinol and it was coated with polyurethane. Because the guide wire was unshielded, it could be made thinner than the coaxial cable-based loopless intravascular antenna design. The material of the box was aluminum. In this study, the diameter of the guide wire was 0.5 mm and the length was 58.7 mm. The ILMA was used as a receiving antenna and body coil for transmission. To verify the feasibility of the ILMA, in vitro and in vivo experiments were performed on a 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. In vitro tests using the ILMA indicated that the proposed design could be used to image target vessel walls with a spatial resolution of 313 μm at the frequency coding direction and more than 100 mm of longitudinal coverage. In vivo tests demonstrated that the images showed the vessel walls clearly by using the ILMA and also indicated that the ILMA could be used for small vessels. The proposed antenna may therefore be utilized to promote MR-based diagnoses and therapeutic solutions for cardiovascular atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:22902470

  10. Atomic layer deposition enhanced grafting of phosphorylcholine on stainless steel for intravascular stents.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qi; Yan, Jin; Qian, Xu; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Aidong

    2014-09-01

    In-stent restenosis (ISR) and re-endothelialization delay are two major issues of intravascular stent in terms of clinical safety and effects. Construction of mimetic cell membrane surface on stents using phosphorylcholine have been regarded as one of the most powerful strategies to resolve these two issues and improve the performance of stents. In this study, atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology, which is widely used in semiconductor industry, was utilized to fabricate ultra-thin layer (10nm) of alumina (Al2O3) on 316L stainless steel (SS), then the alumina covered surface was modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) and 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) sequentially in order to produce phosphorylcholine mimetic cell membrane surface. The pristine and modified surfaces were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscope and water contact angle measurement. Furthermore, the abilities of protein adsorption, platelet adhesion and cell proliferation on the surfaces were investigated. It was found that alumina layer can significantly enhance the surface grafting of APS and MPC on SS; and in turn efficiently inhibit protein adsorption and platelet adhesion, and promote the attachment and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) on the surfaces. In association with the fact that the deposition of alumina layer is also beneficial to the improvement of adhesion and integrity of drug-carrying polymer coating on drug eluting stents, we expect that ALD technology can largely assist in the modifications on inert metallic surfaces and benefit implantable medical devices, especially intravascular stents. PMID:25016426

  11. A Broadband Polyvinylidene Difluoride-Based Hydrophone with Integrated Readout Circuit for Intravascular Photoacoustic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Daeichin, Verya; Chen, Chao; Ding, Qing; Wu, Min; Beurskens, Robert; Springeling, Geert; Noothout, Emile; Verweij, Martin D; van Dongen, Koen W A; Bosch, Johan G; van der Steen, Antonius F W; de Jong, Nico; Pertijs, Michiel; van Soest, Gijs

    2016-05-01

    Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging can visualize the coronary atherosclerotic plaque composition on the basis of the optical absorption contrast. Most of the photoacoustic (PA) energy of human coronary plaque lipids was found to lie in the frequency band between 2 and 15 MHz requiring a very broadband transducer, especially if a combination with intravascular ultrasound is desired. We have developed a broadband polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) transducer (0.6 × 0.6 mm, 52 μm thick) with integrated electronics to match the low capacitance of such a small polyvinylidene difluoride element (<5 pF/mm(2)) with the high capacitive load of the long cable (∼100 pF/m). The new readout circuit provides an output voltage with a sensitivity of about 3.8 μV/Pa at 2.25 MHz. Its response is flat within 10 dB in the range 2 to 15 MHz. The root mean square (rms) output noise level is 259 μV over the entire bandwidth (1-20 MHz), resulting in a minimum detectable pressure of 30 Pa at 2.25 MHz. PMID:26856788

  12. Salvage brachytherapy for locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Okihara, Koji; Iwata, Tsuyoshi; Masui, Koji; Kamoi, Kazumi; Yamada, Kei; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2015-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. Despite the development of novel radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, the risk of local recurrence after EBRT has not been obviated. Various local treatment options (including salvage prostatectomy, brachytherapy, cryotherapy, and high-intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU]) have been employed in cases of local recurrence after primary EBRT. Brachytherapy is the first-line treatment for low-risk and selected intermediate-risk prostate tumors. However, few studies have examined the use of brachytherapy to treat post-EBRT recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current state of our knowledge about the effects of salvage brachytherapy in patients who develop locally recurrent prostate cancer after primary EBRT. This article also introduces our novel permanent brachytherapy salvage method. PMID:26112477

  13. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Michael E; Chaudhary, Ahmed A

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and 226Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy. PMID:26648763

  14. Mouse model of brachytherapy in consort with enucleation for treatment of malignant intraocular melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Niederkorn, J.; Sanborn, G.E.; Scarbrough, E.E. )

    1990-06-01

    The efficacy of brachytherapy in the treatment and prevention of metastasis of intraocular melanoma was investigated in a mouse model. A highly metastatic subline of B16 melanoma was transplanted into the anterior segment of C57BL/6 mice and allowed to grow. Brachytherapy was delivered by means of miniature iodine 125 seeds implanted in shallow subcutaneous pockets of the upper eyelid margin of these mice, and 25 Gy of radiation was delivered between days 12 and 14. This brachytherapy reduced both the tumor volume and the number of mitotic figures per high-power field compared with irradiated controls. In a second experiment, 25 Gy of brachytherapy was delivered before enucleation, straddling enucleation, and after enucleation; there was a significant reduction in metastasis when radiation was delivered prior to enucleation. This model may be useful in conducting further studies involving brachytherapy with 125I plaque implants.

  15. ALGEBRA: ALgorithm for the heterogeneous dosimetry based on GEANT4 for BRAchytherapy.

    PubMed

    Afsharpour, H; Landry, G; D'Amours, M; Enger, S; Reniers, B; Poon, E; Carrier, J-F; Verhaegen, F; Beaulieu, L

    2012-06-01

    Task group 43 (TG43)-based dosimetry algorithms are efficient for brachytherapy dose calculation in water. However, human tissues have chemical compositions and densities different than water. Moreover, the mutual shielding effect of seeds on each other (interseed attenuation) is neglected in the TG43-based dosimetry platforms. The scientific community has expressed the need for an accurate dosimetry platform in brachytherapy. The purpose of this paper is to present ALGEBRA, a Monte Carlo platform for dosimetry in brachytherapy which is sufficiently fast and accurate for clinical and research purposes. ALGEBRA is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code and is capable of handling the DICOM RT standard to recreate a virtual model of the treated site. Here, the performance of ALGEBRA is presented for the special case of LDR brachytherapy in permanent prostate and breast seed implants. However, the algorithm is also capable of handling other treatments such as HDR brachytherapy. PMID:22572100

  16. ALGEBRA: ALgorithm for the heterogeneous dosimetry based on GEANT4 for BRAchytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsharpour, H.; Landry, G.; D'Amours, M.; Enger, S.; Reniers, B.; Poon, E.; Carrier, J.-F.; Verhaegen, F.; Beaulieu, L.

    2012-06-01

    Task group 43 (TG43)-based dosimetry algorithms are efficient for brachytherapy dose calculation in water. However, human tissues have chemical compositions and densities different than water. Moreover, the mutual shielding effect of seeds on each other (interseed attenuation) is neglected in the TG43-based dosimetry platforms. The scientific community has expressed the need for an accurate dosimetry platform in brachytherapy. The purpose of this paper is to present ALGEBRA, a Monte Carlo platform for dosimetry in brachytherapy which is sufficiently fast and accurate for clinical and research purposes. ALGEBRA is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code and is capable of handling the DICOM RT standard to recreate a virtual model of the treated site. Here, the performance of ALGEBRA is presented for the special case of LDR brachytherapy in permanent prostate and breast seed implants. However, the algorithm is also capable of handling other treatments such as HDR brachytherapy.

  17. Air kerma and absorbed dose standards for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in primary standards for the calibration of brachytherapy sources, with an emphasis on the currently most common photon-emitting radionuclides. The introduction discusses the need for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy in general. The following section focuses on the three main quantities, i.e. reference air kerma rate, air kerma strength and absorbed dose rate to water, which are currently used for the specification of brachytherapy photon sources and which can be realized with primary standards from first principles. An overview of different air kerma and absorbed dose standards, which have been independently developed by various national metrology institutes over the past two decades, is given in the next two sections. Other dosimetry techniques for brachytherapy will also be discussed. The review closes with an outlook on a possible transition from air kerma to absorbed dose to water-based calibrations for brachytherapy sources in the future. PMID:24814696

  18. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar; Mason, Josh; Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann; Dickinson, Louise; Ahmed, Hashim U.; Emberton, Mark; Langley, Stephen

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  19. Ocular Response of Choroidal Melanoma With Monosomy 3 Versus Disomy 3 After Iodine-125 Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, Omkar S.; Wu, Jeffrey; Lee, Steve P.; Yu Fei; Burgess, Barry L.; Leu Min; Straatsma, Bradley R.; McCannel, Tara A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report the ocular response of choroidal melanoma with monosomy 3 vs. disomy 3 after {sup 125}I brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated patients with ciliochoroidal melanoma managed with fine needle aspiration biopsy immediately before plaque application for {sup 125}I brachytherapy between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2008. Patients with (1) cytopathologic diagnosis of melanoma, (2) melanoma chromosome 3 status identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and (3) 6 or more months of follow-up after brachytherapy were sorted by monosomy 3 vs. disomy 3 and compared by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Among 40 ciliochoroidal melanomas (40 patients), 15 had monosomy 3 and 25 had disomy 3. Monosomy 3 melanomas had a median greatest basal diameter of 12.00 mm and a median tumor thickness of 6.69 mm before brachytherapy; at a median of 1.75 years after brachytherapy, median thickness was 3.10 mm. Median percentage decrease in tumor thickness was 48.3%. Disomy 3 melanomas had a median greatest basal diameter of 10.00 mm and median tumor thickness of 3.19 mm before brachytherapy; at a median of 2.00 years after brachytherapy, median tumor thickness was 2.37 mm. The median percentage decrease in tumor thickness was 22.7%. Monosomy 3 melanomas were statistically greater in size than disomy 3 melanomas (p < 0.001) and showed a greater decrease in tumor thickness after brachytherapy (p = 0.006). Conclusion: In this study, ciliochoroidal melanomas with monosomy 3 were significantly greater in size than disomy 3 melanoma and showed a significantly greater decrease in thickness at a median of 1.75 years after brachytherapy. The greater decrease in monosomy 3 melanoma thickness after brachytherapy is consistent with other malignancies in which more aggressive pathology has been shown to be associated with a greater initial response to radiotherapy.

  20. WE-F-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy II: Integrating Imaging with HDR

    SciTech Connect

    Craciunescu, O; Todor, D; Leeuw, A de

    2014-06-15

    In recent years, with the advent of high/pulsed dose rate afterloading technology, advanced treatment planning systems, CT/MRI compatible applicators, and advanced imaging platforms, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatments (IGABT) have started to play an ever increasing role in modern radiation therapy. The most accurate way to approach IGABT treatment is to provide the infrastructure that combines in a single setting an appropriate imaging device, a treatment planning system, and a treatment unit. The Brachytherapy Suite is not a new concept, yet the modern suites are incorporating state-of-the-art imaging (MRI, CBCT equipped simulators, CT, and /or US) that require correct integration with each other and with the treatment planning and delivery systems. Arguably, an MRI-equipped Brachytherapy Suite is the ideal setup for real-time adaptive brachytherapy treatments. The main impediment to MRI-IGABT adoption is access to MRI scanners. Very few radiation oncology departments currently house MRI scanners, and even fewer in a dedicated Brachytherapy Suite. CBCT equipped simulators are increasingly offered by manufacturers as part of a Brachytherapy Suite installation. If optimized, images acquired can be used for treatment planning, or can be registered with other imaging modalities. This infrastructure is relevant for all forms of brachytherapy, especially those utilizing multi-fractionated courses of treatment such as prostate and cervix. Moreover, for prostate brachytherapy, US imaging systems can be part of the suite to allow for real-time HDR/LDR treatments. Learning Objectives: Understand the adaptive workflow of MR-based IGBT for cervical cancer. Familiarize with commissioning aspects of a CBCT equipped simulator with emphasis on brachytherapy applications Learn about the current status and future developments in US-based prostate brachytherapy.

  1. Intravascular ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... IVUS may also be used to: View the aorta and structure of the artery walls (which can ... in people who already have kidney problems or diabetes) Stroke (this is rare) After the Procedure After ...

  2. Intravascular Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... and a procedure called cardiac catheterization . IVUS uses sound waves to produce an image of the coronary arteries and to see their condition. The sound waves travel through a tube called a catheter. The ...

  3. Intravascular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Nico; Bom, Nicolaas; Schaar, Johannes; Goertz, David; Frijlink, Martijn; Steen, Anton Fw Van Der

    IVUS is used for diagnostics, therapy guidance and scientific purposes. It is the only clinical available technique that can assess plaque burden and free lumen diameter at high accuracy. Contrast angiography, which was the golden standard before IVUS, can only give a shadow projection of the lumen. Especially with the advent of 3D IVUS using pull backs it became an important tool for monitoring treatment and follow up of interventions like balloon angioplasty and placing of stents (wire prostheses that are used to prevent the arterial wall from recoiling). 3D IVUS in combination with biplane angiography allows assessment of true 3D reconstructions of arteries, pre and post treatment. Using computational fluid dynamics the velocity profile and thus the shear stress at the vascular wall can be calculated. This can be related to biological markers, which gives insight in formation of atherosclerosis, restenosis and remodelling.

  4. Dynamic modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) and intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) for the treatment of rectal and breast carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Matthew Julian

    The ultimate goal of any treatment of cancer is to maximize the likelihood of killing the tumor while minimizing the chance of damaging healthy tissues. One of the most effective ways to accomplish this is through radiation therapy, which must be able to target the tumor volume with a high accuracy while minimizing the dose delivered to healthy tissues. A successful method of accomplishing this is brachytherapy which works by placing the radiation source in very close proximity to the tumor. However, most current applications of brachytherapy rely mostly on the geometric manipulation of isotropic sources, which limits the ability to specifically target the tumor. The purpose of this work is to introduce several types of shielded brachytherapy applicators which are capable of targeting tumors with much greater accuracy than existing technologies. These applicators rely on the modulation of the dose profile through a high-density tungsten alloy shields to create anisotropic dose distributions. Two classes of applicators have been developed in this work. The first relies on the active motion of the shield, to aim a highly directional radiation profile. This allows for very precise control of the dose distribution for treatment, achieving unparalleled dose coverage to the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. This technique has been given the moniker of Dynamic Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT). The second class of applicators, designed to reduce treatment complexity uses static applicators. These applicators retain the use of the tungsten shield, but the shield is motionless during treatment. By intelligently designing the shield, significant improvements over current methods have been demonstrated. Although these static applicators fail to match the dosimetric quality of DMBT applicators the simplified setup and treatment procedure gives them significant appeal. The focus of this work has been to optimize these shield designs, specifically for the treatment of rectal and

  5. Intravascular Biphasic Synovial Sarcoma: The Beneficial Role of Adjuvant Treatment Approach in the Pre-metastatic Stage.

    PubMed

    Chicas-Sett, Rodolfo; Farga-Albiol, Dolores; Collado, Erica; Pacheco, Ariel; Zac, Carlos; Diaz, Roberto; Celada, Francisco; Burgos, Javier; Perez, Maria Jose; Tormo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a high-grade, rare variant of soft tissue sarcoma (STS). The biphasic subtype is less common than the monophasic subtype. SS is very common around joint cavities in the extremities, but can be present elsewhere in the body. Tumor staging and therapeutic management are usually clear for a localized disease, but the proper management at the metastatic stage can be unclear. According to the literature, the histologic presence of an SS tumor thrombus affects tumor staging, making it unclear whether the tumor stage corresponds to localized or metastatic disease. An intravascular SS tumor exhibiting high metastatic potential is a rare finding that warrants thorough investigation. A 49-year-old woman presented with a biphasic SS intravascular tumor of the left inguinal area with femoral vessels involvement. Ten cases of intravascular SS have been reported in the literature and contain little information regarding the proper management of a local metastatic disease. Ours is a rare case of SS with an intravascular tumor occupying the femoral-iliac vein (as seen in metastatic disease) that has been treated as a local disease with a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. As a result, our patient has been disease-free for two years and, during that time, has achieved an acceptable quality of life. We discuss the pertinent clinical findings of this rare tumor and review the literature of tumor thrombus by SS. We also present the multidisciplinary therapeutic approach realized and the history of this disease. PMID:27190730

  6. Development Of A Laser Intravascular Fiber Optic Probe For The Treatment Of Superficial Telangiectasia Of The Lower Extremity In Man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Leon; Taylor, W. A.

    1984-10-01

    Because of the difficulty of laser treatment of superficial telangiectasia in man, a mini vascular fiberoptics probe has been developed for these vessels. Controls have included sclerotherapy, intravascular-galvanic current probes and direct impacts from 0.2 mm argon fiberoptics probes.

  7. Intravascular Biphasic Synovial Sarcoma: The Beneficial Role of Adjuvant Treatment Approach in the Pre-metastatic Stage

    PubMed Central

    Farga-Albiol, Dolores; Collado, Erica; Pacheco, Ariel; Zac, Carlos; Diaz, Roberto; Celada, Francisco; Burgos, Javier; Perez, Maria Jose; Tormo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a high-grade, rare variant of soft tissue sarcoma (STS). The biphasic subtype is less common than the monophasic subtype. SS is very common around joint cavities in the extremities, but can be present elsewhere in the body. Tumor staging and therapeutic management are usually clear for a localized disease, but the proper management at the metastatic stage can be unclear. According to the literature, the histologic presence of an SS tumor thrombus affects tumor staging, making it unclear whether the tumor stage corresponds to localized or metastatic disease. An intravascular SS tumor exhibiting high metastatic potential is a rare finding that warrants thorough investigation. A 49-year-old woman presented with a biphasic SS intravascular tumor of the left inguinal area with femoral vessels involvement. Ten cases of intravascular SS have been reported in the literature and contain little information regarding the proper management of a local metastatic disease. Ours is a rare case of SS with an intravascular tumor occupying the femoral-iliac vein (as seen in metastatic disease) that has been treated as a local disease with a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. As a result, our patient has been disease-free for two years and, during that time, has achieved an acceptable quality of life. We discuss the pertinent clinical findings of this rare tumor and review the literature of tumor thrombus by SS. We also present the multidisciplinary therapeutic approach realized and the history of this disease. PMID:27190730

  8. Characterization of signal properties in atherosclerotic plaque components by intravascular MRI.

    PubMed

    Rogers, W J; Prichard, J W; Hu, Y L; Olson, P R; Benckart, D H; Kramer, C M; Vido, D A; Reichek, N

    2000-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of distinguishing between atherosclerotic plaque components solely on the basis of biochemical differences. However, to date, the majority of plaque characterization has been performed by using high-field strength units or special coils, which are not clinically applicable. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate MRI properties in histologically verified plaque components in excised human carotid endarterectomy specimens with the use of a 5F catheter-based imaging coil, standard acquisition software, and a clinical scanner operating at 0.5 T. Human carotid endarterectomy specimens from 17 patients were imaged at 37 degrees C by use of an opposed solenoid intravascular radiofrequency coil integrated into a 5F double-lumen catheter interfaced to a 0.5-T General Electric interventional scanner. Cross-sectional intravascular MRI (156x250 microm in-plane resolution) that used different imaging parameters permitted the calculation of absolute T1and T2, the magnetization transfer contrast ratio, the magnitude of regional signal loss associated with an inversion recovery sequence (inversion ratio), and regional signal loss in gradient echo (gradient echo-to-spin echo ratio) in plaque components. Histological staining included hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, Kossa, oil red O, and Gomori's iron stain. X-ray micrographs were also used to identify regions of calcium. Seven plaque components were evaluated: fibrous cap, smooth muscle cells, organizing thrombus, fresh thrombus, lipid, edema, and calcium. The magnetization transfer contrast ratio was significantly less in the fibrous cap (0.62+/-13) than in all other components (P<0.05) The inversion ratio was greater in lipid (0.91+/-0.09) than all other components (P<0.05). Calcium was best distinguished by using the gradient echo-to-spin echo ratio, which was lower in calcium (0.36+/-0.2) than in all plaque components, except for the organizing thrombus (P<0

  9. Percutaneous intravascular US as adjunct to catheter-based interventions: preliminary experience in patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Isner, J M; Rosenfield, K; Losordo, D W; Kelly, S; Palefski, P; Langevin, R E; Razvi, S; Pastore, J O; Kosowsky, B D

    1990-04-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound (US) transducers may be introduced into the vascular system to record high-resolution images of the vessel wall and lumen. The potential advantages and existing liabilities of percutaneous intravascular US as an adjunct to transluminal vascular recanalization were investigated. A 6.6-F braided, polyethylene catheter enclosing a rotary drive shaft with a single-element, 20-MHz transducer at the distal tip was used in 17 patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal (balloon) angioplasty (PTA) alone (10 patients), PTA with implantation of an endovascular stent (two patients), atherectomy alone (two patients), or laser angioplasty with PTA and/or atherectomy (three patients). The arteries treated and examined included the common iliac in five patients, the external iliac in two, the superficial femoral in nine, and a vein graft-arterial anastomosis in one. In 14 cases PTA was employed as sole or adjunctive therapy; plaque cracks were clearly delineated with intravascular US in all 14 (100%) and dissections were observed in 11 (78%). Plaque-arterial wall disruption was less prominent in the arteries treated with mechanical atherectomy. The results of laser angioplasty reflected the adjunctive modality employed. After stent implantation, serial intravascular US documented effacement of PTA-induced plaque cracks and/or dissections. Intravascular US also aided in the quantitative assessment of luminal cross-sectional areas after the procedures (19.0-51.8 mm2). The observations recorded in this preliminary group of 17 patients illustrate the potential utility of intravascular US as an adjunct to conventional angiography in patients undergoing percutaneous revascularization. PMID:2138342

  10. Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Glioblastoma Multiforme Treated With Radiotherapy With or Without Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aiken, Ashley H. Chang, Susan M.; Larson, David; Butowski, Nicholas; Cha, Soonmee

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To compare temporal patterns of recurrent contrast enhancement in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with brachytherapy plus external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) vs. EBRT alone. Methods and Materials: We evaluated serial MRI scans for 15 patients who received brachytherapy followed by EBRT (6000 cGy) and 20 patients who received standard EBRT alone (5940-6000 cGy). Brachytherapy consisted of permanent, low-activity {sup 125}I seeds placed around the resection cavity at the time of initial gross total resection. Contrast enhancement (linear, nodular, feathery, or solid), serial progression, and location of contrast enhancement were described. Results: In the EBRT group, 14 patients demonstrated focal nodular contrast enhancement along the resection cavity within 4 months. The 6 remaining EBRT patients developed either transient linear enhancement or no abnormal enhancement. In the brachytherapy plus EBRT group, 7 patients initially developed linear rim enhancement within 4 months that progressed to feathery contrast enhancement over the course of 1 to 2 years. Histopathology confirmed radiation necrosis in all 7 patients. The remaining 8 brachytherapy patients eventually developed focal nodular contrast enhancement along the resection cavity and tumor recurrence. Conclusions: Our data suggest that longitudinal MRI features differ between GBM patients treated with EBRT vs. brachytherapy plus EBRT. In both groups, nodular enhancement adjacent to or remote from the resection cavity strongly suggested tumor recurrence. Feathery enhancement, which progressed from linear rim enhancement immediately adjacent to the cavity, seen only in brachytherapy patients, strongly indicated radiation necrosis.

  11. Brachytherapy in cancer cervix: Time to move ahead from point A?

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Anurita; Datta, Niloy Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy forms an integral part of the radiation therapy in cancer cervix. The dose prescription for intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) in cancer cervix is based on Tod and Meredith’s point A and has been in practice since 1938. This was proposed at a time when accessibility to imaging technology and dose computation facilities was limited. The concept has been in practice worldwide for more than half a century and has been the fulcrum of all ICBT treatments, strategies and outcome measures. The method is simple and can be adapted by all centres practicing ICBT in cancer cervix. However, with the widespread availability of imaging techniques, clinical use of different dose-rates, availability of a host of applicators fabricated with image compatible materials, radiobiological implications of dose equivalence and its impact on tumour and organs at risk; more and more weight is being laid down on individualised image based brachytherapy. Thus, computed tomography, magnetic-resonance imaging and even positron emission computerized tomography along with brachytherapy treatment planning system are being increasingly adopted with promising outcomes. The present article reviews the evolution of dose prescription concepts in ICBT in cancer cervix and brings forward the need for image based brachytherapy to evaluate clinical outcomes. As is evident, a gradual transition from “point” based brachytherapy to “profile” based image guided brachytherapy is gaining widespread acceptance for dose prescription, reporting and outcome evaluation in the clinical practice of ICBT in cancer cervix. PMID:25302176

  12. High-dose-rate brachytherapy in uterine cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Firuza D. . E-mail: patelfd@glide.net.in; Rai, Bhavana; Mallick, Indranil; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is in wide use for curative treatment of cervical cancer. The American Brachytherapy Society has recommended that the individual fraction size be <7.5 Gy and the range of fractions should be four to eight; however, many fractionation schedules, varying from institution to institution, are in use. We use 9 Gy/fraction of HDR in two to five fractions in patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. We found that our results and toxicity were comparable to those reported in the literature and hereby present our experience with this fractionation schedule. Methods and Materials: A total of 121 patients with Stage I-III carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated with HDR brachytherapy between 1996 and 2000. The total number of patients analyzed was 113. The median patient age was 53 years, and the histopathologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 93% of patients. The patients were subdivided into Groups 1 and 2. In Group 1, 18 patients with Stage Ib-IIb disease, tumor size <4 cm, and preserved cervical anatomy underwent simultaneous external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis to a dose of 40 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks with central shielding and HDR brachytherapy of 9 Gy/fraction, given weekly, and interdigitated with external beam radiotherapy. The 95 patients in Group 2, who had Stage IIb-IIIb disease underwent external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis to a dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions within 4.5 weeks followed by two sessions of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy of 9 Gy each given 1 week apart. The follow-up range was 3-7 years (median, 36.4 months). Late toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial local control and disease-free survival rate was 74.5% and 62.0%, respectively. The actuarial local control rate at 5 years was 100% for Stage I, 80% for Stage II, and 67.2% for Stage III patients. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival rate was 88.8% for

  13. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael P.; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    We conducted an approved canine study to investigate the in vivo feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. Brachytherapy seeds coated with black ink were inserted into the canine prostate using methods similar to a human procedure. A transperineal, interstitial, fiber optic light delivery method, coupled to a 1064 nm laser, was utilized to irradiate the prostate and the resulting acoustic waves were detected with a transrectal ultrasound probe. The fiber was inserted into a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy needle that acted as a light-diffusing sheath, enabling radial light delivery from the tip of the fiber inside the sheath. The axis of the fiber was located at a distance of 4-9 mm from the long axis of the cylindrical seeds. Ultrasound images acquired with the transrectal probe and post-operative CT images of the implanted seeds were analyzed to confirm seed locations. In vivo limitations with insufficient light delivery within the ANSI laser safety limit (100 mJ/cm2) were overcome by utilizing a short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamformer, which provided average seed contrasts of 20-30 dB for energy densities ranging 8-84 mJ/cm2. The average contrast was improved by up to 20 dB with SLSC beamforming compared to conventional delay-and-sum beamforming. There was excellent agreement between photoacoustic, ultrasound, and CT images. Challenges included visualization of photoacoustic artifacts that corresponded with locations of the optical fiber and hyperechoic tissue structures.

  14. Conformal Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer Using Transabdominal Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Sylvia Narayan, Kailash; Fisher, Richard; Bernshaw, David

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To determine if transabdominal ultrasound (US) can be used for conformal brachytherapy in cervical cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Seventy-one patients with locoregionally advanced cervix cancer treated with chemoradiation and brachytherapy were included in this study. The protocol consisted of US-assisted tandem insertion and conformal US-based planning. Orthogonal films for applicator reconstruction were also taken. A standard plan was modified to suit the US-based volume and treatment was delivered. The patient then underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan with the applicators in situ. Retrospectively, individual standard (STD), US, and MRI plans were extrapolated for five fractions and superimposed onto the two-dimensional sagittal MRI images for comparison. Doses to Point A, target volume, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) 38 bladder and rectal points, and individualized bowel points were calculated on original implant geometry on Plato for each planning method. Results: STD (high-dose-rate) plans reported higher doses to Point A, target volume, ICRU 38 bladder and rectal points, and individualized bowel point compared with US and MRI plans. There was a statistically significant difference between standard plans and image-based plans-STD vs. US, STD vs. MRI, and STD vs. Final-having consistent (p {<=} 0.001) respectively for target volume, Point A, ICRU 38 bladder, and bowel point. US plan assessed on two-dimensional MRI image was comparable for target volume (p = 0.11), rectal point (p = 0.8), and vaginal mucosa (p = 0.19). Local control was 90%. Late bowel morbidity (G3, G4) was <2%. Conclusions: Transabdominal ultrasound offers an accurate, quick, accessible, and cost-effective method of conformal brachytherapy planning.

  15. Dose rate constant and energy spectrum of interstitial brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2001-01-01

    In the past two years, several new manufacturers have begun to market low-energy interstitial brachytherapy seeds containing 125I and 103Pd. Parallel to this development, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has implemented a modification to the air-kerma strength (S(K)) standard for 125I seeds and has also established an S(K) standard for 103Pd seeds. These events have generated a considerable number of investigations on the determination of the dose rate constants (inverted V) of interstitial brachytherapy seeds. The aim of this work is to study the general properties underlying the determination of dose rate constant and to develop a simple method for a quick and accurate estimation of dose rate constant. As the dose rate constant of clinical seeds is defined at a fixed reference point, we postulated that dose rate constant may be calculated by treating the seed as an effective point source when the seed's source strength is specified in S(K) and its source characteristics are specified by the photon energy spectrum measured in air at the reference point. Using a semi-analytic approach, an analytic expression for dose rate constant was derived for point sources with known photon energy spectra. This approach enabled a systematic study of dose rate constant as a function of energy. Using the measured energy spectra, the calculated dose rate constant for 125I model 6711 and 6702 seeds and for 192Ir seed agreed with the AAPM recommended values within +/-1%. For the 103Pd model 200 seed, the agreement was 5% with a recently measured value (within the +/-7% experimental uncertainty) and was within 1% with the Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic expression for dose rate constant proposed here can be evaluated using a programmable calculator or a simple spreadsheet and it provides an efficient method for checking the measured dose rate constant for any interstitial brachytherapy seed once the energy spectrum of the seed is known. PMID:11213926

  16. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-30

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm{sup 3}. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm{sup 3}. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  17. Prostate Brachytherapy in Men {>=}75 Years of Age

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, Gregory S. Wallner, Kent E.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Brammer, Sarah G.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Adamovich, Edward

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) in prostate cancer patients aged {>=}75 years undergoing brachytherapy with or without supplemental therapies. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and August 2004, 145 consecutive patients aged {>=}75 years underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy. Median follow-up was 5.8 years. Biochemical progression-free survival was defined by a prostate-specific antigen level {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Patients with metastatic prostate cancer or hormone-refractory disease without obvious metastases who died of any cause were classified as dead of prostate cancer. All other deaths were attributed to the immediate cause of death. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. Results: Nine-year CSS, bPFS, and OS rates for the entire cohort were 99.3%, 97.1%, and 64.5%, respectively. None of the evaluated parameters predicted for CSS, whereas bPFS was most closely predicted by percentage positive biopsies. Overall survival and non-cancer deaths were best predicted by tobacco status. Thirty-seven patients have died, with 83.8% of the deaths due to cardiovascular disease (22 patients) or second malignancies (9 patients). To date, only 1 patient (0.7%) has died of metastatic prostate cancer. Conclusions: After brachytherapy, high rates of CSS and bPFS are noted in elderly prostate cancer patients. Overall, approximately 65% of patients are alive at 9 years, with survival most closely related to tobacco status. We believe our results support an aggressive locoregional approach in appropriately selected elderly patients.

  18. Advanced gastric cancer and a concomitant pregnancy associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Takumi; Isii, Keisuke; Suzuki, Mina; Takakuwa, Koichi; Shibazaki, Yasuhiko; Ozawa, Tsunenori; Narisawa, Rintaro; Sekizuka, Naoto; Tanaka, Kenichi

    2004-07-01

    Gastric cancer associated with pregnancy is extremely rare and the prognosis is generally grave. A 31-year-old Japanese women, 41 weeks pregnant, displayed disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), although clinical symptoms and diagnostic examinations did not indicate an obstetrical cause. She went into labor spontaneously and vaginally delivered a 3248-g normal female infant, after receiving a blood transfusion. On the day 5 postpartum, a gastroduodenal fiberscope examination indicated advanced gastric cancer. She was also diagnosed with bilateral chronic subdural hematoma and underwent an operation to allow drainage. It was not possible to treat her curatively, so she was treated conservatively for DIC. She died on day 13 postpartum. Necropsy of the iliac bone indicated bone marrow metastasis of adenocarcinoma. This is the first known case of a pregnant woman with DIC occurring as the first manifestation of advanced gastric cancer. PMID:15232763

  19. Intravascular Lymphomatosis Mimicking Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Oomura, Masahiro; Sakakibara, Noriyuki; Suzuki, Shugo; Wakita, Atsushi; Mori, Yuji; Kamimoto, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a 75-year-old female patient with intravascular lymphomatosis (IVL) who presented with fever of unknown origin. Examination, including contrast-enhanced CT and 67Ga scintigraphy, failed to show any lesions. Her blood levels of lactate dehydrogenase and soluble interleukin-2 receptors were high, suggesting a lymphomatous tumor. A bone marrow puncture was negative, and a random skin biopsy revealed a monoclonal proliferation of naked, large lymphocytes in the vascular space of the subcutaneous tissue, confirming the diagnosis of IVL. MRI, performed 7 weeks after admission, showed a brain mass mimicking primary central nervous system lymphoma. The mass was considered to be a collection of malignant lymphocyte cells invading from the vessels. Without the random skin biopsy, this case may have been misdiagnosed as primary central nervous system lymphoma. PMID:24761147

  20. Disseminated intravascular coagulation observed following treatment with gemtuzumab ozogamicin for relapsed/refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    AZUMA, YOSHIKO; NAKAYA, AYA; HOTTA, MASAAKI; FUJITA, SHINYA; TSUBOKURA, YUKIE; YOSHIMURA, HIDEAKI; SATAKE, ATSUSHI; ISHII, KAZUYOSHI; ITO, TOMOKI; NOMURA, SHOSAKU

    2016-01-01

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) is a recombinant humanized immunoglobulin G4 anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)33 monoclonal antibody conjugated to N-acetyl-γ calicheamicin dimethylhydrazide, a naturally potent antibiotic. It has been introduced for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), since large quantities of CD33 are commonly expressed on the surface of APL cells. The present study reported two cases with prominent disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), which was transiently observed following treatment with GO with relapsed/refractory APL. Very limited information exists regarding DIC occurring following GO, and its mechanism remains to be elucidated. In the present study, recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin was used for DIC treatment, and the patients recovered promptly. Since DIC is the most serious adverse event associated with GO treatment, elucidation of its mechanism and establishment of a treatment strategy are warranted. PMID:27330760

  1. Intravascular Hemolysis and Septicemia due to Clostridium perfringens Emphysematous Cholecystitis and Hepatic Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Justin; Bland, Lacie; Noble, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Context. Clostridium perfringens septicemia is often associated with translocation from the gastrointestinal or gastrourinary tract and occurs in patients who have malignancy or are immunocompromised. Clostridium perfringens septicemia is usually fatal without early identification, source control, and antibiotics. Case. We present a case of a 65-year-old female with Clostridium perfringens septicemia secondary to emphysematous cholecystitis, with progression to hepatic abscesses. Conclusion. Septicemia secondary to Clostridium perfringens is generally fatal if not detected early. Source control with surgery or percutaneous drainage and early antibiotic therapy is imperative. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may reduce mortality. Clinicians caring for patients with sepsis and intravascular hemolysis must have Clostridium perfringens septicemia on their differential diagnosis with a low threshold for starting antibiotics and pursuing source of infection. PMID:26229537

  2. Intravascular photoacoustic detection of vulnerable plaque based on constituent selected imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Xing, Da

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a disease of the large arteries, is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke. Over decades, atherosclerosis is characterized by thickening of the walls of the arteries, only advanced atherosclerotic disease could be observed. Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid imaging technique that combines the advantages of high spatial resolution of ultrasound with contrast of optical absorption. In this paper, we present an intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging system to characterize vulnerable plaques by using the optical absorption contrast between different constituents. Epidemiological studies have revealed several important plaque constituents associated with early atherosclerosis, such as macrophage, cholesterol, lipid, calcification, and so on. We chose a section of lipid rich atherosclerosis artery and a section of normal artery as the phantom. Two IVPA images of them are given to show the difference between sick and normal. As a new method of detecting vulnerable plaque, IVPA constituents imaging will provide more details for diagnosis that offer an enticing prospect in early detecting of atherosclerosis.

  3. [Chronic disseminated intravascular coagulopathy in a dog with lung worm infection].

    PubMed

    Schmitz, S; Moritz, A

    2009-06-01

    The clinical and laboratory findings in a 1-year-old male Jack Russel Terrier dog with lung worm induced coagulopathy are described. The diagnosis was based upon history, clinical findings, radiography, endoscopy, cytology and laboratory results. The presenting complaint was chronic cough. Radiographically, a diffuse interstitial to bronchial lung pattern was observed. Blood analysis revealed thrombocytopaenia and prolonged coagulation times. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) was diagnosed based on D-dimer and fibrinogen measurements, and by thrombelastogram results. After stabilisation of the patient, bronchoscopy with a bronchoalveolar lavage was performed, where large amounts of lung worm larvae were found cytologically. After treatment with fresh frozen plasma and fenbendazole, coagulation parameters improved and the cough resolved. PMID:19496048

  4. Eyelid varix with phlebolith formation, thrombus recanalization, and early intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zakka, Fouad R; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Thakker, Manoj M

    2011-01-01

    An asymptomatic, bluish-gray, movable, raised, and firm left upper eyelid mass had been present for 8 months in an 82-year-old woman. Histopathologic examination revealed a lesion restricted to the dermis and composed in part of a calcific nodule that was circumscribed by an acellular fibrous capsule. An adjacent nodule exhibited proliferating endothelial cells invading a fresh thrombus. Immunohistochemical staining revealed positivity for CD31, CD34, and CD68; D2-40 was negative, ruling out a lymphatic origin. Masson trichrome and elastic staining of deeper sections revealed recanalization of an earlier thrombus; surviving elastic fibers were discovered in the outer wall, establishing a venous source. This is the first reported case of 3 microscopically discernible events (old phlebolith, fresh intravascular endothelial hyperplasia invading a thrombus, and labyrinthine recanalization of a temporally more remote thrombus) in an eyelid varix. The clinical differential diagnosis is reviewed. PMID:20724862

  5. Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma complicated by invasive pulmonary aspergillosis: a rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mahasneh, Tamadur; Harrington, Zinta; Williamson, Jonathan; Alkhawaja, Darweesh; Duflou, Jo; Shin, Joo-Shik

    2014-01-01

    We describe a patient with persisting fevers, a progressive pulmonary infiltrate, and high levels of serum lactate dehydrogenase. No underlying cause for these changes was found prior to her death despite extensive investigations. Postmortem tissue revealed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and subsequent brain examination revealed vascular changes in keeping with intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL). On review, subtle yet extensive lymphomatous infiltrates involved the vasculature of multiple other organs, including the lungs. Aspergillosis is a relatively rare presenting feature of lymphoproliferative disorders, and IVLBCL is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with, to our knowledge, very few case reports to date. Lymphoma should be considered in patients presenting with pneumonitis with bilateral lung infiltrates on imaging, with a high serum level of lactate dehydrogenase. PMID:25473570

  6. (100)-Textured KNN-based thick film with enhanced piezoelectric property for intravascular ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Benpeng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Ma, Teng; Yang, Xiaofei; Li, Yongxiang; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Using tape-casting technology, 35 μm free-standing (100)-textured Li doped KNN (KNLN) thick film was prepared by employing NaNbO3 (NN) as template. It exhibited similar piezoelectric behavior to lead containing materials: a longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d33) of ∼150 pm/V and an electromechanical coupling coefficient (kt) of 0.44. Based on this thick film, a 52 MHz side-looking miniature transducer with a bandwidth of 61.5% at −6 dB was built for Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging. In comparison with 40 MHz PMN-PT single crystal transducer, the rabbit aorta image had better resolution and higher noise-to-signal ratio, indicating that lead-free (100)-textured KNLN thick film may be suitable for IVUS (>50 MHz) imaging. PMID:25991874

  7. (100)-Textured KNN-based thick film with enhanced piezoelectric property for intravascular ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Benpeng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Ma, Teng; Yang, Xiaofei; Li, Yongxiang; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa

    2015-04-01

    Using tape-casting technology, 35 μm free-standing (100)-textured Li doped KNN (KNLN) thick film was prepared by employing NaNbO3 (NN) as template. It exhibited similar piezoelectric behavior to lead containing materials: a longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d33) of ˜150 pm/V and an electromechanical coupling coefficient (kt) of 0.44. Based on this thick film, a 52 MHz side-looking miniature transducer with a bandwidth of 61.5% at -6 dB was built for Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging. In comparison with 40 MHz PMN-PT single crystal transducer, the rabbit aorta image had better resolution and higher noise-to-signal ratio, indicating that lead-free (100)-textured KNLN thick film may be suitable for IVUS (>50 MHz) imaging.

  8. Intravascular Ultrasound and Histology in In Vitro Assessment of Iliac Artery Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lankeren, Winnifred van; Gussenhoven, Elma J.; Qureshi, Akeel; Lugt, Aad van der

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was used to assess in vitro the morphologic and quantitative effects of balloon angioplasty (PTA) of the iliac artery. Methods: Forty human iliac arteries ({>=} 30% area stenosis) were studied with IVUS in vitro before and after PTA and the findings were validated with histology. Results: The sensitivity of IVUS for dissection was 74% and for media rupture 59%. The incidence of vascular damage was higher when the whole segment was analyzed rather than the target site alone. Dissections occurred at the thinnest region of the plaque, unrelated to plaque calcification. Following PTA, quantitative changes at the target site were greater compared with the overall data derived from all cross-sections. The increase in lumen area was caused solely by an increase in vessel area. Conclusions: IVUS is sensitive in detecting dissections, which occurred irrespective of calcification at the thinnest region of the plaque. The increase in lumen area after PTA was caused by stretching of the vessel.

  9. Pathogenesis and management of peripartum coagulopathic calamities (disseminated intravascular coagulation and amniotic fluid embolism).

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Acute coagulopathic peripartum calamities are relatively rare but contribute importantly to maternal morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Abruptio placenta, amniotic fluid embolism, and retained fetal or placental material may lead to fulminant intravascular activation of coagulation which results in thromboembolic complications and consumption coagulopathy causing severe hemorrhage. The central underlying pathophysiological pathway in the coagulopathy associated with these syndromes is the occurrence of tissue factor, released from the placenta and amniotic fluid, in the circulation, in combination with low levels of physiological anticoagulant factors during pregnancy. The diagnosis of DIC may be made trough conventional composite scoring systems employing routine coagulation tests, whereas for the diagnosis of amniotic fluid embolism measurement of insulin like growth factor binding protein-1 seems promising. Therapy is aimed at removing the precipitating factor combined with supportive adjunctive treatment options. PMID:23452737

  10. Splenic angiomyxoma with intravascular tumor embolus in a dog: a case report

    PubMed Central

    LEE, Eun-Mi; KIM, Ah-Young; LEE, Eun-Joo; PARK, Jin-Kyu; KIM, Tae-Hwan; PARK, Se-Il; JEONG, Kyu-Shik

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old castrated male Yorkshire terrier dog had a soft splenic mass, which measured 11 cm in the greatest diameter. Microscopically, the parenchyma of the spleen was completely replaced by myxoid substances. Numerous spindle and stellate cells were loosely arranged in the myxoid stroma, and variable vessels of variable sizes were observed in a loose matrix with poorly defined margins. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that tumor cells were positive for desmin and alpha-SMA, but negative for S-100. Interestingly, intravascular tumor embolus with positive α-SMA expression was observed. This case is meaningful, because angiomyxoma, a rare tumor of dogs, occurs in the spleen. Even in human cases, splenic angiomyxoma was not reported. PMID:26972144

  11. Three-dimensional segmentation of luminal and adventitial borders in serial intravascular ultrasound images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shekhar, R.; Cothren, R. M.; Vince, D. G.; Chandra, S.; Thomas, J. D.; Cornhill, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides exact anatomy of arteries, allowing accurate quantitative analysis. Automated segmentation of IVUS images is a prerequisite for routine quantitative analyses. We present a new three-dimensional (3D) segmentation technique, called active surface segmentation, which detects luminal and adventitial borders in IVUS pullback examinations of coronary arteries. The technique was validated against expert tracings by computing correlation coefficients (range 0.83-0.97) and William's index values (range 0.37-0.66). The technique was statistically accurate, robust to image artifacts, and capable of segmenting a large number of images rapidly. Active surface segmentation enabled geometrically accurate 3D reconstruction and visualization of coronary arteries and volumetric measurements.

  12. Intravascular low-intensity He-Ne laser irradiation therapy on idiopathic edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunqing; Liu, T. C.; Tang, Xiang-Jun

    1998-11-01

    194 patients with psoriasis were treated by intravascular low level laser irradiation combined with Vit C 2.0g iv and O2 inhale to the nose. An hour once a day, for 5-40 times, and 13.06 times in average, ten times with 4-7 days intervals. The results: cured 23 cases, good effected 61 cases, improved 110 cases, relapsed 10 cases. Curative effect was related to treatment times, cured and good effected 5 times 12.5 percent, 10 times 31 percent, 15 times 94 percent. A matched control group in 17 patients was treated by drug. The results: good effected 1 case, improved 13 cases, not effected 3 cases.

  13. Optimized source selection for intracavitary low dose rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nurushev, T.; Kim, Jinkoo

    2005-05-01

    A procedure has been developed for automating optimal selection of sources from an available inventory for the low dose rate brachytherapy, as a replacement for the conventional trial-and-error approach. The method of optimized constrained ratios was applied for clinical source selection for intracavitary Cs-137 implants using Varian BRACHYVISION software as initial interface. However, this method can be easily extended to another system with isodose scaling and shaping capabilities. Our procedure provides optimal source selection results independent of the user experience and in a short amount of time. This method also generates statistics on frequently requested ideal source strengths aiding in ordering of clinically relevant sources.

  14. [Endobronchial brachytherapy: state of the art in 2013].

    PubMed

    Derhem, N; Sabila, H; Mornex, F

    2013-04-01

    Endobronchial brachytherapy is an invasive technique, which allows localizing radioactive sources at the tumour contact. Therefore, high doses are administered to tumour while healthy tissues can be spared. Initially dedicated to a palliative setting, improvements helped reaching 60 to 88% symptoms alleviation and 30 to 100% of endoscopic macroscopic response. New diagnostic techniques and early diagnosis extended the indications to a curative intent: endoluminal primitive tumour, post radiation endobronchial recurrence, inoperable patients. CT-based dosimetry is a keypoint to optimize treatment quality and to minimize potential side effects, making this treatment a safe and efficient technique for specific indications. PMID:23465785

  15. Multimodality Intravascular Imaging Assessment of Plaque Erosion versus Plaque Rupture in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jee Eun; Mintz, Gary S.; Hong, Young Joon; Lee, Sung Yun; Kim, Ki Seok; Hahn, Joo-Yong; Kumar, Kaup Sharath; Won, Hoyoun; Hyeon, Seong Hyeop; Shin, Seung Yong; Lee, Kwang Je; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Chee Jeong; Kim, Sang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We assessed plaque erosion of culprit lesions in patients with acute coronary syndrome in real world practice. Subjects and Methods Culprit lesion plaque rupture or plaque erosion was diagnosed with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was used to determine arterial remodeling. Positive remodeling was defined as a remodeling index (lesion/reference EEM [external elastic membrane area) >1.05. Results A total of 90 patients who had plaque rupture showing fibrous-cap discontinuity and ruptured cavity were enrolled. 36 patients showed definite OCT-plaque erosion, while 7 patients had probable OCT-plaque erosion. Overall, 26% (11/43) of definite/probable plaque erosion had non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) while 35% (15/43) had ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Conversely, 14.5% (13/90) of plaque rupture had NSTEMI while 71% (64/90) had STEMI (p<0.0001). Among plaque erosion, white thrombus was seen in 55.8% (24/43) of patients and red thrombus in 27.9% (12/43) of patients. Compared to plaque erosion, plaque rupture more often showed positive remodeling (p=0.003) with a larger necrotic core area examined by virtual histology (VH)-IVUS, while negative remodeling was prominent in plaque erosion. Overall, 65% 28/43 of plaque erosions were located in the proximal 30 mm of a culprit vessel-similar to plaque ruptures (72%, 65/90, p=0.29). Conclusion Although most of plaque erosions show nearly normal coronary angiogram, modest plaque burden with negative remodeling and an uncommon fibroatheroma might be the nature of plaque erosion. Multimodality intravascular imaging with OCT and VH-IVUS showed fundamentally different pathoanatomic substrates underlying plaque rupture and erosion. PMID:27482258

  16. A method for 3D reconstruction of coronary arteries using biplane angiography and intravascular ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Bourantas, Christos V; Kourtis, Iraklis C; Plissiti, Marina E; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Katsouras, Christos S; Papafaklis, Michail I; Michalis, Lampros K

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a new method for the three-dimensional reconstruction of coronary arteries and its quantitative validation. Our approach is based on the fusion of the data provided by intravascular ultrasound images (IVUS) and biplane angiographies. A specific segmentation algorithm is used for the detection of the regions of interest in intravascular ultrasound images. A new methodology is also introduced for the accurate extraction of the catheter path. In detail, a cubic B-spline is used for approximating the catheter path in each biplane projection. Each B-spline curve is swept along the normal direction of its X-ray angiographic plane forming a surface. The intersection of the two surfaces is a 3D curve, which represents the reconstructed path. The detected regions of interest in the IVUS images are placed perpendicularly onto the path and their relative axial twist is computed using the sequential triangulation algorithm. Then, an efficient algorithm is applied to estimate the absolute orientation of the first IVUS frame. In order to obtain 3D visualization the commercial package Geomagic Studio 4.0 is used. The performance of the proposed method is assessed using a validation methodology which addresses the separate validation of each step followed for obtaining the coronary reconstruction. The performance of the segmentation algorithm was examined in 80 IVUS images. The reliability of the path extraction method was studied in vitro using a metal wire model and in vivo in a dataset of 11 patients. The performance of the sequential triangulation algorithm was tested in two gutter models and in the coronary arteries (marked with metal clips) of six cadaveric sheep hearts. Finally, the accuracy in the estimation of the first IVUS frame absolute orientation was examined in the same set of cadaveric sheep hearts. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed reconstruction method is reliable and capable of depicting the morphology of

  17. Penetration of an artificial arterial thromboembolism in a live animal using an intravascular therapeutic microrobot system.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Semi; Choi, Hyunchul; Go, Gwangjun; Lee, Cheong; Lim, Kyung Seob; Sim, Doo Sun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-04-01

    The biomedical applications of wireless robots are an active area of study. In addition to moving to a target lesion, wireless locomotive robots can deliver a therapeutic drug for a specific disease. Thus, they hold great potential as therapeutic devices in blood vessel diseases, such as thrombi and occlusions, and in other diseases, such as cancer and inflammation. During a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), surgeons wear a heavy shielding cloth. However, they cannot escape severe radiation exposure owing to unstable shielding. They may also suffer from joint pains because of the weight of the shielding cloth. In addition, the catheters in PCIs are controlled by the surgeon's hand. Thus, they lack steering ability. A new intravascular therapeutic system is needed to address these problems in conventional PCIs. We developed an intravascular therapeutic microrobot system (ITMS) using an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system with bi-plane X-ray devices that can remotely control a robot in blood vessels. Using this proposed ITMS, we demonstrated the locomotion of the robot in abdominal and iliac arteries of a live pig by the master-slave method. After producing an arterial thromboembolism in a live pig in a partial iliac artery, the robot moved to the target lesion and penetrated by specific motions (twisting and hammering) of the robot using the proposed ITMS. The results reveal that the proposed ITMS can realize stable locomotion (alignment and propulsion) of a robot in abdominal and iliac arteries of a live pig. This can be considered the first preclinical trial of the treatment of an artificial arterial thromboembolism by penetration of a blood clot. PMID:26857290

  18. Endovascular Repair of Complex Aortic Aneurysms: Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance with an Intracardiac Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Zanchetta, Mario Rigatelli, Gianluca; Pedon, Luigi; Zennaro, Marco; Ronsivalle, Salvatore; Maiolino, Pietro

    2003-09-15

    To assess the accuracy and efficacy of intravascular ultrasound guidance obtained by an intracardiac ultrasound probe during complex aortic endografting. Between November 1999 and July 2002, 19 patients (5 female, 14 male; mean age 73.5 {+-} 2.1 years) underwent endovascular repair of thoracic (n = 10), complex abdominal (n = 6) and concomitant thoraco-abdominal (n = 3) aortic aneurysm. The most suitable size and configuration of the stent-graft were chosen on the basis of preoperative computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Intraoperative intravascular ultrasound imaging was obtained using a 9 Fr, 9 MHz intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) probe, 110 cm in length, inserted through a 10 Fr precurved long sheath. The endografts were deployed as planned by CTA or MRA. Before stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to view the posterior aortic arch and descending thoraco-abdominal aorta without position-related artifacts, and to identify both sites of stent-graft positioning. After stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to detect the need for additional modular components to internally reline the aorta in 11 patients, and to discover 2 incomplete graft expansions subsequently treated with adjunctive balloon angioplasty. In 1 patient, the ICE probe supported the decision that the patient was ineligible for the endovascular exclusion procedure. The ICE probe provides accurate information on the anatomy of the posterior aortic arch and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and a rapid identification of attachment sites and stent-graft pathology, allowing refinement and improvement of the endovascular strategy.

  19. Controlled pitch-adjustment of impeller blades for an intravascular blood pump.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Sciolino, Michael G; Downs, Emily A; Saxman, Robert S; López-Isaza, Sergio; Moskowitz, William B

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of mechanical blood pumps are currently providing circulatory support, and the incidence of their use continues to increase each year. As the use of blood pumps becomes more pervasive in the treatment of those patients with congestive heart failure, critical advances in design features to address known limitations and the integration of novel technologies become more imperative. To advance the current state-of-the-art in blood pump design, this study investigates the inclusion of pitch-adjusting blade features in intravascular blood pumps as a means to increase energy transfer; an approach not explored to date. A flexible impeller prototype was constructed with a configuration to allow for a variable range of twisted blade geometries of 60-250°. Hydraulic experiments using a blood analog fluid were conducted to characterize the pressure-flow performance for each of these twisted positions. The flexible, twisted impeller was able to produce 1-25 mmHg for 0.5-4 L/min at rotational speeds of 5,000-8,000 RPM. For a given twisted position, the pressure rise was found to decrease as a function of increasing flow rate, as expected. Generally, a steady increase in the pressure rise was observed as a function of higher twisted degrees for a constant rotational speed. Higher rotational speeds for a specific twisted impeller configuration resulted in a more substantial pressure generation. The findings of this study support the continued exploration of this unique design approach in the development of intravascular blood pumps. PMID:22691415

  20. Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to intravascular iodine based radiocontrast media -- an update.

    PubMed

    Bumbăcea, Roxana Silvia; Petruţescu, Brînduşa; Bumbăcea, Dragoş; Strâmbu, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Used since 1929 in medical practice, nowadays four chemical varieties of intravascular iodine based radiocontrast media (I-RCM) are available: ionic monomers with high osmolarity, ionic dimers with low osmolarity, non-ionic monomers with low osmolarity and non-ionic iso-osmolar dimers. Increasing prescription of l-RCMs augments the number of reported hypersensitivity reactions. I-RCM induced hypersensitivity reactions can be dclasified in two types: immediate hypersensitivity reactions (IHRs - occurring within the first hour) and delayed hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs - occurring between 1 hour and 7 days). IHRs usually present as urticaria and angioedema but may associate severe respiratory and cardiovascular symptoms. Risk factors for an IHRs include a prior immediate reaction, personal history of atopic diseases (mainly asthma) and treatment with beta blocking agents. Diagnostic tests for IHRs include blood tests (serum tryptase) and skin tests (prick and intradermal) performed 2 to 6 months after IHR. High osmolarity of the I-RCM is the factor most strongly associated with IHRs. Primary prevention of IHRs involves the use of non-ionic low-osmolar or iso-osmolar agents for all intravascular procedures. DHRs are usually mild to moderate in severity, transient and self-limiting, presenting as maculopapular rash in more than 50% of cases. As with IHRs, the most important risk factor for DHRs is a previous reaction to I-RCM. Assessment of DHRs includes skin prick tests, intradermal and patch tests. Due to extensive cross-reactivity between I-RCM, a change of product is no guarantee against a repeated reaction. Current premedication procedures in patients with previous severe reactions can reduce symptoms, but may not prevent recurrent reactions. PMID:23781574

  1. Intravascular extension of papillary thyroid carcinoma to the internal jugular vein: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jarrah, Q.; Abou-Foul, Ak.; Heis, H.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is the most common thyroid malignancy and usually spreads via lymphatic system. PTC can sometimes show microscopic vascular invasion, but rarely causes tumour thrombus in the internal jugular vein (IJV) or other great veins of the neck. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of a 62-year-old female presented with symptomatic central neck mass. Clinical examination revealed a hard solitary right-sided thyroid nodule with ipsilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. Ultrasonography (US) confirmed the clinical diagnosis and visualised a dilated ipsilateral IJV. Fine-needle aspiration cytology revealed PTC cells so total thyroidectomy with right neck dissection was done. A tumour thrombus was discovered in the distended right IJV and was cleared successfully. The patient recovered well after the operation with no local or distant metastasis detected. DISCUSSION Tumour vascular spread is observed in tumours with angio-invasive features including follicular carcinoma of the thyroid gland where great cervical veins can be affected. PTC commonly spreads to the lymph nodes and vascular spread via direct intravascular extension is extremely rare. Neck US has an important role in the diagnosis, and operators should attempt to detect signs of tumour thrombi in all patients with thyroid masses. Aggressive surgical treatment with vascular repair is recommended whenever possible to minimise the risk of potentially fatal complications of the intraluminal masses. CONCLUSION Intravascular tumour extension of PTC is rare but with serious consequences. Diagnosis with neck US is possible but some cases are only discovered intraoperatively. Thrombectomy with vascular repair or reconstruction is usually possible. PMID:25044067

  2. Virtual angioscopic visualization and analysis of coronary aneurysms using intravascular ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayeni, Tina A.; Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2001-05-01

    Kawasaki Disease is an inflammatory illness of young children that can seriously affect the cardiovascular system. The disease may cause coronary artery aneurysms, a thinning and dilation of the arterial wall when the wall is weakened by disease. Such aneurysms significantly increase the risk of rupture of the arterial wall, an event from which few patients survive. Due to the largely asymptotic nature of coronary aneurysms, diagnosis must be timely and accurate in order for treatment to be effective. Currently, aneurysms are detected primarily using X-ray angiography, MRI, and CT images. Increased insight into the disease and its effects on the arterial wall can be gained by multi-dimensional computerized visualization and quantitative analysis of diagnostic images made possible by the techniques of intravascular imaging and virtual endoscopy. Intravascular ultrasound images (IVUS) of a coronary artery exhibiting aneurysms were acquired from a patient with Kawasaki Disease. The disease is characterized by low luminescent in the IVUS images. Image segmentation of the abnormal, prominent anechoic regions branching from the lumen and originating within other layers of the arterial wall was performed and each region defined as a separate object. An object segmentation map was generated and used in perspective rendering of the original image volume set at successive locations along the length of the arterial segment, producing a 'fly-through' of the interior of the artery. The diseased region (aneurysm) of the wall was well defined by the differences in luminal size and by differences in appearance of the arterial wall shape observed during virtual angioscopic fly-throughs. Erosions of the endovascular surface caused pronounced horizontal and vertical ballooning of the lumen. Minute cracks within the unaffected luminal areas revealed possible early development of an aneurysm on the contralateral wall, originating in the medial section of the artery and spreading

  3. Reaction to injury following balloon angioplasty and intravascular stent placement in the canine femoral artery.

    PubMed

    Salam, T A; Taylor, B; Suggs, W D; Hanson, S R; Lumsden, A B

    1994-05-01

    Intravascular stents are used clinically as an adjunct to coronary and iliac angioplasty. This study was performed to evaluate the thrombogenicity and intimal hyperplasia incited by stents deployed in non-injured and in balloon-injured femoral arteries in the canine model. Medinvent stents (4 mm) were placed in the femoral arteries bilaterally in five mongrel dogs via cut down. This was preceded by balloon catheter angioplasty of the stent site on one side. Platelet deposition was measured at 30, 60, and 90 minutes and at 24 and 48 hours after stent placement, using gamma camera imaging of Indium111 platelets. The animals were killed after 2 months using a pressure perfusion technique, and the stents harvested. All vessels were patent at the time of harvest. Neointimal thickness was measured by computer image analysis. Platelet deposition was significantly increased on the angioplastied side compared to the non-angioplastied side at 60 minutes (5.67 x 10(9) +/- 1.4 versus 2.17 x 10(9) +/- 0.5 platelets/cm; P < 0.05), at 90 minutes (8.13 x 10(9) +/- 1.8 versus 2.33 x 10(9) +/- 0.6 platelets/cm; P < 0.05), and at 24 hours (stent-to-blood ratio = 15.86 +/- 6.3 versus 3.75 +/- 1.5; P < 0.05). Neointimal thickness was also significantly greater on the side of combined angioplasty and stent placement (0.45 +/- 0.21 mm versus 0.33 +/- 0.09 mm; P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that placement of intravascular stents in normal arteries is associated with a certain degree of thrombogenicity and formation of neointimal hyperplasia. Combining balloon angioplasty with stent placement significantly augments both thrombogenicity and production of intimal hyperplasia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8161086

  4. Acute Increase in Hepatic Arterial Flow During TIPS Identified by Intravascular Flow Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Radeleff, Boris Sommer, Christof-Matthias; Heye, Tobias; Lopez-Benitez, Ruben; Sauer, Peter; Schmidt, Jan; Kauczor, Haus-Ulrich; Richter, Goetz Martin

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate alterations of hepatic arterial flow during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS) applying intravascular Doppler sonography. This prospective monocenter study included 25 patients with liver cirrhosis (alcohol induced [n = 19], chronic hepatitis associated [n = 3], primary biliary cirrhosis associated [n = 1], and cryptogenic [n = 2]) successfully treated with TIPS. All patients underwent intravascular hepatic arterial flow measurements during TIPS using an endoluminal flow sensor. The average arterial peak velocity (APV) and the maximum arterial peak velocity (MPV) were registered. Twenty-two patients (88%) showed increased APV, one patient (4%) showed unaffected APV, and two patients (8%) showed decreased APV after TIPS. The average portosystemic pressure gradient decreased significantly, from 22.0 {+-} 5.1 mmHg before TIPS to 11.0 {+-} 4.1 mmHg after TIPS (-50.0%; p < 0.0001). The average APV increased significantly, from 41.9 {+-} 17.8 cm/s before TIPS to 60.7 {+-} 19.0 cm/s after TIPS (+44.9%; p < 0.0001). The average MPV increased significantly, from 90.8 {+-} 31.7 cm/s before TIPS to 112.6 {+-} 34.9 cm/s after TIPS (+24.0%; p = 0.0002). These changes in perfusion set in within seconds after TIPS tract formation in all the patients with increased APV. We conclude that TIPS-induced portosystemic decompression leads to a significant increase in hepatic arterial flow. The changes occurred within seconds, suggesting a reflex-like mechanism.

  5. Use of an Intravascular Fluorescent Continuous Glucose Sensor in ICU Patients

    PubMed Central

    Strasma, Paul J.; Finfer, Simon; Flower, Oliver; Hipszer, Brian; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Macken, Lewis; Sechterberger, Marjolein; van der Voort, Peter H. J.; DeVries, J. Hans; Joseph, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia are associated with adverse clinical outcomes in intensive care patients. In product development studies at 4 ICUs, the safety and performance of an intravascular continuous glucose monitoring (IV-CGM) system was evaluated in 70 postsurgical patients. Methods: The GluCath System (GluMetrics, Inc) used a quenched chemical fluorescence mechanism to optically measure blood glucose when deployed via a radial artery catheter or directly into a peripheral vein. Periodic ultrasound assessed blood flow and thrombus formation. Patient glucose levels were managed according to the standard of care and existing protocols at each site. Reference blood samples were acquired hourly and compared against prospectively calibrated sensor results. Results: In all, 63 arterial sensors and 9 venous sensors were deployed in 70 patients. Arterial sensors did not interfere with invasive blood pressure monitoring, sampling or other aspects of patient care. A majority of venous sensors (66%) exhibited thrombus on ultrasound. In all, 89.4% (1383/1547) of arterial and 72.2% (182/252) of venous measurements met ISO15197:2003 criteria (within 20%), and 72.7% (1124/1547) of arterial and 56.3% (142/252) of venous measurements met CLSI POCT 12-A3 criteria (within 12.5%). The aggregate mean absolute relative difference (MARD) between the sensors and the reference was 9.6% for arterial and 14.2% for venous sensors. Conclusions: The GluCath System exhibited acceptable accuracy when deployed in a radial artery for up to 48 hours in ICU patients after elective cardiac surgery. Accuracy of venous deployment was substantially lower with significant rates of intravascular thrombus observed using ultrasound. PMID:25972280

  6. In vivo TLD dose measurements in catheter-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Adlienė, Diana; Jakštas, Karolis; Urbonavičius, Benas Gabrielis

    2015-07-01

    Routine in vivo dosimetry is well established in external beam radiotherapy; however, it is restricted mainly to detection of gross errors in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy due to complicated measurements in the field of steep dose gradients in the vicinity of radioactive source and high uncertainties. The results of in vivo dose measurements using TLD 100 mini rods and TLD 'pin worms' in catheter-based HDR brachytherapy are provided in this paper alongside with their comparison with corresponding dose values obtained using calculation algorithm of the treatment planning system. Possibility to perform independent verification of treatment delivery in HDR brachytherapy using TLDs is discussed. PMID:25809111

  7. Novel application of high-dose rate brachytherapy for severe, recalcitrant palmoplantar pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Timerman, D; Devlin, P M; Nambudiri, V E; Wright, N A; Vleugels, R A; Clark, R A; Kupper, T S; Merola, J F; Patel, M

    2016-07-01

    Palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP) is a chronic pustular dermatitis of the palms and soles, which is frequently associated with significant pruritus and pain, often limiting daily activities. We present the case of a 36-year-old man with severe PPP who had treatment failure with multiple medical therapies but showed marked improvement with high-dose rate brachytherapy. Brachytherapy has the advantage of providing a conformal dose distribution over complex curved surfaces, such as the foot and ankle. Our observations suggest that brachytherapy may be a well-tolerated treatment option for patients with severe, refractory PPP. PMID:26848819

  8. REDMAPS: reduced-dimensionality matching for prostate brachytherapy seed reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghoon; Labat, Christian; Jain, Ameet K; Song, Danny Y; Burdette, Everette Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor; Prince, Jerry L

    2011-01-01

    The success of prostate brachytherapy critically depends on delivering adequate dose to the prostate gland. Intraoperative localization of the implanted seeds provides potential for dose evaluation and optimization during therapy. A reduced-dimensionality matching algorithm for prostate brachytherapy seed reconstruction (REDMAPS) that uses multiple X-ray fluoroscopy images obtained from different poses is proposed. The seed reconstruction problem is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem, and REDMAPS finds a solution in a clinically acceptable amount of time using dimensionality reduction to create a smaller space of possible solutions. Dimensionality reduction is possible since the optimal solution has approximately zero cost when the poses of the acquired images are known to be within a small error. REDMAPS is also formulated to address the "hidden seed problem" in which seeds overlap on one or more observed images. REDMAPS uses a pruning algorithm to avoid unnecessary computation of cost metrics and the reduced problem is solved using linear programming. REDMAPS was first evaluated and its parameters tuned using simulations. It was then validated using five phantom and 21 patient datasets. REDMAPS was successful in reconstructing the seeds with an overall seed matching rate above 99% and a reconstruction error below 1 mm in less than 5 s. PMID:20643600

  9. In vivo visualization of prostate brachytherapy seeds with photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael P.; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a canine study to investigate the in vivo feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. A fiber coupled to a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into high-dose-rate brachytherapy needles, which diffused light spherically. These needles were inserted through the perineum into the prostate for interstitial light delivery and the resulting acoustic waves were detected with a transrectal ultrasound probe. Postoperative computed tomography images and ex vivo photoacoustic images confirmed seed locations. Limitations with insufficient light delivery were mitigated with short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming, providing a 10-20 dB contrast improvement over delay-and-sum (DAS) beamforming for pulse energies ranging from 6.8 to 10.5 mJ with a fiber-seed distance as large as 9.5 mm. For the same distance and the same range of energy densities, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were similar while the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was higher in SLSC compared to DAS images. Challenges included visualization of signals associated with the interstitial fiber tip and acoustic reverberations between seeds separated by ≤2 mm. Results provide insights into the potential for clinical translation to humans.

  10. Thermoluminescence dosimetry measurements of brachytherapy sources in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Tailor, Ramesh; Tolani, Naresh; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2008-09-15

    Radiation therapy dose measurements are customarily performed in liquid water. The characterization of brachytherapy sources is, however, generally based on measurements made with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs), for which contact with water may lead to erroneous readings. Consequently, most dosimetry parameters reported in the literature have been based on measurements in water-equivalent plastics, such as Solid Water. These previous reports employed a correction factor to transfer the dose measurements from a plastic phantom to liquid water. The correction factor most often was based on Monte Carlo calculations. The process of measuring in a water-equivalent plastic phantom whose exact composition may be different from published specifications, then correcting the results to a water medium leads to increased uncertainty in the results. A system has been designed to enable measurements with TLDs in liquid water. This system, which includes jigs to support water-tight capsules of lithium fluoride in configurations suitable for measuring several dosimetric parameters, was used to determine the correction factor from water-equivalent plastic to water. Measurements of several {sup 125}I and {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy sources in liquid water and in a Solid Water phantom demonstrated a correction factor of 1.039{+-}0.005 at 1 cm distance. These measurements are in good agreement with a published value of this correction factor for an {sup 125}I source.

  11. Effects Of The Inhomogeneity of Brachytherapy Sources In Cancer Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onumah, Nnenna

    2006-03-01

    Uniformity of radioactive sources is vital in delivering accurate doses in Brachytherapy. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) defines source uniformity as no more than a 20 % deviation from the average value of the dose along a transverse region. Brachytherapy induced cell damages occur at the microdosimetric levels, and as such, small deviations in dose delivered from different geometrical positions on the source can lead to huge deviations in proper treatment. A Geant4 simulation of a uniform source and a non-uniform source was simulated to check the validity of IAEA's proposed definition. A realistic source of non-uniformity, air bubbles of differing diameters (from 20 to 80 microns) were simulated and their uniformity checked against the model suggested by IAEA in two ways: (1) using the average obtained from the non-uniform source (2) using that obtained from the uniform source. Significant deviations of up to 50% were observed. These results validate the need for the scintillating fiber based detector currently in development within our research group.

  12. Observations on rotating needle insertions using a brachytherapy robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltsner, M. A.; Ferrier, N. J.; Thomadsen, B. R.

    2007-09-01

    A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy implantations has the potential to greatly improve treatment success. Much of the research in robotic surgery focuses on measuring accuracy. However, there exist many factors that must be optimized before an analysis of needle placement accuracy can be determined. Some of these parameters include choice of the needle type, insertion velocity, usefulness of the rotating needle and rotation speed. These parameters may affect the force at which the needle interacts with the tissue. A reduction in force has been shown to decrease the compression of the prostate and potentially increase the accuracy of seed position. Rotating the needle as it is inserted may reduce frictional forces while increasing accuracy. However, needle rotations are considered to increase tissue damage due to the drilling nature of the insertion. We explore many of the factors involved in optimizing a brachytherapy robot, and the potential effects each parameter may have on the procedure. We also investigate the interaction of rotating needles in gel and suggest the rotate-cannula-only method of conical needle insertion to minimize any tissue damage while still maintaining the benefits of reduced force and increased accuracy.

  13. Dosimetric Study of a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Arzamendi, S.; Díaz-Perches, R.

    Carcinoma of the cervix is the most common malignancy - in terms of both incidence and mortality - in Mexican women. Low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy is normally prescribed for the treatment of this disease to the vast majority of patients attending public hospitals in our country. However, most treatment planning systems being used in these hospitals still rely on Sievert integral dose calculations. Moreover, experimental verification of dose distributions are hardly ever done. In this work we present a dosimetric characterisation of the Amersham CDCS-J 137Cs source, an LDR brachytherapy source commonly used in Mexican hospitals. To this end a Monte Carlo simulation was developed, that includes a realistic description of the internal structure of the source embedded in a scattering medium. The Monte Carlo results were compared to experimental measurements of dose distributions. A lucite phantom with the same geometric characteristics as the one used in the simulation was built. Dose measurements were performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters together with commercial RadioChromic dye film. A comparison between our Monte Carlo simulation, the experimental data, and results reported in the literature is presented.

  14. 2D/3D registration algorithm for lung brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zvonarev, P. S.; Farrell, T. J.; Hunter, R.; Wierzbicki, M.; Hayward, J. E.; Sur, R. K.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: A 2D/3D registration algorithm is proposed for registering orthogonal x-ray images with a diagnostic CT volume for high dose rate (HDR) lung brachytherapy. Methods: The algorithm utilizes a rigid registration model based on a pixel/voxel intensity matching approach. To achieve accurate registration, a robust similarity measure combining normalized mutual information, image gradient, and intensity difference was developed. The algorithm was validated using a simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms. Transfer catheters were placed inside the phantoms to simulate the unique image features observed during treatment. The algorithm sensitivity to various degrees of initial misregistration and to the presence of foreign objects, such as ECG leads, was evaluated. Results: The mean registration error was 2.2 and 1.9 mm for the simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms, respectively. The error was comparable to the interoperator catheter digitization error of 1.6 mm. Preliminary analysis of data acquired from four patients indicated a mean registration error of 4.2 mm. Conclusions: Results obtained using the proposed algorithm are clinically acceptable especially considering the complications normally encountered when imaging during lung HDR brachytherapy.

  15. Remote afterloading for intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy with californium-252

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tačev, Tačo; Grigorov, Grigor; Papírek, Tomáš; Kolařík, Vladimír.

    2004-01-01

    The authors present their design concept of remote afterloading for 252Cf brachytherapy with respect to characteristic peculiarities of 252Cf and the current worldwide development of remote afterloading devices. The afterloading device has been designed as a stationary radiator comprising three mutually interconnected units: (1) a control and drive unit, consisting of a control computer and a motor-driven Bowden system carrying the 252Cf source; (2) a source housed in a watertight, concrete vessel, which is stored in a strong room situated well beneath the patient's bed and (3) an afterloading application module installed in the irradiation room. As 252Cf is a nuclide with low specific activity, it was necessary to produce two independent devices for high dose rate intracavitary treatment and for low dose rate intestinal treatment. The sources may be moved arbitrarily during the treatment with a position accuracy of 0.5-1.0 mm within a distance of 520 cm from the source storage position in the strong room to the application position. The technical concept of the present automatic afterloading device for neutron brachytherapy represents one possible option of a range of conceivable design variants, which, while minimizing the technical and economic requirements, provides operating personnel with optimum protection and work safety, thus extending the applicability of high-LET radiation-based treatment methods in clinical practice.

  16. In vivo visualization of prostate brachytherapy seeds with photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael P.; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We conducted a canine study to investigate the in vivo feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. A fiber coupled to a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into high-dose-rate brachytherapy needles, which diffused light spherically. These needles were inserted through the perineum into the prostate for interstitial light delivery and the resulting acoustic waves were detected with a transrectal ultrasound probe. Postoperative computed tomography images and ex vivo photoacoustic images confirmed seed locations. Limitations with insufficient light delivery were mitigated with short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming, providing a 10–20 dB contrast improvement over delay-and-sum (DAS) beamforming for pulse energies ranging from 6.8 to 10.5 mJ with a fiber-seed distance as large as 9.5 mm. For the same distance and the same range of energy densities, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were similar while the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was higher in SLSC compared to DAS images. Challenges included visualization of signals associated with the interstitial fiber tip and acoustic reverberations between seeds separated by ≤2 mm. Results provide insights into the potential for clinical translation to humans. PMID:25531797

  17. Current status and perspectives of brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Toita, Takafumi

    2009-02-01

    Standard definitive radiotherapy for cervical cancer consists of whole pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT). In Japan, high-dose-rate ICBT (HDR-ICBT) has been utilized in clinical practice for more than 40 years. Several randomized clinical trials demonstrated that HDR-ICBT achieved comparative outcomes, both for pelvic control and incidences of late complications, to low-dose-rate (LDR) ICBT. In addition, HDR-ICBT has some potential advantages over LDR-ICBT, leading to further improvement in treatment results. Prior to the current computer planning systems, some excellent treatment planning concepts were established. At present, systems modified from these concepts, or novel approaches, such as image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) are under investigation. One serious problem to be solved in HDR-ICBT for cervical cancer is that of the discrepancy in standard treatment schedules for combination HDR-ICBT and EBRT between the United States and Japan. Prospective studies are ongoing to assess the efficacy and toxicity of the Japanese schedule. PMID:19225920

  18. Comparison of dose calculation methods for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Finger, Paul T.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Mourtada, Firas; Napolitano, Mary E.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Thomson, Rowan M.; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric differences among several clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) and Monte Carlo (MC) codes for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors using {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd plaques, and to evaluate the impact on the prescription dose of the adoption of MC codes and certain versions of a TPS (Plaque Simulator with optional modules). Methods: Three clinical brachytherapy TPS capable of intraocular brachytherapy treatment planning and two MC codes were compared. The TPS investigated were Pinnacle v8.0dp1, BrachyVision v8.1, and Plaque Simulator v5.3.9, all of which use the AAPM TG-43 formalism in water. The Plaque Simulator software can also handle some correction factors from MC simulations. The MC codes used are MCNP5 v1.40 and BrachyDose/EGSnrc. Using these TPS and MC codes, three types of calculations were performed: homogeneous medium with point sources (for the TPS only, using the 1D TG-43 dose calculation formalism); homogeneous medium with line sources (TPS with 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes); and plaque heterogeneity-corrected line sources (Plaque Simulator with modified 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes). Comparisons were made of doses calculated at points-of-interest on the plaque central-axis and at off-axis points of clinical interest within a standardized model of the right eye. Results: For the homogeneous water medium case, agreement was within {approx}2% for the point- and line-source models when comparing between TPS and between TPS and MC codes, respectively. For the heterogeneous medium case, dose differences (as calculated using the MC codes and Plaque Simulator) differ by up to 37% on the central-axis in comparison to the homogeneous water calculations. A prescription dose of 85 Gy at 5 mm depth based on calculations in a homogeneous medium delivers 76 Gy and 67 Gy for specific {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources, respectively, when accounting for COMS-plaque heterogeneities. For off

  19. Comparison of dose calculation methods for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Mark J.; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Finger, Paul T.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Mourtada, Firas; Napolitano, Mary E.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Thomson, Rowan M.; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric differences among several clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) and Monte Carlo (MC) codes for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors using 125I or 103Pd plaques, and to evaluate the impact on the prescription dose of the adoption of MC codes and certain versions of a TPS (Plaque Simulator with optional modules). Methods: Three clinical brachytherapy TPS capable of intraocular brachytherapy treatment planning and two MC codes were compared. The TPS investigated were Pinnacle v8.0dp1, BrachyVision v8.1, and Plaque Simulator v5.3.9, all of which use the AAPM TG-43 formalism in water. The Plaque Simulator software can also handle some correction factors from MC simulations. The MC codes used are MCNP5 v1.40 and BrachyDose∕EGSnrc. Using these TPS and MC codes, three types of calculations were performed: homogeneous medium with point sources (for the TPS only, using the 1D TG-43 dose calculation formalism); homogeneous medium with line sources (TPS with 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes); and plaque heterogeneity-corrected line sources (Plaque Simulator with modified 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes). Comparisons were made of doses calculated at points-of-interest on the plaque central-axis and at off-axis points of clinical interest within a standardized model of the right eye. Results: For the homogeneous water medium case, agreement was within ∼2% for the point- and line-source models when comparing between TPS and between TPS and MC codes, respectively. For the heterogeneous medium case, dose differences (as calculated using the MC codes and Plaque Simulator) differ by up to 37% on the central-axis in comparison to the homogeneous water calculations. A prescription dose of 85 Gy at 5 mm depth based on calculations in a homogeneous medium delivers 76 Gy and 67 Gy for specific 125I and 103Pd sources, respectively, when accounting for COMS-plaque heterogeneities. For off-axis points

  20. Systematic Review of Focal Prostate Brachytherapy and the Future Implementation of Image-Guided Prostate HDR Brachytherapy Using MR-Ultrasound Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Peach, M. Sean; Trifiletti, Daniel M.; Libby, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy found in North American and European men and the second most common cause of cancer related death. Since the practice of PSA screening has become common the disease is most often found early and can have a long indolent course. Current definitive therapy treats the whole gland but has considerable long-term side effects. Focal therapies may be able to target the cancer while decreasing dose to organs at risk. Our objective was to determine if focal prostate brachytherapy could meet target objectives while permitting a decrease in dose to organs at risk in a way that would allow future salvage treatments. Further, we wanted to determine if focal treatment results in less toxicity. Utilizing the Medline repository, dosimetric papers comparing whole gland to partial gland brachytherapy and clinical papers that reported toxicity of focal brachytherapy were selected. A total of 9 dosimetric and 6 clinical papers met these inclusion criteria. Together, these manuscripts suggest that focal brachytherapy may be employed to decrease dose to organs at risk with decreased toxicity. Of current technology, image-guided HDR brachytherapy using MRI registered to transrectal ultrasound offers the flexibility and efficiency to achieve such focal treatments. PMID:27293899

  1. Systematic Review of Focal Prostate Brachytherapy and the Future Implementation of Image-Guided Prostate HDR Brachytherapy Using MR-Ultrasound Fusion.

    PubMed

    Peach, M Sean; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy found in North American and European men and the second most common cause of cancer related death. Since the practice of PSA screening has become common the disease is most often found early and can have a long indolent course. Current definitive therapy treats the whole gland but has considerable long-term side effects. Focal therapies may be able to target the cancer while decreasing dose to organs at risk. Our objective was to determine if focal prostate brachytherapy could meet target objectives while permitting a decrease in dose to organs at risk in a way that would allow future salvage treatments. Further, we wanted to determine if focal treatment results in less toxicity. Utilizing the Medline repository, dosimetric papers comparing whole gland to partial gland brachytherapy and clinical papers that reported toxicity of focal brachytherapy were selected. A total of 9 dosimetric and 6 clinical papers met these inclusion criteria. Together, these manuscripts suggest that focal brachytherapy may be employed to decrease dose to organs at risk with decreased toxicity. Of current technology, image-guided HDR brachytherapy using MRI registered to transrectal ultrasound offers the flexibility and efficiency to achieve such focal treatments. PMID:27293899

  2. The role of brachytherapy in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Bartochowska, Anna; Strnad, Vratislav; Strojan, Primož; Mendenhall, William M; Harrison, Louis B; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Sahai, Puja; Wiegand, Susanne; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-02-01

    Brachytherapy is a form of intensive local irradiation, allowing effective protection of surrounding structures with preservation of organ function and results in a favorable therapeutic ratio. It can be used alone, adjuvantly after surgery, and as a local boost in combination with external-beam radiation therapy. This paper is a literature review on the role of brachytherapy in the management of head and neck cancers with a special emphasis on papers published in the last 5 years. Technical details, effectiveness and potential toxicities of brachytherapy when used in different combinations with other therapeutic modalities and tumor sites are presented. Brachytherapy is an attractive treatment option in the management of primary malignancies and recurrent tumors in previously irradiated areas of the head and neck. It is effective and safe, and results in good functional and oncological outcomes. PMID:25338181

  3. Temporal relationship between prostate brachytherapy and the diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, Sarah A.; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Adamovich, Edward

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To identify the location of pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal malignancies and posttreatment colorectal polyps in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed with brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 through July 2004, 1,351 consecutive patients underwent brachytherapy for clinical stage T1b-T3a (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 2002) prostate cancer. Supplemental external beam radiotherapy (XRT) was administered to 699 patients. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Operative and pathology reports were reviewed for all patients with pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal cancer and posttreatment colorectal polyps. Multiple parameters were evaluated for the development of colorectal cancer or colorectal polyps. Results: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 23 and 25 patients before and after prostate brachytherapy, respectively. No differences were identified in the distribution of colorectal cancers either before or after treatment (3 and 4 rectal cancers in the pre- and postbrachytherapy cohorts). Thirty-five of the 48 colorectal cancers (73%) were diagnosed within 5 years of brachytherapy with a peak incidence 1 year after brachytherapy. One hundred ninety-two colorectal polyps were diagnosed after brachytherapy, 160 (83%) occurred within 4 years of brachytherapy, and only 27 (14%) were located in the rectum. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, prostate D{sub 9} (minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume) predicted for posttreatment colorectal cancer. Rectal polyps were most closely related to patient age and percent positive biopsies, whereas sigmoid/colon polyps were best predicted by patient age, planning volume, and supplemental XRT. Conclusions: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed with equal frequency before and after brachytherapy with comparable geographic distributions. In addition, the vast majority of postbrachytherapy colorectal polyps were located beyond the confines of the

  4. Effect of brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on cervical cancer implant dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Anker, Christopher J.; O'Donnell, Kristen; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Gaffney, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relationship between brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on dose to organs-at-risk (OARs) in patients undergoing high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From 1998 to 2008, 31 patients with cervical cancer with full dosimetric data were identified who received definitive external-beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy with tandem and ovoid applicators. Doses were recorded at point A, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)-38 rectal point, the ICRU-38 bladder point, the vaginal surface, and the pelvic sidewall. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the significance of changes in OAR to point A dose ratios with differences in brachytherapy technique or patient characteristics. Patients underwent a median of 5 brachytherapy procedures (range, 3 to 5), with a total of 179 procedures for 31 patients. For all brachytherapy treatments, the average ratios between the doses for the rectal, bladder, vaginal surface, and pelvic sidewall reference points to those at point A were 0.49, 0.59, 1.15, and 0.17, respectively. In general, decreased OAR dose was associated with a lower stage, younger age, increased ovoid size, increased tandem length, and earlier implant number. Increased tandem curvature significantly increased bladder dose and decreased rectal dose. Intravenous anesthesia usage was not correlated with improved dosimetry. This study allowed identification of patient and procedure characteristics influencing OAR dosing. Although the advent of 3-dimensional (3D) image-guided brachytherapy will bring new advances in treatment optimization, the actual technique involved at the time of the brachytherapy implant procedure will remain important.

  5. Permanent iodine 125 brachytherapy in patients with progressive or recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Larson, David A.; Suplica, Jeffrey M.; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; McDermott, Michael W.; Sneed, Penny K.; Prados, Michael D.; Wara, William M.; Nicholas, M. Kelly; Berger, Mitchel S.

    2004-01-01

    This study reports the initial experience at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) with tumor resection and permanent, low-activity iodine 125 (125I) brachytherapy in patients with progressive or recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GM) and compares these results to those of similar patients treated previously at UCSF with temporary brachytherapy without tumor resection. Thirty-eight patients with progressive or recurrent GM were treated at UCSF with repeat craniotomy, tumor resection, and permanent, low-activity 125I brachytherapy between June 1997 and May 1998. Selection criteria were Karnofsky performance score ⩾60, unifocal, contrast-enhancing, well-circumscribed progressive or recurrent GM that was judged to be completely resectable, and no evidence of leptomeningeal or subependymal spread. The median brachytherapy dose 5 mm exterior to the resection cavity was 300 Gy (range, 150–500 Gy). One patient was excluded from analysis. Median survival was 52 weeks from the date of brachytherapy. Age, Karnofsky performance score, and preimplant tumor volume were all statistically significant on univariate analyses. Multivariate analysis for survival showed only age to be significant. Median time to progression was 16 weeks. Both univariate and multivariate analysis of freedom from progression showed only preoperative tumor volume to be significant. Comparison to temporary brachytherapy patients showed no apparent difference in survival time. Chronic steroid requirements were low in patients with minimal postoperative residual tumor. We conclude that permanent 125I brachytherapy for recurrent or progressive GM is well tolerated. Survival time was comparable to that of a similar group of patients treated with temporary brachytherapy. PMID:15134626

  6. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Bojaxhiu, Beat; Simcock, Mathew; Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard; Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Broemme, Jens O.; Geretschlaeger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3-23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  7. Preparation of (103)Pd brachytherapy seeds by electroless plating of (103)Pd onto carbon bars.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Yong; Gao, Hui-Bo; Deng, Xue-Song; Zhou, Leng; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Han, Lian-Ge; Jin, Xiao-Hai; Cui, Hai-Ping

    2015-09-01

    A method for preparing (103)Pd brachytherapy seeds is reported. The key of the method was to deposit (103)Pd onto carbon bars by electroless plating so as to prepare source cores. After each carbon bar with (103)Pd was sealed in a titanium capsule, the (103)Pd seeds were fabricated. This paper provides valuable experiences and data for the preparation of (103)Pd brachytherapy seeds. PMID:26092353

  8. Prostate Brachytherapy seed migration to the Bladder presenting with Gross Hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Haroun, Reham R; Nance, John W; Fishman, Elliot K

    2016-01-01

    We present the radiologic findings in a case of prostate brachytherapy seed migration to the bladder presenting as gross hematuria. While prostate brachytherapy seed implantation is considered a relatively safe procedure, migration is not uncommon; however, it is usually clinically silent and the seeds most commonly migrate to the lungs through the venous circulation via the periprostatic venous plexus. Our case illustrates that local erosion is possible, can be symptomatic, and therefore must be considered when evaluating select patients. PMID:27200152

  9. Validating a bimodal intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) catheter for atherosclerotic plaque detection in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Abran, Maxime; Stähli, Barbara E.; Merlet, Nolwenn; Mihalache-Avram, Teodora; Mecteau, Mélanie; Rhéaume, Eric; Busseuil, David; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lesage, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is characterized by atherosclerotic plaque formation. Despite impressive advances in intravascular imaging modalities, in vivo molecular plaque characterization remains challenging, and different multimodality imaging systems have been proposed. We validated an engineered bimodal intravascular ultrasound imaging (IVUS) / near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging catheter in vivo using a balloon injury atherosclerosis rabbit model. Rabbit aortas and right iliac arteries were scanned in vivo after indocyanine green (ICG) injection, and compared to corresponding ex vivo fluorescence and white light images. Areas of ICG accumulation were colocalized with macroscopic atherosclerotic plaque formation. In vivo imaging was performed with the bimodal catheter integrating ICG-induced fluorescence signals into cross-sectional IVUS imaging. In vivo ICG accumulation corresponded to ex vivo fluorescence signal intensity and IVUS identified plaques. PMID:26504648

  10. Seeing is saving: the benefit of 3D imaging in gynecologic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Akila N; Erickson, Beth A

    2015-07-01

    Despite a concerning decline in the use of brachytherapy over the past decade, no other therapy is able to deliver a very high dose of radiation into or near a tumor, with a rapid fall-off of dose to adjacent structures. Compared to traditional X-ray-based brachytherapy that relies on points, the use of CT and MR for 3D planning of gynecologic brachytherapy provides a much more accurate volume-based calculation of dose to an image-defined tumor and to the bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and other pelvic organs at risk (OAR) for radiation complications. The publication of standardized guidelines and an online contouring teaching atlas for performing 3D image-based brachytherapy has created a universal platform for communication and training. This has resulted in a uniform approach to using image-guided brachytherapy for treatment and an internationally accepted format for reporting clinical outcomes. Significant improvements in survival and reductions in toxicity have been reported with the addition of image guidance to increase dose to tumor and decrease dose to the critical OAR. Future improvements in individualizing patient treatments should include a more precise definition of the target. This will allow dose modulation based on the amount of residual disease visualized on images obtained at the time of brachytherapy. PMID:25748646

  11. WE-E-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy I: Overview of Clinical Application and QA

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, B; Showalter, T

    2014-06-15

    With the increased usage of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and the introduction of dedicated image guided brachytherapy suites, it is necessary to review the processes and procedures associated with safely delivering these treatments in the expedited time scales that dedicated treatment suites afford. The speakers will present the clinical aspects of switching from LDR to HDR treatments, including guidelines for patient selection, and the clinical outcomes comparing LDR to HDR. The speakers will also discuss the HDR treatment process itself, because the shortened clinical timeline involved with a streamlined scan/plan/treat workflow can introduce other issues. Safety and QA aspects involved with the streamlined process, including increased personnel required for parallel tasks, and possible interfering tasks causing delays in patient treatments will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical aspects of HDR Brachytherapy, including common clinical indications, patient selection, and the evolving evidence in support of this therapeutic modality To review the current prominent clinical trials for HDR brachytherapy To interpret the established guidelines for HDR brachytherapy quality assurance for implementation into practical clinical settings. To introduce the basic requirements for image guided brachytherapy.

  12. Adherence to Vaginal Dilation Following High Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Lois C.; Abdallah, Rita; Schluchter, Mark; Panneerselvam, Ashok; Kunos, Charles A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: We report demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors associated with adherence to vaginal dilation and describe the sexual and marital or nonmarital dyadic functioning of women following high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated women aged 18 years or older in whom early-stage endometrial (IAgr3-IIB) cancers were treated by HDR intravaginal brachytherapy within the past 3.5 years. Women with or without a sexual partner were eligible. Patients completed questionnaires by mail or by telephone assessing demographic and clinical variables, adherence to vaginal dilation, dyadic satisfaction, sexual functioning, and health beliefs. Results: Seventy-eight of 89 (88%) eligible women with early-stage endometrial cancer treated with HDR brachytherapy completed questionnaires. Only 33% of patients were adherers, based on reporting having used a dilator more than two times per week in the first month following radiation. Nonadherers who reported a perceived change in vaginal dimension following radiation reported that their vaginas were subjectively smaller after brachytherapy (p = 0.013). Adherers reported more worry about their sex lives or lack thereof than nonadherers (p = 0.047). Patients reported considerable sexual dysfunction following completion of HDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: Adherence to recommendations for vaginal dilator use following HDR brachytherapy for endometrial cancer is poor. Interventions designed to educate women about dilator use benefit may increase adherence. Although sexual functioning was compromised, it is likely that this existed before having cancer for many women in our study.

  13. Retroperitoneal Bleeding and Arteriovenous Fistula after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Successfully Treated with Intravascular Ultrasound-guided Covered Stent Implantation.

    PubMed

    Mogi, Satoshi; Maekawa, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Keiichi; Noma, Shigetaka

    2016-01-01

    The major puncture-site complications of the transfemoral approach are retroperitoneal bleeding (RPB), arteriovenous (AV) fistula, and arterial pseudoaneurysm. Although the management of RPB and AV fistula depends on individual cases, our experience shows that the use of a covered stent with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance can successfully manage percutaneous coronary intervention-associated RPB and AV fistula. IVUS guidance can therefore make it easy to use an optimal-size covered stent. PMID:27250054

  14. Diverse Findings in Calcified Thrombus Between Histopathology and In Vivo Imaging Including Intravascular Ultrasound, Optical Coherence Tomography, and Angioscopy.

    PubMed

    Koga, Seiji; Ikeda, Satoshi; Nakata, Tomoo; Kawano, Hiroaki; Abe, Kuniko; Maemura, Koji

    2015-01-01

    A 46-year-old woman on hemodialysis due to end-stage renal disease was admitted for repeated thrombus formation in previously implanted drug-eluting stents in the right coronary artery. We could successfully aspirate this thrombus, and histopathology revealed a calcified thrombus comprising multiple microcalcifications and fibrinous materials. This is the first report showing how a calcified thrombus is visualized in vivo by intracoronary imaging modalities including intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, and angioscopy. PMID:26549397

  15. In situ measurement of linezolid and vancomycin concentrations in intravascular catheter-associated biofilm.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, M H; Kite, P; Mills, K; Sugden, S

    2001-02-01

    We describe a new method for the measurement of antimicrobial concentrations in the biofilm associated with the endoluminal surface of intravascular catheters. We quantified endoluminal planktonic bacteria in haemodialysis catheters using the acridine orange method on catheter blood. After catheter removal, separate lumens were perfused in vitro with either vancomycin or linezolid to simulate in vivo antibiotic infusion. Biofilm was recovered using endoluminal brushes, weighed and assayed by fluoroimmunoassay for vancomycin and by bioassay for linezolid. Viable bacteria were counted by serial dilution and agar plating. Biofilm had measurable amounts of vancomycin in 11/11 catheter lumens post-infusion (0.3-18.2 mg biofilm per lumen, mean 6.8 mg; vancomycin concentration 0.2-89 mg/g biofilm, median 19 mg/g). By comparison, linezolid was detected in 4/11 catheter lumens post-infusion (0.5-18.1 mg biofilm per lumen, mean 5.9 mg; linezolid concentration 0.9-6.1 mg/g biofilm, median 1.5 mg/g). Percentage reductions in biofilm-associated bacterial counts post-antibiotic were 84-100%, median 95% (vancomycin) and 0-98%, median 91% (linezolid). We found a significant difference (P = 0.05; Wilcoxon rank sum test) in vancomycin concentrations in coagulase-negative staphylococcal biofilm (median 17.0 mg/g, mean 27.9 mg/g) compared with glycopeptide levels found in biofilm associated with other microorganisms (median 5.5 mg/g, mean 6.9 mg/g). Biofilm concentrations of vancomycin are generally higher than linezolid after antibiotic infusion, which can be explained partly by glycopeptide binding to glycocalyx. Neither antibiotic achieved consistent 100% kill of biofilm bacteria after single infusions, even when a very high concentration was present. The endoluminal brush technique can be used to measure antibiotic concentration in intravascular catheter-associated biofilm in situ. This approach can be exploited to measure biofilm antibiotic concentrations in vivo, without the

  16. Intravascular disorders of microcirculation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the results of clinical and morphological examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiodorova, Tatiana A.

    1999-05-01

    We have evaluated the results of clinical and morphological study of microcirculation and its intravascular factors in 120 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Conjunctival biomicroscopy with quantitative evaluation of microcirculatory changes we performed. This data were compared with the results of laboratory study of erythrocytes and thrombocytes aggregation, some plasma hemostasis indices and morphological examination of microcirculation. The results of conjunctival biomicroscopy showed the close correlation between the clinical severity of the disease, the degree of respiratory failure and the degree of microcirculatory disorders. Progress of the disease with the development of respiratory failure and cor pulmonale was characterized by the expansion of the process of erythrocytes aggregation to the whole parts of the microcirculatory bad and was associated with perivascular hemorrhages. In some patients with severe COPD laboratory data showed chronic disseminated intravascular microcoagulation (DVS-syndrome). Intravascular platelets, erythrocytes and mixed aggregates which completely cork the vessels and compressed endothelium were uncovered by electron microscopy. Platelets membrane injuring with its degranulation was seen. This discovered correlation between microcirculatory abnormalities in lungs and in conjunctiva in patients with COPD demonstrate that this abnormalities of microcirculation are prevalent. This allows to use in clinical accessible and informative method of conjunctival biomicroscopy to estimate the condition of microcirculation in this pathology.

  17. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging of atherosclerosis: toward coronary arterial visualization of biologically high-risk plaques

    PubMed Central

    Calfon, Marcella A.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Jaffer, Farouc A.

    2010-01-01

    New imaging methods are urgently needed to identify high-risk atherosclerotic lesions prior to the onset of myocardial infarction, stroke, and ischemic limbs. Molecular imaging offers a new approach to visualize key biological features that characterize high-risk plaques associated with cardiovascular events. While substantial progress has been realized in clinical molecular imaging of plaques in larger arterial vessels (carotid, aorta, iliac), there remains a compelling, unmet need to develop molecular imaging strategies targeted to high-risk plaques in human coronary arteries. We present recent developments in intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheter-based strategies for in vivo detection of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized arteries. In particular, the biological, light transmission, imaging agent, and engineering principles that underlie a new intravascular near-IR fluorescence sensing method are discussed. Intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheters appear highly translatable to the cardiac catheterization laboratory, and thus may offer a new in vivo method to detect high-risk coronary plaques and to assess novel atherosclerosis biologics. PMID:20210433

  18. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J.

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of

  19. Critical Organ Preservation in Reirradiation Brachytherapy by Injectable Spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Kazushi Sonomura, Tetsuo; Shirai, Shintaro; Sato, Morio; Tanaka, Kayo

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: This case series study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of an interstitial high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) procedure combined with an at-risk organ-sparing procedure. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients who were scheduled for reirradiation treatment for recurrent cancer after receiving a median dose of 60 Gy (range, 44-70 Gy) in 2-Gy fractions of previous external beam treatment were enrolled. Thirteen patients had lesions in the head and neck, and other lesions were located in the axilla, skeleton, breast, pelvis, and abdominal wall. Chief complaints included local masses (for 25) and refractory pain (for 21). After high-dose rate brachytherapy applicator needle implantation, an optimal CT-based three-dimensional brachytherapy plan was created with a virtual at-risk organ shift from the target. According to the plan, hyaluronic acid gel was injected to maintain the shift during irradiation. The prescribed dose was the result of an individualized tradeoff between target dose and at-risk organ dose, to avoid serious complications. A single-fraction dose of 18.0 Gy (median, equivalent to 75.6 Gy at an {alpha}/{beta} value of 3; range, 16-20 Gy) was applied to the tumor. Results: The at-risk organ dose decreased from 9.1 {+-} 0.9 Gy to 4.4 {+-} 0.4 Gy (mean {+-} standard deviation, p < 0.01), and the normal tissue complication probability decreased from 60.8% {+-} 12.6% to 16.1% {+-} 19.8% (p < 0.01). The shift effect lasted at least 4 hours and disappeared gradually. Distinct tumor shrinkage in 20 of 21 eligible patients, including tumor disappearance in 6 patients, pain reduction in 18 of 21 eligible patients, and no unexpected late toxicity greater than grade 2 were observed during the 19.5-month observation period. Conclusions: This at-risk organ-sparing preservation procedure may provide a safe and efficient reirradiation treatment.

  20. Studies on the development of ¹⁶⁹Yb-brachytherapy seeds: New generation brachytherapy sources for the management of cancer.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sanjay Kumar; Kumar, Yogendra; Jagadeesan, K C; Nuwad, Jitendra; Bamankar, Y R; Dash, Ashutosh

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes development of (169)Yb-seeds by encapsulating 0.6-0.65 mm (ϕ) sized (169)Yb2O3 microspheres in titanium capsules. Microspheres synthesized by a sol-gel route were characterized by XRD, SEM/EDS and ICP-AES. Optimization of neutron irradiation was accomplished and (169)Yb-seeds up to 74 MBq of (169)Yb could be produced from natural Yb2O3 microspheres, which have the potential for use in prostate brachytherapy. A protocol to prepare (169)Yb-brachytherapy sources (2.96-3.7 TBq of (169)Yb) with the use of enriched targets was also formulated. PMID:25846454

  1. AUTOMATIC SEGMENTATION OF PELVIS FOR BRACHYTHERAPY OF PROSTATE.

    PubMed

    Kardell, M; Magnusson, M; Sandborg, M; Alm Carlsson, G; Jeuthe, J; Malusek, A

    2016-06-01

    Advanced model-based iterative reconstruction algorithms in quantitative computed tomography (CT) perform automatic segmentation of tissues to estimate material properties of the imaged object. Compared with conventional methods, these algorithms may improve quality of reconstructed images and accuracy of radiation treatment planning. Automatic segmentation of tissues is, however, a difficult task. The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an algorithm that automatically segments tissues in CT images of the male pelvis. The newly developed algorithm (MK2014) combines histogram matching, thresholding, region growing, deformable model and atlas-based registration techniques for the segmentation of bones, adipose tissue, prostate and muscles in CT images. Visual inspection of segmented images showed that the algorithm performed well for the five analysed images. The tissues were identified and outlined with accuracy sufficient for the dual-energy iterative reconstruction algorithm whose aim is to improve the accuracy of radiation treatment planning in brachytherapy of the prostate. PMID:26567322

  2. Apparatus and method for high dose rate brachytherapy radiation treatment

    DOEpatents

    Macey, Daniel J.; Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Smith, Mark Frederick; Kross, Brian James

    2005-01-25

    A method and apparatus for the in vivo location and tracking of a radioactive seed source during and after brachytherapy treatment. The method comprises obtaining multiple views of the seed source in a living organism using: 1) a single PSPMT detector that is exposed through a multiplicity of pinholes thereby obtaining a plurality of images from a single angle; 2) a single PSPMT detector that may obtain an image through a single pinhole or a plurality of pinholes from a plurality of angles through movement of the detector; or 3) a plurality of PSPMT detectors that obtain a plurality of views from different angles simultaneously or virtually simultaneously. The plurality of images obtained from these various techniques, through angular displacement of the various acquired images, provide the information required to generate the three dimensional images needed to define the location of the radioactive seed source within the body of the living organism.

  3. Evaluating the cost of therapy for restenosis: considerations for brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, W S

    1996-11-01

    Costs have become increasingly important in medicine in recent years as demand for services has outstripped readily available resources. Clinical microeconomics offers an approach to understanding cost and outcomes in an environment of economic scarcity. In this article the types of costs and methods for determining cost are presented. In addition, methods for assessing outcome and outcome in relation to cost are developed. Restenosis after coronary angioplasty is a prime example of a clinical problem requiring economic evaluation. This is because it results in little serious morbidity except for recurrent chest pain, but it has serious economic consequences which occur some time after the original angioplasty. This makes the economic assessment of restenosis complicated. The application of health care microeconomic principles to brachytherapy for restenosis in the coronary arteries is presented. PMID:8960526

  4. Registration of structurally dissimilar images in MRI-based brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berendsen, F. F.; Kotte, A. N. T. J.; de Leeuw, A. A. C.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, I. M.; Viergever, M. A.; Pluim, J. P. W.

    2014-08-01

    A serious challenge in image registration is the accurate alignment of two images in which a certain structure is present in only one of the two. Such topological changes are problematic for conventional non-rigid registration algorithms. We propose to incorporate in a conventional free-form registration framework a geometrical penalty term that minimizes the volume of the missing structure in one image. We demonstrate our method on cervical MR images for brachytherapy. The intrapatient registration problem involves one image in which a therapy applicator is present and one in which it is not. By including the penalty term, a substantial improvement in the surface distance to the gold standard anatomical position and the residual volume of the applicator void are obtained. Registration of neighboring structures, i.e. the rectum and the bladder is generally improved as well, albeit to a lesser degree.

  5. Angiosarcoma of the Prostate Gland following Brachytherapy for Prostatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arjun; Patnaik, Mrinal M.; Naina, Harris V.

    2015-01-01

    Prostatic adenocarcinoma is the most common cancer in men, but only a handful of cases of prostatic angiosarcoma have been reported in the literature. Prior radiation therapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma has been hypothesized to be a risk factor for angiosarcoma. The increasing practice of prostate cancer screening and the use of radiation therapy for management of prostatic adenocarcinoma will likely lead to more cases of prostatic angiosarcoma. Diagnosis is made by tissue sampling. Optimal management of these aggressive tumors remains to be defined and outcomes are poor with a high 1-year mortality. Primary care physicians and urologists should be aware of this rare entity and refer these patients to specialist centers where they can be managed by a multidisciplinary team. We report a case of angiosarcoma of the prostate gland diagnosed in a male presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms 5 years after brachytherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma. PMID:26889128

  6. Radiobiological evaluation of low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaup, Courtney James

    Low dose-rate brachytherapy is a radiation therapy treatment for men with prostate cancer. While this treatment is common, the use of isotopes with varying dosimetric characteristics means that the prescription level and normal organ tolerances vary. Additionally, factors such as prostate edema, seed loss and seed migration may alter the dose distribution within the prostate. The goal of this work is to develop a radiobiological response tool based on spatial dose information which may be used to aid in treatment planning, post-implant evaluation and determination of the effects of prostate edema and seed migration. Aim 1: Evaluation of post-implant prostate edema and its dosimetric and biological effects. Aim 2: Incorporation of biological response to simplify post-implant evaluation. Aim 3: Incorporation of biological response to simplify treatment plan comparison. Aim 4: Radiobiologically based comparison of single and dual-isotope implants. Aim 5: Determine the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of seed disappearance and migration.

  7. Electronic brachytherapy--current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Eaton, D J

    2015-05-01

    In the past decade, electronic brachytherapy (EB) has emerged as an attractive modality for the treatment of skin lesions and intraoperative partial breast irradiation, as well as finding wider applications in intracavitary and interstitial sites. These miniature X-ray sources, which operate at low kilovoltage energies (<100 kV), have reduced shielding requirements and inherent portability, therefore can be used outside the traditional realms of the radiotherapy department. However, steep dose gradients and increased sensitivity to inhomogeneities challenge accurate dosimetry. Secondly, ease of use does not mitigate the need for close involvement by medical physics experts and consultant oncologists. Finally, further studies are needed to relate the more heterogeneous dose distributions to clinical outcomes. With these provisos, the practical convenience of EB strongly suggests that it will become an established option for selected patients, not only in radiotherapy departments but also in a range of operating theatres and clinics around the world. PMID:25748070

  8. Regeneration in cervix cancer after sup 252 Cf neutron brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.; Wierzbicki, J.; Feola, J.; Urano, M. )

    1990-07-01

    Regeneration of clonogens in human cervical cancer was assessed by the pathological evaluation of the hysterectomy specimen after intracavitary {sup 252}Cf neutron brachytherapy implants separated by varying time intervals followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. In this study, patients with bulky/barrel shaped Stage IB cervical cancers received {sup 252}Cf implants plus approximately 45 Gy of whole pelvis linear accelerator radiotherapy in approximately 25 fractions in 5 weeks followed by hysterectomy 4-6 weeks after radiotherapy. The specimens were studied grossly and microscopically for residual tumor. It was found that the fraction of positive specimens increased with elapsed time interval between implants. These findings support the hypothesis that there is repopulation of surviving clonogens with increased time interval between the implants. The observation also supports current concerns that rapid depopulation of tumor can lead to rapid repopulation, that is, rapid shrinkage of tumor can alter the physiological environment such that clonogens can rapidly regenerate.

  9. Current Pathological and Laboratory Considerations in the Diagnosis of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Toh, Cheng Hock; Alhamdi, Yasir; Abrams, Simon T

    2016-11-01

    Systemically sustained thrombin generation in vivo is the hallmark of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Typically, this is in response to a progressing disease state that is associated with significant cellular injury. The etiology could be infectious or noninfectious, with the main pathophysiological mechanisms involving cross-activation among coagulation, innate immunity, and inflammatory responses. This leads to consumption of both pro- and anticoagulant factors as well as endothelial dysfunction and disrupted homeostasis at the blood vessel wall interface. In addition to the release of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and soluble thrombomodulin (sTM) following cellular activation and damage, respectively, there is the release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as extracellular histones and cell-free DNA. Extracellular histones are increasingly recognized as significantly pathogenic in critical illnesses through direct cell toxicity, the promotion of thrombin generation, and the induction of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. Clinically, high circulating levels of histones and histone-DNA complexes are associated with multiorgan failure, DIC, and adverse patient outcomes. Their measurements as well as that of other DAMPs and molecular markers of thrombin generation are not yet applicable in the routine diagnostic laboratory. To provide a practical diagnostic tool for acute DIC, a composite scoring system using rapidly available coagulation tests is recommended by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. Its usefulness and limitations are discussed alongside the advances and unanswered questions in DIC pathogenesis. PMID:27578502

  10. Intravascular optical imaging of high-risk plaques in vivo by targeting macrophage mannose receptors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Bak; Park, Kyeongsoon; Ryu, Jiheun; Lee, Jae Joong; Lee, Min Woo; Cho, Han Saem; Nam, Hyeong Soo; Park, Ok Kyu; Song, Joon Woo; Kim, Tae Shik; Oh, Dong Joo; Gweon, DaeGab; Oh, Wang-Yuhl; Yoo, Hongki; Kim, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages mediate atheroma expansion and disruption, and denote high-risk arterial plaques. Therefore, they are substantially gaining importance as a diagnostic imaging target for the detection of rupture-prone plaques. Here, we developed an injectable near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe by chemically conjugating thiolated glycol chitosan with cholesteryl chloroformate, NIRF dye (cyanine 5.5 or 7), and maleimide-polyethylene glycol-mannose as mannose receptor binding ligands to specifically target a subset of macrophages abundant in high-risk plaques. This probe showed high affinity to mannose receptors, low toxicity, and allowed the direct visualization of plaque macrophages in murine carotid atheroma. After the scale-up of the MMR-NIRF probe, the administration of the probe facilitated in vivo intravascular imaging of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized vessels of atheromatous rabbits using a custom-built dual-modal optical coherence tomography (OCT)-NIRF catheter-based imaging system. This novel imaging approach represents a potential imaging strategy enabling the identification of high-risk plaques in vivo and holds promise for future clinical implications. PMID:26948523

  11. Cross-Sectional Elastic Imaging of Arterial Wall Using Intravascular Ultrasonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Hitoshi; Kanai, Hiroshi; Koiwa, Yoshiro; Ichiki, Masataka; Tezuka, Fumiaki

    2001-07-01

    There have been several studies on the imaging of the distribution of the elasticity of the arterial wall using intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS). In those studies, the elasticity is estimated only during ventricular diastole. However, the viscous characteristics of the smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall are also included in the strain measured during diastole. Alternatively, during systole, the smooth muscle has an almost purely elastic characteristic. However, the IVUS probe moves greatly due to the arrival of the pulsatile wave at the beginning of the ejection period. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method to compensate for the movement of the IVUS probe in order to precisely measure the regional change in thickness of the arterial wall during one cardiac cycle. Basic experiments using a silicone rubber tube, in which pulsatile flow is generated by an artificial heart, determined the two-dimensional (2-D) distribution of the regional change in thickness and the elasticity. The obtained incremental elastic modulus coincides with that determined by the static pressure-strain test. Furthermore, in an in vitro experiment performed on an extracted human iliac artery, the 2-D distribution of elasticity is obtained and compared with pathological results.

  12. Intravascular carcinomatosis of central nervous system due to metastatic inflammatory breast cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Takei, Hidehiro; Rouah, Emilie; Barrios, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by metastatic cancer is well-recognized and typically presents with multifocal solid tumors within the brain parenchyma or leptomeningeal dissemination. We describe herein a histologically very rare case of CNS metastasis in a 52-year-old woman who presented with mental status changes. Post mortem examination revealed extensive CNS involvement by metastatic inflammatory breast carcinoma, characterized by the presence of single tumor cells diffusely present within capillaries without parenchymal or perivascular invasion, and acute ischemic changes/infarcts bilaterally involving multiple areas. The cancer cells were found predominantly in the cerebral cortices and deep gray matter structures. Pre-mortem magnetic resonance and CT imaging of the brain did not identify metastatic cancer; however, widespread ischemic changes (i.e. brain infarcts) were identified. Inflammatory breast carcinoma is well-known to have a predilection for spread through lymphovascular spaces. Post mortem examination revealed tumor involvement of bilateral lungs, heart and bladder, with sinusoidal spread in the liver and lymph nodes and prominent involvement of the splenic red pulp in addition to extensive vascular involvement of the brain and spinal cord without a discrete mass, despite the presence of widely metastatic disease. The tumor cells in the CNS were strongly immunoreactive for pancytokeratin, E-cadherin, cytokeratin-7, epithelial membrane antigen and CAM 5.2. This unique histologic pattern of tumor spread is considered to represent "intravascular carcinomatosis" in the CNS, and most likely the cause of the patient's widespread ischemic injuries. PMID:25923831

  13. Multislice CT virtual intravascular endoscopy of aortic dissection: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhonghua; Cao, Yan

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To present our experience of using 3D virtual intravascular endoscopy (VIE) to characterize and evaluate the intraluminal appearances of aortic dissection. METHODS: Ten patients with known aortic dissection underwent dual-source computed tomography angiography and were included in the study. In addition to 2D axial and multiplanar reformatted images as well as 3D reconstructions, VIE images were created in each patient to demonstrate intraluminal views of the aorta and its branches, origin of artery branches and artery branch involvement by aortic dissection. RESULTS: Stanford A dissection was found in 8 patients and B dissection in the remaining 2 patients. VIE images were successfully generated in all of the patients with excellent visualization of the normal anatomical structures, intimal flap and intimal entrance tear, communication between true and false lumens, as well as assessment of the extent of aortic dissection. CONCLUSION: Our preliminary experience suggests that VIE could be used as a complementary tool to assist radiologists accurately evaluate aortic dissection so that better patient management can be achieved. PMID:21179312

  14. Pharmacokinetics and acetylation of sulfamethoxazole in turbot Scophthalmus maximus after intravascular administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Fei; Lian, Chun'ang; Zhai, Qianqian; Li, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The pharmacokinetic profiles and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) acetylation process in turbot reared at 18°C were investigated. Either SMX (parent drug) or its acetylized metabolite, N4-acetylsulfamethoxazole (AcSMX), was administered intravascularly to turbot at a dosage of 50 mg/kg BW. Serum concentrations of the parent drug and its metabolite were both measured by HPLC, and the changes in concentration over time were analyzed in two- and non-compartment models because SMX treatment produced multiple peaks. The results demonstrated that the elimination half-life of the parent drugs, SMX and AcSMX, were 159.2 and 5.9 h, respectively. The apparent volume of distribution was 0.2 and 0.8 L/kg, and the clearance was 0.038 and 0.222 L/(h·kg), for SMX and AcSMX, respectively. SMX acetylation in turbot was 2.8%, and the deacetylation of AcSMX was 0.2%. These findings may be useful in optimizing SMX dosage regimens in turbot aquaculture.

  15. A physics-based intravascular ultrasound image reconstruction method for lumen segmentation.

    PubMed

    Mendizabal-Ruiz, Gerardo; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2016-08-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) refers to the medical imaging technique consisting of a miniaturized ultrasound transducer located at the tip of a catheter that can be introduced in the blood vessels providing high-resolution, cross-sectional images of their interior. Current methods for the generation of an IVUS image reconstruction from radio frequency (RF) data do not account for the physics involved in the interaction between the IVUS ultrasound signal and the tissues of the vessel. In this paper, we present a novel method to generate an IVUS image reconstruction based on the use of a scattering model that considers the tissues of the vessel as a distribution of three-dimensional point scatterers. We evaluated the impact of employing the proposed IVUS image reconstruction method in the segmentation of the lumen/wall interface on 40MHz IVUS data using an existing automatic lumen segmentation method. We compared the results with those obtained using the B-mode reconstruction on 600 randomly selected frames from twelve pullback sequences acquired from rabbit aortas and different arteries of swine. Our results indicate the feasibility of employing the proposed IVUS image reconstruction for the segmentation of the lumen. PMID:27235803

  16. Automatic detection of bioresorbable vascular scaffold struts in intravascular optical coherence tomography pullback runs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ancong; Nakatani, Shimpei; Eggermont, Jeroen; Onuma, Yoshi; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M.; Serruys, Patrick W.; Reiber, Johan H.C.; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2014-01-01

    Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS) have gained significant interest in both the technical and clinical communities as a possible alternative to metallic stents. For accurate BVS analysis, intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is currently the most suitable imaging technique due to its high resolution and the translucency of polymeric BVS struts for near infrared light. However, given the large number of struts in an IVOCT pullback run, quantitative analysis is only feasible when struts are detected automatically. In this paper, we present an automated method to detect and measure BVS struts based on their black cores in IVOCT images. Validated using 3 baseline and 3 follow-up data sets, the method detected 93.7% of 4691 BVS struts correctly with 1.8% false positives. In total, the Dice’s coefficient for BVS strut areas was 0.84. It concludes that this method can detect BVS struts accurately and robustly for tissue coverage measurement, malapposition detection, strut distribution analysis or 3D scaffold reconstruction. PMID:25360375

  17. Fast retrieval of calcification from sequential intravascular ultrasound gray-scale images.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Sun; Bing-Ru, Liu

    2016-08-12

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-based tissue characterization is invaluable for the computer-aided diagnosis and interventional treatment of cardiac vessel diseases. Although the analysis of raw backscattered signals allows more accurate plaque characterization than gray-scale images, its applications are limited due to its nature of electrocardiogram-gated acquisition. Images acquired by IVUS devices that do not allow the acquisition of raw signals cannot be characterized. To address these limitations, we developed a method for fast frame-by-frame retrieval and location of calcification according to the jump features of radial gray-level variation curves from sequential IVUS gray-scale images. The proposed method consists of three main steps: (1) radial gray-level variation curves are extracted from each filtered polar view, (2) sequential images are preliminarily queried according to the maximal slopes of radial gray-level variation curves, and finally, (3) key frames that include calcification are selected through checking the gray-level features of successive pixel columns in the preliminary results. Experimental results with clinically acquired in vivo data sets indicate key frames that include calcification can be retrieved with the advantages of simplicity, high efficiency, and accuracy. Recognition results correlate well with manual characterization results obtained by experienced physicians and through virtual histology. PMID:27567774

  18. Transposition of Intravascular Lipid in Experimentally Induced Fat Embolism: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, So-Min; Kim, Hong-Il; Jung, Yong-Hui; Kim, Hyung-Do

    2014-01-01

    Background Liposuction is a procedure to reduce the volume of subcutaneous fat by physical force. Intracellular storage fat is composed of triglyceride, whereas circulating fat particles exist as cholesterol or triglycerol bound to carrier proteins. It is unavoidable that the storage form of fat particles enters the circulation system after these particles are physiologically destroyed. To date, however, no studies have clarified the fatal characteristics of fat embolism that occurs after the subclinical phase of free fat particles. Methods A mixture of human lipoaspirate and normal saline (1:100, 0.2 mL) was injected into the external jugular vein of rats, weighing 200 g on average. Biopsy specimens of the lung and kidney were examined at 12-hour intervals until postoperative 72 hours. The deposit location and transport of the injected free fat particles were confirmed histologically by an Oil Red O stain. Results Inconsistent with previous reports, free fat particles were transported from the intravascular space to the parenchyma. At 24 hours after infusion, free fat particles deposited in the vascular lumen were confirmed on the Oil Red O stain. At 72 hours after infusion, free fat particles were accumulated compactly within the parenchymal space near the perivascular area. Conclusions Many surgeons are aware of the fatal results and undiscovered pathophysiologic mechanisms of free fat particles. Our results indicate that free fat particles, the storage form of fat that has been degraded through a physiological process, might be removed through a direct transport mechanism and phagocytotic uptake. PMID:25075352

  19. Airborne lipid antigens mobilize resident intravascular NKT cells to induce allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Seth T.; Thomas, Seddon Y.; Ferreira, Caroline M.; Bai, Li; Krausz, Thomas; Savage, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne exposure to microbial cell wall lipids such as lipopolysaccharide triggers innate immune responses that regulate susceptibility to allergic airway inflammation. α-Glycosylceramides represent another widespread class of microbial lipids that directly stimulate innate-like, IL-4– and IL-13–producing, CD1d-restricted NKT cells. In this study, we demonstrate that NKT cells constitutively accumulate and reside in the microvasculature of the mouse lung. After a single airborne exposure to lipid antigen, they promptly extravasate to orchestrate the formation of peribronchiolar and interstitial lymphohistiocytic granulomas containing numerous eosinophils. Concomitant airborne exposure to ovalbumin (OVA) induces the priming of OVA-specific Th2 cells and IgE antibodies by the same dendritic cell coexpressing CD1d and MHC class II. Although NKT cell activation remains confined to the lipid-exposed lung and draining lymph nodes, Th2 cells recirculate and seed the lung of a parabiotic partner, conferring susceptibility to OVA challenge months after the initial exposure, in a manner independent of NKT cells and CD1d. Thus, transient recruitment and activation of lung-resident intravascular NKT cells can trigger long-term susceptibility to allergic airway inflammation. PMID:21930768

  20. Assessment of implanted stent coverage of side-branches in intravascular optical coherence tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Eggermont, J.; Reiber, J. H. C.; Dekker, N.; de Koning, P. J. H.; Dijkstra, J.

    2013-02-01

    Coronary stents improve the blood flow by keeping narrowed vessels open, but small stent cells that overlay a side branch may cause restenosis and obstruct the blood flow to the side branch. There are increasing demands for precise measurement of the stent coverage of side branches for outcome evaluation and clinical research. Capturing micrometerresolution images, intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) allows proper visualization of the stent struts, which subsequently can be used for the coverage measurement purpose. In this paper, a new approach to compute the stent coverage of side branches in IVOCT image sequences is presented. The amount of the stent coverage of a side branch is determined by the ostial area of the stent cells that cover this side branch. First, the stent struts and the guide wires are detected to reconstruct the irregular stent surface and the stent cell contours are generated to segment their coverage area on the stent surface. Next, the covered side branches are detected and their lumen contours are projected onto the stent surface to specify the side branch areas. By assessing the common parts between the stent cell areas and the side branch areas, the stent cell coverage of side branches can be computed. The evaluation based on a phantom data set demonstrated that the average error of the stent coverage of side branches is 8.9% +/- 7.0%. The utility of the presented approach for in-vivo data sets was also proved by the testing on 12 clinical IVOCT image sequences.

  1. Automated tissue characterization of in vivo atherosclerotic plaques by intravascular optical coherence tomography images

    PubMed Central

    Ughi, Giovanni Jacopo; Adriaenssens, Tom; Sinnaeve, Peter; Desmet, Walter; D’hooge, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is rapidly becoming the method of choice for the in vivo investigation of coronary artery disease. While IVOCT visualizes atherosclerotic plaques with a resolution <20µm, image analysis in terms of tissue composition is currently performed by a time-consuming manual procedure based on the qualitative interpretation of image features. We illustrate an algorithm for the automated and systematic characterization of IVOCT atherosclerotic tissue. The proposed method consists in a supervised classification of image pixels according to textural features combined with the estimated value of the optical attenuation coefficient. IVOCT images of 64 plaques, from 49 in vivo IVOCT data sets, constituted the algorithm’s training and testing data sets. Validation was obtained by comparing automated analysis results to the manual assessment of atherosclerotic plaques. An overall pixel-wise accuracy of 81.5% with a classification feasibility of 76.5% and per-class accuracy of 89.5%, 72.1% and 79.5% for fibrotic, calcified and lipid-rich tissue respectively, was found. Moreover, measured optical properties were in agreement with previous results reported in literature. As such, an algorithm for automated tissue characterization was developed and validated using in vivo human data, suggesting that it can be applied to clinical IVOCT data. This might be an important step towards the integration of IVOCT in cardiovascular research and routine clinical practice. PMID:23847728

  2. Semiautomated segmentation and 3D reconstruction of coronary trees: biplane angiography and intravascular ultrasound data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prause, Guido P. M.; DeJong, Steven C.; McKay, Charles R.; Sonka, Milan

    1996-04-01

    In this paper, we describe an approach to 3D reconstruction of the coronary tree based on combined use of biplane coronary angiography and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Shortly before the start of a constant-speed IVUS pullback, radiopaque dye is injected into the examined coronary tree and the heart is imaged with a calibrated biplane X-ray system. The 3D centerline of the coronary tree is reconstructed from the geometrically corrected biplane angiograms using an automated segmentation method and manual matching of corresponding branching points. The borders of vessel wall and plaque are automatically detected in the acquired pullback images and the IVUS cross sections are mapped perpendicular to the previously reconstructed 3D vessel centerline. In addition, the twist of the IVUS probe due to the curvature of the coronary artery is calculated for a torsion-free catheter and the whole vessel reconstruction is rotationally adjusted using available anatomic landmarks. The accuracy of the biplane reconstruction procedure is validated by means of a left coronary tree phantom. The feasibility of the entire approach is demonstrated in a cadaveric pig heart.

  3. VISUALIZING THE STRESS DISTRIBUTION WITHIN VASCULAR TISSUES USING INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND ELASTOGRAPHY: A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Michael S.; Perucchio, Renato; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2015-01-01

    A methodology for computing the stress distribution of vascular tissue using finite element-based, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) reconstruction elastography is described. This information could help cardiologists detect life-threatening atherosclerotic plaques and predict their propensity to rupture. The calculation of vessel stresses requires the measurement of strain from the ultrasound images, a calibrating pressure measurement and additional model assumptions. In this work, we conducted simulation studies to investigate the effect of varying the model assumptions, specifically Poisson’s ratio and the outer boundary conditions, on the resulting stress fields. In both simulation and phantom studies, we created vessel geometries with two fibrous cap thicknesses to determine if we could detect a difference in peak stress (spatially) between the two. The results revealed that (i) Poisson’s ratios had negligible impact on the accuracy of stress elastograms, (ii) the outer boundary condition assumption had the greatest effect on the resulting modulus and stress distributions and (iii) in simulation and in phantom experiments, our stress imaging technique was able to detect an increased peak stress for the vessel geometry with the smaller cap thickness. This work is a first step toward understanding and creating a robust stress measurement technique for evaluating atherosclerotic plaques using IVUS elastography. PMID:25837424

  4. Microarterial anastomoses: A parameterised computational study examining the effect of suture position on intravascular blood flow.

    PubMed

    Wain, R A J; Hammond, D; McPhillips, M; Whitty, J P M; Ahmed, W

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the extent to which individual aspects of suture placement influence local haemodynamics within microarterial anastomoses. An attempt to physically quantify flow characteristics of blood past microvascular sutures is made using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Particular focus has been placed on increased shear strain rate (SSR), a known precipitant of intravascular platelet activation and thrombosis. Measurements were taken from micrographs of sutured anastomoses in chicken femoral vessels, with each assessed for bite width, suture angle and suture spacing. Computational geometries were then created to represent the anastomosis. Each suture characteristic was parameterised to allow independent or simultaneous adjustment. Flow rates were obtained from anonymised Doppler ultrasound scans of analogous vessels during preoperative assessment for autologous breast reconstruction. Vessel simulations were performed in 2.5mm ducts with blood as the working fluid. Vessel walls were non-compliant and a continuous Newtonian flow was applied, in accordance with current literature. Suture bite angle and spacing had significant effects on local haemodynamics, causing notably higher local SSRs, when simulated at extremes of surgical practice. A combined simulation, encompassing subtle changes of each suture parameter simultaneously i.e. representing optimum technique, created a more favourable SSR profile. As such, haemodynamic changes associated with optimum suture placement are unlikely to influence thrombus formation significantly. These findings support adherence to the basic principles of good microsurgical practice. PMID:26876115

  5. Imaging manifestations of intravascular leiomyoma involving the right atrium: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Aimei; Su, Xinyou; Li, Shujing; Li, Kun; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the imaging features of intravascular leiomyoma (IVL) involving the heart and the imaging techniques in the diagnosis of this disease. The imaging features of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), the clinical data and the pathological data of a case of IVL involving the right atrium were retrospectively analyzed and the literatures were reviewed. A 42-year-old woman was admitted to Jinan Central Hospital with a 7-day history of lower extremity weakness, chest tightness and short breath. Contrast-enhanced CT scanning revealed that there was a mass in the inferior vena cava and right atrium, which was heterogeneously enhanced. There was a gap between the vessel wall and the mass. Spiral CT scanning with multiplanner reformation (MPR) reconstruction revealed the morphology, scope and extension pathways of the tumor clearly. Ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also played important roles in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of IVL. To the patients with a history of uterine fibroids, spiral CT scanning, US and MRI could be used to improve the correct diagnosis rates of IVL before surgery. PMID:26379990

  6. First clinical pilot study with intravascular polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villiger, Martin; Karanasos, Antonios; Ren, Jian; Lippok, Norman; Shishkov, Milen; Daemen, Joost; Van Mieghem, Nicolas; Diletti, Roberto; Valgimigli, Marco; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; de Jaegere, Peter; Zijlstra, Felix; van Soest, Gijs; Nadkarni, Seemantini; Regar, Evelyn; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-02-01

    Polarization sensitive (PS) OCT measures the polarization states of the light backscattered by tissue and provides measures of tissue birefringence and depolarization in addition to the structural OCT signal. Ex vivo studies have demonstrated that birefringence is increased in tissue rich in collagen and with elevated smooth muscle cell content. Preliminary data further suggests that depolarization can identify regions of macrophage infiltration, lipid, and irregularly arranged collagen fibers. These are important aspects of the mechanical integrity and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. To evaluate the potential of PS-OCT in the clinical setting, we combined our custom PS-OCT system with commercially available OCT catheters (Fastview, Terumo Corporation) and performed a pilot study in 30 patients, scheduled to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on the grounds of stable or unstable angina. A total of 82 pullbacks in 39 vessels were performed, either in the native coronary arteries or post procedure. Comparing consecutive pullbacks of the same coronary artery, we found excellent agreement between the polarization features in the repeat pullbacks, validating the repeatability and robustness of PS-OCT in the clinical in vivo setting. In addition we observed that the birefringence and depolarization features vary significantly across lesions with identical structural OCT appearance, suggesting morphological subtypes. This first human pilot study proved the feasibility and robustness of intravascular PS-OCT. PS-OCT achieves improved tissue characterization and may help in identifying high-risk plaques, with the potential to ultimately improve risk stratification and help guiding PCI.

  7. Parameter estimation of atherosclerotic tissue optical properties from three-dimensional intravascular optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Shalev, Ronny; Prabhu, David; Tanaka, Kentaro; Rollins, Andrew M.; Costa, Marco; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We developed robust, three-dimensional methods, as opposed to traditional A-line analysis, for estimating the optical properties of calcified, fibrotic, and lipid atherosclerotic plaques from in vivo coronary artery intravascular optical coherence tomography clinical pullbacks. We estimated attenuation μt and backscattered intensity I0 from small volumes of interest annotated by experts in 35 pullbacks. Some results were as follows: noise reduction filtering was desirable, parallel line (PL) methods outperformed individual line methods, root mean square error was the best goodness-of-fit, and α-trimmed PL (α-T-PL) was the best overall method. Estimates of μt were calcified (3.84±0.95  mm−1), fibrotic (2.15±1.08  mm−1), and lipid (9.99±2.37  mm−1), similar to those in the literature, and tissue classification from optical properties alone was promising. PMID:26158087

  8. Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance for Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Procedure in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kew, Jacqueline; Davies, Roger P.

    2004-01-15

    A new method is described for guiding hepato-portalvenous puncture using a longitudinal side-view intravascular ultrasound(L-IVUS) transducer to assist in the performance of transjugularintrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in three Australian swine.Simultaneous L-IVUS with an AcuNav (registered) 5-10 MHz 10 Fr transducer(Acuson Corporation, Mountain View, CA, USA) and fluoroscopy guidance was used to image and monitor the hepatic to portal venous puncture,dilatation of the tract, and deployment of the TIPS stent. Flow through the shunt could be demonstrated with both L-IVUS and angiography. TIPS was successful in all swine. The time for portal vein puncture once the target portal vein was identified was reduced at each attempt. The number of portal vein puncture attempts was 2, 1, and 1. No post-procedural complication was evident. L-IVUS-guided TIPS is practical and has the potential to improve safety by permitting simultaneous ultrasound and fluoroscopic imaging of the needle and target vascular structures. This technique allows for a more streamlined approach to TIPS, decreasing the fluoroscopic time (hence,decreasing the radiation exposure to the staff and patient) and anesthetic time. In addition, there are improved safety benefits obviating the need for wedged portography, facilitating avoidance of bile duct and hepatic arterial puncture, and minimizing hepatic injury by decreasing liver capsular puncture and the attendant risks.

  9. Flow cytometric evaluation of disseminated intravascular coagulation in a canine endotoxemia model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dohyeon; Noh, Dongho; Park, Jinho

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in dogs. Alterations in hemostasis by systemic inflammation play an important role in the pathophysiology of sepsis. To evaluate the functional hemostatic changes in sepsis, we evaluated coagulation profiles and flow cytometric measurement of P-selectin (CD62P) expression on platelets, as well as platelet-leukocyte aggregation from a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia model in dogs (n = 7). A sublethal dose of LPS [1 mg/kg body weight (BW)] induced thrombocytopenia and increased activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT), and D-dimer concentrations. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in P-selectin expression on platelets between 1 and 24 h of a total 48 h of the experiment. In addition, platelet-leukocyte aggregation was significantly increased in the early stage of endotoxemia (at 1 and < 6 h for platelet-monocyte aggregation and at 3 h for platelet-neutrophil aggregation). Our results suggest that CD62P expression on platelets and platelet-leukocyte aggregation, as measured by flow cytometry, can be useful biomarkers of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in canine sepsis. These functional changes contribute to our understanding of the pathophysiology of hemostasis in endotoxemia. PMID:25673909

  10. Use of the activated clotting time in anticoagulation monitoring of intravascular procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, J; Ferguson, J J

    1993-01-01

    The activated clotting time first came into clinical use in the mid-1970s to guide the administration and reversal of heparin during cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. The explosive growth of cardiopulmonary bypass led to the development of automated techniques for measuring activated clotting times. Recent advances in the field of interventional cardiology have emphasized the importance of the coagulation cascade and the need for the prevention of thrombosis with anticoagulant drugs. The activated clotting time has emerged as an important means of monitoring and guiding heparin therapy during invasive intravascular procedures. This review focuses on the following topics: 1) the development of anticoagulation monitoring techniques; 2) current alternatives in bedside anticoagulation monitoring; and 3) the clinical application of activated clotting times outside surgery. Until prospective studies can establish appropriate "target" activated-clotting-time values for interventional procedures, procedural anticoagulation must be guided empirically. Nevertheless, the activated clotting time is extremely useful in the catheterization laboratory, for monitoring heparin therapy and the adequacy of anticoagulation. PMID:8298321

  11. Image-based dosimetry of an implanted radioactive stent using intravascular ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Stephen W.

    Angioplasty has become an increasingly popular and effective treatment for heart disease. Unfortunately, restenosis, a cellular and biological reaction to the procedure, has hindered its effectiveness. Two of the most successful methods of inhibiting restenosis are radiation and stents. The combination of these two components, radioactive stents, is not as common as some of the other methods, yet still has potential of slowing restenosis. Investigation into source characteristics and artery wall radiobiology may illuminate some possible solutions to the problems of restenosis. This work has developed a calculational method to look at in-vivo images of implanted stents and determine the dose to the artery walls in order to test different source characteristics. The images are Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) cross-sectional slices of the stent and the artery. From these images, it is possible to determine the implanted stent structure. The pieces of the stent are identified in the images and modeled in a Monte Carlo simulation, using MCNP4c3. The simulation results were combined with the images to give three-dimensional absolute dose contours of the stent. The absolute dose values were verified using radiochromic film and 198Au-plated stents. This work was able to successfully verify the dose results and create a three-dimensional dose map of the implanted stent.

  12. Automatic stent strut detection in intravascular OCT images using image processing and classification technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hong; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Wang, Zhao; Chamie, Daniel; Attizani, Guilherme F.; Kanaya, Tomoaki; Ray, Soumya; Costa, Marco A.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2013-02-01

    Intravascular OCT (iOCT) is an imaging modality with ideal resolution and contrast to provide accurate in vivo assessments of tissue healing following stent implantation. Our Cardiovascular Imaging Core Laboratory has served >20 international stent clinical trials with >2000 stents analyzed. Each stent requires 6-16hrs of manual analysis time and we are developing highly automated software to reduce this extreme effort. Using classification technique, physically meaningful image features, forward feature selection to limit overtraining, and leave-one-stent-out cross validation, we detected stent struts. To determine tissue coverage areas, we estimated stent "contours" by fitting detected struts and interpolation points from linearly interpolated tissue depths to a periodic cubic spline. Tissue coverage area was obtained by subtracting lumen area from the stent area. Detection was compared against manual analysis of 40 pullbacks. We obtained recall = 90+/-3% and precision = 89+/-6%. When taking struts deemed not bright enough for manual analysis into consideration, precision improved to 94+/-6%. This approached inter-observer variability (recall = 93%, precision = 96%). Differences in stent and tissue coverage areas are 0.12 +/- 0.41 mm2 and 0.09 +/- 0.42 mm2, respectively. We are developing software which will enable visualization, review, and editing of automated results, so as to provide a comprehensive stent analysis package. This should enable better and cheaper stent clinical trials, so that manufacturers can optimize the myriad of parameters (drug, coverage, bioresorbable versus metal, etc.) for stent design.

  13. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with massive disseminated intravascular coagulopathy treated with systemic chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Byung Gyu; Oh, Burm Seok; Han, Dong Kyun; Choi, Yoo Duk; Kook, Hoon

    2015-01-01

    It is uncommon for pediatric patients with rhabdomyosarcoma to present with clinical and/or laboratory features of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We report a case of metastatic alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with severe bleeding because of DIC in a 13-year-old boy. He experienced persistent oozing at the site of a previous operation, gross hematuria, and massive epistaxis. Two weeks after initiating combination chemotherapy consisting of vincristine, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide, the patients' laboratory indications of DIC began to resolve. During this period, the patient received massive blood transfusion of a total of 311 units (26 units of red blood cells, 26 units of fresh frozen plasma, 74 units of platelet concentrates, 17 units of single donor platelets, and 168 units of cryoprecipitate), antithrombin-III and a synthetic protease inhibitor. Despite chemotherapy and radiation therapy, he died 1 year later because of disease progression. In children with metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma and massive DIC, prompt chemotherapy and aggressive supportive care is important to decrease malignancy-triggered procoagulant activities. PMID:26770227

  14. Angled-focused 45 MHz PMN-PT single element transducer for intravascular ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sangpil; Williams, Jay; Kang, Bong Jin; Yoon, Changhan; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor; Jeong, Jong Seob; Lee, Sang Goo; Shung, K. Kirk; Kim, Hyung Ham

    2015-01-01

    A transducer with an angled and focused aperture for intravascular ultrasound imaging has been developed. The acoustic stack for the angled-focused transducer was made of PMN-PT single crystal with one matching layer, one protective coating layer, and a highly damped backing layer. It was then press-focused to a desired focal length and inserted into a thin needle housing with an angled tip. A transducer with an angled and unfocused aperture was also made, following the same fabrication procedure, to compare the performance of the two transducers. The focused and unfocused transducers were tested to measure their center frequencies, bandwidths, and spatial resolutions. Lateral resolution of the angled-focused transducer (AFT) improved more than two times compared to that of the angled-unfocused transducer (AUT). A tissue-mimicking phantom in water and a rabbit aorta tissue sample in rabbit blood were scanned using AFT and AUT. Imaging with AFT offered improved contrast, over imaging with AUT, of the tissue-mimicking phantom and the rabbit aorta tissue sample by 23 dB and 8 dB, respectively. The results show that AFT has strong potential to provide morphological and pathological information of coronary arteries with high resolution and high contrast. PMID:25914443

  15. Micromachined PIN-PMN-PT crystal composite transducer for high-frequency intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Ma, Teng; Tian, Jian; Han, Pengdi; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we report the use of micromachined PbIn1/2Nb1/2O3-PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3-PbTiO 3 (PIN-PMNPT) single crystal 1-3 composite material for intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging application. The effective electromechanical coupling coefficient kt(eff) of the composite was measured to be 0.75 to 0.78. Acoustic impedance was estimated to be 20 MRayl. Based on the composite, needle-type and flexible-type IVUS transducers were fabricated. The composite transducer achieved an 86% bandwidth at the center frequency of 41 MHz, which resulted in a 43 μm axial resolution. Ex vivo IVUS imaging was conducted to demonstrate the improvement of axial resolution. The composite transducer was capable of identifying the three layers of a cadaver coronary artery specimen with high resolution. The PIN-PMN-PT-based composite has superior piezoelectric properties comparable to PMN-PT-based composite and its thermal stability is higher than PMN-PT. PIN-PMN-PT crystal can be an alternative approach for fabricating high-frequency composite, instead of using PMN-PT. PMID:24960706

  16. Micromachined PIN-PMN-PT Crystal Composite Transducer for High-Frequency Intravascular Ultrasound (IVUS) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Ma, Teng; Tian, Jian; Han, Pengdi; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the use of micromachined PbIn1/2Nb1/2O3–PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3–PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) single crystal 1–3 composite material for intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging application. The effective electromechanical coupling coefficient kt(eff) of the composite was measured to be 0.75 to 0.78. Acoustic impedance was estimated to be 20 MRayl. Based on the composite, needle-type and flexible-type IVUS transducers were fabricated. The composite transducer achieved an 86% bandwidth at the center frequency of 41 MHz, which resulted in a 43 μm axial resolution. Ex vivo IVUS imaging was conducted to demonstrate the improvement of axial resolution. The composite transducer was capable of identifying the three layers of a cadaver coronary artery specimen with high resolution. The PIN-PMN-PT-based composite has superior piezoelectric properties comparable to PMN-PT-based composite and its thermal stability is higher than PMN-PT. PIN-PMN-PT crystal can be an alternative approach for fabricating high-frequency composite, instead of using PMN-PT. PMID:24960706

  17. Serial gray scale intravascular ultrasound findings in late drug-eluting stent restenosis.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Diaa A; Mintz, Gary S; Sanidas, Elias; Rusinova, Reni; Weisz, Giora; Leon, Martin B; Moses, Jeffery W; Stone, Gregg W; Maehara, Akiko

    2013-03-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to assess the gray scale intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) findings that might be associated with late drug-eluting stent restenosis. The study included 47 patients (54 lesions) who had undergone either baseline IVUS-guided stent implantation or IVUS-guided repeat stenting to treat in-stent restenosis and then had IVUS follow-up data for ≥1.5 years afterward without any intervening procedures. The left anterior descending artery was the culprit in 59% of cases, and 50% of the lesions were at bifurcation sites. Quantitative and qualitative IVUS analyses showed a decreased minimum lumen area at follow-up from 6.0 ± 1.8 to 3.8 ± 1.4 mm(2) (p <0.0001) that was mainly due to neointimal hyperplasia with chronic stent recoil (defined as a >15% decrease in minimum stent area) in only 2 lesions and stent fracture in only 5 lesions. Calcified neointima appeared in 12 lesions, mostly in the form of macrocalcification, and was associated with increased calcium both behind the stent and in the reference segment. In conclusion, late drug-eluting stent restenosis showed neointimal calcification in 20% of cases, and chronic stent recoil was rare. PMID:23273714

  18. Long-term follow-up after coronary stenting and intravascular red laser therapy.

    PubMed

    De Scheerder, I; Wang, K; Nikolaychik, V; Kaul, U; Singh, B; Sahota, H; Keelan, M H; Kipshidze, N

    2000-11-01

    A high restenosis rate remains a limiting factor for coronary angioplasty and stenting. Recently, use of intravascular red light therapy (IRLT) has been shown to be effective in different animal models and in humans in reducing the restenosis rate. Sixty-eight patients were treated with IRLT in conjunction with coronary stenting procedures. Mean age was 64 +/- 9 years. Treated lesions were type A (11), type B (42), and type C (18) with a mean lesion length of 16.5 +/- 2.4 mm. Reference vessel diameter and minimal lumen diameter (MLD) before therapy were 2.90 +/- 0.15 and 1.12 +/- 0.36 mm, respectively. After stenting and laser irradiation, MLD was 2.76 +/- 0.39 mm. No procedural complications or in-hospital adverse events occurred. All patients were followed up as depicted in the protocol. Sixty-one patients underwent angiographic restudy, which revealed restenosis in 9 patients (14.7%). Observed restenosis rate by artery size was > 3 mm (n = 21, 0%), 2.5 to 3.0 mm (n = 28, 14.2%), and <2.5 mm (n = 12, 41.6%). We conclude that IRLT is safe and feasible and reduces the expected restenosis rate in patients after coronary stenting in arteries of >2.5 mm. PMID:11053701

  19. Local hemostasis, immunothrombosis, and systemic disseminated intravascular coagulation in trauma and traumatic shock.

    PubMed

    Gando, Satoshi; Otomo, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Knowing the pathophysiology of trauma-induced coagulopathy is important for the management of severely injured trauma patients. The aims of this review are to provide a summary of the recent advances in our understanding of thrombosis and hemostasis following trauma and to discuss the pathogenesis of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) at an early stage of trauma. Local hemostasis and thrombosis respectively act to induce physiological wound healing of injuries and innate immune responses to damaged-self following trauma. However, if overwhelmed by systemic inflammation caused by extensive tissue damage and tissue hypoperfusion, both of these processes foster systemic DIC associated with pathological fibrin(ogen)olysis. This is called DIC with the fibrinolytic phenotype, which is characterized by the activation of coagulation, consumption coagulopathy, insufficient control of coagulation, and increased fibrin(ogen)olysis. Irrespective of microvascular thrombosis, the condition shows systemic thrombin generation as well as its activation in the circulation and extensive damage to the microvasculature endothelium. DIC with the fibrinolytic phenotype gives rise to oozing-type non-surgical bleeding and greatly affects the prognosis of trauma patients. The coexistences of hypothermia, acidosis, and dilution aggravate DIC and lead to so-called trauma-induced coagulopathy. He that would know what shall be must consider what has been. The Analects of Confucius. PMID:25886801

  20. NON-RIGID IMAGE REGISTRATION BASED STRAIN ESTIMATOR FOR INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND ELASTOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Michael S.; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound elastography (IVUSe) could improve the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease by revealing vulnerable plaques through their mechanical tissue properties. To improve the performance of IVUSe, we developed and implemented a non-rigid image-registration method to visualize the radial and circumferential component of strain within vascular tissues. We evaluated the algorithm’s performance with four initialization schemes using simulated and experimentally acquired ultrasound images. Applying the registration method to radio-frequency (RF) echo frames improved the accuracy of displacements compared to when B-mode images were employed. However, strain elastograms measured from RF echo frames produce erroneous results when both the zero-initialization method and the mesh-refinement scheme were employed. For most strain levels, the cross-correlation-initialization method produced the best performance. The simulation study predicted that elastograms obtained from vessels with average strains in the range of 3%–5% should have high elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNRe)–on the order of 4.5 and 7.5 for the radial and circumferential components of strain, respectively. The preliminary in vivo validation study (phantom and an atherosclerotic rabbit) demonstrated that the non-rigid registration method could produce useful radial and circumferential strain elastograms under realistic physiologic conditions. The results of this investigation were sufficiently encouraging to warrant a more comprehensive in vivo validation. PMID:23245827

  1. Visualization and recording of intravascular details by fiberoptic angioscopy: the Sumida cardioangioscope.

    PubMed

    Sumida, S; Masuda, M; Furuyama, M

    1988-01-01

    Direct selective observation of the intravascular lumen through a catheter cardioangioscope provides accurate diagnostic information that facilitates the detection and treatment of vascular diseases. The Sumida-cardioangioscope is approximately 0.75 to 2.4 mm in diameter and consists of at least 3,000-6,000 delicate glass fibers, each measuring 4.8-5.5 micron and fused into a long flexible 75 to 130 cm tube. The cardioangioscope has the following components: (1) a scope connected to a camera; (2) a lightguide, consisting of 80-500 fibers, measuring 30-50 micron in diameter, and a 75-watt xenon lamp; (3) a transport channel for saline or drug solution; (4) an inflatable cuff; and (5) a handle to manipulate the catheter tip. The abdominal aorta in living dogs and the coronary arteries, aortic valves, abdominal-iliac, femoral and popliteal arteries, abdomino-iliac bifurcation, and venous system were clearly observed and recorded on videotape, 16-mm movie film and 35-mm photographic film. Angioplasty by balloon and laser ablation are possible applications. PMID:3360839

  2. Intravascular optical imaging of high-risk plaques in vivo by targeting macrophage mannose receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Bak; Park, Kyeongsoon; Ryu, Jiheun; Lee, Jae Joong; Lee, Min Woo; Cho, Han Saem; Nam, Hyeong Soo; Park, Ok Kyu; Song, Joon Woo; Kim, Tae Shik; Oh, Dong Joo; Gweon, DaeGab; Oh, Wang-Yuhl; Yoo, Hongki; Kim, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages mediate atheroma expansion and disruption, and denote high-risk arterial plaques. Therefore, they are substantially gaining importance as a diagnostic imaging target for the detection of rupture-prone plaques. Here, we developed an injectable near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe by chemically conjugating thiolated glycol chitosan with cholesteryl chloroformate, NIRF dye (cyanine 5.5 or 7), and maleimide-polyethylene glycol-mannose as mannose receptor binding ligands to specifically target a subset of macrophages abundant in high-risk plaques. This probe showed high affinity to mannose receptors, low toxicity, and allowed the direct visualization of plaque macrophages in murine carotid atheroma. After the scale-up of the MMR-NIRF probe, the administration of the probe facilitated in vivo intravascular imaging of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized vessels of atheromatous rabbits using a custom-built dual-modal optical coherence tomography (OCT)-NIRF catheter-based imaging system. This novel imaging approach represents a potential imaging strategy enabling the identification of high-risk plaques in vivo and holds promise for future clinical implications. PMID:26948523

  3. SPECT study of low intensity He-Ne laser intravascular irradiation therapy for brain infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xue-Chang; Dong, Jia-Zheng; Chu, Xiao-Fan; Jia, Shao-Wei; Liu, Timon C.; Jiao, Jian-Ling; Zheng, Xi-Yuan; Zhou, Ci-Xiong

    2003-12-01

    We used single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in brain perfusion imaging to study the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and cerebral function in brain infarction patients treated with intravascular laser irradiation of blood (ILIB). 17 of 35 patients with brain infarction were admitted to be treated by ILIB on the base of standard drug therapy, and SPECT brain perfusion imaging was performed before and after ILIB therapy with self-comparison. The results were analyzed in quantity with brain blood flow function change rate (BFCR%) model. Effect of ILIB during the therapy process in the other 18 patients were also observed. In the 18 patients, SPECT indicated an improvement of rCBF (both in focus and in total brain) and cerebral function after a 30 min-ILIB therapy. And the 17 patients showed an enhancement of total brain rCBF and cerebral function after ILIB therapy in comparison with that before, especially for the focus side of the brain. The enhancement for focus itself was extremely obvious with a higher significant difference (P<0.0001). The mirror regions had no significant change (P>0.05). BFCR% of foci was prominently higher than that of mirror regions (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the ILIB therapy can improve rCBF and cerebral function and activate brain cells of patients with brain infarction. The results denote new evidence of ILIB therapy for those patients with cerebral ischemia.

  4. Flexible valinomycin electrodes for on-line determination of intravascular and myocardial K+.

    PubMed

    Hill, J L; Gettes, L S; Lynch, M R; Hebert, N C

    1978-10-01

    Flexible electrode systems capable of monitoring in vivo changes in venous and myocardial extracellular potassium activity were constructed using valinomycin-polyvinyl chloride matrix membrane and polyvinyl chloride tubing. Electrode impedance was 1--30 Momega, time constant 10--200 ms, drift less than 1 mV/h, and shelf life approximately 3 days (intramyocardial electrode) and approximately 6 wk (venous electrode). In vitro and in vivo accuracy were determined in 5 dogs and 18 pigs, anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital (35 mg/kg iv), with normal and elevated K+ levels. Serum and venous K+ concentration, determined using a K+ electrode with tip diameter of 1.5 mm, correlated well to serum K+ values determined by flame photometry (r = 0.997). Steady-state myocardial extracellular K+ concentration determined using double-barrel electrodes with total tip diameter of 0.6 mm also correlated well to the serum K+ concentration (r = 0.992). These electrode assemblies permit on-line, virtually instantaneous in vivo determination of intravascular and local myocardial extracellular K+ activity, a capability not previously available. PMID:696888

  5. Visualizing the stress distribution within vascular tissues using intravascular ultrasound elastography: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Richards, Michael S; Perucchio, Renato; Doyley, Marvin M

    2015-06-01

    A methodology for computing the stress distribution of vascular tissue using finite element-based, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) reconstruction elastography is described. This information could help cardiologists detect life-threatening atherosclerotic plaques and predict their propensity to rupture. The calculation of vessel stresses requires the measurement of strain from the ultrasound images, a calibrating pressure measurement and additional model assumptions. In this work, we conducted simulation studies to investigate the effect of varying the model assumptions, specifically Poisson's ratio and the outer boundary conditions, on the resulting stress fields. In both simulation and phantom studies, we created vessel geometries with two fibrous cap thicknesses to determine if we could detect a difference in peak stress (spatially) between the two. The results revealed that (i) Poisson's ratios had negligible impact on the accuracy of stress elastograms, (ii) the outer boundary condition assumption had the greatest effect on the resulting modulus and stress distributions and (iii) in simulation and in phantom experiments, our stress imaging technique was able to detect an increased peak stress for the vessel geometry with the smaller cap thickness. This work is a first step toward understanding and creating a robust stress measurement technique for evaluating atherosclerotic plaques using IVUS elastography. PMID:25837424

  6. Targeted mutagenesis of zebrafish antithrombin III triggers disseminated intravascular coagulation and thrombosis, revealing insight into function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Kretz, Colin A.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Richter, Catherine E.; Tsao, Philip; Vo, Andy H.; Huarng, Michael C.; Rode, Thomas; Hu, Zhilian; Mehra, Rohit; Olson, Steven T.; Joung, J. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic blood clotting is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, underlying deep vein thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Genetic predisposition to thrombosis is still poorly understood, and we hypothesize that there are many additional risk alleles and modifying factors remaining to be discovered. Mammalian models have contributed to our understanding of thrombosis, but are low throughput and costly. We have turned to the zebrafish, a tool for high-throughput genetic analysis. Using zinc finger nucleases, we show that disruption of the zebrafish antithrombin III (at3) locus results in spontaneous venous thrombosis in larvae. Although homozygous mutants survive into early adulthood, they eventually succumb to massive intracardiac thrombosis. Characterization of null fish revealed disseminated intravascular coagulation in larvae secondary to unopposed thrombin activity and fibrinogen consumption, which could be rescued by both human and zebrafish at3 complementary DNAs. Mutation of the human AT3-reactive center loop abolished the ability to rescue, but the heparin-binding site was dispensable. These results demonstrate overall conservation of AT3 function in zebrafish, but reveal developmental variances in the ability to tolerate excessive clot formation. The accessibility of early zebrafish development will provide unique methods for dissection of the underlying mechanisms of thrombosis. PMID:24782510

  7. Accurate 3D reconstruction of complex blood vessel geometries from intravascular ultrasound images: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, K R; Thubrikar, M J; Fowler, B; Mostafavi, M T; Funk, M W

    2000-01-01

    We present a technique that accurately reconstructs complex three dimensional blood vessel geometry from 2D intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images. Biplane x-ray fluoroscopy is used to image the ultrasound catheter tip at a few key points along its path as the catheter is pulled through the blood vessel. An interpolating spline describes the continuous catheter path. The IVUS images are located orthogonal to the path, resulting in a non-uniform structured scalar volume of echo densities. Isocontour surfaces are used to view the vessel geometry, while transparency and clipping enable interactive exploration of interior structures. The two geometries studied are a bovine artery vascular graft having U-shape and a constriction, and a canine carotid artery having multiple branches and a constriction. Accuracy of the reconstructions is established by comparing the reconstructions to (1) silicone moulds of the vessel interior, (2) biplane x-ray images, and (3) the original echo images. Excellent shape and geometry correspondence was observed in both geometries. Quantitative measurements made at key locations of the 3D reconstructions also were in good agreement with those made in silicone moulds. The proposed technique is easily adoptable in clinical practice, since it uses x-rays with minimal exposure and existing IVUS technology. PMID:11105284

  8. [Successful treatment with recombinant thrombomodulin for disseminated intravascular coagulation complicated with hemophagocytic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Tatsumi, Goichi; Kotani, Shin-Ichi; Arai, Yasuyuki; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Kitano, Toshiyuki; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant human thrombomodulin (rTM) improves the blood coagulation disorder characteristic of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) as well as, or even better than, other anti-DIC drugs. On post-marketing surveillance, its effectiveness has been recognized for hematologic disorders, sepsis and solid tumor subgroups. However, the effect on hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) complicated by DIC remains unclear. We treated three HPS patients with rTM in addition to chemotherapy for the underlying diseases including nasal NK/T cell lymphoma, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and refractory acute myeloid leukemia post cord blood transplantation. Although being refractory to medical management was suspected in our cases, clinical status rapidly came under control including not only amelioration of the blood coagulation disorder but also inflammatory reactions, such as serum ferritin and lactic acid dehydrogenase abnormalities, which represent HPS activity. These observations suggest that rTM might exert marked synergistic effects on HPS with DIC. Given the results obtained in these three cases, administration of rTM appears to offer a promising method of treating HPS complicated by DIC. PMID:25876785

  9. Intravascular ultrasound-based analysis of factors affecting minimum lumen area in coronary artery intermediate lesions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Wei-Min; Wang, Zhao; Li, Qi; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Ma, Yu-Liang; Lu, Ming-Yu; Zhao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify clinical characteristics associated with the minimum lumen area (MLA) of proximal or middle intermediate lesions in the left anterior descending (LAD) artery, and to develop a model to predict MLA. Methods We retrospectively analyzed demographic data, medical history, and intravascular ultrasound findings for 90 patients with intermediate lesions in the LAD artery. Linear regression was used to identify factors affecting MLA, and multiple regression was used to develop a model for predicting MLA. Results Age, number of lesions, and diabetes mellitus correlated significantly with MLA of proximal or middle intermediate lesions. A regression model for predicting MLA (mm2) was derived from the data: 7.00 − 0.05 × (age) − 0.50 × (number of lesions). A cut-off value of 3.1 mm2 was proposed for deciding when to perform percutaneous coronary intervention. Conclusion This model for predicting MLA of proximal or middle intermediate lesions in the LAD artery showed high accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, indicating good diagnostic potential. PMID:27168744

  10. Intravascular low-power laser light illumination: a new method in restenosis prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkacz, Arkadiusz; Bialy, Dariusz; Protasiewicz, Marcin; Beres-Pawlik, Elzbieta M.; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2004-07-01

    The procedure of percutaneous coronary intervention is associated with the 30% risk of restenosis in the dilatated coronary artery. in order to minimize its occurrence we developed the method of intracoronary low power laser irradiation and called it the photoremodling. We developed and constructed at total set-up for the intravascular illumination. It consists of the laser diode connected with a multimode step-index silica fiber 200/270 μm terminated with a special fiber diffuser, which allows to irradiate homogeneously a coronary vessel in the place of dilatation. The diffuser is inserted into the coronary vessel by a modificated angioplasty catheter. Till now PTCA plus photoremodeling procedures have been carried out in 40 patients (28 with stent implantation and 12 with balloon angioplasty). We did not observed any side effects and complications of the procedure. All patients were qualified for 6 months follow-up, which was terminated in 19 cases with a control coronarography. We did not find any case of restenosis in the stent group. In the group of patients after balloon angioplasty restenosis rate was 25%. The new method of treatment is safe. The preliminary results seem to be beneficial especially in the case of stent implantation.

  11. Tools for experimental characterization of the non-uniform rotational distortion in intravascular OCT probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Marc L.; Bisaillon, Charles-Etienne; Lamouche, Guy; Vergnole, Sebastien; Hewko, Mark; D'Amours, Frédéric; Padioleau, Christian; Sowa, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The Industrial Material Institute (IMI) together with the Institute for Biodiagnostic (IBD) has developed its own optical catheters for cardiovascular imaging applications. Those catheters have been used experimentally in the in vitro coronary artery model of the Langendorff beating heart and in a percutaneous coronary intervention procedure in a porcine model. For some catheter designs, non-uniform rotational distortion (NURD) can be observed as expected from past experience with intra-vascular ultrasound (IVUS) catheters. A two-dimensional (2D) coronary artery test bench that simulates the path into the coronary arteries has been developed. The presence or absence of NURD can be assessed with the test bench using a custom-built cardiovascular Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging system. A square geometry instead of the circular shape of an artery is used to simulate the coronary arteries. Thereby, it is easier to visualize NURD when it is present. The accumulated torsion induced by the friction on the catheter is measured along the artery path. NURD is induced by the varying friction force that is balanced by the accumulated torsion force. The pullback force is measured and correlated with NURD observed in the 2D test bench. Finally, a model is presented to help understanding the mechanical constraint that leads to the friction force variations.

  12. Intravascular optical coherence tomography light scattering artifacts: merry-go-rounding, blooming, and ghost struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, J. Jacob; Halaney, David L.; Elahi, Sahar; Ho, Derek; Wang, Tianyi; Ouyang, Yongjian; Dijkstra, Jouke; Milner, Thomas E.; Feldman, Marc D.

    2014-12-01

    We sought to elucidate the mechanisms underlying two common intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT) artifacts that occur when imaging metallic stents: "merry-go-rounding" (MGR), which is an increase in strut arc length (SAL), and "blooming," which is an increase in the strut reflection thickness (blooming thickness). Due to uncontrollable variables that occur in vivo, we performed an in vitro assessment of MGR and blooming in stented vessel phantoms. Using Xience V and Driver stents, we examined the effects of catheter offset, intimal strut coverage, and residual blood on SAL and blooming thickness in IV-OCT images. Catheter offset and strut coverage both caused minor MGR, while the greatest MGR effect resulted from light scattering by residual blood in the vessel lumen, with 1% hematocrit (Hct) causing a more than fourfold increase in SAL compared with saline (p<0.001). Residual blood also resulted in blooming, with blooming thickness more than doubling when imaged in 0.5% Hct compared with saline (p<0.001). We demonstrate that a previously undescribed mechanism, light scattering by residual blood in the imaging field, is the predominant cause of MGR. Light scattering also results in blooming, and a newly described artifact, three-dimensional-MGR, which results in "ghost struts" in B-scans.

  13. Hyperkalemia after irradiation of packed red blood cells: Possible effects with intravascular fetal transfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Thorp, J.A.; Plapp, F.V.; Cohen, G.R.; Yeast, J.D.; O'Kell, R.T.; Stephenson, S. )

    1990-08-01

    Plasma potassium, calcium, and albumin concentrations in irradiated blood, and in fetal blood before and after transfusion, were measured. Dangerously high plasma potassium levels were observed in some units of irradiated packed red blood cells (range, 13.9 to 66.5 mEq/L; mean, 44.7 mEq/L) and could be one possible explanation for the high incidence of fetal arrhythmia associated with fetal intravascular transfusion. There are many factors operative in the preparation of irradiated packed red blood cells that may predispose to high potassium levels: the age of the red blood cells, the number of procedures used to concentrate the blood, the duration of time elapsed from concentration, the duration of time elapsed from irradiation, and the hematocrit. Use of fresh blood, avoidance of multiple packing procedures, limiting the hematocrit in the donor unit to less than or equal to 80%, and minimizing the time between concentration, irradiation and transfusion may minimize the potassium levels, and therefore making an additional washing procedure unnecessary.

  14. Acceleration and motion-correction techniques for high-resolution intravascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Shashank Sathyanarayana; Zhang, Yi; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose High-resolution intravascular (IV) MRI is susceptible to degradation from physiological motion and requires high frame-rates for true endoscopy. Traditional cardiac-gating techniques compromise efficiency by reducing the effective scan rate. Here we test whether compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction and ungated motion-compensation employing projection shifting, could provide faster motion-suppressed, IVMRI. Theory and Methods CS reconstruction is developed for under-sampled Cartesian and radial imaging using a new IVMRI-specific cost function to effectively increase imaging speed. A new motion correction method is presented wherein individual IVMRI projections are shifted based on the IVMRI detector's intrinsic amplitude and phase properties. The methods are tested at 3T in fruit, human vessel specimens, and a rabbit aorta in vivo. Images are compared using Structural-Similarity and ‘Spokal-Variation’ indices. Results Although some residual artifacts persisted, CS acceleration and radial motion compensation strategies reduced motion artefact in vitro and in vivo, allowing effective accelerations of up to eightfold at 200-300μm resolution. Conclusion 3T IVMRI detectors are well-suited to CS and motion correction strategies based on their intrinsic radially-sparse sensitivity profiles and high signal-to-noise ratios. While benefits of faster free-breathing high-resolution IVMRI and reduced motion sensitivity are realized, there are costs to spatial resolution, and some motion artifacts may persist. PMID:25163750

  15. Intravascular ultrasound-guided unprotected left main coronary artery stenting in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qiang; Wang, Qingsheng; Liu, Dongtian; Zhang, Shuangyue; Zhang, Yang; Li, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) could improve clinical outcomes compared with angiography-guided PCI in the treatment of unprotected left main coronary artery stenosis (ULMCA) in the elderly. Methods: This controlled study was carried out between October 2009 and September 2012, in Qinhuangdao First Hospital, Hebei Province, China. One hundred and twenty-three consecutive patients with ULMCA, aged 70 or older, were randomized to an IVUS-guided group and a control group. The occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE): death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or target lesion revascularizations) were recorded after 2 years of follow-up. Results: The IVUS-guided group had a lower rate of 2-year MACE than the control group (13.1% versus 29.3%, p=0.031). The incidence of target lesion revascularization was lower in the IVUS-guided group than in the control group (9.1% versus 24%, p=0.045). However, there were no differences in death and myocardial infarction in the 2 groups. On Cox proportional hazard analysis, distal lesion was the independent predictor of MACE (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.99, confidence interval [CI]: 1.129-2.367; p=0.043); IVUS guidance was independent factor of survival free of MACE (HR: 0.414, CI: 0.129-0.867; p=0.033). Conclusion: The use of IVUS could reduce MACE in elderly patients undergoing ULMCA intervention. PMID:25935174

  16. Intravascular optical coherence tomography light scattering artifacts: merry-go-rounding, blooming, and ghost struts

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, J. Jacob; Halaney, David L.; Elahi, Sahar; Ho, Derek; Wang, Tianyi; Ouyang, Yongjian; Dijkstra, Jouke; Milner, Thomas E.; Feldman, Marc D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We sought to elucidate the mechanisms underlying two common intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT) artifacts that occur when imaging metallic stents: “merry-go-rounding” (MGR), which is an increase in strut arc length (SAL), and “blooming,” which is an increase in the strut reflection thickness (blooming thickness). Due to uncontrollable variables that occur in vivo, we performed an in vitro assessment of MGR and blooming in stented vessel phantoms. Using Xience V and Driver stents, we examined the effects of catheter offset, intimal strut coverage, and residual blood on SAL and blooming thickness in IV-OCT images. Catheter offset and strut coverage both caused minor MGR, while the greatest MGR effect resulted from light scattering by residual blood in the vessel lumen, with 1% hematocrit (Hct) causing a more than fourfold increase in SAL compared with saline (p<0.001). Residual blood also resulted in blooming, with blooming thickness more than doubling when imaged in 0.5% Hct compared with saline (p<0.001). We demonstrate that a previously undescribed mechanism, light scattering by residual blood in the imaging field, is the predominant cause of MGR. Light scattering also results in blooming, and a newly described artifact, three-dimensional-MGR, which results in “ghost struts” in B-scans. PMID:25545341

  17. A novel method of coronary stent sizing using intravascular ultrasound: Safety and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Christopher B; Hansen, Norman D

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The use of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in guiding coronary stenting has increased in recent years. The feasibility, safety and clinical outcomes of a novel method of sizing coronary stents using IVUS have not been established. The main end points of the current study are the incidence of acute and short-term complications, and the need for target vessel revascularization at six months. METHODS Eighty-six patients underwent coronary stenting using IVUS imaging during the procedure. The optimal size of the stents was determined by using a novel method (the ‘aggressive IVUS method’), ie, measuring the media-to-media dimensions of the coronary vessels at the site of the lesions using IVUS. A six-month follow-up chart review was performed following the initial stenting. RESULTS At six months, there were two noncardiac deaths in the group. There were no acute, subacute or late stent thromboses. Target vessel revascularization and major adverse cardiac event rates remained low – at 5.8% and 9.3%, respectively. The mean (± SD) IVUS-derived coronary stent size (3.89±0.98 mm) using the aggressive IVUS method was significantly different from the mean IVUS-derived coronary stent size (3.46±0.96 mm) using the ‘traditional IVUS method’. CONCLUSION Aggressive sizing of the coronary stents by IVUS guidance is feasible and safe, and is associated with a favourable clinical outcome. PMID:22477471

  18. An integrated framework for spatio-temporal registration of intravascular ultrasound pullbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Wahle, Andreas; Chen, Zhi; Downe, Richard; Lopez, John; Kovarnik, Tomas; Sonka, Milan

    2015-03-01

    Spatio-temporal registration of baseline and follow-up intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) pullbacks is of paramount importance in studying the progression/regression of coronary artery disease. Automating these two tasks has the potential to increase productivity when studying large patient populations. Current automated methods are often designed for only one of the two tasks - spatial or temporal. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework which combines the two tasks and employs side-branches to constrain the IVUS pullback registration tasks. For temporal registration, canonical time warping technique optimizes extracted features and weighs cumulative distances. For spatial registration, the search range of cross-correlation based method is constrained by utilizing the angular differences between side-branches. Pilot validation is currently available for ten pairs of IVUS pullback sub-sequences. Results show average spatial and temporal registration errors of 0.49 mm +/- 0.51 mm and 5.56° +/- 3.35°, respectively, a notable improvement over our previous approach (p < 0.001) in temporal registration. Our method has the potential to improve spatial and temporal correspondence in studies of atherosclerotic vascular disease development using IVUS.

  19. Dose estimation for different skin models in interstitial breast brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kabacińska, Renata; Makarewicz, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Skin is a major organ at risk in breast-conserving therapy (BCT). The American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendations require monitoring of maximum dose received, however, there is no unambiguous way of skin contouring provided. The purpose of this study was to compare the doses received by the skin in different models. Material and methods Standard treatment plans of 20 patients who underwent interstitial breast brachytherapy were analyzed. Every patient had a new treatment plan prepared according to Paris system and had skin contoured in three different ways. The first model, Skin 2 mm, corresponds to the dermatological breast skin thickness and is reaching 2 mm into an external patient contour. It was rejected in a further analysis, because of distinct discontinuities in contouring. The second model, Skin 4 mm, replaced Skin 2 mm, and is reaching 2 mm inside and 2 mm outside of the External contour. The third model, Skin EXT, is created on the External contour and it expands 4 mm outside. Doses received by the most exposed 0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc, and the maximum doses for Skin 4 mm and Skin EXT were compared. Results Mean, median, maximum, and standard deviation of percentage dose difference between Skin EXT and Skin 4 mm for the most exposed 0.1 cc (D0.1cc) of skin were 18.01%, 17.20%, 27.84%, and 4.01%, respectively. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions Monitoring of doses received by skin is necessary to avoid complications and obtain a satisfactory cosmetic effect. It is difficult to assess the compatibility of treatment plans with recommendations, while there is no unambiguous way of skin contouring. Especially, if a mean difference of doses between two models of skin contouring is 18% for the most exposed 0.1 cc and can reach almost 28% in some cases. Differences of this magnitude can result in skin complications during BCT. PMID:25097562

  20. Dosimetry of the 198Au Source used in Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dauffy, L; Braby, L; Berner, B

    2004-05-18

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 report, AAPM TG-43, provides an analytical model and a dosimetry protocol for brachytherapy dose calculations, as well as documentation and results for some sealed sources. The radionuclide {sup 198}Au (T{sub 1/2} = 2.70 days, E{gamma} = 412 keV) has been used in the form of seeds for brachytherapy treatments including brain, eye, and prostate tumors. However, the TG-43 report has no data for {sup 198}Au seeds, and none have previously been obtained. For that reason, and because of the conversion of most treatment planning systems to TG-43 based methods, both Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP 4C) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are used in this work to determine these data. The geometric variation in dose is measured using an array of TLDs in a solid water phantom, and the seed activity is determined using both a well ion chamber and a High Purity Germanium detector (HPGe). The results for air kerma strength, S{sub k}, per unit apparent activity, are 2.06 (MCNP) and 2.09 (measured) U mCi{sup -1}. The former is identical to what was published in 1991 in the AAPM Task Group 32 report. The dose rate constant results, {Lambda}, are 1.12 (MCNP) and 1.10 (measured), cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. The radial dose function, g(r), anisotropy function, F(r,{theta}), and anisotropy factor, {psi}{sub an}(r), are given. The anisotropy constant values are 0.973 (MCNP) and 0.994 (measured) and are consistent with both source geometry and the emitted photon energy.