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Sample records for post-traumatic cerebrospinal fluid

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Jerrard, D A; Hanna, J R; Schindelheim, G L

    2001-08-01

    A quick and accurate diagnosis of maladies affecting the central nervous system (CNS) is imperative. Procurement and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are paramount in helping the clinician determine a patient's clinical condition. Various staining methods, measurement of white blood cell counts, glucose and protein levels, recognition of xanthochromia, and microbiologic studies are CSF parameters that are collectively important in the ultimate determination by a clinician of the presence or absence of a catastrophic CNS condition. Many of these CNS parameters have significant limitations that should be recognized to minimize under treating patients with catastrophic illness. PMID:11489408

  2. Post-Traumatic Seizures Exacerbate Histopathological Damage after Fluid-Percussion Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Ying-hui; Bramlett, Helen M.; Atkins, Coleen M.; Truettner, Jessie S.; Lotocki, George; Alonso, Ofelia F.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an induced period of post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) on the histopathological damage caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI). Male Sprague Dawley rats were given a moderate parasagittal fluid-percussion brain injury (1.9–2.1 atm) or sham surgery. At 2 weeks after surgery, seizures were induced by administration of a GABAA receptor antagonist, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 30 mg/kg). Seizures were then assessed over a 1-h period using the Racine clinical rating scale. To evaluate whether TBI-induced pathology was exacerbated by the seizures, contusion volume and cortical and hippocampal CA3 neuronal cell loss were measured 3 days after seizures. Nearly all TBI rats showed clinical signs of PTE following the decrease in inhibitory activity. In contrast, clinically evident seizures were not observed in TBI rats given saline or sham-operated rats given PTZ. Contusions in TBI-PTZ-treated rats were significantly increased compared to the TBI-saline-treated group (p < 0.001). In addition, the TBI-PTZ rats showed less NeuN-immunoreactive cells within the ipsilateral parietal cerebral cortex (p < 0.05) and there was a trend for decreased hippocampal CA3 neurons in TBI-PTZ rats compared with TBI-saline or sham-operated rats. These results demonstrate that an induced period of post-traumatic seizures significantly exacerbates the structural damage caused by TBI. These findings emphasize the need to control seizures after TBI to limit even further damage to the injured brain. PMID:20836615

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a laboratory test to look for bacteria, fungi, and viruses in the normally clear fluid that ... The laboratory personnel watch to see if bacteria, fungi, or viruses grow in the dish. Growth means ...

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea due to cochlear dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Syal, Rajan; Tyagi, Isha; Goyal, Amit

    2005-07-01

    Cochlear dysplasia associated with defect in stapes footplate can be a cause of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak in these cases is usually done by packing the vestibule with muscle or fascia. This traditional method of repair has 30-60% failure rate. Cerebrospinal fluid leak in four such patients was successfully repaired using multiple layer packing of vestibule, reinforced by pedicle temporalis muscle graft. Intraoperatively continuous lumbar drain was done. Magnetic resonance imaging of inner ear using 3D FSE T2WI and 3D FIESTA sequences was found helpful noninvasive investigation to localize site and route of cerebrospinal fluid leak. PMID:15911019

  5. [Cerebrospinal fluid syndrome in neuroschistosomiasis].

    PubMed

    Livramento, J A; Machado, L R; da Silva, L C; Spina-França, A

    1985-12-01

    A study was made of 220 samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients who suffered from several diseases of the central nervous system. In all samples immunological reactions for syphilis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, Chagas' disease and schistosomiasis were studied comparatively. Immunofluorescent reactions for schistosomiasis were made by indirect antiglobulin technic with two types of antigen: the worm and the liver granuloma of hamster infected by Schistosoma mansoni. Emphasis is given on data concerning to 16 cases in which these reactions were reagent. The importance of routine search in the CSF for schistosomiasis antibodies is discussed. The concept of a 'CSF neuroschistosomiasis syndrome' is discussed as the main aspect of diagnosis "in vivo" of the disease. It is supported by the demonstration of specific antibodies in the CSF. Hypercytosis of lymphomononuclear type associated to the presence of eosinophil cells, protein concentration increase and gamma globulins increase are other characteristics found in the CSF in this syndrome. PMID:3938654

  6. The Maze of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The author analyzes a historical, long, and tortuous way to discover the cerebrospinal fluid. At least 35 physicians and anatomists described in the text have laid the fundamentals of recognition of this biological fluid's presence. On the basis of crucial anatomical, experimental, and clinical works there are four greatest physicians who should be considered as equal cerebrospinal fluid's discoverers: Egyptian Imhotep, Venetian Nicolo Massa, Italian Domenico Felice Cotugno, and French François Magendie. PMID:24396600

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid flow in adults.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William G; Haughton, Victor; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    2016-01-01

    This chapter uses magnetic resonance imaging phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow measurements to predict which clinical normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) patients will respond to shunting as well as which patients with Chiari I are likely to develop symptoms of syringomyelia. Symptomatic NPH patients with CSF flow (measured as the aqueductal CSF stroke volume) which is shown to be hyperdynamic (defined as twice normal) are quite likely to respond to ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The hyperdynamic CSF flow results from normal systolic brain expansion compressing the enlarged ventricles. When atrophy occurs, there is less brain expansion, decreased aqueductal CSF flow, and less likelihood of responding to shunting. It appears that NPH is a "two-hit" disease, starting as benign external hydrocephalus in infancy, followed by deep white-matter ischemia in late adulthood, which causes increased resistance to CSF outflow through the extracellular space of the brain. Using computational flow dynamics (CFD), CSF flow can be modeled at the foramen magnum and in the upper cervical spine. As in the case of NPH, hyperdynamic CSF flow appears to cause the signs and symptoms in Chiari I and can provide an additional indication for surgical decompression. CFD can also predict CSF pressures over the cardiac cycle. It has been hypothesized that elevated pressure pulses may be a significant etiologic factor in some cases of syringomyelia. PMID:27432684

  8. Endonasal Endoscopic Closure of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Schmerber, S.; Righini, Ch.; Lavielle, J.-P.; Passagia, J.-G.; Reyt, E.

    2001-01-01

    The authors review their experience with endoscopic repair of skull base defects associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea involving the paranasal sinuses. A total of 22 patients was treated endoscopically between 1992 and 1998. The repair method consisted of closure of the CSF fistula with a free autologous abdominal fat graft and fibrin glue, supported with a sheet of silastic. The primary closure rate was 82% (18/22), and the overall closure rate was 95.5% (21/22) without recurrence or complications within an average follow-up of 5 years (14-83 months). A single patient still complains of cerebrospinal rhinorrhea, although this was never proved by any clinical, endoscopic, or biological (β2-transferrin) examination. The repair of ethmoidal-sphenoidal cerebrospinal fluid fistulae by endonasal endoscopic surgery is an excellent technique, both safe and effective. Fat is a material of choice, as it is tight and resists infection well. The technique and indications for endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17167603

  9. [BLOOD AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID PURINES IN PREGNANT].

    PubMed

    Oreshnikov, E V; Oreshnikov, S F

    2015-01-01

    The research includes 88 pregnant women, that had their purine basis and malondialdehyde in water thermocoagulate extract of venous blood and cerebrospinal fluid examined (along with common standards clinical-laboratory tests) before the spinal anesthesia for the caesarian section was provided It was detected that preeclampsy and HELLP-syndine feature the increased adenine guanine hypoxantine and uric acid levels in cerebrospinal fluid, as well as increased concentrations of blood malondyaldehyde (higher than upper normal level), accompany with the increased hemotaencephalic barrier permeability for adenine, guanine and hypoxantine. It's demonstrated that level of guanine in blood serum can be used as a prognostic factor of spinal anesthesia quality in obstetrics. It is supposed to examine purine levels in pregnant women not only in blood but also in cere brospinal fluid. PMID:26596029

  10. Acrylamide exposure impairs blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xue; Yan, Licheng; Yao, Lin; Guan, Weijun; Zeng, Fanxu; Cao, Fuyuan; Zhang, Yanshu

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies show that chronic acrylamide exposure leads to central and peripheral neu-ropathy. However, the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. In this study, we examined the permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and its ability to secrete transthyretin and transport leptin of rats exposed to acrylamide for 7, 14, 21 or 28 days. Transthyretin levels in cerebrospinal fluid began to decline on day 7 after acrylamide exposure. The sodium fluorescein level in cerebrospinal fluid was increased on day 14 after exposure. Evans blue concentration in cerebrospinal fluid was increased and the cerebrospinal fluid/serum leptin ratio was decreased on days 21 and 28 after exposure. In comparison, the cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratio was increased on day 28 after exposure. Our findings show that acrylamide exposure damages the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and impairs secretory and transport functions. These changes may underlie acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25206854

  11. Acrylamide exposure impairs blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xue; Yan, Licheng; Yao, Lin; Guan, Weijun; Zeng, Fanxu; Cao, Fuyuan; Zhang, Yanshu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that chronic acrylamide exposure leads to central and peripheral neu-ropathy. However, the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. In this study, we examined the permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and its ability to secrete transthyretin and transport leptin of rats exposed to acrylamide for 7, 14, 21 or 28 days. Transthyretin levels in cerebrospinal fluid began to decline on day 7 after acrylamide exposure. The sodium fluorescein level in cerebrospinal fluid was increased on day 14 after exposure. Evans blue concentration in cerebrospinal fluid was increased and the cerebrospinal fluid/serum leptin ratio was decreased on days 21 and 28 after exposure. In comparison, the cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratio was increased on day 28 after exposure. Our findings show that acrylamide exposure damages the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and impairs secretory and transport functions. These changes may underlie acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25206854

  12. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus

    PubMed Central

    Składzien, Jacek; Betlej, Marek; Chrzan, Robert; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus, obesity and no history of trauma. Follow-up imaging scans confirmed enlargement of the defect within the posterior clival framework to the size of 16 × 9 × 4 mm with a suspected meningocerebral hernia. The surgeons used the “two nostrils – four hands” endoscopic operating technique. The patient reported a history of cerebrospinal fluid leaks lasting for 3 years, with increasingly shorter leak-free periods and an increasing incidence of inflammatory complications. The patient recovered without complications, and she was discharged 14 days after the surgery. Good local outcome and improved patient condition were achieved postoperatively. PMID:26865899

  13. [Cerebrospinal fluid diagnostics for neuroinfectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Spreer, A; Nau, R

    2015-02-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis is of prime importance to establish an early diagnosis of central nervous system infections. Beside the basic diagnostics containing CSF white cell count, lactate concentration and protein analysis, the targeted search for agents of bacterial, viral or fungal CNS infectious diseases is essential. Decisive methods are bacterial and fungal staining techniques, microbiological culture methods, nucleic acid amplification and antigen detection methods or indirect identification of pathogens by serologic testings including the determination of pathogen-specific intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis. Besides imparting basic principles of cerebrospinal fluid analysis, this article focuses on special aspects of detection of infectious agents. Well-directed questions and a close communication between clinician and laboratory allow optimal diagnostic analysis for successful confirmation of the diagnosis and for optimal treatment of the patient. PMID:25723775

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure and the eye.

    PubMed

    Morgan, William H; Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Lind, Christopher R P; Colley, Steve; Kang, Min H; House, Philip H; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) interacts with intraocular pressure (IOP) and blood pressure to exert a major influence upon the eye, particularly the optic nerve head region. There is increased interest regarding the influence of CSFP upon disorders affecting this region, in particular glaucoma and idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Additionally, a high proportion of astronauts develop features similar to idiopathic intracranial hypertension that persist for years after returning to Earth. The factors that affect the CSFP influence upon the optic nerve and globe are likely to influence the outcome of various ophthalmic disorders. PMID:25877896

  15. Extracranial repair of cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Persky, M.S.; Rothstein, S.G.; Breda, S.D.; Cohen, N.L.; Cooper, P.; Ransohoff, J. )

    1991-02-01

    Forty-eight patients with cerebrospinal fluid leaks comprise this retrospective study. There were 39 traumatic and 9 spontaneous leaks. Nine patients were initially managed with bed rest and spinal drainage, but 3 patients in this group ultimately required surgical intervention for repair of their persistent leaks. Thirty-nine patients had surgery as initial therapy, with 33 extracranial repairs, 2 intracranial repairs, and 4 combined approaches. The extracranial approach was used in 36 of 42 patients, with an initial success rate of 86%.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid stasis and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Whedon, James M; Glassey, Donald

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesize that stasis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) occurs commonly and is detrimental to health. Physiologic factors affecting the normal circulation of CSF include cardiovascular, respiratory, and vasomotor influences. The CSF maintains the electrolytic environment of the central nervous system (CNS), influences systemic acid-base balance, serves as a medium for the supply of nutrients to neuronal and glial cells, functions as a lymphatic system for the CNS by removing the waste products of cellular metabolism, and transports hormones, neurotransmitters, releasing factors, and other neuropeptides throughout the CNS. Physiologic impedance or cessation of CSF flow may occur commonly in the absence of degenerative changes or pathology and may compromise the normal physiologic functions of the CSF. CSF appears to be particularly prone to stasis within the spinal canal. CSF stasis may be associated with adverse mechanical cord tension, vertebral subluxation syndrome, reduced cranial rhythmic impulse, and restricted respiratory function. Increased sympathetic tone, facilitated spinal segments, dural tension, and decreased CSF flow have been described as closely related aspects of an overall pattern of structural and energetic dysfunction in the axial skeleton and CNS. Therapies directed at affecting CSF flow include osteopathic care (especially cranial manipulation), craniosacral therapy, chiropractic adjustment of the spine and cranium, Network Care (formerly Network Chiropractic), massage therapy (including lymphatic drainage techniques), yoga, therapeutic breath-work, and cerebrospinal fluid technique. Further investigation into the nature and causation of CSF stasis, its potential effects upon human health, and effective therapies for its correction is warranted. PMID:19472865

  17. Post traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Tiller, J; Kyrios, M; Bennett, P

    1996-10-01

    Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs after a person has been exposed to a traumatic event involving actual or threatened death, and has responded with intense fear or helplessness. The event is then persistently re-experienced. The person avoids stimuli associated with the trauma and experiences a numbing of general responsiveness. Symptoms of increased arousal can occur as well as depression and anxiety. PTSD causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. The general practitioner is uniquely placed to identify PTSD and can have a key role in treatment. Cognitive behavioural treatment is a central therapeutic approach and can be carried out in general practice. The issues are to counteract the physiological components, expose the patient to the feared situation and help the patient to relearn that the stimuli are not necessarily associated with danger or threat. Repeated brief consultations over time can facilitate this process. PMID:8936738

  18. Hourly analysis of cerebrospinal fluid glucose shows large diurnal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Marcel M; Leen, Wilhelmina G; Willemsen, Michèl A; Slats, Diane; Claassen, Jurgen A

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis is important in the diagnostics of many neurological disorders. Since the influence of food intake on the cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentration and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio is largely unknown, we studied fluctuations in these parameters in healthy adult volunteers during a period of 36 h. Our observations show large physiological fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid glucose and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio, and their relation to food intake. These findings provide novel insights into the physiology of cerebral processes dependent on glucose levels such as energy formation (e.g. glycolysis), enzymatic reactions (e.g. glycosylation), and non-enzymatic reactions (e.g. advanced endproduct glycation). PMID:26945018

  19. A new look at cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    According to the traditional understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology, the majority of CSF is produced by the choroid plexus, circulates through the ventricles, the cisterns, and the subarachnoid space to be absorbed into the blood by the arachnoid villi. This review surveys key developments leading to the traditional concept. Challenging this concept are novel insights utilizing molecular and cellular biology as well as neuroimaging, which indicate that CSF physiology may be much more complex than previously believed. The CSF circulation comprises not only a directed flow of CSF, but in addition a pulsatile to and fro movement throughout the entire brain with local fluid exchange between blood, interstitial fluid, and CSF. Astrocytes, aquaporins, and other membrane transporters are key elements in brain water and CSF homeostasis. A continuous bidirectional fluid exchange at the blood brain barrier produces flow rates, which exceed the choroidal CSF production rate by far. The CSF circulation around blood vessels penetrating from the subarachnoid space into the Virchow Robin spaces provides both a drainage pathway for the clearance of waste molecules from the brain and a site for the interaction of the systemic immune system with that of the brain. Important physiological functions, for example the regeneration of the brain during sleep, may depend on CSF circulation. PMID:24817998

  20. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  1. Imhotep and the Discovery of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned. PMID:24744920

  2. Imhotep and the discovery of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned. PMID:24744920

  3. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician September 01, 2000, http://www.aafp.org/afp/20000901/1035.html) Post-traumatic Stress Reactions Following ... Physician August 01, 1999, http://www.aafp.org/afp/990800ap/524.html) Written by familydoctor.org editorial ...

  4. Post-traumatic stress disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder . It can occur after you have gone through an extreme ... Normally, after the event, the body recovers. The stress hormones and chemicals the body releases due to ...

  5. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... PTSD include violent personal assaults, natural or human-caused disasters, accidents, or military combat. For Consumers General Information Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder ( NIMH ) Anxiety Information Stress Information Depression Information St. John's Wort Information See more Research ...

  6. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Thoracic Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pan-Pan; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Yu, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to review cerebrospinal fluid leakage (CSFL) after thoracic decompression and describe its regular and special features. Data Sources: Literature cited in this review was retrieved from PubMed and Medline and was primarily published during the last 10 years. “Cerebrospinal fluid”, “leakage”, “dural tears”, and “thoracic decompression” were the indexed terms. Relevant citations in the retrieved articles were also screened to include more data. Study Selection: All retrieved literature was scrutinized, and four categories were recorded: incidence and risk factors, complications, treatment modalities, and prognosis. Results: CSFL is much more frequent after thoracic decompression than after cervical and lumbar spinal surgeries. Its occurrence is related to many clinical factors, especially the presence of ossified ligaments and the adhesion of the dural sac. While its impact on the late neurological recovery is currently controversial, CSFL increases the risk of other perioperative complications, such as low intracranial pressure symptoms, infection, and vascular events. The combined use of primary repairs during the operation and conservative treatment postoperatively is generally effective for most CSFL cases, whereas lumbar drains and reoperations should be implemented as rescue options for refractory cases only. Conclusions: CSFL after thoracic decompression has not been specifically investigated, so the present study provides a systematic and comprehensive review of the issue. CSFL is a multi-factor-related complication, and pathological factors play a decisive role. The importance of CSFL is in its impact on the increased risk of other complications during the postoperative period. Methods to prevent these complications are in need. In addition, though the required treatment resources are not special for CSFL after thoracic decompression, most CSFL cases are conservatively curable, and surgeons should be

  7. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David

    2006-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases. PMID:16287170

  8. Malignancy markers in the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Koskiniemi, M

    1988-10-01

    The specificity and sensitivity of malignancy marker determinations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are often insufficient. Even at the subclinical stage of the disease the marker should be present. The effect of therapy should be monitored and relapses noted. Thus high standards of methodology are required. There are many substances that may indicate a malignant process in the central nervous system. However, there are many pitfalls in their determination. Malignant cells may occur in CSF via processes involving leptomeningeal structures such as metastases and leukaemia, but primary brain tumours seldom show cells in CSF. Human chorionic gonadotrophin and alpha-fetoprotein determinations assist in the early detection of cerebral germ cell tumours and of relapses, even in the subclinical stage. Desmosterol may aid in the diagnosis of medulloblastomas and malignant gliomas and in monitoring therapy. Putrescine levels are elevated in CSF of patients with medulloblastoma and correlate with the clinical state, and serial analyses may reveal relapses. Fibronectin, when determined in CSF at the time of diagnosis, appears to be of great significance for the prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Ferritin and beta-2-microglobulin may help in some well-defined conditions. Brain-specific proteins and antibodies to them are non-specific markers whereas tumour-specific antigens and growth factors may be more significant. PMID:3058481

  9. Tegmental defects and cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea.

    PubMed

    Valtonen, H; Geyer, C; Tarlov, E; Heilman, C; Poe, D

    2001-01-01

    Congenital tegmental defects that present as unsuspected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea are diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. We reviewed 5 such patients to determine an optimal strategy for evaluation. Five patients presented with watery otorrhea, 4 of them after ventilation tube placement, and only 1 with rhinorrhea. The preoperative analysis of middle ear effusion for beta(2)-transferrin was positive in 2/4, equivocal in 1/4 and false negative in 1/4. Computerized tomography (CT) revealed nonspecific tegmental defects in all 5 patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated meningoencephalocele in 3/5 and dural irregularity in 1/5. Tegmental defects were confirmed at surgery in all cases, demonstrating meningocele or arachnoid granulations in 2/5 and encephalocele in 2/5 patients. We recommend a combination of beta(2)-transferrin analysis to verify CSF, high resolution CT (axial and coronal planes) to diagnose tegmental defects, and MRI (multiplanar) to evaluate the type of herniation. A combination mastoid and middle fossa approach for definitive repair is suggested. PMID:11174062

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis after unprovoked first seizure

    PubMed Central

    Zisimopoulou, Vaso; Mamali, Margarita; Katsavos, Serafeim; Siatouni, Anna; Tavernarakis, Antonios; Gatzonis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to determine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics after an unprovoked first seizure (UFS). We reviewed the medical records of 71 patients with UFS who underwent lumbar puncture, and examined the CSF parameters. Each CSF parameter was evaluated separately for potential correlations with the other study variables. We observed an overall frequency of CSF abnormalities of 35.2%. CSF protein was the most common abnormal parameter (31%) and showed significant positive correlations with male gender (p=0.037) and older age (p=0.007). Only seven patients (9.9%) had an abnormal cell count (5–40 cells/μl). Higher CSF cell counts were found to predict a longer hospitalization period (p=0.005). No relationship with abnormal EEG findings could be established (p=0.169). This study is one of the few to evaluate postictal CSF parameters in a clinical setting, and to our knowledge the first to investigate these parameters specifically in the emergency department. The development of a rapid, easy-to-use test that does not require extensive laboratory equipment to differentiate UFS from other conditions could be of great value in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27358223

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites and suicide.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Jussi; Nordström, Anna-Lena; Nordström, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Prospective studies of the serotonergic system and suicide report that low 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and a history of attempted suicide predict suicide risk. Low CSF homovanillic acid (HVA) is reported to be associated with past and future lethality of suicide attempts but not with suicide. The interrelationships between monoamine metabolites, violent method, suicide intent and lethality of suicidal behaviour are complex. We hypothesized that CSF 5-HIAA and HVA levels are related to suicide intent, violence and lethality of suicidal behaviour. Fifteen male suicide attempters admitted to a psychiatric ward at the Karolinska University Hospital and eight healthy male volunteers were submitted to lumbar puncture and CSF 5-HIAA and HVA were assayed. Suicide intent with the Beck Suicide Intent Scale (SIS), lethality and violence of suicidal behaviour were assessed. All patients were followed up for causes of death. Six suicides and one fatal accident were identified with death certificates. Mean CSF 5-HIAA but not CSF HVA differed between suicides and survivors. Violent suicides had higher suicide intent and CSF 5-HIAA than non-violent suicides. In violent suicides, CSF 5-HIAA levels were negatively correlated with SIS. Greater suicide intent may be associated with greater aggressive intent and predicts a violent suicide method. PMID:19034712

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow Studies and Recent Advancements.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Erin J; Yamada, Shinya

    2016-04-01

    This article provides an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques used to assess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) movement in the central nervous system (CNS), including Phase-Contrast (PC), Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse, and simultaneous multi slice echo planar phase contrast imaging. These techniques have been used to assess CSF movement in the CNS under normal and pathophysiological situations. PC can quantitatively measure stroke volume in selected regions, particularly the aqueduct of Sylvius, as synchronized to the heartbeat. The PC is frequently used to investigate those patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus and a Chiari I malformation. Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse, with high signal-to-noise ratio, captures motion of CSF anywhere in the CNS over a time period of up to 5 seconds. Variations of PC-MRI improved temporal resolution and included contributions from respiration. With non-invasive imaging such as these, more can be understood about CSF dynamics, especially with respect to the relative effects of cardiac and respiratory changes on CSF movement. PMID:27063659

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV Escape from Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gisslen, Magnus; Cinque, Paola; Price, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    CNS infection is a nearly constant facet of systemic CNS infection and is generally well controlled by suppressive systemic antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there are instances when HIV can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) despite suppression of plasma viruses below the clinical limits of measurement. We review three types of CSF viral escape: asymptomatic, neuro-symptomatic, and secondary. The first, asymptomatic CSF escape, is seemingly benign and characterized by lack of discernable neurological deterioration or subsequent CNS disease progression. Neuro-symptomatic CSF escape is an uncommon, but important, entity characterized by new or progressive CNS disease that is critical to recognize clinically because of its management implications. Finally, secondary CSF escape, which may be even more uncommon, is defined by an increase of CSF HIV replication in association with a concomitant non-HIV infection, as a consequence of the local inflammatory response. Understanding these CSF escape settings not only is important for clinical diagnosis and management but also may provide insight into the CNS HIV reservoir. PMID:25860317

  14. Endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Janakiram, Narayanan; Pande, Sonjay; Bajaj, Jitin; Namdev, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea occurs due to communication between the intracranial subarachnoid space and the sinonasal mucosa. It could be due to trauma, raised intracranial pressure (ICP), tumors, erosive diseases, and congenital skull defects. Some leaks could be spontaneous without any specific etiology. The potential leak sites include the cribriform plate, ethmoid, sphenoid, and frontal sinus. Glucose estimation, although non-specific, is the most popular and readily available method of diagnosis. Glucose concentration of > 30 mg/dl without any blood contamination strongly suggests presence and the absence of glucose rules out CSF in the fluid. Beta-2 transferrin test confirms the diagnosis. High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance cisternography are complementary to each other and are the investigation of choice. Surgical intervention is indicated, when conservative management fails to prevent risk of meningitis. Endoscopic closure has revolutionized the management of CSF rhinorrhea due to its less morbidity and better closure rate. It is usually best suited for small defects in cribriform plate, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinus. Large defects can be repaired when sufficient experience is acquired. Most frontal sinus leaks, although difficult, can be successfully closed by modified Lothrop procedure. Factors associated with increased recurrences are middle age, obese female, raised ICP, diabetes mellitus, lateral sphenoid leaks, superior and lateral extension in frontal sinus, multiple leaks, and extensive skull base defects. Appropriate treatment for raised ICP, in addition to proper repair, should be done to prevent recurrence. Long follow-up is required before leveling successful repair as recurrences may occur very late. PMID:27366243

  15. Endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Janakiram, Narayanan; Pande, Sonjay; Bajaj, Jitin; Namdev, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea occurs due to communication between the intracranial subarachnoid space and the sinonasal mucosa. It could be due to trauma, raised intracranial pressure (ICP), tumors, erosive diseases, and congenital skull defects. Some leaks could be spontaneous without any specific etiology. The potential leak sites include the cribriform plate, ethmoid, sphenoid, and frontal sinus. Glucose estimation, although non-specific, is the most popular and readily available method of diagnosis. Glucose concentration of > 30 mg/dl without any blood contamination strongly suggests presence and the absence of glucose rules out CSF in the fluid. Beta-2 transferrin test confirms the diagnosis. High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance cisternography are complementary to each other and are the investigation of choice. Surgical intervention is indicated, when conservative management fails to prevent risk of meningitis. Endoscopic closure has revolutionized the management of CSF rhinorrhea due to its less morbidity and better closure rate. It is usually best suited for small defects in cribriform plate, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinus. Large defects can be repaired when sufficient experience is acquired. Most frontal sinus leaks, although difficult, can be successfully closed by modified Lothrop procedure. Factors associated with increased recurrences are middle age, obese female, raised ICP, diabetes mellitus, lateral sphenoid leaks, superior and lateral extension in frontal sinus, multiple leaks, and extensive skull base defects. Appropriate treatment for raised ICP, in addition to proper repair, should be done to prevent recurrence. Long follow-up is required before leveling successful repair as recurrences may occur very late. PMID:27366243

  16. [Diagnosis of spinal diseases by cerebrospinal fluid examination].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R M

    1979-01-01

    In this work, changes in the cerebrospinal fluid in acute and chronic polyneuritis as well as in the Guillan-Barré-Strohl syndrome are discussed and and it is pointed out that a specific coordination of the inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid syndromes to certain pathogens or noxae cannot be made. For the differentiation of the Guillain-Barré-Strohl syndrome and existence of increased gamma-globulin bands with identical mobility in the serum is pointed out. In myelitic disease pictures, acute and chronic cerebrospinal fluid syndromes are distinguished also in the cerebrospinal fluid according to the clinical course; regular changes, however, cannot be derived. Syphilitic cerebrospinal-fluid syndromes can easily be differentiated by their immunoactive findings. In multiple sclerosis, we distinguish between typical and atypical changes in the cerebrospinal fluid. Above all, the oligoclonal bands, i. e. the discontinuous proceeding of the gamma-globulin zone and the existence of several bands in the agar gel electrophoresis, play an essential role. In 95 per cent of the cases, oligoclonal bands can be shown. There are no greater differences with respect to oligoclonal bands between intermittent and chronic-progressive courses. For the differential diagnosis of haemorrhagic syndromes, the cerebrospinal fluid cell picture can make a considerable contribution. Macrophages loaded with erythrocytes indicate that a haemorrhage occurred 12 to 18 hours before; macrophages loaded with haemosiderin indicate a haemorrhage that occurred 6 to 8 days before; and macrophages loaded with erythrocytes and haemosiderin indicate a seeping haemorrhage or an event that occurred several times. The Nonne-Froin syndrome indicates a massive protein increase often with a regular or only slightly increased number of cells. The importance of the Queckenstedt tests is pointed out. A particular role is played by meningitis carcinomatosa et sarcomatosa with the demonstration of a great number of

  17. Reconsidering Post-Traumatic Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This article serves to challenge the prevailing wisdom that suggests that most trauma is followed by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and is best treated with critical incident stress debriefing (CISD). Instead, recent evidence suggests that many individuals exposed to stress do not experience stress responses. Even those who do, however,…

  18. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with post-traumatic stress need early treatment with methods that are used to treat other trauma victims. ... symptoms of post-traumatic stress. The crisis intervention method aims to relieve distress and help the patient ...

  19. The 1H NMR Profile of Healthy Dog Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Musteata, Mihai; Nicolescu, Alina; Solcan, Gheorghe; Deleanu, Calin

    2013-01-01

    The availability of data for reference values in cerebrospinal fluid for healthy humans is limited due to obvious practical and ethical issues. The variability of reported values for metabolites in human cerebrospinal fluid is quite large. Dogs present great similarities with humans, including in cases of central nervous system pathologies. The paper presents the first study on healthy dog cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile using 1H NMR spectroscopy. A number of 13 metabolites have been identified and quantified from cerebrospinal fluid collected from a group of 10 mix breed healthy dogs. The biological variability as resulting from the relative standard deviation of the physiological concentrations of the identified metabolites had a mean of 18.20% (range between 9.3% and 44.8%). The reported concentrations for metabolites may be used as normal reference values. The homogeneity of the obtained results and the low biologic variability show that the 1H NMR analysis of the dog’s cerebrospinal fluid is reliable in designing and interpreting clinical and therapeutic trials in dogs with central nervous system pathologies. PMID:24376499

  20. Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker in cognitively normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Jon B; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Harten, Argonde C; Glodzik, Lidia; Martinez-Lage, Pablo; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella; Rami, Lorena; Hansson, Oskar; Sperling, Reisa; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Osorio, Ricardo S; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Vandijck, Manu; Hampel, Harald; Teipl, Stefan; Moghekar, Abhay; Albert, Marilyn; Hu, William T; Monge Argilés, Jose A; Gorostidi, Ana; Teunissen, Charlotte E; De Deyn, Peter P; Hyman, Bradley T; Molinuevo, Jose L; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Linazasoro, Gurutz; de Leon, Mony J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q

    2015-09-01

    In a large multicentre sample of cognitively normal subjects, as a function of age, gender and APOE genotype, we studied the frequency of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid levels of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers including: total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42. Fifteen cohorts from 12 different centres with either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays or Luminex® measurements were selected for this study. Each centre sent nine new cerebrospinal fluid aliquots that were used to measure total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42 in the Gothenburg laboratory. Seven centres showed a high correlation with the new Gothenburg measurements; therefore, 10 cohorts from these centres are included in the analyses here (1233 healthy control subjects, 40-84 years old). Amyloid-β amyloid status (negative or positive) and neurodegeneration status (negative or positive) was established based on the pathological cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's disease cut-off values for cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 and total tau, respectively. While gender did not affect these biomarker values, APOE genotype modified the age-associated changes in cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers such that APOE ε4 carriers showed stronger age-related changes in cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau, total tau and amyloid-β1-42 values and APOE ε2 carriers showed the opposite effect. At 40 years of age, 76% of the subjects were classified as amyloid negative, neurodegeneration negative and their frequency decreased to 32% at 85 years. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-negative group remained stable. The amyloid-negative neurodegeneration-positive group frequency increased slowly from 1% at 44 years to 16% at 85 years, but its frequency was not affected by APOE genotype. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-positive frequency increased from 1% at 53 years to 28% at 85 years. Abnormally low cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 levels were already frequent in midlife and APOE genotype strongly

  1. More Than the Brain's Drain: Does Cerebrospinal Fluid Help the Brain Convey Messages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, John

    1999-01-01

    Examines the role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a clear, colorless liquid that constantly bathes the brain and spinal cord. Scientists argue that cerebrospinal fluid carries important signals for sleep, appetite, and sex. Evaluates past and current research documenting the purpose of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. (CCM)

  2. Post-Traumatic Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Edward J.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    Visual loss following head trauma is common, and the diagnosis can be challenging for the neurologist called to perform an emergency room assessment. The approach to the patient with post-traumatic visual loss is complicated by a wide range of potential ocular and brain injuries with varying pathophysiology. In addition to direct injuries of the eye and orbit, traumatic optic neuropathies, carotid cavernous fistulas, and damage to the intracranial visual pathways are classic causes of visual loss after head trauma. This review provides an update on the diagnosis and management of these conditions. PMID:18660739

  3. Delayed Post-Traumatic Anisocoria.

    PubMed

    Ergül, Dursun Fırat; Ekemen, Serdar; Özdemir, Özcan; Uzan, Çağdaş; Yelken, Birgül

    2015-06-01

    Post-traumatic carotid artery dissection is one of the major causes of ischemic stroke in young patients; its diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians because of its variable clinical presentation. An otherwise healthy 37-year-old man was referred to the intensive care unit of our faculty for the management of multiple trauma because of a car accident. At 11 days from admission, his doctor noticed the advent of anisocoria. A prompt treatment was instituted with anti-platelet and-coagulant agents. The patient had a complete resolution of symptoms. The prognosis was good, and the patient achieved a complete clinical recovery. He was discharged without any sequelae. PMID:27366498

  4. [Post-traumatic stress disorder].

    PubMed

    Ponteva, Matti; Henriksson, Markus; Isoaho, Raimo; Laukkala, Tanja; Männikkö, Timo; Punamäki, Raija-Leena; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    Psychosocial support and careful monitoring are recommended for acute stress reaction (ASR) and acute stress disorder (ASD). If symptoms require, short focused cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy can be used for ASD. Medication is rarely necessary, but sleeping pills can be used for a short period. Trauma-focused psychotherapeutic interventions are first-line treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. SSRI or SNRI antidepressant medication is also effective. There is less evidence on antipsychotic and antiepileptic medication. Psychotherapeutic interventions and medication can be, and often are, combined. Children, the elderly, and military and peacekeeping personnel need interventions that are tailored to their needs. PMID:19839195

  5. [Post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth].

    PubMed

    Korábová, I; Masopustová, Z

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the issue of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth to health care professionals. The text focuses on the diagnostic definition of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth, symptoms, physiological background, prevalence, course, risk factors and consequences of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth for a woman, her child and her partner. Options for interventions and therapy are outlined as well. PMID:26982058

  6. A new look at cerebrospinal fluid movement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Brinker et al. extensively reviewed recent findings about CSF circulation in a recent article: “A new look at cerebrospinal circulation”, but did not analyze some important available data in sufficient detail. For example, our findings as well as some clinical data and experimental results obtained from different animal species, do not support unidirectional CSF circulation but strongly suggest that there are cardiac cycle-dependent systolic-diastolic to-and-fro cranio-spinal CSF movements. These are based on: a) physiological oscillations of arterial and venous blood during cranio-spinal blood circulation; b) respiratory activity, and c) body activity and posture. That kind of complex CSF movement could explain the observed distribution of many different substances in all directions along the CSF system and within central nervous system tissue. It seems that efflux transport systems at capillary endothelium may be more important for brain homeostasis than the removal of metabolites by CSF flow. Thus, when discussing the CSF dynamics we suggest that a more appropriate term would be CSF movement rather than CSF circulation. PMID:25089184

  7. Distinct Lysosomal Network Protein Profiles in Parkinsonian Syndrome Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Boman, Andrea; Svensson, Samuel; Boxer, Adam; Rojas, Julio C.; Seeley, William W.; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Bruce; Kågedal, Katarina; Svenningsson, Per

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes like Parkinson’s disease (PD), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is hampered by overlapping symptomatology and lack of diagnostic biomarkers, and definitive diagnosis is only possible post-mortem. Objective: Since impaired protein degradation plays an important role in many neurodegenerative disorders, we hypothesized that profiles of select lysosomal network proteins in cerebrospinal fluid could be differentially expressed in these parkinsonian syndromes. Methods: Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from PD patients (n = 18), clinically diagnosed 4-repeat tauopathy patients; corticobasal syndrome (CBS) (n = 3) and PSP (n = 8); and pathologically diagnosed PSP (n = 8) and CBD patients (n = 7). Each patient set was compared to its appropriate control group consisting of age and gender matched individuals. Select lysosomal network protein levels were detected via Western blotting. Factor analysis was used to test the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the select lysosomal network protein expression profiles. Results: PD, CBD and PSP were markedly different in their cerebrospinal fluid lysosomal network protein profiles. Lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 were significantly decreased in PD; early endosomal antigen 1 was decreased and lysozyme increased in PSP; and lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and lysozyme were increased in CBD. A panel of lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2, lysozyme and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain discriminated between controls, PD and 4-repeat tauopathies. Conclusions: This study offers proof of concept that select lysosomal network proteins are differentially expressed in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson’s disease, corticobasal syndrome and progressive supranuclear palsy. Lysosomal network protein analysis

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G disrupts blood brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Nasrin; Berg, Carsten Tue; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2015-08-01

    To clarify the significance of immunoglobulin G autoantibody specific for the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 in cerebrospinal fluid, aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G from a neuromyelitis optica patient was administered intrathecally to naïve mice, and the distribution and pathogenic impact was evaluated. A distinct distribution pattern of aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G deposition was observed in the subarachnoid and subpial spaces where vessels penetrate the brain parenchyma, via a paravascular route with intraparenchymal perivascular deposition. Perivascular astrocyte-destructive lesions were associated with blood-borne horseradish peroxidase leakage indicating blood-brain barrier breakdown. The cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G therefore distributes widely in brain to initiate astrocytopathy and blood-brain barrier breakdown. PMID:26339679

  9. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence

    This paper is a clinical discussion of post-traumatic stress disorder and violence, particularly as it applies to the Vietnam Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome. In the first section, the syndrome is described as the sudden onset of explosive rage and unprovoked violence with little or no warning, accompanied by a drastic change in personality. It is…

  10. A Poorly Known Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunt Complication: Miyazaki Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Riccardo; Wierzbicki, Venceslao; Marrocco, Luigi; Pesce, Alessandro; Piccione, Emanuele

    2015-09-01

    We studied a poorly known form of cerebrospinal fluid hypotension characterized by cervical myelopathy, a considerable growth in volume of the venous plexus of the cervical spine, and absence of headache. This form was first described by Miyazaki. We reported a case brought to our attention, reviewed the literature, and formulated etiopathogenic theories that might explain all the various clinical aspects of this pathology. PMID:25913430

  11. Interventional Treatment for Post-traumatic Headache.

    PubMed

    Conidi, Francis X

    2016-06-01

    Post-traumatic headache (migraine) is the most common symptom of concussion and traumatic brain injury. An expert opinion-based review along with a literature review (PubMed) was conducted looking at known interventional procedures for post-traumatic headache using the keywords post-traumatic headache, post-traumatic migraine headache, concussion, mild traumatic brain injury, and traumatic brain injury and the following categories: mechanism, pathophysiology, treatment, physical therapy, neurostimulation, Botox@/Onabotulinum toxin, and surgical intervention. The results returned a total of 181 articles of which 52 were selected. None of the articles included randomized placebo-controlled studies, and most were either prospective or retrospective case analysis and/or review articles or consensus opinion papers, with most studies yielding positive results. Despite a lack of hard evidence, interventional procedures, alone or in combination, appear to be an effective treatment for post-traumatic headaches. PMID:27130542

  12. Sterile post-traumatic immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Nahidul; Bradley, Benjamin A; Ceredig, Rhodri

    2016-04-01

    After major trauma, the human immune system initiates a series of inflammatory events at the injury site that is later followed by suppression of local inflammation favoring the repair and remodeling of the damaged tissues. This local immune response involves complex interactions between resident cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, soluble mediators such as cytokines and chemokines, and recruited cells such as neutrophils, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells. If of sufficient magnitude, these initial immune responses nevertheless have systemic consequences resulting in a state called post-traumatic immunosuppression (PTI). However, controversy exists regarding the exact immunological changes occurring in systemic compartments triggered by these local immune responses. PTI is one of the leading causes of post-surgical mortality and makes patients vulnerable to hospital-acquired infections, multiple organ failure and many other complications. In addition, hemorrhage, blood transfusion, immunesenescence and immunosuppressant drugs aggravate PTI. PTI has been intensively studied, but published results are frequently cloudy. The purpose of this review is to focus on the contributions made by different responsive modalities to immunosuppression following sterile trauma and to try to integrate these into an overall scheme of PTI. PMID:27195120

  13. Sterile post-traumatic immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md Nahidul; Bradley, Benjamin A; Ceredig, Rhodri

    2016-01-01

    After major trauma, the human immune system initiates a series of inflammatory events at the injury site that is later followed by suppression of local inflammation favoring the repair and remodeling of the damaged tissues. This local immune response involves complex interactions between resident cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, soluble mediators such as cytokines and chemokines, and recruited cells such as neutrophils, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells. If of sufficient magnitude, these initial immune responses nevertheless have systemic consequences resulting in a state called post-traumatic immunosuppression (PTI). However, controversy exists regarding the exact immunological changes occurring in systemic compartments triggered by these local immune responses. PTI is one of the leading causes of post-surgical mortality and makes patients vulnerable to hospital-acquired infections, multiple organ failure and many other complications. In addition, hemorrhage, blood transfusion, immunesenescence and immunosuppressant drugs aggravate PTI. PTI has been intensively studied, but published results are frequently cloudy. The purpose of this review is to focus on the contributions made by different responsive modalities to immunosuppression following sterile trauma and to try to integrate these into an overall scheme of PTI. PMID:27195120

  14. Pediatric leptomeningeal metastasis: 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, M C

    1994-04-01

    Nine children (five girls and four boys) ranging in age from 1 to 18 years (median age, 12 years) with leptomeningeal metastasis were evaluated for cerebrospinal fluid compartmentalization with cerebrospinal fluid flow studies using ventricular diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with indium 111 (111In-DTPA). Histologic diagnosis included medulloblastoma (two), primitive neuroectodermal tumor (two), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (two), pineoblastoma (one), ependymoma (one), and anaplastic astrocytoma (one). Sixteen 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies were performed, of which nine demonstrated normal anterograde cerebrospinal fluid flow of radionuclide, with the following cerebrospinal fluid compartment median times to appearance, with ranges in parentheses: ventricles, 1 minute (0 to 3 minutes); cisterna magna/basal cisterns, 5 minutes (3 to 5 minutes); cervical subarachnoid space, 8 minutes (5 to 10 minutes); thoracic subarachnoid space, 15 minutes (10 to 30 minutes); lumbar subarachnoid space, 35 minutes (20 to 45 minutes); and sylvian cistern, 80 minutes (60 to 90 minutes). Blockage of normal anterograde cerebrospinal fluid flow was seen in seven 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies in the following cerebrospinal fluid compartments: cervical subarachnoid space (four), lumbar subarachnoid space (two), and cisterna magna/basal cisterns (one). Five 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies were performed after demonstration of cerebrospinal fluid compartmentalization and treatment with limited-field radiation therapy to involved regions; cerebrospinal fluid flow blocks resolved in three. In conclusion, cerebrospinal fluid compartmentalization, as shown by radionuclide ventriculography, is a common occurrence in pediatric leptomeningeal metastasis (four of nine patients, or 44%) and may be palliated by involved-field radiotherapy. PMID:8006365

  15. Analysis of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khoonsari, Payam Emami; Häggmark, Anna; Lönnberg, Maria; Mikus, Maria; Kilander, Lena; Lannfelt, Lars; Bergquist, Jonas; Ingelsson, Martin; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder accounting for more than 50% of cases of dementia. Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease relies on cognitive tests and analysis of amyloid beta, protein tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau in cerebrospinal fluid. Although these markers provide relatively high sensitivity and specificity for early disease detection, they are not suitable for monitor of disease progression. In the present study, we used label-free shotgun mass spectrometry to analyse the cerebrospinal fluid proteome of Alzheimer’s disease patients and non-demented controls to identify potential biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. We processed the data using five programs (DecyderMS, Maxquant, OpenMS, PEAKS, and Sieve) and compared their results by means of reproducibility and peptide identification, including three different normalization methods. After depletion of high abundant proteins we found that Alzheimer’s disease patients had lower fraction of low-abundance proteins in cerebrospinal fluid compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). Consequently, global normalization was found to be less accurate compared to using spiked-in chicken ovalbumin for normalization. In addition, we determined that Sieve and OpenMS resulted in the highest reproducibility and PEAKS was the programs with the highest identification performance. Finally, we successfully verified significantly lower levels (p<0.05) of eight proteins (A2GL, APOM, C1QB, C1QC, C1S, FBLN3, PTPRZ, and SEZ6) in Alzheimer’s disease compared to controls using an antibody-based detection method. These proteins are involved in different biological roles spanning from cell adhesion and migration, to regulation of the synapse and the immune system. PMID:26950848

  16. Diagnosis of chordoma by cytologic examination of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Marigil, M A; Pardo-Mindan, F J; Joly, M

    1983-09-01

    This is a case report of a 44-year-old man with a chordoma of the clivus that caused dysphonia, low back pain, and urinary and fecal incontinence. The diagnosis was made by cytologic study of the CSF, which demonstrated vacuolated malignant cells. The patient was treated with intrathecal methotrexate, dexamethasone, and radiotherapy. At autopsy extensive dissemination of chordoma was found at the base of the brain, in the ventricles, and in the leptomeninges of the spinal cord. This is the sixth reported case of intrathecal dissemination of a chordoma and the first diagnosed by cytology of the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:6881106

  17. Management of Frontal Sinus Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks and Encephaloceles.

    PubMed

    Illing, Elisa A; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-08-01

    Encephaloceles and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks of the frontal sinus may result from congenital, traumatic, spontaneous, or neoplastic causes. Paramount to success is adequate preoperative planning with accurate history, physical exam, endoscopy, imaging, and testing to confirm location of the leak and origin of the disease. Generally, frontal sinus CSF leaks may be addressed endoscopically with favorable anatomy, proper surgical technique, and appropriate equipment. Open surgical approaches (eg, osteoplastic flap) are often required for superior/lateral defects or if the surgeon is not experienced with endoscopic frontal sinus techniques. PMID:27450619

  18. Confocal Raman microscopy of pathologic cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Lonkina, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Migmanov, T. E.; Lademann, J.; Darvin, M. E.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the spatial localization of leucocytes, bacteria, and erythrocytes in the crystal pattern of a dried droplet of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is established. Characteristic lines are detected and identified in the Raman spectrum of the CSF that point to the presence of pathologic cells therein and can be used in a timely way to diagnose meningitis, the spectroscopic sample preparation procedure being simple enough. A dry CSF sample retains its characteristic spectral features for no less than three days, which is important for its safe keeping and transportation, and also for the computer processing of its spectra.

  19. [Spontaneous trans-sphenoidal encephalocele presenting with nontraumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea (case report)].

    PubMed

    Yücel, Aylin; Değirmenci, Bumin; Yilmaz, M Deniz; Altuntaş, Ali

    2004-09-01

    Encephaloceles are uncommon and can arise from congenital, traumatic, or spontaneous origins. Approximately 80% of all cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrheas are caused by head injuries. Spontaneous or nontraumatic encephaloceles or cerebrospinal fluid leaks have been the least common in most series, accounting for only 3% to 5% of all cerebrospinal fluid leaks. There is a high incidence of meningitis and brain abscess. Thus, early diagnosis is very important. We present an adult patient with uncomplicated nontraumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea that was caused by spontaneous trans-sphenoidal encephalocele. PMID:15470620

  20. Post-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage: A review.

    PubMed

    Modi, Nikhilkumar J; Agrawal, Manish; Sinha, Virendra Deo

    2016-01-01

    Head injury has been the leading cause of death and disability in people younger than 40 years and the incidence is rising continuously. Anticipation of the pathological consequences of post-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (tSAH) and an outcome-oriented management are very important in these cases. To encounter the complications pertaining to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and tSAH, various classifications have been proposed and goal-oriented screening strategies have been offered. The role of serial computed tomography (CT) scans, perfusion studies, transcranial Doppler, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and angiographic studies as diagnostic tools, has been described. Recently, MRI fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), gradient reversal echo (GRE), and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) have emerged as excellent complimentary MRI sequences, and the authors of this article have evaluated their role in the diagnosis and prognostication of patients with tSAH. Numerous studies have been conducted on the various complications associated with tSAH such as vasospasm, hydrocephalus, and electrolyte disturbances and their management. This article discusses these aspects of tSAH and their management nuances. PMID:26954974

  1. Evaluation of the Production and Absorption of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    MIYAJIMA, Masakazu; ARAI, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    The traditional hypothesis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics presumes that CSF is primarily produced in the choroid plexus (CP), then flows from the ventricles into the subarachnoid spaces, and mainly reabsorbed in the arachnoid granulations. This hypothesis is necessary to reconsider in view of recent research and clinical observations. This literature review presents numerous evidence for a new hypothesis of CSF hydrodynamics—(1) A significantly strong relationship exists between the CSF and interstitial fluid (IF), (2) CSF and IF are mainly produced and absorbed in the parenchymal capillaries of the brain and spinal cord. A considerable amount of CSF and IF are also absorbed by the lymphatic system, and (3) CSF movement is not unidirectional flow. It is only local mixing and diffusion. PMID:26226980

  2. Evaluation of the Production and Absorption of Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Masakazu; Arai, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    The traditional hypothesis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics presumes that CSF is primarily produced in the choroid plexus (CP), then flows from the ventricles into the subarachnoid spaces, and mainly reabsorbed in the arachnoid granulations. This hypothesis is necessary to reconsider in view of recent research and clinical observations. This literature review presents numerous evidence for a new hypothesis of CSF hydrodynamics-(1) A significantly strong relationship exists between the CSF and interstitial fluid (IF), (2) CSF and IF are mainly produced and absorbed in the parenchymal capillaries of the brain and spinal cord. A considerable amount of CSF and IF are also absorbed by the lymphatic system, and (3) CSF movement is not unidirectional flow. It is only local mixing and diffusion. PMID:26226980

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Mechanics and Its Coupling to Cerebrovascular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linninger, Andreas A.; Tangen, Kevin; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Frim, David

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is not stagnant but displays fascinating oscillatory flow patterns inside the ventricular system and reversing fluid exchange between the cranial vault and spinal compartment. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of pulsatile CSF motion. Observations contradicting classical views about its bulk production and clearance are highlighted. A clinical account of diseases of abnormal CSF flow dynamics, including hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, Chiari malformation type 1, and pseudotumor cerebri, is also given. We survey medical imaging modalities used to observe intracranial dynamics in vivo. Additionally, we assess the state of the art in predictive models of CSF dynamics. The discussion addresses open questions regarding CSF dynamics as they relate to the understanding and management of diseases.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure in conscious head-down tilted rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severs, Walter B.; Morrow, Bret A.; Keil, Lanny C.

    1991-01-01

    The acute effects of a 1-h -45 deg head-down tilt on continouously recorded cerebrospinal fluid pressure (PCSF) of conscious rats are studied in order to investigate the shift of blood volume into the thoracic cavity in microgravity. PCSF, evaluated in 15-min time blocks over a 3-h experiment, increased slightly (less than 0.05) during the first 30 min of a control hour at 0 deg. There was a transient increase for about 5 min immediately after tilt (-45 deg) that may have been due to head movement after the position change. PCSF was statistically unchanged (above 0.05) during the second (-45 deg) hour and the third (0 deg) recovery hour. It is shown that the dynamics of intracranial pressure regulation can accommodate the acute cephalad fluid shift after tilting.

  5. High Blood Pressure Effects on the Blood to Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier and Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein Composition: A Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis Study in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    González-Marrero, Ibrahim; Castañeyra-Ruiz, Leandro; González-Toledo, Juan M.; Castañeyra-Ruiz, Agustín; de Paz-Carmona, Hector; Castro, Rafael; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R.; Castañeyra-Perdomo, Agustín; Carmona-Calero, Emilia M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to analyze the cerebrospinal fluid proteomic profile, trying to find possible biomarkers of the effects of hypertension of the blood to CSF barrier disruption in the brain and their participation in the cholesterol and β-amyloid metabolism and inflammatory processes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a system linked to the brain and its composition can be altered not only by encephalic disorder, but also by systemic diseases such as arterial hypertension, which produces alterations in the choroid plexus and cerebrospinal fluid protein composition. 2D gel electrophoresis in cerebrospinal fluid extracted from the cistern magna before sacrifice of hypertensive and control rats was performed. The results showed different proteomic profiles between SHR and WKY, that α-1-antitrypsin, apolipoprotein A1, albumin, immunoglobulin G, vitamin D binding protein, haptoglobin and α-1-macroglobulin were found to be up-regulated in SHR, and apolipoprotein E, transthyretin, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, transferrin, α-1β-glycoprotein, kininogen and carbonic anhidrase II were down-regulated in SHR. The conclusion made here is that hypertension in SHR produces important variations in cerebrospinal fluid proteins that could be due to a choroid plexus dysfunction and this fact supports the close connection between hypertension and blood to cerebrospinal fluid barrier disruption. PMID:23401751

  6. Pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Linninger, Andreas A; Tsakiris, Cristian; Zhu, David C; Xenos, Michalis; Roycewicz, Peter; Danziger, Zachary; Penn, Richard

    2005-04-01

    Disturbances of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the brain can lead to hydrocephalus, a condition affecting thousands of people annually in the US. Considerable controversy exists about fluid and pressure dynamics, and about how the brain responds to changes in flow patterns and compression in hydrocephalus. This paper presents a new model based on the first principles of fluid mechanics. This model of fluid-structure interactions predicts flows and pressures throughout the brain's ventricular pathways consistent with both animal intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements and human CINE phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging data. The computations provide approximations of the tissue deformations of the brain parenchyma. The model also quantifies the pulsatile CSF motion including flow reversal in the aqueduct as well as the changes in ICPs due to brain tissue compression. It does not require the existence of large transmural pressure differences as the force for ventricular expansion. Finally, the new model gives an explanation of communicating hydrocephalus and the phenomenon of asymmetric hydrocephalus. PMID:15825857

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid carnitine levels in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rubio, J C; de Bustos, F; Molina, J A; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Benito-León, J; Martín, M A; Campos, Y; Ortí-Pareja, M; Cabrera-Valdivia, F; Arenas, J

    1998-03-01

    We assessed free carnitine (FC) and acylcarnitine esters (AC) in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from 24 patients with diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and from 28 healthy matched-controls. We found no significant correlation between FC and AC levels in CSF. FC and AC levels in CSF did not differ significantly between AD patients and controls, but plasma FC levels were significantly lower in AD patients. CSF and plasma FC and AC levels did not correlate with age, age at onset of AD, duration of AD, and scores of the Minimental State Examination of Folstein. Although these results suggest that CSF carnitine levels are apparently unrelated with the risk for AD, the trend of the FC/AC ratio to be higher in AD patients might suggest the possibility of a lower carnitine acetyltransferase activity in AD, as previously reported in some brain areas. PMID:9562266

  8. Congenital cerebrospinal fluid fistula through the inner ear and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Phelps, P D; Proops, D; Sellars, S; Evans, J; Michaels, L

    1993-06-01

    Congenital deformities of the labyrinth of the inner ear can be associated with a fistulous communication between the intracranial subarachnoid space and the middle ear cavity. We describe seven such cases, six confirmed by high resolution CT and one by postmortem histological section. The seven patients all presented with meningitis although a cerebrospinal fluid fistula was demonstrated at subsequent surgery or postmortem. The lesions were bilateral in three patients, unilateral in three and probably bilateral in the postmortem case although only one temporal bone was obtained. In every case there was a dilated sac instead of the normal two and a half turn cochlea on the affected side and this was confirmed at surgery. The demonstration of the basal cochlear turn is of paramount importance in any deaf child presenting with meningitis. A true Mondini deformity with a normal basal turn and some hearing is not at risk of developing a fistula. PMID:8345296

  9. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection. PMID:27597915

  10. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone.

    PubMed

    Iannella, Giannicola; Manno, Alessandra; Pasqualitto, Emanuela; Ciofalo, Andrea; Angeletti, Diletta; Pasquariello, Benedetta; Magliulo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS) with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection. PMID:27597915

  11. Huntington's disease cerebrospinal fluid seeds aggregation of mutant huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Z; Dai, W; van Erp, T G M; Overman, J; Demuro, A; Digman, M A; Hatami, A; Albay, R; Sontag, E M; Potkin, K T; Ling, S; Macciardi, F; Bunney, W E; Long, J D; Paulsen, J S; Ringman, J M; Parker, I; Glabe, C; Thompson, L M; Chiu, W; Potkin, S G

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat producing a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with a polyglutamine-repeat expansion. Onset of symptoms in mutant huntingtin gene-carrying individuals remains unpredictable. We report that synthetic polyglutamine oligomers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from BACHD transgenic rats and from human HD subjects can seed mutant huntingtin aggregation in a cell model and its cell lysate. Our studies demonstrate that seeding requires the mutant huntingtin template and may reflect an underlying prion-like protein propagation mechanism. Light and cryo-electron microscopy show that synthetic seeds nucleate and enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation. This seeding assay distinguishes HD subjects from healthy and non-HD dementia controls without overlap (blinded samples). Ultimately, this seeding property in HD patient CSF may form the basis of a molecular biomarker assay to monitor HD and evaluate therapies that target mHTT. PMID:26100538

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid proteome of patients with acute Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Warren, H. Shaw

    2012-01-01

    During acute Lyme disease, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of meningitis and other neurologic symptoms. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing a deep view into the proteome for patients diagnosed with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified differences in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. We identified 108 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease from controls. Comparison between infected patients and control subjects revealed differences in proteins in the CSF associated with cell death localized to brain synapses and others that likely originate from brain parenchyma. PMID:22900834

  13. Citramalic acid in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Perlman, S; Carr, S A

    1984-07-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from uninfected patients and from patients with bacterial and viral meningitis was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography, with use of a flame ionization detector, and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The resulting profiles were consistent and reproducible. Hydroxy acids were the compounds found in greatest abundance in both normal and infected CSF. Control experiments to establish the sensitivity and efficiency of the extraction and derivatization methods are also presented. Constituents of CSF from patients with bacterial meningitis differed quantitatively and qualitatively from those of CSF from uninfected patients or patients with nonbacterial infections. CSF from seven of eight patients with bacterial meningitis contained citramalic acid, a compound not previously identified in either normal or infected CSF. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:6145530

  14. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Javidi, H; Yadollahie, M

    2012-01-01

    Unexpected extreme sudden traumatic stressor may cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Important traumatic events include war, violent personal assault (e.g., sexual assault, and physical attack), being taken hostage or kidnapped, confinement as a prisoner of war, torture, terrorist attack, severe car accidents, and natural disasters. In childhood age sexual abuse or witnessing serious injuries or unexpected death of a beloved one are among important traumatic events.PTSD can be categorized into two types of acute and chronic PTSD: if symptoms persist for less than three months, it is termed "acute PTSD," otherwise, it is called "chronic PTSD." 60.7% of men and 51.2% of women would experience at least one potentially traumatic event in their lifetime. The lifetime prevalence of PTSD is significantly higher in women than men. Lifetime prevalence of PTSD varies from 0.3% in China to 6.1% in New Zealand. The prevalence of PTSD in crime victims are between 19% and 75%; rates as high as 80% have been reported following rape. The prevalence of PTSD among direct victims of disasters was reported to be 30%-40%; the rate in rescue workers was 10%-20%. The prevalence of PTSD among police, fire, and emergency service workers ranged from 6%-32%. An overall prevalence rate of 4% for the general population, the rate in rescue/recovery occupations ranged from 5% to 32%, with the highest rate reported in search and rescue personnel (25%), firefighters (21%), and workers with no prior training for facing disaster. War is one of the most intense stressors known to man. Armed forces have a higher prevalence of depression, anxiety disorders, alcohol abuse and PTSD. High-risk children who have been abused or experienced natural disasters may have an even higher prevalence of PTSD than adults.Female gender, previous psychiatric problem, intensity and nature of exposure to the traumatic event, and lack of social support are known risk factors for work-related PTSD. Working with

  15. Embryonic blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier formation and function

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, David; Parvas, Maryam; Hermelo, Ismaïl; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development and adult life, brain cavities and ventricles are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF has attracted interest as an active signaling medium that regulates brain development, homeostasis and disease. CSF is a complex protein-rich fluid containing growth factors and signaling molecules that regulate multiple cell functions in the central nervous system (CNS). The composition and substance concentrations of CSF are tightly controlled. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that embryonic CSF (eCSF) has a key function as a fluid pathway for delivering diffusible signals to the developing brain, thus contributing to the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells, and to the expansion and patterning of the brain. From fetal stages through to adult life, CSF is primarily produced by the choroid plexus. The development and functional activities of the choroid plexus and other blood–brain barrier (BBB) systems in adults and fetuses have been extensively analyzed. However, eCSF production and control of its homeostasis in embryos, from the closure of the anterior neuropore when the brain cavities become physiologically sealed, to the formation of the functional fetal choroid plexus, has not been studied in as much depth and remains open to debate. This review brings together the existing literature, some of which is based on experiments conducted by our research group, concerning the formation and function of a temporary embryonic blood–CSF barrier in the context of the crucial roles played by the molecules in eCSF. PMID:25389383

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteomics Reveals Potential Pathogenic Changes in the Brains of SIV-infected Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Trauger, Sunia A.; Kalisiak, Ewa; Ellis, Ronald J.; Siuzdak, Gary; Fox, Howard S.

    2009-01-01

    The HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder occurs in approximately one-third of infected individuals. It has persisted in the current era of anti-retroviral therapy, and its study is complicated by the lack of biomarkers for this condition. Since the cerebrospinal fluid is the most proximal biofluid to the site of pathology, we studied the cerebrospinal fluid in a nonhuman primate model for HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder. Here we present a simple and efficient liquid chromatography coupled mass spectrometry based proteomics approach that utilizes small amounts of cerebrospinal fluid. First, we demonstrate the validity of the methodology using human cerebrospinal fluid. Next, using the simian immunodeficiency virus infected monkey model, we show its efficacy in identifying proteins such as alpha-1-antitrypsin, complement C3, hemopexin, IgM heavy chain and plasminogen, whose increased expression is linked to disease. Finally, we find that the increase in cerebrospinal fluid proteins is linked to increased expression of their genes in the brain parenchyma, revealing that the cerebrospinal fluid alterations identified reflect changes in the brain itself and not merely leakage of the blood-brain or blood- cerebrospinal fluid barriers. This study reveals new central nervous system alterations in lentivirus-induced neurological disease, and this technique can be applied to other systems in which limited amounts of biofluids can be obtained. PMID:19281240

  17. Early embryonic brain development in rats requires the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Alonso, M I; Santiago, C; Moro, J A; De la Mano, A; Carretero, R; Gato, A

    2009-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid has shown itself to be an essential brain component during development. This is particularly evident at the earliest stages of development where a lot of research, performed mainly in chick embryos, supports the evidence that cerebrospinal fluid is involved in different mechanisms controlling brain growth and morphogenesis, by exerting a trophic effect on neuroepithelial precursor cells (NPC) involved in controlling the behaviour of these cells. Despite it being known that cerebrospinal fluid in mammals is directly involved in corticogenesis at fetal stages, the influence of cerebrospinal fluid on the activity of NPC at the earliest stages of brain development has not been demonstrated. Here, using "in vitro" organotypic cultures of rat embryo brain neuroepithelium in order to expose NPC to or deprive them of cerebrospinal fluid, we show that the neuroepithelium needs the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid to undergo normal rates of cell survival, replication and neurogenesis, suggesting that NPC are not self-sufficient to induce their normal activity. This data shows that cerebrospinal fluid is an essential component in chick and rat early brain development, suggesting that its influence could be constant in higher vertebrates. PMID:19540909

  18. Adolescent Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yule, William

    2003-01-01

    Based on over a decade of work in the area of PTSD, including a longitudinal study of PTSD among adolescents, Dr. Yule provides an introduction to post-traumatic stress disorder as it occurs in youth. This includes a look at the manifestations of stress reactions, the incidence and prevalence of PTSD, and the relationship between levels of…

  19. Cysticercus Antigens in Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples from Patients with Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Pardini, Alessandra Xavier; Vaz, Adelaide José; Machado, Luis Dos Ramos; Livramento, José Antônio

    2001-01-01

    Antigens were detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with neurocysticercosis (NC) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using polyclonal sera of rabbit anti-Taenia solium cysticerci (anti-Tso) and anti- Taenia crassiceps cysticerci vesicular fluid (anti-Tcra or anti-Tcra <30 kDa). A group of NC patients (n = 174) were studied (NC), including 40 patients in different phases of the disease. ELISAs carried out with the anti-Tso, anti-Tcra, and anti-Tcra <30 kDa showed sensitivities of 81.2, 90, and 95.8% and specificities of 82, 98, and 100%, respectively. The 14- and 18-kDa low-molecular-weight peptides were only detected in CSF samples from patients with NC by immunoblotting with anti-Tso and anti-Tcra sera. Because of the importance of the diagnosis and prognosis of cysticercosis, the detection of antigens may contribute as an additional marker to the study and clarification of the parasite-host relationship. PMID:11526181

  20. Post-Traumatic Blepharocele in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraju, Venkatesh; Bharathi, Ravindra

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection in the eyelid is known as blepharocele. It is rarely reported in adults. In this report, we describe one such patient who developed a non-resolving swelling of the left upper eyelid associated with mechanical ptosis following a head injury. He had fractures involving the left orbital rim and roof, and the medial and lateral walls. His left frontal sinus was hypoplastic. The diagnosis of CSF blepharocele was made based on clinical, biochemical and radiological findings. He underwent transcranial repair of the left frontobasal dural tear with a good recovery. PMID:23984042

  1. IL-5 in post-traumatic eosinophilic pleural effusion.

    PubMed Central

    Schandené, L; Namias, B; Crusiaux, A; Lybin, M; Devos, R; Velu, T; Capel, P; Bellens, R; Goldman, M

    1993-01-01

    Thoracic trauma or pneumothorax can result in pleural fluid eosinophilia. In this study we investigated the role of the eosinophilopoietic cytokine IL-5 in three cases of post-traumatic eosinophilic pleural effusions (EPE). Using a specific immunoenzymatic assay, significant levels of IL-5 were found in EPE (range 100-3000 pg/ml), while IL-5 was undetectable (< 25 pg/ml) in corresponding serum samples and in non-eosinophilic pleural fluids. IL-5 present in pleural fluids was found bioactive in a proliferative assay using a mouse CTLL-2 cell line transfected with the cDNA corresponding to the alpha chain of the human IL-5 receptor. Using a reverse polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, we found IL-5 mRNA expression within pleural mononuclear cells from patients with EPE, but not in corresponding peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), confirming that IL-5 is synthesized locally in the pleural cavity. In the two cases in which pleural CD4+ cells were purified, these cells were identified as the major source of IL-5. Taken together, these data indicate that the development of post-traumatic EPE is related to a local secretion of IL-5 by CD4+ cells present in the pleural cavity. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8100745

  2. [Post-traumatic subdural hygroma: diagnostic conditions and therapeutic attitude in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Loembe, P M; Ndong-Launay, M

    1989-01-01

    An excessive collection of cerebrospinal fluid in the subdural space is known as subdural hygroma, or hydroma. By far, the most common cause is severe cranial trauma. The diagnosis can be made by angiography or computer tomography and, with certainly, only by trephine or burr hole evacuation. 11 cases of post-traumatic subdural hygromas, mainly diagnosed during operative interventions, from April 1981 to September 1988, are reported. Most patients had acute forms of hygroma requiring acute surgical intervention. The acuteness could broken down as: coma (medium Glasgow coma scale: 6), lateralizing neurologic signs (4 cases) and temporal lobe herniation signs (7 cases). There were difficulties in obtaining angiographic studies. 10 patients underwent burr hole evacuation. Craniectomy was performed in one case. Time between cranial trauma and surgical intervention varied from 24 hours (6 cases) to 34 days. It appears that the prognosis is related to the extent of primary brain damage and not to the pressure exerted by the (usually) small mass lesion. The authors propose a clinical management of this lesion and hope for improvement in the diagnostic technics available. PMID:2808559

  3. Monoamines in the brain cerebrospinal fluid of facial pain patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bouckoms, A. J.; Sweet, W. H.; Poletti, C.; Lavori, P.; Carr, D.; Matson, W.; Gamache, P.; Aronin, N.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assay monoamines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from the trigeminal cistern of 64 patients with intractable facial pain. The CSF was analyzed for homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), end-product markers of activity for the dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine systems, respectively. HVA averaged 121 ng/mL in these facial pain patients, compared to 150 to 550 ng/mL in 10 studies of ventricular brain CSF in assorted psychiatric and pain patients. 5-HIAA averaged 29 to ng/mL in our facial pain patients compared to 60 to 120 ng/mL in nine studies of ventricular brain CSF in assorted psychiatric and neurological patients. Trigeminal cistern CSF MHPG averaged 9 ng/mL, similar to the range of 13 studies of lumbar CSF of assorted psychiatric and pain diagnoses. These results indicate that (1) the electrochemical detection method provides a unique way of accurately measuring nanogram concentrations of multiple monoamines in a little as 0.25 mL of CSF; (2) trigeminal cistern and posterior fossa brain CSF monoamine metabolites reflect a different profile of dopaminergic and serotonergic functioning in these facial pain patients from that previously reported with lumbar CSF measurements of other patients; and (3) trigeminal sensory ganglion or brain dopamine and serotonin systems may be concomitantly dysfunctional in intractable facial pain. PMID:7504420

  4. Postoperative Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage Associated With Total En Bloc Spondylectomy.

    PubMed

    Yokogawa, Noriaki; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Kato, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Takayoshi; Igarashi, Takashi; Fang, Xiang; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a serious postoperative complication associated with total en bloc spondylectomy. The authors examined the risk factors for CSF leakage after this procedure. A total of 72 patients underwent total en bloc spondylectomy at the authors' institution between May 2010 and April 2013. Postoperative CSF leakage was observed in 17 of the 72 patients (23.6%). The results of univariate analysis suggested that age 54 years or older, preoperative surgical site irradiation, resection of 3 or more vertebral bodies, and dural injury were significant risk factors for postoperative CSF leakage after total en bloc spondylectomy. Multivariate analysis showed that preoperative surgical site irradiation was the only significant risk factor for postoperative CSF leakage (adjusted odds ratio, 5.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-26.45, P=.046). The authors also assessed the course of treatment for postoperative CSF leakage in each patient. Of 17 patients with postoperative CSF leakage, 13 recovered without further complications, but 4 required reoperation (2 for wound dehiscence, 1 for surgical site infection, and 1 for severe intracranial hypotension). All 4 patients who required reoperation had a history of surgical site irradiation. Thus, this study suggests that careful consideration should be given to postoperative CSF leakage in patients with a history of surgical site irradiation. These findings may contribute to the management of postoperative CSF leakage associated with total en bloc spondylectomy and supplement the information given to the patient in the process of obtaining informed consent. PMID:26186316

  5. Short-term stability of Borrelia garinii in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Berenová, Dagmar; Krsek, Daniel; Šípková, Lenka; Lukavská, Alena; Malý, Marek; Kurzová, Zuzana; Hořejší, Jan; Kodym, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the optimal conditions for short-term storage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples for direct diagnosis of Lyme disease. A mixture of Borrelia-negative CSFs spiked with a defined amount of cultured Borrelia garinii was used. Borrelia stability was investigated over 7 days at four different temperatures [room temperature (RT), +4, -20 and -70 °C]. Quantitative changes in CSF Borrelia were measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR), and morphological changes in the spirochetes were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These qPCR results were statistically evaluated. We found +4 °C to be an optimal temperature for short-term storage of CSF samples intended for TEM observation. There was no significant difference between the temperatures tested in the average quantity of Borrelia measured by qPCR. On the contrary, electron optical diagnosis of frozen samples and samples stored at RT showed destructive morphological changes and decreased spirochete counts. Our results show that optimal conditions for the pre-analytical phase of investigation of one type of material can differ depending on the diagnostic method employed. PMID:26104540

  6. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid folate and cobalamin levels in febrile convulsion.

    PubMed

    Osifo, B O; Lukanmbi, F A; Familusi, J B

    1985-05-01

    Folate and cobalamin parameters were studied in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of 40 febrile paediatric patients. Eighteen of these children were in a state of febrile convulsion while the remaining 22 were non-convulsing. The serum folate concentration of all the patients was higher than that of the control group but the highest value was found in the convulsing children. There was no significant difference in the CSF folate levels between the two groups of patients. The serum cobalamin levels of the patients were significantly lower than those of the control children and the lowest mean was observed in the convulsing state. On the other hand, there was no difference in the CSF cobalamin between the convulsing and non-convulsing children. These results confirm that there is an effective blood-brain barrier system for folate even when serum folate levels are higher than normal. There is also a definite decrease in serum cobalamin during pyrexia but this decrease is more apparent in the convulsing state. The role of cobalamin metabolism in convulsion is not clear. PMID:4009203

  8. A potential endophenotype for Alzheimer's disease: cerebrospinal fluid clusterin.

    PubMed

    Deming, Yuetiva; Xia, Jian; Cai, Yefei; Lord, Jenny; Holmans, Peter; Bertelsen, Sarah; Holtzman, David; Morris, John C; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H; Kauwe, John; Goate, Alison; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have associated clusterin (CLU) variants with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role of CLU on AD pathogenesis is not totally understood. We used cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma CLU levels as endophenotypes for genetic studies to understand the role of CLU in AD. CSF, but not plasma, CLU levels were significantly associated with AD status and CSF tau/amyloid-beta ratio, and highly correlated with CSF apolipoprotein E (APOE) levels. Several loci showed almost genome-wide significant associations including LINC00917 (p = 3.98 × 10(-7)) and interleukin 6 (IL6, p = 9.94 × 10(-6), in the entire data set and in the APOE ε4- individuals p = 7.40 × 10(-8)). Gene ontology analyses suggest that CSF CLU levels may be associated with wound healing and immune response which supports previous functional studies that demonstrated an association between CLU and IL6. CLU may play a role in AD by influencing immune system changes that have been observed in AD or by disrupting healing after neurodegeneration. PMID:26545630

  9. Increased Ventricular Cerebrospinal Fluid Lactate in Depressed Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Kailyn A. L.; Mao, Xiangling; Case, Julia A. C.; Kang, Guoxin; Shungu, Dikoma C.; Gabbay, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction has been increasingly examined as a potential pathogenic event in psychiatric disorders, although its role early in the course of major depressive disorder (MDD) is unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate mitochondrial dysfunction in medication-free adolescents with MDD through in vivo measurements of neurometabolites using high-spatial resolution multislice/multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Methods Twenty-three adolescents with MDD and 29 healthy controls, ages 12–20, were scanned at 3T and concentrations of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid lactate, as well as N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), total creatine (tCr), and total choline (tCho) in the bilateral caudate, putamen, and thalamus were reported. Results Adolescents with MDD exhibited increased ventricular lactate compared to healthy controls [F(1, 41) = 6.98, p = .01]. However, there were no group differences in the other neurometabolites. Dimensional analyses in the depressed group showed no relation between any of the neurometabolites and symptomatology, including anhedonia and fatigue. Conclusions Increased ventricular lactate in depressed adolescents suggests mitochondrial dysfunction may be present early in the course of MDD; however it is still not known whether the presence of mitochondrial dysfunction is a trait vulnerability of individuals predisposed to psychopathology or a state feature of the disorder. Therefore, there is a need for larger multimodal studies to clarify these chemical findings in the context of network function. PMID:26802978

  10. Endoscopic Management of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea: The Charing Cross Experience

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Jagdeep Singh; Elmiyeh, Behrad; Saleh, Hesham A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe our experience of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea management. Design Retrospective. Setting Charing Cross Hospital, London, a tertiary referral center. Participants Fifty-four patients with CSF rhinorrhea managed from 2003 to 2011. Main outcome measures Surgical technique; Recurrence. Results Etiologically, 36 were spontaneous and 18 traumatic. Eight patients with spontaneous and two with traumatic leaks had previous failed repairs in other units. Success rates after first and second surgery were 93% and 100%, respectively. Mean follow-up was 21 months. Four patients, all of spontaneous etiology, had recurrences; three of these underwent successful second repair with three layered technique, and the fourth had complete cessation of the leak after gastric bypass surgery and subsequent weight reduction. Adaptation of anatomic three-layered repair since then averted any further failure in the following 7 years. Mean body mass index was 34.0 kg/m2 in spontaneous and 27.8 kg/m2 in traumatic cases (p < 0.05). Fifty percent of spontaneous leaks were from the cribriform plate, 22% sphenoid, 14% ethmoid, and 14% frontal sinus. In the traumatic CSF leak group: 33.3% were from the cribriform plate, 33.3% sphenoid, 22.2% ethmoid, and 11.1% frontal. Conclusion Endoscopic CSF fistula closure is a safe and effective operation. All sites of leak can be accessed endoscopically. We recommend the use of an anatomic three-layered closure in difficult cases. PMID:24436890

  11. Simulating transitional hydrodynamics of the cerebrospinal fluid at extreme scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Kartik; Roller, Sabine; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    Chiari malformation type I is a disorder characterized by the herniation of cerebellar tonsils into the spinal canal through the foramen magnum resulting in obstruction to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow. The flow of pulsating bidirectional CSF is of acutely complex nature due to the anatomy of the conduit containing it - the subarachnoid space. We report lattice Boltzmann method based direct numerical simulations on patient specific cases with spatial resolution of 24 μm amounting meshes of up to 2 billion cells conducted on 50000 cores of the Hazelhen supercomputer in Stuttgart. The goal is to characterize intricate dynamics of the CSF at resolutions that are of the order of Kolmogorov microscales. Results unfold velocity fluctuations up to ~ 10 KHz , turbulent kinetic energy ~ 2 times of the mean flow energy in Chiari patients whereas the flow remains laminar in a control subject. The fluctuations confine near the cranio-vertebral junction and are commensurate with the extremeness of pathology and the extent of herniation. The results advocate that the manifestation of pathological conditions like Chiari malformation may lead to transitional hydrodynamics of the CSF, and a prudent calibration of numerical approach is necessary to avoid overlook of such phenomena.

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Mukaetova-Ladinska, Elizabeta B.; Monteith, Rachael; Perry, Elaine K.

    2010-01-01

    More than 750,000 of the UK population suffer from some form of cognitive impairment and dementia. Of these, 5–20% will have Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). Clinico-pathological studies have shown that it is the low frequency of DLB clinical core features that makes the DLB diagnosis hardly recognisable during life, and easily misdiagnosed for other forms of dementia. This has an impact on the treatment and long-term care of the affected subjects. Having a biochemical test, based on quantification of a specific DLB biomarker within Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) could be an effective diagnostic method to improve the differential diagnosis. Although some of the investigated DLB CSF biomarkers are well within the clinical criteria for sensitivity and specificity (>90%), they all seem to be confounded by the contradictory data for each of the major groups of biomarkers (α-synuclein, tau and amyloid proteins). However, a combination of CSF measures appear to emerge, that may well be able to differentiate DLB from other dementias: α-synuclein reduction in early DLB, a correlation between CSF α-synuclein and Aβ42 measures (characteristic for DLB only), and t-tau and p-tau181 profile (differentiating AD from DLB). PMID:21048932

  13. Vitamin B6 in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Children

    PubMed Central

    Albersen, Monique; Bosma, Marjolein; Jans, Judith J. M.; Hofstede, Floris C.; van Hasselt, Peter M.; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique G. M.; Visser, Gepke; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the past years, the essential role of vitamin B6 in brain development and functioning has been recognized and genetic metabolic disorders resulting in functional vitamin B6 deficiency have been identified. However, data on B6 vitamers in children are scarce. Materials and Methods B6 vitamer concentrations in simultaneously sampled plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 70 children with intellectual disability were determined by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. For ethical reasons, CSF samples could not be obtained from healthy children. The influence of sex, age, epilepsy and treatment with anti-epileptic drugs, were investigated. Results The B6 vitamer composition of plasma (pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxal (PL)) differed from that of CSF (PL > PLP > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxamine). Strong correlations were found for B6 vitamers in and between plasma and CSF. Treatment with anti-epileptic drugs resulted in decreased concentrations of PL and PLP in CSF. Conclusion We provide concentrations of all B6 vitamers in plasma and CSF of children with intellectual disability (±epilepsy), which can be used in the investigation of known and novel disorders associated with vitamin B6 metabolism as well as in monitoring of the biochemical effects of treatment with vitamin B6. PMID:25760040

  14. Estimation of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Rohan R.; Mehta, Anish; Uchil, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in tuberculosis is around 5–10%. Of the various manifestations of CNS tuberculosis, meningitis is the most common (70–80%). Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels in tubercular meningitis and compare the levels with controls. Methods: Cross-sectional, prospective, observational, hospital-based study done in 20 patients of tubercular meningitis, 20 patients of aseptic meningitis (AM) and 25 control subjects without any preexisting neurological disorders who have undergone lumbar puncture for spinal anesthesia. Results: Cortisol was detected in all 40 CSF samples of patients (100%). Mean CSF cortisol level was 8.82, 3.47 and 1.05 in tubercular meningitis, AM and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in tubercular meningitis was significantly higher as compared to AM and controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Cortisol level estimation in CSF is one of the rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic markers in early identification of tubercular meningitis along with CSF findings of elevated proteins, hypoglycorrhachia and lymphocytic pleocytosis. This aids in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. This is the first study on the estimation of CSF cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:26752900

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers mirror rate of cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Rolstad, Sindre; Berg, Anne Ingeborg; Bjerke, Maria; Johansson, Boo; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wallin, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The ability to predict future decline in cognitive systems using the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers 42 amino acid form of amyloid-β (Aβ42) and total tau (T-tau) is not fully understood. In a clinical sample ranging from cognitively healthy to dementia (n = 326), linear regression models were performed in order to investigate the ability of CSF biomarkers to predict cognitive decline in all cognitive domains from baseline to 2-year follow-up. Gender, age, and years of education were included as covariates. In patients with subjective cognitive impairment, T-tau had a small impact on executive functions (r2 = 0.07). T-tau had a small to moderate influence (r2 = 0.06-0.11) on all cognitive functions with the exception of visuospatial functions in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In patients with dementia, the impact of T-tau was large (r2 = 0.29) on semantic memory. Aβ42 had a small effect (r2 = 0.07) on speed and executive functions in MCI. In patients with dementia, Aβ42 had a moderate influence (r2 = 0.13-0.24) on semantic and verbal working memory/fluency. Our results speak in favor of the notion that CSF biomarkers reflect the rate of cognitive decline across the continuum of cognitive impairment from healthy to dementia. CSF predicted subsequent decline in more cognitive domains among MCI cases, but the impact was most pronounced in patients with dementia. PMID:23313924

  16. Molecular biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Brit; Hecker, Michael; Zettl, Uwe Klaus

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system, usually occurring in young adults and leading to disability. Despite the progress in technology and intensive research work of the last years, diagnosing MS can still be challenging. A heterogenic and complex pathophysiology with various types of disease courses makes MS unique for each patient. There is an urgent need to identify markers facilitating rapid and accurate diagnosis and prognostic assessments with regard to optimal therapy for each MS patient. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an outstanding source of specific markers related to MS pathology. Molecules reflecting specific pathological processes, such as inflammation, cellular damage, and loss of blood-brain-barrier integrity, are detectable in CSF. Clinically used biomarkers of CSF are oligoclonal bands, IgG-index, measles-rubella-zoster-reaction, anti-aquaporin 4 antibodies, and antibodies against John Cunningham virus. Many other potential biomarkers have been proposed in recent years. In this review we examine the current scientific knowledge on CSF molecular markers that could guide diagnosis and discrimination of different MS forms, support treatment decisions, or be helpful in monitoring and predicting disease progression, therapy response, and complications such as opportunistic infections. PMID:26071103

  17. Phantom model of physiologic intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bottan, Simone; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2012-06-01

    We describe herein a novel life-size phantom model of the intracranial cavity and its validation. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) domains including ventricular, cysternal, and subarachnoid spaces were derived via magnetic resonance imaging. Brain mechanical properties and cranio-spinal compliance were set based on published data. Both bulk and pulsatile physiologic CSF flow were modeled. Model validation was carried out by comparisons of flow and pressure measurements in the phantom with published in vivo data of healthy subjects. Physiologic intracranial pressure with 10 mmHg mean and 0.4 mmHg peak pulse amplitude was recorded in the ventricles. Peak CSF flow rates of 0.2 and 2 ml/s were measured in the cerebral aqueduct and subarachnoid space, respectively. The phantom constitutes a first-of-its-kind approach to modeling physiologic intracranial dynamics in vitro. Herein, we describe the phantom design and manufacturing, definition and implementation of its operating parameters, as well as the validation of the modeled dynamics. PMID:22333981

  18. The longitudinal cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Elizabeth; Larkin, James R.; Claridge, Tim D. W.; Talbot, Kevin; Sibson, Nicola R.; Turner, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Neurochemical biomarkers are urgently sought in ALS. Metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy is a highly sensitive method capable of revealing nervous system cellular pathology. The 1H-NMR CSF metabolomic signature of ALS was sought in a longitudinal cohort. Six-monthly serial collection was performed in ALS patients across a range of clinical sub-types (n = 41) for up to two years, and in healthy controls at a single time-point (n = 14). A multivariate statistical approach, partial least squares discriminant analysis, was used to determine differences between the NMR spectra from patients and controls. Significantly predictive models were found using those patients with at least one year's interval between recruitment and the second sample. Glucose, lactate, citric acid and, unexpectedly, ethanol were the discriminating metabolites elevated in ALS. It is concluded that 1H-NMR captured the CSF metabolomic signature associated with derangements in cellular energy utilization connected with ALS, and was most prominent in comparisons using patients with longer disease duration. The specific metabolites identified support the concept of a hypercatabolic state, possibly involving mitochondrial dysfunction specifically. Endogenous ethanol in the CSF may be an unrecognized novel marker of neuronal tissue injury in ALS. PMID:26121274

  19. The longitudinal cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Elizabeth; Larkin, James R; Claridge, Tim D W; Talbot, Kevin; Sibson, Nicola R; Turner, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Neurochemical biomarkers are urgently sought in ALS. Metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy is a highly sensitive method capable of revealing nervous system cellular pathology. The (1)H-NMR CSF metabolomic signature of ALS was sought in a longitudinal cohort. Six-monthly serial collection was performed in ALS patients across a range of clinical sub-types (n = 41) for up to two years, and in healthy controls at a single time-point (n = 14). A multivariate statistical approach, partial least squares discriminant analysis, was used to determine differences between the NMR spectra from patients and controls. Significantly predictive models were found using those patients with at least one year's interval between recruitment and the second sample. Glucose, lactate, citric acid and, unexpectedly, ethanol were the discriminating metabolites elevated in ALS. It is concluded that (1)H-NMR captured the CSF metabolomic signature associated with derangements in cellular energy utilization connected with ALS, and was most prominent in comparisons using patients with longer disease duration. The specific metabolites identified support the concept of a hypercatabolic state, possibly involving mitochondrial dysfunction specifically. Endogenous ethanol in the CSF may be an unrecognized novel marker of neuronal tissue injury in ALS. PMID:26121274

  20. Head movement, an important contributor to human cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiang; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Zheng, Nan; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Chi, Yan-Yan; Liu, Cong; Wang, Xue-Mei; Lin, Xiang-Tao; Sui, Hong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via the myodural bridges (MDBs). Recently, it was suggested that they might work as a pump to provide power for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of the suboccipital muscles contractions on the CSF flow. Forty healthy adult volunteers were subjected to cine phase-contrast MR imaging. Each volunteer was scanned twice, once before and once after one-minute-head-rotation period. CSF flow waveform parameters at craniocervical junction were analyzed. The results showed that, after the head rotations, the maximum and average CSF flow rates during ventricular diastole were significantly increased, and the CSF stroke volumes during diastole and during entire cardiac cycle were significantly increased. This suggested that the CSF flow was significantly promoted by head movements. Among the muscles related with head movements, only three suboccipital muscles are connected to the upper cervical spinal dura mater via MDBs. It was believed that MDBs might transform powers of the muscles to CSF. The present results suggested that the head movements served as an important contributor to CSF dynamics and the MDBs might be involved in this mechanism. PMID:27538827

  1. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Brouillette, Ashley M; Öz, Gülin; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, and SCA6, and the sporadic disease multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type (MSA-C), compared with age-matched controls. We estimated disease severity using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Most proteins measured trended higher in disease versus control group yet did not reach statistical significance. We found the levels of tau in both SCA2 and MSA-C patients were significantly higher than control. We found that α-synuclein levels were lower with higher SARA scores in SCA1 and tau levels were higher with greater SARA in MSA-C, although this final correlation did not reach statistical significance after post hoc correction. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to improve the power of these studies and validate the use of CSF biomarkers in SCA and MSA-C. PMID:26265793

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Brouillette, Ashley M.; Öz, Gülin; Gomez, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, and SCA6, and the sporadic disease multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type (MSA-C), compared with age-matched controls. We estimated disease severity using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Most proteins measured trended higher in disease versus control group yet did not reach statistical significance. We found the levels of tau in both SCA2 and MSA-C patients were significantly higher than control. We found that α-synuclein levels were lower with higher SARA scores in SCA1 and tau levels were higher with greater SARA in MSA-C, although this final correlation did not reach statistical significance after post hoc correction. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to improve the power of these studies and validate the use of CSF biomarkers in SCA and MSA-C. PMID:26265793

  3. Visualization of the cerebrospinal fluid drainage into the Galen's vein.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, P H; Gotow, T; Ichimura, T; Nakatani, T; Takasu, N; Kodaka, R; Sumitani, S; Fukuda, T

    1985-04-01

    Arachnoid granulations are not always present in lower mammals and primate newborns. In order to visualize the route for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to drain into the venous system, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was injected into the lateral ventricle or cisterna cerebellomedullaris of the mouse and rat. From 30 to 60 min after the commencing of a slow infusion for 15-30 min of 0.05-0.1 ml solution containing 10-20 mg HRP, the mouse, whose skull had been exposed, was dropped into cold acetone at dry ice temperature; other animals were fixed by perfusion with aldehyde solution. The frozen head was dissected in a cryostat kept at -18 degrees C to remove the skull, but leave the dura mater and the falx cerebri. The brain with meninges was cut into 30-45 microns sagittal sections in the cryostat, and processed for peroxidase reaction. The perfusion-fixed brains were used for scanning electron microscopy and for electron microscope observation of the tracer. The reaction product was found within fenestrated venous capillaries of the choroid plexus. The route for the HRP in the CSF to drain into the sinus rectus via the vena choroidea and vena cerebri magna was directly visualized in the mouse. PMID:4038002

  4. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control.

    PubMed

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M F; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E

    2014-08-28

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called "embryonic CSF." Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life. PMID:25165044

  5. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control

    PubMed Central

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M. Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M. F.; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called “embryonic CSF.” Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life. PMID:25165044

  6. Metagenomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Perlejewski, Karol; Bukowska-Ośko, Iwona; Nakamura, Shota; Motooka, Daisuke; Stokowy, Tomasz; Płoski, Rafał; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Zakrzewska-Pniewska, Beata; Podlecka-Piętowska, Aleksandra; Nojszewska, Monika; Gogol, Anna; Caraballo Cortés, Kamila; Demkow, Urszula; Stępień, Adam; Laskus, Tomasz; Radkowski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of central nervous system of unknown etiology. However, some infectious agents have been suggested to play a significant role in its pathogenesis. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and metagenomics can be employed to characterize microbiome of MS patients and to identify potential causative pathogens. In this study, 12 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disorders (IIDD) of the central nervous system were studied: one patient had clinically isolated syndrome, one patient had recurrent optic neuritis, and ten patients had multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition, there was one patient with other non-inflammatory neurological disease. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was sampled from all patients. RNA was extracted from CSF and subjected to a single-primer isothermal amplification followed by NGS and comprehensive data analysis. Altogether 441,608,474 reads were obtained and mapped using blastn. In a CSF sample from the patient with clinically isolated syndrome, 11 varicella-zoster virus reads were found. Other than that similar bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and protozoan reads were identified in all samples, indicating a common presence of contamination in metagenomics. In conclusion, we identified varicella zoster virus sequences in one out of the 12 patients with IIDD, which suggests that this virus could be occasionally related to the MS pathogenesis. A widespread bacterial contamination seems inherent to NGS and complicates the interpretation of results. PMID:27311319

  7. [Cerebrospinal fluid markers in early diagnosis of Alzheimer dementia].

    PubMed

    Wiltfang, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid-based neurochemical dementia diagnostics (CSF-NDD) is meanwhile validated on S3 evidence level and international dementia guidelines like those of the German neuropsychiatric associations (DGPPN, DGN; http://www.DGPPN.de) recommend CSF-NDD for the improved early and differential diagnostics of multigenetic (sporadic) Alzheimer's Dementia (AD). CSF-NDD does also offer a predictive diagnosis of incipient AD for high-risk patients when they are still within the prodromal stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). But since currently no (secondary) preventive therapy of AD is available, the use of CSF-NDD for the predictive molecular diagnosis of AD is not recommended by the latter guidelines. However, molecular diagnostics of preclinical AD by CSF-NDD and/or [18F]Amyloid-PET has meanwhile gained high clinical relevance for therapeutic clinical research, as this novel clinical model allows to systematically screen for promising (secondary) preventive therapy options. Moreover, future blood based neurochemical diagnostics of preclinical or early AD by means of multiplex assays seems to be promising. However, so far blood assays were not consistently validated by independent research groups and in contrast to CSF-NDD a blood-based diagnosis of AD is not yet available. PMID:25791051

  8. A novel method to study cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in rats

    PubMed Central

    Karimy, Jason K.; Kahle, Kristopher T.; Kurland, David B.; Yu, Edward; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics play critical roles in both the immature and adult brain, with implications for neurodevelopment and disease processes such as hydrocephalus and neurodegeneration. Remarkably, the only reported method to date for measuring CSF formation in laboratory rats is the indirect tracer dilution method (a.k.a., ventriculocisternal perfusion), which has limitations. New Method Anesthetized rats were mounted in a stereotaxic apparatus, both lateral ventricles were cannulated, and the Sylvian aqueduct was occluded. Fluid exited one ventricle at a rate equal to the rate of CSF formation plus the rate of infusion (if any) into the contralateral ventricle. Pharmacological agents infused at a constant known rate into the contralateral ventricle were tested for their effect on CSF formation in real-time. Results The measured rate of CSF formation was increased by blockade of the Sylvian aqueduct but was not changed by increasing the outflow pressure (0–3 cm of H2O). In male Wistar rats, CSF formation was age-dependent: 0.39±0.06, 0.74±0.05, 1.02±0.04 and 1.40±0.06 µL/min at 8, 9, 10 and 12 weeks, respectively. CSF formation was reduced 57% by intraventricular infusion of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide. Comparison with existing methods Tracer dilution methods do not permit ongoing real-time determination of the rate of CSF formation, are not readily amenable to pharmacological manipulations, and require critical assumptions. Direct measurement of CSF formation overcomes these limitations. Conclusions Direct measurement of CSF formation in rats is feasible. Our method should prove useful for studying CSF dynamics in normal physiology and disease models. PMID:25554415

  9. Postoperative Low-Flow Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Rucai; Chen, Songyu; Xu, Shujun; Liu, James K.; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To assess the effectiveness of continuous lumbar drainage (LD) for management of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for resection of pituitary adenoma. Three hundred eighty-four medical records of patients who were admitted to our institute during a 2.5-year period were retrospectively reviewed, 33 of them experienced low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak postoperatively. If LD was used, all patients with low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak were classified into 2 groups, lumbar drained group and conservatively treated group. The age, sex, management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and related complications were reviewed. Statistical comparisons between the 2 groups were made using SPSS 19.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). The differences were considered statistically significant if the P value was less than 0.05. Thirty-three of 384 (8.6%) experienced low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Cured rate of cerebrospinal fluid leak was 94.4% (17/18) in continuous lumbar drained group, and 93.3% (14/15) in control group. There were 2 (11.2%) patients who developed meningitis in the LD group and 1 (5.6%) patient in the control group. One patient required endoscopic repair of skull base because of persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak in both groups, with the rates of 5.6% and 6.7%, respectively. There was no significant difference noted in each rate in both groups. Placement of LD may not be necessary for the management of low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after using endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach to pituitary adenoma. PMID:26080170

  10. Cytomegalovirus Antibody in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Schizophrenic Patients Detected by Enzyme Immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller Torrey, E.; Yolken, Robert H.; Winfrey, C. Jack

    1982-05-01

    By means of enzyme immunoassay techniques to detect the presence of antibody to cytomegalovirus, the cerebrospinal fluid of 178 patients with schizophrenia, 17 patients with bipolar disorders, and 11 other psychiatric patients was compared with that of 79 neurological patients and 41 normal control subjects. The cerebrospinal fluid of 20 of the schizophrenic patients and 3 of the patients with bipolar disorders showed significant increases in immunoglobulin M antibody to cytomegalovirus; no difference was found in patients on or off psychotropic medications.

  11. Evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid in Southeast Asian refugees with reactive serologic tests for syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Buchwald, D; Collier, A C; Lukehart, S A; Kith, P; Goldstein, E; Hooton, T M

    1996-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities in Southeast Asian refugees with reactive serologic tests for syphilis, we evaluated 65 patients, 36 prospectively and 29 retrospectively, in a primary care clinic. Information was collected on history of treponemal infections, neurologic symptoms and signs, and total protein concentration, leukocyte count, and the VDRL test in the cerebrospinal fluid. Neurologic symptoms were reported by all patients for whom data were available. Abnormal neurologic signs were found or noted in medical records in 15 (42%) prospectively evaluated patients and 9 (64%) of 14 retrospectively evaluated patients for whom data were available. No patient had evidence of congenital or non-neurologic sequelae such as cutaneous or cardiovascular manifestations of syphilis. No patient had a positive cerebrospinal fluid VDRL test, 1 had more than 5 x 10(6) leukocytes per liter (5 leukocytes per mm3), and 6 (9%) had elevated total protein levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. Previous therapy for syphilis was not associated with lower serum VDRL reactions, neurologic symptoms and signs, or cerebrospinal fluid findings. In the absence of other indications, routine examination of the cerebrospinal fluid in seropositive Southeast Asian refugees who have nonspecific neurologic symptoms has a low yield, perhaps because of the high prevalence of yaws in this population, and may not be warranted. PMID:8993199

  12. Post-traumatic elbow rotational stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Samuel KK; Faan, Yan Sui; Lui, Paulina WY; Ngai, Wai Kit

    2014-01-01

    Background The elbow is an important but complex structure, with movement in both the sagittal plane in flexion and extension, as well as the rotational plane in forearm supination and pronation. Trauma is a common cause of elbow stiffness, which significantly hampers daily function. There are currently no gold-standard management guidelines for post-traumatic elbow stiffness, and most of the published literature focuses solely on the sagittal plane of motion. Methods This is a retrospective case series reviewing all patients who underwent a surgical release for treatment of post-traumatic elbow stiffness during a 36-month period. Motion range and the shortened version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores were serially measured and analyzed. Results The results obtained showed that both the sagittal and rotational range of motion directly influenced upper limb function; however, the relationship between these two motion planes was weak, meaning that both sagittal and rotational motion in the elbow need be addressed individually. Post-traumatic elbow stiffness could be aptly managed by various surgical approaches, including arthroscopic-assisted procedures; these were all effective in increasing both the sagittal and rotational range of motion. More importantly, this gain in range translated to a statistically significant improvement in upper limb function. Conclusions Management of elbow stiffness needs to be tackled in both the sagittal and rotational motion planes.

  13. Südeck's post-traumatic osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Murariu, Isabella Cristina; Macovei, Luana

    2012-01-01

    The diversity that exists in the types of trauma, in the investigated anatomical structures, in the sites of trauma, in the outcomes of traumatic injuries, and in the general reaction of the body lead to a symptomatological polymorphism of post-traumatic sequelae. Therefore it is impossible to establish a well-defined nosological entity of these sequelae. The damaged tissues react under a very similar scheme, irrespective of the type of tissue, trauma or area, namely, through an inflammatory process, that causes various sequelae depending on certain parameters. Südeck post-traumatic osteodystrophy may be defined as a pathological entity based on some well-defined clinical features, on the development of its own therapy and on its more or less ubiquitous character. Südeck's post-traumatic osteodystrophy of the hand is rarely found isolated. This "acute bone atrophy" is usually included in the "pathological syndrome of the hand" and is caused by circulatory disorders that occur on a traumatized hand or on a hand with injury "at a distance", especially when nerve damage is involved. PMID:23700903

  14. [Diagnosis of cerebrospinal fluid leakages by gamma-cisternography].

    PubMed

    Oberson, R

    1976-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakages either secondary (traumatic) or spontaneous (non-traumatic) are first considered in their frequency and origin. The exact topography of the various meningeal and cranial lesions involved are difficult to assess particularly in the most important groups of persistant traumatic CSF rhinorrhea and recurrent meningitis. Among the various diagnostic approaches, direct observation is always necessary, but of limited value. Standard X-rays must be followed by multidirectionnal tomography (Polytome) and, whenever available, computed tomodensitography of the base of the skull. Brain pneumography provides a thorough setting fourth of the congenital or acquired cerebral lesions as well as the new cranio-meningeal conditions. Difficulties encountered with the techniques of subdurography and Pantopaque injection are underlined. Three radioisotope techniques are considered. 1) The earlier technique of cotton-pledgets only shows the external orifice. 2) The recent proposal of nuclide cranial subdurography is criticized for ignoring the leptomeningeal bag. 3) Radioisotope cisternography (RIC) or gamma-cisternography is described more precisely. It remains the most complete and appropriate method for observing the natural behaviour of the leakage. RIC with fistulography is performed through suboccipital injection of 99mTc-DTPA. RIC provides essential clues on the relative importance of associated dynamic disturbances of the third circulation and morphological changes of its anatomical bed (stenoses and widenings of the ependymal and leptomeningeal spaces). If present, the leakage may be directly shown on the RIC pictures. If rhinorrhea is abundant, there is no difficulty in assessing side and site of the fistula. If rhinorrhea is occult, dubious or intermittent, diagnosis is often difficult. There are also indirect signs of rhinorrhea: leptomeningeal dilatation near a frontal or ethmoidal fracture, contamination of the rhinopharynx, examination of

  15. Endostatin level in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Salza, Romain; Oudart, Jean-Baptiste; Ramont, Laurent; Maquart, François-Xavier; Bakchine, Serge; Thoannès, Henri; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the level of endostatin, a fragment of collagen XVIII that accumulates in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), in the cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The concentrations of total protein, endostatin, amyloid-β1-42 peptide, tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in CSF of patients with AD (n = 57), behavioral frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, n = 22), non AD and non FTD dementia (nAD/nFTD, n = 84), and 45 subjects without neurodegenerative diseases. The statistical significance of the results was assessed by Mann-Whitney and Kruskal and Wallis tests, and by ROC analysis. The concentration of endostatin in CSF was higher than the levels of the three markers of AD both in control subjects and in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The endostatin/amyloid-β1-42 ratio was significantly increased in patients with AD (257%, p < 0.0001) and nAD/nFTD (140%, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. The endostatin/tau protein ratio was significantly decreased in patients with AD (-49%, p < 0.0001) but was increased in bvFTD patients (89%, p < 0.0001) compared to controls. In the same way, the endostatin/hyperphosphorylated tau protein ratio was decreased in patients with AD (-21%, p = 0.0002) but increased in patients with bvFTD (81%, p = 0.0026), compared to controls. The measurement of endostatin in CSF and the calculation of its ratio relative to well-established AD markers improve the diagnosis of bvFTD patients and the discrimination of patients with AD from those with bvFTD and nAD/nFTD. PMID:25408220

  16. Clearance of valproic acid from cerebrospinal fluid in anesthetized rabbit.

    PubMed

    Artru, A A; Adkinson, K D; Powers, K M; Shen, D D

    1994-07-01

    Clearance of valproic acid from brain tissue is believed to occur via a carrier-mediated system(s). The present study was designed to determine whether clearance was capacity-limited (saturable) and whether it occurred primarily at the choroid plexus. Ten rabbits were anesthetized with halothane and surgically prepared for ventriculocisternal perfusion. In group 1 (n = 5) valproic acid was added to blue dextran-containing mock cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to achieve concentrations of 5, 20, 100, and 500 micrograms.ml-1. The mixture was infused through needles in both cerebral ventricles. The purpose of this group was to determine whether over a large range (100x) of valproic acid concentrations, clearance from CSF was capacity limited (saturable). In group 2 (n = 5) valproic acid concentrations were 3, 10, and 30 microgram.ml-1 and infusion was into the left cerebral ventricle only. The purposes of this group were to determine (a) the magnitude of valproic acid clearance for the "clinical" range of valproic acid in CSF (10-30 micrograms.ml-1), and (b) whether clearance of valproic acid was changed by perfusion across a portion of the choroid plexus surface area (group 2) as compared with perfusion across the entire choroid plexus surface area (group 1). In both groups the percent extraction of valproic acid was calculated from the concentration ratio (valproic acid)out/(valproic acid)in corrected for the rate of CSF formation. In group 1 the percent extraction of valproic acid was 93 +/- 2% (mean +/- SD) at 5 micrograms.ml-1 and stabilized within the range of 58-70% (individual values) at the higher inflow concentrations of valproic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7521700

  17. Placental ischemia increases seizure susceptibility and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Junie P

    2015-01-01

    Eclampsia is diagnosed in preeclamptic patients who develop unexplained seizures and/or coma during pregnancy or postpartum. Eclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, accounting for ∼13% of maternal deaths worldwide. Little is known about the mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of eclampsia, partly due to the lack of suitable animal models. This study tested the hypothesis that placental ischemia, induced by reducing utero-placental perfusion, increases susceptibility to seizures, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation, and neurokinin B (NKB) expression in brain and plasma. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a pro-convulsive drug, was injected into pregnant and placental ischemic rats (40 mg/kg, i.p.) on gestational day 19 followed by video monitoring for 30 min. Seizure scoring was blindly conducted. Placental ischemia hastened the onset of seizures compared to pregnant controls but had no effect on seizure duration. Placental ischemia increased CSF levels of IL-2, IL-17, IL-18 and eotaxin (CCL11), had no effect on plasma NKB; however, PTZ increased plasma NKB in both pregnant and placental ischemic rats. NKB was strongly correlated with latency to seizure in normal pregnant rats (R2 = 0.88 vs. 0.02 in placental ischemic rats). Lastly, NKB decreased in the anterior cerebrum in response to placental ischemia and PTZ treatment but was unchanged in the posterior cerebrum. These data demonstrate that placental ischemia is associated with increased susceptibility to seizures and CSF inflammation; thus provides an excellent model for elucidating mechanisms of eclampsia-like symptoms. Further studies are required to determine the role of CSF cytokines/chemokines in mediating increased seizure susceptibility. PMID:26603461

  18. Evaluation of Cerebrospinal Fluid Assay Variability in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    White, Matthew T.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Xie, Sharon X.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Studies of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have indicated that much of the variability observed in the biomarkers may be due to measurement error. Biomarkers are often obtained with measurement error, which may make the diagnostic biomarker appear less effective than it truly is. In the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, technical replicates of CSF biomarkers are available; the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database contains longitudinal replicates of CSF biomarkers. We focus on the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) as the measure of diagnostic effectiveness for differentiating AD from normal cognition using CSF biomarkers and compare AUC estimates obtained by a more standard, naïve method (which uses a single observation per subject and ignores measurement error) to a maximum likelihood (ML) based method (which uses all replicates per subject and adjusts for measurement error). The choice of analysis method depends upon the noise to signal ratio (i.e., the magnitude of the measurement error variability relative to the true biomarker variability); moderate to high ratios may significantly bias the naïve AUC estimate, and the ML-based method would be preferred. The noise to signal ratios were low for the ADNI biomarkers but high for the tTau and pTau biomarkers in NACC. Correspondingly, the naïve and ML-based AUC estimates were nearly identical in the ADNI data but dissimilar for the tTau and pTau biomarkers in the NACC data. Therefore, using the naïve method is adequate for analysis of CSF biomarkers in the ADNI study, but the ML method is recommended for the NACC data. PMID:26890778

  19. Placental ischemia increases seizure susceptibility and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines.

    PubMed

    Warrington, Junie P

    2015-11-01

    Eclampsia is diagnosed in preeclamptic patients who develop unexplained seizures and/or coma during pregnancy or postpartum. Eclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, accounting for ~13% of maternal deaths worldwide. Little is known about the mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of eclampsia, partly due to the lack of suitable animal models. This study tested the hypothesis that placental ischemia, induced by reducing utero-placental perfusion, increases susceptibility to seizures, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation, and neurokinin B (NKB) expression in brain and plasma. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a pro-convulsive drug, was injected into pregnant and placental ischemic rats (40 mg/kg, i.p.) on gestational day 19 followed by video monitoring for 30 min. Seizure scoring was blindly conducted. Placental ischemia hastened the onset of seizures compared to pregnant controls but had no effect on seizure duration. Placental ischemia increased CSF levels of IL-2, IL-17, IL-18 and eotaxin (CCL11), had no effect on plasma NKB; however, PTZ increased plasma NKB in both pregnant and placental ischemic rats. NKB was strongly correlated with latency to seizure in normal pregnant rats (R(2) = 0.88 vs. 0.02 in placental ischemic rats). Lastly, NKB decreased in the anterior cerebrum in response to placental ischemia and PTZ treatment but was unchanged in the posterior cerebrum. These data demonstrate that placental ischemia is associated with increased susceptibility to seizures and CSF inflammation; thus provides an excellent model for elucidating mechanisms of eclampsia-like symptoms. Further studies are required to determine the role of CSF cytokines/chemokines in mediating increased seizure susceptibility. PMID:26603461

  20. Amyloid and tau cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Because of the emerging intersections of HIV infection and Alzheimer's disease, we examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers related of amyloid and tau metabolism in HIV-infected patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study we measured soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα and sAPPβ), amyloid beta fragment 1-42 (Aβ1-42), and total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau) in CSF of 86 HIV-infected (HIV+) subjects, including 21 with AIDS dementia complex (ADC), 25 with central nervous system (CNS) opportunistic infections and 40 without neurological symptoms and signs. We also measured these CSF biomarkers in 64 uninfected (HIV-) subjects, including 21 with Alzheimer's disease, and both younger and older controls without neurological disease. Results CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ concentrations were highly correlated and reduced in patients with ADC and opportunistic infections compared to the other groups. The opportunistic infection group but not the ADC patients had lower CSF Aβ1-42 in comparison to the other HIV+ subjects. CSF t-tau levels were high in some ADC patients, but did not differ significantly from the HIV+ neuroasymptomatic group, while CSF p-tau was not increased in any of the HIV+ groups. Together, CSF amyloid and tau markers segregated the ADC patients from both HIV+ and HIV- neuroasymptomatics and from Alzheimer's disease patients, but not from those with opportunistic infections. Conclusions Parallel reductions of CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ in ADC and CNS opportunistic infections suggest an effect of CNS immune activation or inflammation on neuronal amyloid synthesis or processing. Elevation of CSF t-tau in some ADC and CNS infection patients without concomitant increase in p-tau indicates neural injury without preferential accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau as found in Alzheimer's disease. These biomarker changes define pathogenetic pathways to brain injury in ADC that differ from those of Alzheimer's disease

  1. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Monoamine Metabolites in the Epileptic Baboon

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, C. Ákos; Patel, Mayuri; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2016-01-01

    The baboon represents a natural model for genetic generalized epilepsy and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). In this retrospective study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monoamine metabolites and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) were evaluated in 263 baboons of a pedigreed colony. CSF monoamine abnormalities have been linked to reduced seizure thresholds, behavioral abnormalities and SUDEP in various animal models of epilepsy. The levels of 3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylglycol, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and homovanillic acid in CSF samples drawn from the cisterna magna were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. These levels were compared between baboons with seizures (SZ), craniofacial trauma (CFT) and asymptomatic, control (CTL) baboons, between baboons with abnormal and normal EEG studies. We hypothesized that the CSF levels of major monoaminergic metabolites (i.e., dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine) associate with the baboons’ electroclinical status and thus can be used as clinical biomarkers applicable to seizures/epilepsy. However, despite apparent differences in metabolite levels between the groups, usually lower in SZ and CFT baboons and in baboons with abnormal EEG studies, we did not find any statistically significant differences using a logistic regression analysis. Significant correlations between the metabolite levels, especially between 5-HIAA and HVA, were preserved in all electroclinical groups. While we were not able to demonstrate significant differences in monoamine metabolites in relation to seizures or EEG markers of epilepsy, we cannot exclude the monoaminergic system as a potential source of pathogenesis in epilepsy and SUDEP. A prospective study evaluating serial CSF monoamine levels in baboons with recently witnessed seizures, and evaluation of abnormal expression and function of monoaminergic receptors and transporters within epilepsy-related brain regions, may impact the electroclinical status. PMID:26924854

  2. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.

    2016-01-01

    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for

  3. Surgical challenge: endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebrospinal fluid leaks (CSF) result from an abnormal communication between the subarachnoid space and the extracranial space. Approximately 90% of CSF leak at the anterior skull base manifests as rhinorrhea and can become life-threatening condition. Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) has become a common otolaryngologist procedure. The aim of this article is to consider our experience and to evaluate the outcomes in patients who underwent a purely endoscopic repair of CSF leaks of the anterior skull base. Findings Retrospective chart review was performed of all patients surgically treated for CSF leaks presenting to the Section of Nasal and Sinus Disorders at the Service of ENT–Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela (CHUS), between 2004 and 2010. A total of 30 patients who underwent repair CSF leak by ESS. The success rate was 93.4% at the first attempt; only two patients (6.6%) required a second surgical procedure, and none of it was necessary to use a craniotomy for closure. Follow-up periods ranged from 4 months to 6 years. Conclusion Identifying the size, site, and etiology of the CSF leak remains the most important factor in the surgical success. It is generally accepted that the ESS have made procedures minimally invasive, and CSF leak is now one of its well-established indications with low morbidity and high success rate, with one restriction for fistulas of the posterior wall of the frontal sinus should be repaired in conjunction with open techniques. PMID:22925201

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's biomarker profiles in CNS infections.

    PubMed

    Krut, Jan Jessen; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Cinque, Paola; Hagberg, Lars; Price, Richard W; Studahl, Marie; Gisslén, Magnus

    2013-02-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker profile in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by decreased beta amyloid (Aβ(1-42)), increased total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau, respectively), which is a useful diagnostic tool and gives insight in the pathogenesis of AD. It is of importance to study how these biomarkers react in other CNS diseases; therefore, we decided to analyse amyloid and tau biomarkers in different CNS infections. We also included analysis of soluble amyloid precursor proteins (sAPPα and -β). CSF Aβ(1-42), sAPPα and -β, t-tau and p-tau were analysed in bacterial meningitis (n = 12), Lyme neuroborreliosis (n = 13), herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (n = 10), HIV-associated dementia (HAD) (n = 21), AD (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 42). Concurrent with AD, Aβ(1-42) was decreased in all groups except neuroborreliosis compared to controls. HSV-1 encephalitis, bacterial meningitis and HAD showed lower concentrations of sAPPα and -β compared to AD. T-tau was increased in AD and HSV-1 encephalitis compared to all other groups. P-tau was higher in AD and HSV-1 encephalitis compared to bacterial meningitis, HAD and control. Decreased CSF Aβ(1-42), sAPPα and -β in various CNS infections imply an effect of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism which is similar in regard to AD concerning Aβ(1-42), but differs concerning sAPPα and -β. These results clearly indicate different pathologic pathways in AD and infectious CNS disease and may provide help in the differential biomarker diagnostics. Increased p-tau in HSV-1 encephalitis probably reflect acute neuronal damage and necrosis. PMID:23052602

  5. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip S; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin: relation to cognition and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Skillbäck, Tobias; Törnqvist, Ulrika; Andreasson, Ulf; Trojanowski, John Q; Weiner, Michael W; Shaw, Leslie M; Mattsson, Niklas; Blennow, Kaj

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic dysfunction is linked to cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, measurement of synapse proteins in cerebrospinal fluid may be useful biomarkers to monitor synaptic degeneration. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of the postsynaptic protein neurogranin are increased in Alzheimer's disease, including in the predementia stage of the disease. Here, we tested the performance of cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin to predict cognitive decline and brain injury in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study. An in-house immunoassay was used to analyse neurogranin in cerebrospinal fluid samples from a cohort of patients who at recruitment were diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 95) or mild cognitive impairment (n = 173), as well as in cognitively normal subjects (n = 110). Patients with mild cognitive impairment were grouped into those that remained cognitively stable for at least 2 years (stable mild cognitive impairment) and those who progressed to Alzheimer's disease dementia during follow-up (progressive mild cognitive impairment). Correlations were tested between baseline cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin levels and baseline and longitudinal cognitive impairment, brain atrophy and glucose metabolism within each diagnostic group. Cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin was increased in patients with Alzheimer's disease dementia (P < 0.001), progressive mild cognitive impairment (P < 0.001) and stable mild cognitive impairment (P < 0.05) compared with controls, and in Alzheimer's disease dementia (P < 0.01) and progressive mild cognitive impairment (P < 0.05) compared with stable mild cognitive impairment. In the mild cognitive impairment group, high baseline cerebrospinal fluid neurogranin levels predicted cognitive decline as reflected by decreased Mini-Mental State Examination (P < 0.001) and increased Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (P < 0.001) scores at clinical follow-up. In addition, high baseline

  7. Independent information from cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and florbetapir imaging in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Philip S.; Donohue, Michael; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William J.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Weiner, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 and increased retention of florbetapir positron emission tomography are biomarkers reflecting cortical amyloid load in Alzheimer's disease. However, these measurements do not always agree and may represent partly different aspects of the underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. The goal of this study was therefore to test if cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β biomarkers are independently related to other Alzheimer's disease markers, and to examine individuals who are discordantly classified by these two biomarker modalities. Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were measured at baseline in 769 persons [161 healthy controls, 68 subjective memory complaints, 419 mild cognitive impairment and 121 Alzheimer's disease dementia, mean age 72 years (standard deviation 7 years), 47% females] and used to predict diagnosis, APOE ε4 carriage status, cerebral blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid total-tau and phosphorylated-tau levels (cross-sectionally); and hippocampal volume, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography results and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores (longitudinally). Cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography amyloid-β were highly correlated, but adjusting one of these predictors for the other revealed that they both provided partially independent information when predicting diagnosis, APOE ε4, hippocampal volume, metabolism, cognition, total-tau and phosphorylated-tau (the 95% confidence intervals of the adjusted effects did not include zero). Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β was more strongly related to APOE ε4 whereas positron emission tomography amyloid-β was more strongly related to tau levels (P < 0.05). Discordance (mainly isolated cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β positivity) differed by diagnostic group (P < 0.001) and was seen in 21% of cognitively healthy people but only 6% in dementia patients. The finding that

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities in patients with neoplastic meningitis. An evaluation using /sup 111/In-DTPA ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, S.A.; Trump, D.L.; Chen, D.C.; Thompson, G.; Camargo, E.E.

    1982-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics were evaluated by /sup 111/In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (/sup 111/In-DTPA) ventriculography in 27 patients with neoplastic meningitis. Nineteen patients (70 percent) had evidence of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbances. These occurred as ventricular outlet obstructions, abnormalities of flow in the spinal canal, or flow distrubances over the cortical convexities. Tumor histology, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, myelograms, and computerized axial tomographic scans were not sufficient to predict cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns. These data indicate that cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities are common in patients with neoplastic meningitis and that /sup 111/In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging is useful in characterizing these abnormalities. This technique provides insight into the distribution of intraventricularly administered chemotherapy and may provide explanations for treatment failure and drug-induced neurotoxicity in patients with neoplastic meningitis.

  9. Increased digitalis-like activity in human cerebrospinal fluid after expansion of the extracellular fluid volume

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, J.A.; Martin, A.M.; Malave, S.

    1985-08-12

    The present study was designed to determine whether acute expansion of the extracellular fluid volume influenced the digitalis-like activity of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), previously described. Human CSF samples, drawn before and 30 minutes after the intravenous infusion of 1 liter of either saline or glucose solutions, were assayed for digitalis-like activity by inhibition of either the /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake into human erythrocytes or by the activity of a purified Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ ATPase. The CSF inhibitory activity on both systems significantly increased after the infusion of sodium solutions but did not change after the infusion of glucose. These results indicate that the digitalis-like factor of human CSF might be involved in the regulation of the extracellular fluid volume and electrolyte content and thereby in some of the physiological responses to sodium loading. 31 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Canine Cervical Spondylomyelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Vaquero, Paula; da Costa, Ronaldo C.; Allen, Matthew J.; Moore, Sarah A.; Keirsey, Jeremy K.; Green, Kari B.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Objective To identify proteins with differential expression in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 15 clinically normal (control) dogs and 15 dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM). Summary of Background Data Canine CSM is a spontaneous, chronic, compressive cervical myelopathy similar to human cervical spondylotic myelopathy. There is a limited knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying these conditions. Differentially expressed CSF proteins may contribute with novel information about the disease pathogenesis in both dogs and humans. Methods Protein separation was performed with two-dimensional electrophoresis. A Student’s t-test was used to detect significant differences between groups (P < 0.05). Three comparisons were made: 1) control versus CSM-affected dogs, 2) control versus non-corticosteroid treated CSM-affected dogs, and 3) non-corticosteroid treated CSM-affected versus corticosteroid treated CSM-affected dogs. Protein spots exhibiting at least a statistically significant 1.25-fold change between groups were selected for subsequent identification with capillary-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results A total of 96 spots had a significant average change of at least 1.25-fold in one of the three comparisons. Compared to the CSF of control dogs, CSM-affected dogs demonstrated increased CSF expression of eight proteins including vitamin D-binding protein, gelsolin, creatine kinase B-type, angiotensinogen, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, SPARC, calsyntenin-1, and complement C3, and decreased expression of pigment epithelium-derived factor, prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase, apolipoprotein E, and clusterin. In the CSF of CSM-affected dogs, corticosteroid treatment increased the expression of haptoglobin, transthyretin isoform 2, cystatin C-like, apolipoprotein E, and clusterin, and decreased the expression of angiotensinogen, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, and gelsolin. Conclusions Many of the differentially expressed

  11. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YAN; LIU, XIAO-HUI; WU, JIAN-JUN; REN, HUI-MING; WANG, JIAN; DING, ZHENG-TONG; JIANG, YU-PING

    2016-01-01

    The present study used comparative proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients in order to identify proteins that may act as diagnostic biomarkers and indicators of the pathogenesis of ALS. This analysis was performed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology, coupled with 2-dimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery software was utilized for bioinformatic analysis of the data. Following this, western blotting was performed in order to examine the expression of 3 candidate proteins in ALS patients compared with healthy individuals [as a normal control (NC) group] or patients with other neurological disease (OND); these proteins were insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-2), glutamate receptor 4 (GRIA4) and leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein 1 (LRG1). Clinical data, including gender, age, disease duration and ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R) score, were also collected in the ALS patients. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed between the clinical data and the results of western blot analysis. A total of 248 distinct proteins were identified in the ALS and NC groups, amongst which a significant difference could be identified in 35 proteins; of these, 21 proteins were downregulated and 14 were upregulated. These differentially-expressed proteins were thus revealed to be associated with ALS. The western blot analysis confirmed a proportion of the data attained in the iTRAQ analysis, revealing the differential protein expression of IGF-2 and GRIA4 between the ALS and NC groups. IGF-2 was significantly downregulated in ALS patients (P=0.017) and GRIA4 was significantly upregulated (P=0.016). These results were subsequently validated in the 35-patient ALS and OND groups (P=0.002), but no significant difference was identified in LRG1 expression between these groups. GRIA4 protein expression was higher

  12. Post Traumatic Endophthalmitis: Incidence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Ali Reza; Rezaei, Leila; Salam, Hasan; Mohammadi, Zahra; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Post traumatic endophthalmitis is an uncommon but severe complication of ocular trauma. We aimed to identify the incidence of post traumatic endophthalmitis and its contributing risk factors in Feiz hospital (Isfahan, Iran) from 2006 until 2010. Medical records of 1042 patients with open globe injury were analyzed and data were collected including age, sex, location of being injured, visual acuity (VA), time from injury to hospitalization and to repair, site of ophthalmic injury and the presence of foreign body. The frequency of post-traumatic endophthalmitis was about 2.1% (N = 22) of all patients. Nine of 22 cases with endophthalmitis were under 8 years. The visual acuity at the time of admission was seen to be contributed to high rate of endophthalmitis. Intraocular foreign body was detected in 139 patients; and the rate of endophthalmitis was 5% among these patients. Statistical analysis showed significant relationship between presence of foreign body and higher rate of endophthalmitis. Also, duration of hospitalization was significantly different between two study groups (P = 0.019). There were no significant differences between two groups in terms of other studied variables. Patients with low age, low visual acuity at admission, presence of intraocular foreign body and long duration of hospital stay had a higher risk of endophthalmitis after the repair of the globe. Compared to the reports of other large institutions, we can attribute the low incidence rate of endophthalmitis in our institution to the early use of systemic antibiotics such as gentamycin and cephalosporins in the first hour of hospitalization until discharge. PMID:25363107

  13. What is post-traumatic stress disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Andreasen, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    Although post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) are categorized as separate and discrete disorders, the boundary between them is sometimes indistinct. Their separation is based on the assumption that PTSD results primarily from psychological stress, while TBI is the consequence of an identifiable injury to the brain. This distinction is based on an antiquated polarity between mind and brain, and the separation of the two disorders often becomes arbitrary in day-to-day psychiatric practice and research. PMID:22033951

  14. Mammalian embryonic cerebrospinal fluid proteome has greater apolipoprotein and enzyme pattern complexity than the avian proteome.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Bueno, David

    2005-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid, which has an essential role in the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. We identified and analyzed the proteome of Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid from rat embryos (Rattus norvegicus), which includes proteins involved in the regulation of Central Nervous System development. The comparison between mammalian and avian Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteomes reveals great similarity, but also greater complexity in some protein groups. The pattern of apolipoproteins and enzymes in CSF is more complex in the mammals than in birds. This difference may underlie the greater neural complexity and synaptic plasticity found in mammals. Fourteen Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid gene products were previously identified in adult human Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteome, and interestingly they are altered in patients with neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis may contribute to our understanding of Central Nervous System development and evolution, and these human diseases. PMID:16335996

  15. Penetration of aztreonam into cerebrospinal fluid of patients with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Modai, J; Vittecoq, D; Decazes, J M; Wolff, M; Meulemans, A

    1986-01-01

    The penetration of aztreonam into the cerebrospinal fluid was determined in 16 patients with bacterial meningitis undergoing treatment with other antibiotics. Three aztreonam doses of 30 mg/kg were infused intravenously over 30 to 45 min at 8-h intervals, first between days 2 and 4 and again between days 11 and 20 after onset of the disease. Concentrations of aztreonam in serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples obtained at 60, 90, 120, and 240 min after the third aztreonam dose were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The concentrations of aztreonam in cerebrospinal fluid ranged from 3.5 to 62 micrograms/ml, depending on the sampling time and the time elapsed since the onset of the disease. These concentrations were equal to or higher than the MICs for most of the gram-negative bacilli (including Pseudomonas aeruginosa). PMID:3717933

  16. Antibodies Against Equine Herpesvirus 1 in the Cerebrospinal Fluid in the Horse

    PubMed Central

    Blythe, Linda L.; Mattson, Donald E.; Lassen, E. Duane; Craig, A. Morrie

    1985-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies against equine herpesvirus 1 were measured in serum and cerebrospinal fluid of 16 horses and ponies from a closed herd both before and after vaccination with modified live equine herpesvirus 1. These titers were also measured in 22 neurologically normal and 15 neurologically abnormal horses at a teaching hospital. Animals from the closed herd had prevaccination serum titers up to 1:8 and postvaccination serum titers up to 1:128. Horses from the teaching hospital had serum titers up to 1:64. Cerebrospinal fluid titers were not detected in the vaccinated horses or the neurologically normal horses but a low titer (1:8) was noted in one neurologically abnormal horse. This titer probably resulted from hemorrhage into the cerebrospinal fluid following trauma. PMID:17422553

  17. A corny cause of cerebrospinal fluid ascites: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Hira; Abrams, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report a rare cause of cerebrospinal fluid ascites. Methods: A 37-year-old female with history of intracranial hypertension and a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was referred to liver clinic for evaluation of newly developed ascites. Results: Initially, the cause of ascites was thought to be secondary to a liver etiology. However, this was excluded after a comprehensive evaluation including portal pressure measurements. We determined the ascites to be infected cerebrospinal fluid secondary to a rare commensal organism, Corynebacterium non-Jeikeium, which resolved after removing ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, appropriate antibiotics and conversion to a ventriculo-atrial shunt. Conclusion: Cerebrospinal fluid ascites is a rare complication of VP shunts and since 1976 only 8 cases of Corynebacterium non jk VP shunt infections have been reported in the literature but none associated with ascites. Also this report highlights the beneficial role of transjugular portal pressure measurements in the evaluation of ascites. PMID:27489721

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    See Rabinovici (doi:10.1093/brain/aww025) for a scientific commentary on this article. Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET during preclinical stages of Alzheimer’s disease. We included 437 non-demented subjects from the prospective, longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. All underwent 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 analysis at baseline and at least one additional positron emission tomography after a mean follow-up of 2.1 years (range 1.1–4.4 years). Group classifications were based on normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography results at baseline. We found that cases with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and normal positron emission tomography at baseline accumulated amyloid with a mean rate of 1.2%/year, which was similar to the rate in cases with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (1.2%/year, P = 0.86). The mean accumulation rate of those with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid was more than three times that of those with both normal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (0.35%/year, P = 0.018). The group differences were similar when analysing yearly change in standardized uptake value ratio of florbetapir instead of percentage change. Those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography deteriorated more in memory and hippocampal volume compared with the other groups (P < 0.001), indicating that they were closer to Alzheimer’s disease dementia. The results were replicated after

  19. Human African trypanosomiasis: a latex agglutination field test for quantifying IgM in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Lejon, V.; Büscher, P.; Sema, N. H.; Magnus, E.; Van Meirvenne, N.

    1998-01-01

    LATEX/IgM, a rapid agglutination test for the semi-quantitative detection of IgM in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with African trypanosomiasis, is described in this article. The lyophilized reagent has been designed for field use and remains stable at 45 degrees C for one year. The test has been evaluated on cerebrospinal fluid samples from trypanosome-infected and non-infected patients, by comparison with commercial latex agglutination, radial immunodiffusion, and nephelometry. All test systems yielded similar results. PMID:10191550

  20. Severe dehydration and acute renal failure associated with external ventricular drainage of cerebrospinal fluid in children.

    PubMed

    Simpson, S; Yung, M; Slater, A

    2006-10-01

    We report three paediatric cases of severe dehydration and hyponatraemia with circulatory compromise associated with the use of external ventricular drainage of cerebrospinal fluid. Two of the children had cardiac arrests. All were successfully resuscitated. While there were additional factors that contributed to other fluid losses, and fluid balance data are incomplete, these cases highlight a need for increased vigilance when managing children with external ventricular drains. PMID:17061645

  1. [A Case of Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Associated with Cervical Spondylosis].

    PubMed

    Arai, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Hirohito; Shiomi, Ryoji; Tatsumi, Shotaro; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak and intracranial hypotension associated with cervical spondylosis have rarely been observed, and only a few cases are reported. A 69-year-old woman, previously treated for rectal and thyroid cancer, complained of a non-postural persistent headache. The patient regularly practiced aerobic exercise, but a month earlier she had started experiencing headache and neck pain while exercising. Computed tomography(CT)showed bilateral chronic subdural hematomas, and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)revealed diffuse dural enhancement and tonsillar herniation. We drained the subdural hematomas and replaced the ventricular reservoir to safely access the cerebrospinal fluid space. After surgery, the persistent headache disappeared for several days, but a postural headache emerged. CT myelogram showed extradural accumulation of the contrast medium at the C2-5 level with cervical spondylosis. The patient was treated with conservative therapy of bed rest and intravenous fluid hydration for two weeks, and the headache improved. CT myelogram after treatment showed no extradural accumulation of the contrast medium. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak associated with cervical spondylosis could be induced by the repeated minor mechanical stress caused by physical exercise. Therefore, the possibility that non-postural persistent headache may be caused by spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak should not be underestimated. PMID:27605479

  2. Post-traumatic headaches: a clinical overview.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; D'Onofrio, F; Conte, F; Petretta, V; Tedeschi, G; Tessitore, A

    2014-05-01

    Headache attributed to head and/or neck trauma or injury, the so-called post-traumatic headache (PTH), is the most common secondary headache disorder and one of the most controversial clinical entities in the headache field, due to its unclear pathophysiological mechanisms and the unsolved role of associated psychological and medico-legal aspects. PTH, as a significant cause of morbidity after traumatic brain injury, may occur as an isolated symptom or as one of a constellation of symptoms known as post-concussive syndrome. However, in many cases, PTH might also represent an accentuation of non-disabling, remote or infrequent pre-existing primary headaches rather than a new onset headache strictly related to the trauma. Recently, the International Classification of Headache Disorders attempted to classify PTH; however, many unsolved issues are still to be clarified. In this brief review, we will focus on PTH clinical aspects and diagnostic criteria. PMID:24867854

  3. Tribulin in post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J; Glover, V; Clow, A; Kudler, H; Meador, K; Sandler, M

    1988-11-01

    Tribulin (endogenous monoamine oxidase inhibitor/benzodiazepine receptor binding inhibitor) output was measured in the urine of 18 patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 13 controls. The level of the two inhibitory activities was highly significantly correlated in the group as a whole. There was no difference between output of either inhibitor in patients and controls. However, when the PTSD group was subdivided according to various psychometric ratings, a pattern of output did emerge. Levels of both inhibitory activities were higher in agitated compared with non-agitated subjects, and lower in extroverts compared with introverts. This finding supports the view that tribulin output is raised in conditions of greater arousal. PMID:3270828

  4. Letter to the editor: Identification of Sarcocystis capracanis in cerebrospinal fluid from sheep with neurological disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent report (Formisano et al., 2013) identified clinical sacrocystosis in 2 adult sheep. The diagnosis relied primarily on characterization of DNA extracted from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and paraffin-embedded heart tissue. Parasites identified as merozoites were identified in CSF smears stained...

  5. Extensive Recruitment of Plasma Blasts to the Cerebrospinal Fluid in Toscana Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, Lucas; Wölfel, Silke; Georgi, Enrico; Ploner, Markus; Bauer, Barbara; Hemmer, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    An unexpectedly extensive recruitment of B cells and plasma blasts to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a patient with Toscana virus (TOSV) encephalitis is described. Acute infection by TOSV was demonstrated by serological methods and by detection of TOSV-specific nucleic acid in the CSF by real-time polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. PMID:26393235

  6. Flow Cytometry To Assess Cerebrospinal Fluid Fungal Burden in Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Lisa M.; Schutz, Charlotte; Scriba, Thomas J.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Boulware, David R.; Meintjes, Graeme; Lalloo, David G.; Urban, Britta C.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal burden in the cerebrospinal fluid is an important determinant of mortality in cryptococcal meningitis, but its use in aiding clinical decision making is hampered by the time involved to perform quantitative cultures. Here, we demonstrate the potential of flow cytometry as a novel and rapid technique to address this issue. PMID:26719441

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of central catecholamine deficiency in Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Holmes, Courtney; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2012-06-01

    Central catecholamine deficiency characterizes α-synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that cerebrospinal fluid levels of neuronal metabolites of catecholamines provide neurochemical biomarkers of these disorders. To test this hypothesis we measured cerebrospinal fluid levels of catechols including dopamine, norepinephrine and their main respective neuronal metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydroxyphenylglycol in Parkinson's disease and two other synucleinopathies, multiple system atrophy and pure autonomic failure. Cerebrospinal fluid catechols were assayed in 146 subjects-108 synucleinopathy patients (34 Parkinson's disease, 54 multiple system atrophy, 20 pure autonomic failure) and 38 controls. In 14 patients cerebrospinal fluid was obtained before or within 2 years after the onset of parkinsonism. The Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and pure autonomic failure groups all had lower cerebrospinal fluid dihydroxyphenylacetic acid [0.86 ± 0.09 (SEM), 1.00 ± 0.09, 1.32 ± 0.12 nmol/l] than controls (2.15 ± 0.18 nmol/l; P < 0.0001; P < 0.0001; P = 0.0002). Dihydroxyphenylglycol was also lower in the three synucleinopathies (8.82 ± 0.44, 7.75 ± 0.42, 5.82 ± 0.65 nmol/l) than controls (11.0 ± 0.62 nmol/l; P = 0.009, P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001). Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid was lower and dihydroxyphenylglycol higher in Parkinson's disease than in pure autonomic failure. Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid was 100% sensitive at 89% specificity in separating patients with recent onset of parkinsonism from controls but was of no value in differentiating Parkinson's disease from multiple system atrophy. Synucleinopathies feature cerebrospinal fluid neurochemical evidence for central dopamine and norepinephrine deficiency. Parkinson's disease and pure autonomic failure involve differential dopaminergic versus noradrenergic lesions. Cerebrospinal fluid

  8. A Case of Post-Traumatic Meniere's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Juyong; Jung, Hahn Jin; Kim, Chong Sun

    2014-01-01

    There are only a few reports of post-traumatic Meniere's disease and there is few literature that contains detailed data associated with the disease. We report a case of post-traumatic Meniere's disease. He suffered from tinnitus, fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss, and recurrent vertigo. Symptomatic medical treatment was not helpful and neither was soft tissue plugging around the oval and round windows during exploratory tympanotomy. Three months after soft tissue plugging, endolymphatic sac decompression surgery was performed. The patient's symptoms improved markedly thereafter. The clinical significance of post-traumatic Meniere's disease is described and we present a brief review of the literature. PMID:24782951

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid-Cutaneous Fistula After Continuous Spinal Catheter in an Obstetric Patient.

    PubMed

    Lenart, Mark J; Carness, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    A 23-year-old woman at 41 weeks and 6 days estimated gestational age underwent continuous spinal analgesia for labor after a recognized, unintended dural puncture. Excellent analgesia was maintained throughout labor and vaginal delivery, the intrathecal catheter was left in situ for 24 hours postpartum, and the catheter was subsequently removed without apparent complication. On physical examination during her anesthesia postoperative visit, clear fluid was noted to be slowly draining from the catheter insertion site. Although she denied all symptoms associated with a dural puncture, including headache, a cerebrospinal fluid-cutaneous fistula was diagnosed. An epidural blood patch was placed, which terminated the cerebrospinal fluid leak. No long-term complications were evident. Subsequent literature review revealed a rare incidence of this type of complication and varied recommendations for intervention and optimal management. We review the literature with regard to this complication and offer discussion regarding the various suggested means of diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27580408

  10. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid regulates neuroepithelial survival, proliferation, and neurogenesis in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Gato, Angel; Moro, J A; Alonso, M I; Bueno, D; De La Mano, A; Martín, C

    2005-05-01

    Early in development, the behavior of neuroepithelial cells is controlled by several factors, which act in a developmentally regulated manner. Diffusible factors are secreted locally by the neuroepithelium itself, although other nearby structures may also be involved. Evidence suggests a physiological role for the cerebrospinal fluid in the development of the brain. Here, using organotypic cultures of chick embryo neuroepithelial explants from the mesencephalon, we show that the neuroepithelium in vitro is not able to self-induce cell survival, replication, and neurogenesis. We also show that the embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) promotes neuroepithelial stem cell survival and induces proliferation and neurogenesis in mesencephalic explants. These data strongly suggest that E-CSF is involved in the regulation of neuroepithelial cells behavior, supporting the hypothesis that this fluid plays a key role during the early development of the central nervous system. PMID:15803475

  11. Post-traumatic stress disorder and vision.

    PubMed

    Trachtman, Joseph N

    2010-05-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be defined as a memory linked with an unpleasant emotion that results in a spectrum of psychological and physical signs and symptoms. With the expectation of at least 300,000 postdeployment veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan having PTSD, optometrists will be faced with these patients' vision problems. Complicating the diagnosis of PTSD is some overlap with patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The estimated range of patients with TBI having PTSD varies from 17% to 40%, which has recently led the Federal government to fund research to better ascertain their relationship and differences. As a result of the sensory vision system's interconnections with the structures of the limbic system, blurry vision is a common symptom in PTSD patients. A detailed explanation is presented tracing the sensory vision pathways from the retina to the lateral geniculate body, visual cortex, fusiform gyrus, and the hypothalamus. The pathways from the superior colliculus and the limbic system to the eye are also described. Combining the understanding of the afferent and efferent fibers reveal both feedforward and feedback mechanisms mediated by nerve pathways and the neuropolypeptides. The role of the peptides in blurry vision is elaborated to provide an explanation as to the signs and symptoms of patients with PTSD. Although optometrists are not on the front line of mental health professionals to treat PTSD, they can provide the PTSD patients with an effective treatment for their vision disorders. PMID:20435270

  12. Relationships among Trait Resilience, Virtues, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, and Post-traumatic Growth.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wenjie; Guo, Pengfei; Gan, Pei

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the relationship between trait resilience and virtues in the context of trauma. A total of 537 participants who attended the preliminary investigation and completed the Life Events Checklist were screened. Of these participants, 142 suffered from personal traumatic experiences in the past year; these individuals were qualified and invited to respond to online questionnaires to assess trait resilience, virtues (i.e., Conscientiousness, Vitality, and Relationship), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and post-traumatic growth (PTG). The following questionnaires were used: Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale-Revised, Chinese Virtues Questionnaire, PTSD Checklist-Specific, and Post-traumatic Growth Inventory-Chinese. Only 95 participants who manifested self-reported PTSD symptoms and PTG were involved in the current analyses. Trauma was positively and significantly correlated with PTSD in the current sample. Results indicated that trait resilience was positively associated with virtues and PTG; by contrast, PTSD scores were negatively but not significantly related to most of these factors. The three virtues contributed to PTG to a greater extent than trait resilience in non-PTSD and PTSD groups. However, trait resilience remained a significant predictor in the PTSD group even when the three virtues were controlled. The relationship between trait resilience and PTG was moderated by PTSD type (non-PTSD group vs. PTSD group). Our results further suggested that trait resilience and virtues were conceptually related but functionally different constructs. Trait resilience and virtues are positively related; thus, these factors contributed variances to PTG in the context of trauma; however, trait resilience is only manifested when virtues are controlled and when individuals are diagnosed as PTSD. Furthermore, implications and limitations of this study are discussed. PMID:25932954

  13. Relationships among Trait Resilience, Virtues, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, and Post-traumatic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wenjie; Guo, Pengfei; Gan, Pei

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the relationship between trait resilience and virtues in the context of trauma. A total of 537 participants who attended the preliminary investigation and completed the Life Events Checklist were screened. Of these participants, 142 suffered from personal traumatic experiences in the past year; these individuals were qualified and invited to respond to online questionnaires to assess trait resilience, virtues (i.e., Conscientiousness, Vitality, and Relationship), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and post-traumatic growth (PTG). The following questionnaires were used: Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale-Revised, Chinese Virtues Questionnaire, PTSD Checklist-Specific, and Post-traumatic Growth Inventory-Chinese. Only 95 participants who manifested self-reported PTSD symptoms and PTG were involved in the current analyses. Trauma was positively and significantly correlated with PTSD in the current sample. Results indicated that trait resilience was positively associated with virtues and PTG; by contrast, PTSD scores were negatively but not significantly related to most of these factors. The three virtues contributed to PTG to a greater extent than trait resilience in non-PTSD and PTSD groups. However, trait resilience remained a significant predictor in the PTSD group even when the three virtues were controlled. The relationship between trait resilience and PTG was moderated by PTSD type (non-PTSD group vs. PTSD group). Our results further suggested that trait resilience and virtues were conceptually related but functionally different constructs. Trait resilience and virtues are positively related; thus, these factors contributed variances to PTG in the context of trauma; however, trait resilience is only manifested when virtues are controlled and when individuals are diagnosed as PTSD. Furthermore, implications and limitations of this study are discussed. PMID:25932954

  14. Antibody and Viral Nucleic Acid Testing of Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Eastern Equine Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, David C.; Howard, John J.; Oliver, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis diagnostic serum antibody can appear 6 days after the onset of symptoms, and its numbers can increase 4-fold in 4 days, arguing for early and frequent serum testing. In populations where cerebrospinal fluid viral nucleic acid testing sensitivity and specificity remain undetermined, cerebrospinal antibody testing should also be performed. PMID:26063852

  15. Effect of methylprednisolone on entry of ampicillin and gentamicin into cerebrospinal fluid in experimental pneumococcal and Escherichia coli meningitis.

    PubMed

    Scheld, W M; Brodeur, J P

    1983-01-01

    The influence of methylprednisolone on the passage of ampicillin and gentamicin into and activity within cerebrospinal fluid was examined in two models of experimental meningitis. Steroid pretreatment reduced the concentrations of these drugs in purulent cerebrospinal fluid of rabbits with experimental pneumococcal and Escherichia coli meningitis (P less than 0.05). However, the resultant mean concentrations of these antibiotics in cerebrospinal fluid still exceeded the minimal bactericidal concentrations of the infecting organisms. The rate of bactericidal effect in vivo was unaffected by steroid therapy in each model. Methylprednisolone did not have deleterious effects on the course of treated experimental meningitis under these short-term (24-h) experiments. PMID:6338816

  16. The relationship between cerebrospinal fluid markers of Alzheimer pathology and positron emission tomography tau imaging.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Brian A; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brier, Matthew; Blazey, Tyler; Su, Yi; Christensen, Jon; Aldea, Patricia; McConathy, Jonathan; Holtzman, David M; Cairns, Nigel J; Morris, John C; Fagan, Anne M; Ances, Beau M; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-08-01

    The two primary molecular pathologies in Alzheimer's disease are amyloid-β plaques and tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles. Investigations into these pathologies have been restricted to cerebrospinal fluid assays, and positron emission tomography tracers that can image amyloid-β plaques. Tau tracers have recently been introduced into the field, although the utility of the tracer and its relationship to other Alzheimer biomarkers are still unknown. Here we examined tau deposition in 41 cognitively normal and 11 cognitively impaired older adults using the radioactive tau ligand (18)F-AV-1451 (previously known as T807) who also underwent a lumbar puncture to assess cerebrospinal fluid levels of total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181) and amyloid-β42 Voxel-wise statistical analyses examined spatial patterns of tau deposition associated with cognitive impairment. We then related the amount of tau tracer uptake to levels of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. All analyses controlled for age and gender and, when appropriate, the time between imaging and lumbar puncture assessments. Symptomatic individuals (Clinical Dementia Rating > 0) demonstrated markedly increased levels of tau tracer uptake. This elevation was most prominent in the temporal lobe and temporoparietal junction, but extended more broadly into parietal and frontal cortices. In the entire cohort, there were significant relationships among all cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and tracer uptake, notably for tau-related cerebrospinal fluid markers. After controlling for levels of amyloid-β42, the correlations with tau uptake were r = 0.490 (P < 0.001) for t-tau and r = 0.492 (P < 0.001) for p-tau181 Within the cognitively normal cohort, levels of amyloid-β42, but not t-tau or p-tau181, were associated with elevated tracer binding that was confined primarily to the medial temporal lobe and adjacent neocortical regions. AV-1451 tau binding in the medial temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices

  17. Update on the management of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Duncan; Cooper, John

    2015-04-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder occurs in people exposed to life-threatening trauma. GPs may be seeing more patients with post-traumatic stress disorder as military personnel return from overseas deployments. The condition can present in various ways. To reduce the likelihood of missed or delayed diagnosis GPs can screen at-risk populations. A comprehensive assessment is recommended. Specialist referral may be required, particularly if there are other mental health problems. Trauma-focused psychological therapies should be offered as the first line of treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. Usually 8-12 sessions are needed for a therapeutic effect. If drug treatment is needed, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the first line. Other drugs used in post-traumatic stress disorder include antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and prazosin. PMID:26648617

  18. Update on the management of post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Duncan; Cooper, John

    2015-01-01

    Summary Post-traumatic stress disorder occurs in people exposed to life-threatening trauma. GPs may be seeing more patients with post-traumatic stress disorder as military personnel return from overseas deployments. The condition can present in various ways. To reduce the likelihood of missed or delayed diagnosis GPs can screen at-risk populations. A comprehensive assessment is recommended. Specialist referral may be required, particularly if there are other mental health problems. Trauma-focused psychological therapies should be offered as the first line of treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. Usually 8–12 sessions are needed for a therapeutic effect. If drug treatment is needed, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the first line. Other drugs used in post-traumatic stress disorder include antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and prazosin. PMID:26648617

  19. Primary Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks and Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Mario A.; Bialer, Omer Y.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is increasingly recognized as a cause of spontaneous cerebrospinal (CSF) leak in the ENT and neurosurgical literature. The diagnosis of IIH in patients with spontaneous CSF leaks is classically made a few weeks after surgical repair of the CSF leak when symptoms and signs of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) appear. Methods Case reports and literature review. Two young obese women developed spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea related to an empty sella in one, and a cribriform plate encephalocele in the other. Both patients underwent surgical repair of the CSF leak. A few weeks later, they developed chronic headaches and bilateral papilledema. Lumbar punctures showed elevated CSF-opening pressures with normal CSF contents, with temporary improvement of headaches. A man with a three-year history of untreated IIH developed spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea. He experienced improvement of his headaches and papilledema after a CSF shunting procedure, and the rhinorrhea resolved after endoscopic repair of the leak. Results These cases and the literature review confirm a definite association between IIH and spontaneous CSF leak based on: 1) similar demographics; 2) increased ICP in some patients with spontaneous CSF leak after leak repair; 3) higher rate of leak recurrence in patients with raised ICP; 4) patients with intracranial hypertension secondary to tumors may develop CSF leak, confirming that raised ICP from other causes than IIH can cause CSF leak. Conclusions CSF leak may occasionally keep IIH patients symptom-free; however, classic symptoms and signs of intracranial hypertension may develop after the CSF leak is repaired, exposing these patients to a high risk of recurrence of the leak unless an ICP-lowering intervention is performed. PMID:24042170

  20. EMDR for post-traumatic stress and other psychological trauma.

    PubMed

    Norgate, Kath

    Eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) is a powerful psychotherapy with well-researched benefits for adults and children who are experiencing post-traumatic stress and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is a wealth of research and practice-based evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of EMDR in many differing clinical presentations but the true potential of this extraordinarily beneficial therapeutic approach has not been fully embraced by the mental health nursing profession. PMID:23243806

  1. Penetration of doxycycline into cerebrospinal fluid in patients treated for suspected Lyme neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Dotevall, L; Hagberg, L

    1989-01-01

    Twelve patients were treated orally with 100 mg of doxycycline twice a day (b.i.d.) and 10 patients were treated with 200 mg b.i.d. for suspected tick-borne neuroborreliosis (Lyme borreliosis). At 5 to 8 days after the start of therapy, the mean concentrations in serum were 4.7 micrograms/ml for the doxycycline dose of 100 mg b.i.d. and 7.5 micrograms/ml for 200 mg b.i.d., 2 to 3 h after the last drug administration. The corresponding levels for cerebrospinal fluid were 0.6 and 1.1 micrograms/ml. Since a doxycycline concentration in cerebrospinal fluid above the estimated MIC for Borrelia burgdorferi (0.6 to 0.7 microgram/ml) is wanted in patients treated for severe neuroborreliosis, the higher dose is preferable. PMID:2782858

  2. An improved dinitrosalicylic acid method for determining blood and cerebrospinal fluid sugar levels.

    PubMed

    MOHUN, A F; COOK, I J

    1962-03-01

    A development of a technique for estimating sugar in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, etc., is described, using 3:5-dinitrosalicylic acid (D.N.S.A.) originally introduced by Sumner (1921). Results can be obtained in less than 10 minutes if required. The method is well suited to the estimation of random blood sugars and the handling of diabetic clinic requirements in hospital laboratories. The reagents are cheap, stable, and easily prepared. The results are very close to true glucose values in blood and cerebrospinal fluid. The technique has justified its existence in a busy clinical laboratory on the grounds of simplicity and rapidity, and is sufficiently precise for all ordinary work. PMID:14475095

  3. Soluble Megalin is Reduced in Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples of Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Spuch, Carlos; Antequera, Desireé; Pascual, Consuelo; Abilleira, Soledad; Blanco, María; Moreno-Carretero, María José; Romero-López, Jesús; Ishida, Tetsuya; Molina, Jose Antonio; Villarejo, Alberto; Bermejo-Pareja, Felix; Carro, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Megalin or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD) by clearing brain amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) across the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier at the choroid plexus. Here, we found a soluble form of megalin secreted from choroid plexus epithelial cells. Soluble megalin levels were also localized in the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), being reduced in AD patients. We have also shown that soluble megalin binding to Aβ is decreased in the CSF of AD patients, suggesting that decreased sequestration of Aβ in the CSF could be associated with defective clearance of Aβ and an increase of brain Aβ levels. Thus, therapies, which increase megalin expression, at the choroid plexus and/or enhance circulating soluble megalin hold potential to control brain Aβ-related pathologies in AD. PMID:25926771

  4. Soluble Megalin is Reduced in Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples of Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spuch, Carlos; Antequera, Desireé; Pascual, Consuelo; Abilleira, Soledad; Blanco, María; Moreno-Carretero, María José; Romero-López, Jesús; Ishida, Tetsuya; Molina, Jose Antonio; Villarejo, Alberto; Bermejo-Pareja, Felix; Carro, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Megalin or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by clearing brain amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) across the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier at the choroid plexus. Here, we found a soluble form of megalin secreted from choroid plexus epithelial cells. Soluble megalin levels were also localized in the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), being reduced in AD patients. We have also shown that soluble megalin binding to Aβ is decreased in the CSF of AD patients, suggesting that decreased sequestration of Aβ in the CSF could be associated with defective clearance of Aβ and an increase of brain Aβ levels. Thus, therapies, which increase megalin expression, at the choroid plexus and/or enhance circulating soluble megalin hold potential to control brain Aβ-related pathologies in AD. PMID:25926771

  5. Cytokine network analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hornig, M; Gottschalk, G; Peterson, D L; Knox, K K; Schultz, A F; Eddy, M L; Che, X; Lipkin, W I

    2016-02-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome is an unexplained debilitating disorder that is frequently associated with cognitive and motor dysfunction. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid from 32 cases, 40 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 19 normal subjects frequency-matched for age and sex using a 51-plex cytokine assay. Group-specific differences were found for the majority of analytes with an increase in cases of CCL11 (eotaxin), a chemokine involved in eosinophil recruitment. Network analysis revealed an inverse relationship between interleukin 1 receptor antagonist and colony-stimulating factor 1, colony-stimulating factor 2 and interleukin 17F, without effects on interleukin 1α or interleukin 1β, suggesting a disturbance in interleukin 1 signaling. Our results indicate a markedly disturbed immune signature in the cerebrospinal fluid of cases that is consistent with immune activation in the central nervous system, and a shift toward an allergic or T helper type-2 pattern associated with autoimmunity. PMID:25824300

  6. Post-traumatic stress disorder: evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Chris

    2009-11-01

    Fear is the key emotion of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Fear's evolved function is motivating survival via defensive behaviours. Defensive behaviours have been highly conserved throughout mammalian species; hence much may be learned from ethology. Predation pressure drove the early evolution of defences, laying foundations in the more ancient brain structures. Conspecific (same species) pressure has been a more recent evolutionary influence, but along with environmental threats it has dominated PTSD research. Anti-predator responses involve both avoiding a predator's sensory field and avoiding detection if within it, as well as escape behaviours. More effective avoidance results in less need for escape behaviours, suggesting that avoidance is biologically distinct from flight. Recognizing the predation, environmental and conspecific origins of defence may result in clearer definition of PTSD phenomena. Defence can also be viewed in the stages of no threat, potential threat, encounter and circa strike. Specific defences are used sequentially and according to contexts, loosely in the order: avoidance, attentive immobility, withdrawal, aggressive defence, appeasement and tonic immobility. The DSM-IV criteria and PTSD research show substantial congruence with the model proposed: that PTSD is a disorder of heightened defence involving six key defences used in conjunction with vigilance and risk assessment according to contexts. Human research is reviewed in this respect with reference to laboratory and wild animal observations providing new insights. Understanding individual perceptual issues (e.g. predictability and controllability) relevant to these phenomena, combined with defence strategy recalibration and neuronal plasticity research goes some way to explaining why some traumatized individuals develop PTSD when others do not. PMID:20001399

  7. Mortality in late post-traumatic seizures.

    PubMed

    Englander, Jeffrey; Bushnik, Tamara; Wright, Jerry M; Jamison, Laura; Duong, Thao T

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the mortality rates in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) who were classified as having experienced late post-traumatic seizures (LPTS) in the first 2 years post-TBI compared to those who were seizure-free (non-LPTS). Participants were a pooled sample (n = 508) from two studies which enrolled individuals with TBI who were injured between March 31, 1992 and December 20, 1999. The first sample was made up of individuals enrolled in a study of risk factors for LPTS development; the second sample was composed of individuals enrolled in the TBI National Database from a single rehabilitation center. Seventy-one (14%) participants had LPTS, of which 27% had died at 8-15 years post-injury, as compared to 10% of non-LPTS participants. Individuals with LPTS died at a younger age (54.1 versus 67.7 years; p = 0.01), but there were no statistically significant differences in either time from date of injury to death or highest GCS score in the first 24 h. Causes of death were variable and not specifically related to epilepsy. Of those with LPTS, risk factors for death include advanced age at time of injury and presence of subdural hematoma. The higher mortality rate and death at younger age with variable causes in TBI individuals with LPTS warrant close medical evaluation and monitoring of these individuals, particularly accessibility and compliance with ongoing general medical care, and education of primary care colleagues of the unique needs of this at-risk population. PMID:19508123

  8. Monoamine metabolite concentrations in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid of patients with histologically verified Alzheimer's dementia.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, A M; Sims, N R; Bowen, D M; Neary, D; Palo, J; Wikstrom, J; Davison, A N

    1984-01-01

    Concentrations of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), 5-hydroxy indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were determined in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from control subjects and patients of both presenile and senile age with histologically verified Alzheimer's dementia. CSF HVA increased with age in control but not in Alzheimer patients. HVA and 5-HIAA in the CSF of presenile Alzheimer patients was lower than that of age matched control subjects. PMID:6204017

  9. Breast Capsular Cerebrospinal Fluid Collection from Migration of a Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, William J.; Kamali, Parisa; Chun, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Summary: In this case report we have described an unusual complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt migration into a breast implant capsule. The patient was appropriately diagnosed with computed tomographic imaging and successfully managed with shunt revision and cerebrospinal fluid aspiration. Given the high complication profile of ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheters, this case suggests an opportunity for improved perioperative communication between plastic surgeons and neurosurgeons in patients with breast implants. Coordination regarding the subcutaneous catheter tunneling may hopefully minimize the risk of this complication. PMID:27257570

  10. Tension pneumocephalus complicating ventriculoperitoneal shunt for cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea: case report.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, K; Nakano, M; Tani, E

    1978-04-01

    A case of spontaneous nontraumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea secondary to aqueductal stenosis is reported. The patient required direct repair of the fistula after the insertion of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for aqueductal stenosis. We emphasise an unusual complication of tension pneumocephalus in a case where the shunt patency had been substantiated. Intracranial pressure fall due to the siphon effect in the ventriculoperitoneal shunt tubing in the erect position might be responsible for ingress of an excessive amount of air. PMID:650239

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in parkinsonian conditions: an update and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Magdalinou, Nadia; Lees, Andrew J; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonian diseases comprise a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders, which show significant clinical and pathological overlap. Accurate diagnosis still largely relies on clinical acumen; pathological diagnosis remains the gold standard. There is an urgent need for biomarkers to diagnose parkinsonian disorders, particularly in the early stages when diagnosis is most difficult. In this review, several of the most promising cerebrospinal fluid candidate markers will be discussed. Their strengths and limitations will be considered together with future developments in the field. PMID:24691581

  12. [Simultaneous diagnosis of pseudomeningocele, tethered cord syndrome and cerebrospinal fluid fistula: Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Quillo-Olvera, Javier; Zambrano-Velarde, Luis E; Velázquez-Santana, Héctor; Gutiérrez-Partida, Carlos F; Velázquez-García, Francisco; Alcántara-Gómez, Leopoldo A

    2016-01-01

    The clinical case is presented on a patient with an extensive sacral dysraphism, a history of myelomeningocele surgical repair in her childhood, as well as tethered cord syndrome. The patient was also diagnosed with pseudomeningocele and a cerebrospinal fluid cutaneous fístula. A surgical approach was used, with encouraging results being obtained in the clinical outcome of the patient. A review of the literature was performed to support the surgical decision in this case. PMID:26936617

  13. Fistula of stapes footplate caused by pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid in inner ear malformation.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, F; Hagen, R; Hofmann, E

    1997-01-01

    Congenital malformations of the inner ear are well described, though the combination with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks remains controversial. In this paper a case of a bilateral Mondini malformation with a CSF otorrhea on one side is reported. The malformed stapes contains a perforation in the middle of the footplate and associated thinning analogous to a pothole in a mountain stream. The histological findings support the hypothesis of pulsatile flow of CSF as origin of the perforation of the footplate. PMID:9166882

  14. Development of a theoretical framework for analyzing cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Benjamin; Voorhees, Abram; Vedel, Søren; Wei, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Background To date hydrocephalus researchers acknowledge the need for rigorous but utilitarian fluid mechanics understanding and methodologies in studying normal and hydrocephalic intracranial dynamics. Pressure volume models and electric circuit analogs introduced pressure into volume conservation; but control volume analysis enforces independent conditions on pressure and volume. Previously, utilization of clinical measurements has been limited to understanding of the relative amplitude and timing of flow, volume and pressure waveforms; qualitative approaches without a clear framework for meaningful quantitative comparison. Methods Control volume analysis is presented to introduce the reader to the theoretical background of this foundational fluid mechanics technique for application to general control volumes. This approach is able to directly incorporate the diverse measurements obtained by clinicians to better elucidate intracranial dynamics and progression to disorder. Results Several examples of meaningful intracranial control volumes and the particular measurement sets needed for the analysis are discussed. Conclusion Control volume analysis provides a framework to guide the type and location of measurements and also a way to interpret the resulting data within a fundamental fluid physics analysis. PMID:19772652

  15. Differential proteomics analysis of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lifei; Wang, Dongtao; Wang, Lihong; Lan, Wenjie; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one common neurodegenerative disease featured with degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. Multiple factors participate in the pathogenesis and progression of PD. In this study, we investigated the proteomics profiles of mononuclear cells in cerebrospinal fluids from both PD patients and normal people, in order to explore the correlation between disease factors and PD. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from both PD and normal people and were separated for mononuclear cells in vitro. Proteins were then extracted and separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins with differential expressions were identified by comparison to standard proteome expression profile map, followed by software and database analysis. In PD patients, there were 8 proteins with consistent expression profile and 16 proteins with differential expressions. Those differential proteins identified include cytoskeleton proteins (actin, myosin), signal transduction proteins (adenosine cyclase binding protein 1, calcium binding protein, talin) and anti-oxidation factor (thioredoxin peroxide reductase). PD patients had differential protein expressional profiles in the mononuclear cells of cerebrospinal fluids compared to normal people, suggesting the potential involvement of cytoskeleton and signal transduction proteins in apoptosis of neuronal apoptosis and PD pathogenesis. PMID:26823915

  16. Strain-dependent disruption of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier by Streptoccocus suis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Tobias; Adam, Rüdiger; Eggelnpöhler, Ingo; Matalon, David; Seibt, Annette; K Novotny, Gerd E; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Schroten, Horst

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus suis capsular type 2 is an important agent of diseases including meningitis among pigs worldwide, and is also a zoonotic agent. The barrier function of the choroid plexus epithelium that constitutes the structural basis for the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier has not been elucidated yet in bacterial meningitis. We investigated the influence of various S. suis isolates on the barrier function of cultured porcine choroid plexus epithelial cells with respect to the transepithelial resistance and paracellular [(3)H]-mannitol flux. Preferentially apical application of S. suis isolates significantly decreased transepithelial resistance and significantly increased paracellular [(3)H]-mannitol flux in a time-, dose- and strain-dependent manner. Viable S. suis isolates caused cytotoxicity determined by lactate dehydrogenase assay and electron microscopy, whereas S. suis sonicates and UV-inactivated S. suis did not cause cytotoxicity. The observed effects on porcine choroid plexus epithelial cells barrier function could not exclusively be ascribed to known virulence factors of S. suis such as suilysin. In conclusion, S. suis isolates induce loss of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function in an in vitro model. Thus, S. suis may facilitate trafficking of bacteria and leucocytes across the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. The underlying mechanisms for the barrier breakdown have yet to be determined. PMID:15780575

  17. Radioimmunoassay of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Engbaek, F.; Voldby, B

    1982-04-01

    A direct radioimmunoassay is described for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in cerebrospinal fluid, platelet-poor plasma, and serum. Antisera in rabbits was raised against serotonin diazotized to a conjugate of bovine albumin and D,L-p-aminophenylalanine. Polyethylene glycol, alone or in combination with anti-rabbit immunoglobulins, is used to separate bound and unbound tritiated serotonin. The minimum concentration of serotonin detectable is 2 nmol/L in a 200-..mu..L sample. Within-day precision (CV) is 4.3% between-day precision 7.7%. Analytical recoveries of serotonin are 109% and 101% for cerebrospinal fluid and plasma, respectively. Tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol do not interfere with the assay. However, 5-methoxytryptamine and tryptamine cross react. Of samples of cerebrospinal fluid from patients with disc herniations (n=21) or low-pressure hydrocephalus (n=10), one-third had concentrations of 2-4 nmol/L and two-thirds were below the minimum detectable concentration. The observed range for the concentration of serotonin in plasma of 14 normal subjects was 5-14 nmol/L (mean +/- SD, 9 +/- 3 nmol/L). The observed ranges for serotonin in serum were: for 10 women 520-900 (mean +/- SD: 695 +/- 110) nmol/L and for 10 men 380-680 (520 +/- 94) nmol/L.

  18. [Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak may cause intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Ingelise

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is often misinterpreted as migraine or tension headache. This type of headache is, however, orthostatic and resolves in supine position. CT scan/MRI of the brain has characteristic findings, enhancement of the pachymeninges and bilateral hygroma. An extreme situation of a 70-year-old woman with sagging midbrain is described in this case report. Although this type of headache may be caused by a dural fistula with spinal fluid leak it is not necessary to locate the lesion with myelografi/MR. Timely treatment with an epidural blood patch at any lumbal level could prevent potentially life-threatening complications and the headache resolved within hours/few days. PMID:25557447

  19. Application of Control Volume Analysis to Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Cohen, Benjamin; Anor, Tomer; Madsen, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is among the most common birth defects and may not be prevented nor cured. Afflicted individuals face serious issues, which at present are too complicated and not well enough understood to treat via systematic therapies. This talk outlines the framework and application of a control volume methodology to clinical Phase Contrast MRI data. Specifically, integral control volume analysis utilizes a fundamental, fluid dynamics methodology to quantify intracranial dynamics within a precise, direct, and physically meaningful framework. A chronically shunted, hydrocephalic patient in need of a revision procedure was used as an in vivo case study. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements within the patient's aqueduct were obtained in four biomedical state and were analyzed using the methods presented in this dissertation. Pressure force estimates were obtained, showing distinct differences in amplitude, phase, and waveform shape for different intracranial states within the same individual. Thoughts on the physiological and diagnostic research and development implications/opportunities will be presented.

  20. Coupling poroelasticity and CFD for cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tully, Brett; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2009-06-01

    This research uses a novel coupling of poroelastic theory and computational fluid dynamics to investigate acute hydrocephalus resulting from stenosis of the cerebral aqueduct. By coupling poroelastic theory with a multidimensional simulation of the cerebral aqueduct we are able to investigate, for the first time, the impact of physically relevant stenosis patterns on ventricular enlargement, accounting for the nonintuitive long time history responses of the ventricular system. Preliminary findings demonstrate clearly the importance that the fluidic-poroelastic coupling plays: ventricular enlargement is significantly smaller with local stenosis patterns and almost all of the observable pressure drop occurs across the stenosis. Short timescale effects [O(heartbeat)] are explored and their contribution to the long timescales interrogated. PMID:19304478

  1. Development and functions of the choroid plexus–cerebrospinal fluid system

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Melody P.; Monuki, Edwin S.; Lehtinen, Maria K.

    2015-01-01

    The choroid plexus (ChP) is the principal source of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which has accepted roles as a fluid cushion and a sink for nervous system waste in vertebrates. Various animal models have provided insight into how the ChP–CSF system develops and matures. In addition, recent studies have uncovered new, active roles for this dynamic system in the regulation of neural stem cells, critical periods and the overall health of the nervous system. Together, these findings have brought about a paradigm shift in our understanding of brain development and health, and have stimulated new initiatives for the treatment of neurological disease. PMID:26174708

  2. EDA-containing fibronectin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pupek, Małgorzata; Jasonek, Jolanta; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Fibronectin containing an alternatively spliced extra domain A (EDA-FN) participates in diverse biological cell functions, being also directly or indirectly engaged during an inflammatory response to brain injury and/or neuron regeneration. We analyzed FN and EDA-FN isoform levels by ELISA in 85 cerebrospinal fluid samples and 67 plasma samples obtained from children suffering from bacterial or viral meningitis and non-meningitis peripheral inflammation. We have found that the cerebrospinal level of EDA-FN was significantly lower in the bacterial meningitis group than in the viral- and non-meningitis groups. In the patients' plasma, EDA-FN was almost undetectable. The determination of fibronectin containing the EDA segment might be considered as an additional diagnostic marker of bacterial meningitis in children. PMID:23884219

  3. Meningeal haemorrhage secondary to cerebrospinal fluid drainage during thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Mancio, Jennifer; Pires-Morais, Gustavo; Bettencourt, Nuno; Oliveira, Marco; Santos, Lino; Melica, Bruno; Rodrigues, Alberto; Braga, José Pedro; Ribeiro, Vasco Gama

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has shown lower mortality compared with open surgical repair (OSR). However, the risk of spinal cord ischaemia (SCI) remains similar than OSR. As a prophylactic measure to reduce the risk of SCI, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage has been widely used in OSR. In TEVAR, the utility of this adjunct is still controversial. We report a case of a 56-year-old man referred for TEVAR for a descending thoracic aneurysm that previously underwent an abdominal aneurysmectomy with aortobifemoral bypass graft. On the day before, a lumbar cerebrospinal drain was placed prophylactically. Forty-eight hours after the procedure, meningeal symptoms without neurological deficits developed. Clinical investigation revealed meningeal haemorrhage. Therapy with nimodipine was initiated with symptomatic relief. Evidence from randomized controlled trials supporting the role of CSF drainage in TEVAR is still lacking. We discuss the current recommendations, potential benefits and risks and cautions associated with CSF drainage in TEVAR. PMID:25988028

  4. Ganaxolone improves behavioral deficits in a mouse model of post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pinna, Graziano; Rasmusson, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Allopregnanolone and its equipotent stereoisomer, pregnanolone (together termed ALLO), are neuroactive steroids that positively and allosterically modulate the action of gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) at GABAA receptors. Levels of ALLO are reduced in the cerebrospinal fluid of female premenopausal patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a severe, neuropsychiatric condition that affects millions, yet is without a consistently effective therapy. This suggests that restoring downregulated brain ALLO levels in PTSD may be beneficial. ALLO biosynthesis is also decreased in association with the emergence of PTSD-like behaviors in socially isolated (SI) mice. Similar to PTSD patients, SI mice also exhibit changes in the frontocortical and hippocampal expression of GABAA receptor subunits, resulting in resistance to benzodiazepine-mediated sedation and anxiolysis. ALLO acts at a larger spectrum of GABAA receptor subunits than benzodiazepines, and increasing corticolimbic ALLO levels in SI mice by injecting ALLO or stimulating ALLO biosynthesis with a selective brain steroidogenic stimulant, such as S-norfluoxetine, at doses far below those that block serotonin reuptake, reduces PTSD-like behavior in these mice. This suggests that synthetic analogs of ALLO, such as ganaxolone, may also improve anxiety, aggression, and other PTSD-like behaviors in the SI mouse model. Consistent with this hypothesis, ganaxolone (3.75–30 mg/kg, s.c.) injected 60 min before testing of SI mice, induced a dose-dependent reduction in aggression toward a same-sex intruder and anxiety-like behavior in an elevated plus maze. The EC50 dose of ganaxolone used in these tests also normalized exaggerated contextual fear conditioning and, remarkably, enhanced fear extinction retention in SI mice. At these doses, ganaxolone failed to change locomotion in an open field test. Therefore, unlike benzodiazepines, ganaxolone at non-sedating concentrations appears to improve dysfunctional emotional

  5. Samuel Pepys and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Daly, R J

    1983-07-01

    Samuel Pepys's diary allows us an opportunity to see how a man of acknowledged ability and stability coped with the severe psychological trauma of being involved in the Great Fire of London in 1666. His self-monitoring provides an excellent record of the development of post-traumatic stress disorder and an account of his coping behaviour. Despite being one of the newest categories of mental disorder in the official nomenclature, post-traumatic stress disorder has obviously had a long existence. PMID:6349738

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage and headache after lumbar puncture: a prospective non-invasive imaging study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yen-Feng; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Chen, Shih-Pin; Hseu, Shu-Shya; Wu, Jaw-Ching; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2015-06-01

    The spatial distribution and clinical correlation of cerebrospinal fluid leakage after lumbar puncture have not been determined. Adult in-patients receiving diagnostic lumbar punctures were recruited prospectively. Whole-spine heavily T2-weighted magnetic resonance myelography was carried out to characterize post-lumbar puncture spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakages. Maximum rostral migration was defined as the distance between the most rostral spinal segment with cerebrospinal fluid leakage and the level of lumbar puncture. Eighty patients (51 female/29 male, mean age 49.4 ± 13.3 years) completed the study, including 23 (28.8%) with post-dural puncture headache. Overall, 63.6% of periradicular leaks and 46.9% of epidural collections were within three vertebral segments of the level of lumbar puncture (T12-S1). Post-dural puncture headache was associated with more extensive and more rostral distributions of periradicular leaks (length 3.0 ± 2.5 versus 0.9 ± 1.9 segments, P = 0.001; maximum rostral migration 4.3 ± 4.7 versus 0.8 ± 1.7 segments, P = 0.002) and epidural collections (length 5.3 ± 6.1 versus 1.0 ± 2.1 segments, P = 0.003; maximum rostral migration 4.7 ± 6.7 versus 0.9 ± 2.4 segments, P = 0.015). In conclusion, post-dural puncture headache was associated with more extensive and more rostral distributions of periradicular leaks and epidural collections. Further, visualization of periradicular leaks was not restricted to the level of dural defect, although two-thirds remained within the neighbouring segments. PMID:25688077

  7. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypernatremia Elevates Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Blood Pressure via the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Sean D; Lang, Susan M; Simmonds, Sarah S; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2015-12-01

    Elevated NaCl concentrations of the cerebrospinal fluid increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in salt-sensitive hypertension. Neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in the regulation of SNA and receive mono- or polysynaptic inputs from several hypothalamic structures responsive to hypernatremia. Therefore, the present study investigated the contribution of RVLM neurons to the SNA and pressor response to cerebrospinal fluid hypernatremia. Lateral ventricle infusion of 0.15 mol/L, 0.6 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L NaCl (5 µL/10 minutes) produced concentration-dependent increases in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure, despite no change in splanchnic SNA and a decrease in renal SNA. Ganglionic blockade with chlorisondamine or acute lesion of the lamina terminalis blocked or significantly attenuated these responses, respectively. RVLM microinjection of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) agonist muscimol abolished the sympathoexcitatory response to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl. Furthermore, blockade of ionotropic glutamate, but not angiotensin II type 1, receptors significantly attenuated the increase in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure. Finally, single-unit recordings of spinally projecting RVLM neurons revealed 3 distinct populations based on discharge responses to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl: type I excited (46%; 11/24), type II inhibited (37%; 9/24), and type III no change (17%; 4/24). All neurons with slow conduction velocities were type I cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that acute increases in cerebrospinal fluid NaCl concentrations selectively activate a discrete population of RVLM neurons through glutamate receptor activation to increase SNA and arterial blood pressure. PMID:26416846

  8. Neuroactive steroid levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of male multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Donatella; Melis, Marta; Fenu, Giuseppe; Giatti, Silvia; Romano, Simone; Grimoldi, Maria; Crippa, Donatella; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Cavaletti, Guido; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo

    2014-08-01

    Neuroactive steroid family includes molecules synthesized in peripheral glands (i.e., hormonal steroids) and directly in the nervous system (i.e., neurosteroids) which are key regulators of the nervous function. As already reported in clinical and experimental studies, neurodegenerative diseases affect the levels of neuroactive steroids. However, a careful analysis comparing the levels of these molecules in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in plasma of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is still missing. To this aim, the levels of neuroactive steroids were evaluated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in CSF and plasma of male adults affected by Relapsing-Remitting MS and compared with those collected in control patients. An increase in pregnenolone and isopregnanolone levels associated with a decrease in progesterone metabolites, dihydroprogesterone, and tetrahydroprogesterone was observed in CSF of MS patients. Moreover, an increase of 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol and of 17β-estradiol levels associated with a decrease of dihydrotestosterone also occurred. In plasma, an increase in pregnenolone, progesterone, and dihydrotestosterone and a decrease in dihydroprogesterone and tetrahydroprogesterone levels were reported. This study shows for the first time that the levels of several neuroactive steroids, and particularly those of progesterone and testosterone metabolites, are deeply affected in CSF of relapsing-remitting MS male patients. We here demonstrated that, the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma levels of several neuroactive steroids are modified in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis male patients. Interestingly, we reported for the first time that, the levels of progesterone and testosterone metabolites are deeply affected in cerebrospinal fluid. These findings may have an important relevance in therapeutic and/or diagnostic field of multiple sclerosis. PMID:24766130

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum cytokine profiles in narcolepsy with cataplexy: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jaussent, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Scholz, Sabine; Bayard, Sophie; Cristol, Jean Paul; Blain, Hubert; Dupuy, Anne-Marie

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide strong support that narcolepsy-cataplexy is an immune-mediated disease. Only few serum cytokine studies with controversial results were performed in narcolepsy and none in the cerebrospinal fluid. We measured a panel of 12 cytokines by a proteomic approach in the serum of 35 patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to 156 healthy controls, and in the cerebrospinal fluid of 34 patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to 17 non-narcoleptic patients; and analyzed the effect of age, duration and severity of disease on the cytokine levels. After multiple adjustments we reported lower serum IL-2, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1 and EGF levels, and a tendency for higher IL-4 level in narcolepsy compared to controls. Significant differences were only found for IL-4 in cerebrospinal fluid, being higher in narcolepsy. Positive correlations were found in serum between IL-4, daytime sleepiness, and cataplexy frequency. The expression of some pro-inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, VEGF, EGF, IL2, IL-1β, IFN-γ) in either serum or CSF was negatively correlated with disease severity and duration. No correlation was found for any specific cytokine in 18 of the patients with narcolepsy with peripheral and central samples collected the same day. Significant decreased pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine profiles were found at peripheral and central levels in narcolepsy, together with a T helper 2/Th1 serum cytokine secretion imbalance. To conclude, we showed some evidence for alterations in the cytokine profile in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to controls at peripheral and central levels, with the potential role of IL-4 and significant Th1/2 imbalance in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy. PMID:24394344

  10. Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms and Post-Traumatic Growth: Evidence from a Longitudinal Study following an Earthquake Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jieling; Zhou, Xiao; Zeng, Min; Wu, Xinchun

    2015-01-01

    Objective The current longitudinal study aims to examine the bidirectional relationship between post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and post-traumatic growth (PTG). Method One hundred twenty-two adults in the most severely affected area were investigated by self-report questionnaires at 12 months and 18 months after the Wenchuan Earthquake occurred in China. Results The autoregressive cross-lagged structure equation analysis revealed that PTG at 12 months post-earthquake could negatively predict PTSS at 18 months post-earthquake above and beyond PTSS stability, whereas PTSS at 12 months post-earthquake could not significantly predict subsequent PTG. Moreover, PTG at 12 months post-earthquake could predict fewer subsequent intrusions, numbing and hyper-arousal symptoms but not avoidance symptoms. Conclusion Growth can play a role in reducing long-term post-traumatic stress symptoms, and the implication of a positive perspective in post-trauma circumstance is discussed. PMID:26046912

  11. Comparative Analysis of Technologies for Quantifying Extracellular Vesicles (EVs) in Clinical Cerebrospinal Fluids (CSF).

    PubMed

    Akers, Johnny C; Ramakrishnan, Valya; Nolan, John P; Duggan, Erika; Fu, Chia-Chun; Hochberg, Fred H; Chen, Clark C; Carter, Bob S

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have emerged as a promising biomarker platform for glioblastoma patients. However, the optimal method for quantitative assessment of EVs in clinical bio-fluid remains a point of contention. Multiple high-resolution platforms for quantitative EV analysis have emerged, including methods grounded in diffraction measurement of Brownian motion (NTA), tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS), vesicle flow cytometry (VFC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Here we compared quantitative EV assessment using cerebrospinal fluids derived from glioblastoma patients using these methods. For EVs <150 nm in diameter, NTA detected more EVs than TRPS in three of the four samples tested. VFC particle counts are consistently 2-3 fold lower than NTA and TRPS, suggesting contribution of protein aggregates or other non-lipid particles to particle count by these platforms. While TEM yield meaningful data in terms of the morphology, its particle count are consistently two orders of magnitude lower relative to counts generated by NTA and TRPS. For larger particles (>150 nm in diameter), NTA consistently detected lower number of EVs relative to TRPS. These results unveil the strength and pitfalls of each quantitative method alone for assessing EVs derived from clinical cerebrospinal fluids and suggest that thoughtful synthesis of multi-platform quantitation will be required to guide meaningful clinical investigations. PMID:26901428

  12. Comparative Analysis of Technologies for Quantifying Extracellular Vesicles (EVs) in Clinical Cerebrospinal Fluids (CSF)

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Johnny C.; Ramakrishnan, Valya; Nolan, John P.; Duggan, Erika; Fu, Chia-Chun; Hochberg, Fred H.; Chen, Clark C.; Carter, Bob S.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have emerged as a promising biomarker platform for glioblastoma patients. However, the optimal method for quantitative assessment of EVs in clinical bio-fluid remains a point of contention. Multiple high-resolution platforms for quantitative EV analysis have emerged, including methods grounded in diffraction measurement of Brownian motion (NTA), tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS), vesicle flow cytometry (VFC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Here we compared quantitative EV assessment using cerebrospinal fluids derived from glioblastoma patients using these methods. For EVs <150 nm in diameter, NTA detected more EVs than TRPS in three of the four samples tested. VFC particle counts are consistently 2–3 fold lower than NTA and TRPS, suggesting contribution of protein aggregates or other non-lipid particles to particle count by these platforms. While TEM yield meaningful data in terms of the morphology, its particle count are consistently two orders of magnitude lower relative to counts generated by NTA and TRPS. For larger particles (>150 nm in diameter), NTA consistently detected lower number of EVs relative to TRPS. These results unveil the strength and pitfalls of each quantitative method alone for assessing EVs derived from clinical cerebrospinal fluids and suggest that thoughtful synthesis of multi-platform quantitation will be required to guide meaningful clinical investigations. PMID:26901428

  13. Endoscopic Endonasal Repair of Spontaneous and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea: A Review and Local Experience.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Lior; Monteiro, Eric; Klironomos, George; Alghonaim, Yazeed; Vescan, Allan; Zadeh, Gelareh; Gentili, Fred

    2015-07-01

    This article presents an overview of endoscopic endonasal repair of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea. In recent years, endoscopic repair has become the standard of care for managing this condition, because it gradually replaces the traditional open transcranial approach. Discussion includes the etiologic classification of CSF rhinorrhea, management paradigm for each category, diagnosis algorithm, comprehensive description of the surgical technique, and an updated review of the literature regarding the safety and efficacy of this procedure. In addition, the authors present their experience, including 2 surgical videos demonstrating endoscopic repair of CSF rhinorrhea in 2 distinct clinical scenarios. PMID:26141354

  14. Cronobacter sakazakii DNA Detection in Cerebrospinal Fluid of a Patient with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Mimic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Piombo, Marianna; Chiarello, Daniela; Corbetto, Marzia; Di Pino, Giovanni; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Angeletti, Silvia; Riva, Elisabetta; De Florio, Lucia; Capone, Fioravante; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old male noticed progressive weakness of the right lower limb with gait disturbance. Over the following months, motor deficits worsened, spreading to the right upper limb. Electromyography showed active denervation in the upper and lower limb muscles. A diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was made. About 2 years after symptom onset, gradual improvement occurred. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis performed about 3 years after the beginning of symptoms identified Cronobacter sakazakii. Since no other possible causes were identified, we suggest that an almost completely reversible ALS-like syndrome had been triggered by Cronobacter infection in our immunocompetent patient. PMID:26955334

  15. Cronobacter sakazakii DNA Detection in Cerebrospinal Fluid of a Patient with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Mimic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Piombo, Marianna; Chiarello, Daniela; Corbetto, Marzia; Di Pino, Giovanni; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Angeletti, Silvia; Riva, Elisabetta; De Florio, Lucia; Capone, Fioravante; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old male noticed progressive weakness of the right lower limb with gait disturbance. Over the following months, motor deficits worsened, spreading to the right upper limb. Electromyography showed active denervation in the upper and lower limb muscles. A diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was made. About 2 years after symptom onset, gradual improvement occurred. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis performed about 3 years after the beginning of symptoms identified Cronobacter sakazakii. Since no other possible causes were identified, we suggest that an almost completely reversible ALS-like syndrome had been triggered by Cronobacter infection in our immunocompetent patient. PMID:26955334

  16. Rosai Dorfman disease: case with extensive dural involvement and cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nalini, Atchayaram; Jitender, Saini; Anantaram, Gudipati; Santosh, Vani

    2012-03-15

    We report a young adult man who presented with chronic raised intracranial tension features and unusually progressive bilateral visual and hearing impairment of 18 months duration. MR imaging showed extensive dural involvement and contiguous orbital and spinal disease. Cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated persistent high lymphocytic pleocytosis. Dural biopsy obtained from posterior cervical approach with C1 arch excision and meningeal biopsy revealed features of classical of Rosai-Dorfman disease. Histiocytes were strongly positive for CD-68 and S-100 proteins. The illness relentlessly progressed with patient developing total deafness and near total blindness at last follow-up. PMID:22029938

  17. Chemical profiling of cerebrospinal fluid by multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Christina R; Yannell, Karen E; Mollenhauer, Brit; Espy, Ryan D; Cordeiro, Fernanda B; Ouyang, Z; Cooks, R G

    2016-09-21

    We report an accelerated biomarker discovery workflow and results of sample screening by mass spectrometry based on multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). This methodology shows promising initial results for the currently unsolved challenge of Parkinson's disease (PD) laboratory diagnosis by biomarker screening. Small molecules present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at low parts per million levels are monitored using specific transitions connecting ion pairs. A set of such transitions constitutes a multidimensional chemical profile used to distinguish and characterize different CSF samples using multivariate statistical methods. PMID:27517482

  18. The use of cerebrospinal fluid and neuropathological studies in neuropsychiatry practice and research

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Kalyani; Irwin, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The gold standard for diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases (i.e. Alzheimer’s disease, Frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson’s disease, Dementia with Lewy bodies, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is neuropathological examination at autopsy. As such, laboratory studies play a central role in ante mortem diagnosis of these conditions and their differentiation from the neuroinflammatory, infectious, toxic, and other non-degenerative etiologies (e.g. rapidly-progressive dementias) that are encountered in neuropsychiatric practice. This review summarizes the use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) laboratory studies in the diagnostic evaluation of dementia syndromes and emerging CSF biomarkers specific for underlying neuropathology in neurodegenerative disease research. PMID:25998118

  19. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vecsei, L.; Csala, B.; Widerloev, E.E.; Ekman, R.; Czopf, J.; Palffy, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were investigated by use of radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The somatostatin level was significantly decreased in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis compared to the control group. The magnitude of this change was more pronounced in patients with severe clinical symptoms of the illness. The CSF neuropeptide Y concentration did not differ from the control values. These findings suggest a selective involvement of somatostatin neurotransmission in multiple sclerosis.

  20. Amino acid composition of cerebrospinal fluid in actue neuroinfections in children.

    PubMed

    Buryakova, A V; Sytinsky, I A

    1975-01-01

    A survey of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amino acids, glutamine, and glutamic and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids was made in 168 children, aged 1 to 14 years, with various neurological infections. The glutamic acid and glutamine concentrations in the CSF of children with severe forms of acute serous and bacterial meningitis were about three to four times as great as in controls. The indices returned almost to normal during recovery. GABA is absent in normal CSF, but appeared in the CSF of patients with bacterial meningitis. Its determination may be used as an additional test to differentiate between serous and bacterial meningitis. PMID:234733

  1. Swiftly Decreasing Cerebrospinal Fluid Cathelicidin Concentration Predicts Improved Outcome in Childhood Bacterial Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Savonius, Okko; Helve, Otto; Roine, Irmeli; Andersson, Sture; Fernández, Josefina; Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula

    2016-06-01

    We investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cathelicidin concentrations in childhood bacterial meningitis on admission and during antimicrobial treatment. CSF cathelicidin concentrations on admission correlated with CSF white cell counts and protein levels but not with bacterial etiology. A greater decrease in the concentration in response to treatment was associated with a better outcome. Since the CSF cathelicidin concentration reflects the degree of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, it may be used as a novel biomarker in childhood bacterial meningitis. An early decrease during treatment likely signals more rapid mitigation of the disease process and thus a better outcome. PMID:27008883

  2. Digital subtraction cisternography: a new approach to fistula localisation in cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J V; Ingram, C E; MacVicar, D; Sullivan, F M; Uttley, D

    1990-01-01

    Positive contrast cisternography with digital subtraction of fluoroscopy images before computed tomography (CT) was employed in the investigation of eight patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhoea. Fistulae were visualised by preliminary digital subtraction cisternography (DSC) in six patients and in five patients the sites of leakage were confirmed at surgery. Fluoroscopy facilitated interpretation of CT in all the positive studies and in two patients provided information which could not be deduced from CT cisternography (CTC) alone. The combined technique is recommended for the investigation of patients with recurrent and post operative CSF rhinorrhoea and when CTC alone fails to identify the site of leakage. Images PMID:2292701

  3. Immunohistochemical analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid for carcinomatous and lymphomatous leptomeningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Hovestadt, A.; Henzen-Logmans, S. C.; Vecht, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of immunohistochemical analysis in relation to the standard cytological examination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with either a solid tumour or a haematological malignancy and possible leptomeningeal disease, 68 CSF-samples derived from 68 patients were examined. The sensitivity of immunohistochemical analysis was 0.54 and its specificity 0.98. Only one patient had a positive immunohistochemistry and a negative cytology. The gain of adding immunohistochemistry to cytology is nearly 8%. It is concluded that immunohistochemistry should not be used as a screening test for leptomeningeal disease in patients with cancer. PMID:2223585

  4. Cucurbitacin I blocks cerebrospinal fluid and platelet derived growth factor-BB stimulation of leptomeningeal and meningioma DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, there are no consistently effective chemotherapies for recurrent and inoperable meningiomas. Recently, cucurbitacin I (JSI-124), a naturally occurring tetracyclic triterpenoid compound used as folk medicines has been found to have cytoxic and anti-proliferative properties in several malignancies thru inhibition of activator of transcription (STAT3) activation. Previously, we have found STAT3 to be activated in meningiomas, particularly higher grade tumors. Methods Primary leptomeningeal cultures were established from 17, 20 and 22 week human fetuses and meningioma cell cultures were established from 6 World Health Organization (WHO) grade I or II meningiomas. Cells were treated with cerebrospinal fluid from patients without neurologic disease. The effects of cucurbitacin I on cerebrospinal fluid stimulation of meningioma cell DNA synthesis phosphorylation/activation of JAK1, STAT3, pMEK1/2, p44/42MAPK, Akt, mTOR, Rb and caspase 3 activation were analyzed in human leptomeningeal and meningioma cells. Results Cerebrospinal fluid significantly stimulated DNA synthesis in leptomeningeal cells. Co-administration of cucurbitacin I (250 nM) produces a significant blockade of this effect. Cucurbitacin I alone also produced a significant reduction in basal DNA synthesis. In grade I and II meningiomas, cerebrospinal fluid also significantly stimulated DNA synthesis. Co-administration of cucurbitacin I (250 nM) blocked this effect. In the leptomeningeal cultures, cerebrospinal fluid stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation but not p44/42MAPK, Akt or mTOR. Cucurbitacin I had no effect on basal STAT3 phosphorylation but co-administration with cerebrospinal fluid blocked cerebrospinal fluid stimulation of STAT3 phosphorylation in each. In the grade I meningiomas, cerebrospinal fluid stimulated phosphorylation of STAT3 and decreased MEK1/2 and cucurbitacin I had no effect on basal STAT3, p44/42MAPK, Akt, JAK1, mTOR, or Rb phosphorylation. In the grade II

  5. Post-traumatic osteolysis of the clavicle: MR features.

    PubMed

    Erickson, S J; Kneeland, J B; Komorowski, R A; Knudson, G J; Carrera, G F

    1990-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance findings in a pathologically proven case of post-traumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle. High signal intensity tissue centered on the acromioclavicular joint was seen on T2-weighted images, consistent with synovial proliferation. PMID:2398173

  6. MedlinePlus: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... traumatic stress disorder Traumatic events and children Related Health Topics Stress Veterans and Military Health National Institutes of Health ... Stress Disorder is the National Institute of Mental Health NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): NIH Research to Results PTSD: A ...

  7. Post-Traumatic Pneumocele of the Frontal Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Calisir, Cuneyt; Adapinar, Baki

    2008-01-01

    A pneumocele is an abnormal dilatation of a paranasal sinus, most commonly affecting the frontal sinus. Although the etiology of pneumocele is not entirely known, several causative factors have been suggested including trauma, surgery, tumor and infection. We report here a case of post-traumatic pneumocele of the frontal sinus following a head trauma. PMID:18682678

  8. Pregabalin in post traumatic neuropathic pain: Case studies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Sinha, Vijay Prakash; Pal, U. S.; Yadav, Sharad C.; Singh, Maneesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Pregabalin is effective in the treatment of peripheral and central neuropathic pain. This study evaluated the effectiveness of pregablin in management of post traumatic peripheral nerve injury facial pain not responding to other medication like analgesics. Pregabalin was well tolerated. The most common adverse effects were dizziness and tiredness. PMID:23251069

  9. Post-traumatic Lipoma of the Parotid gland

    PubMed Central

    Rehal, Satnam Singh; Alibhai, Mustansir; Perera, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Lipoma of the parotid gland is a rare entity. Trauma with soft tissue haematoma formation and subsequent lymphatic effusion, fat necrosis and lipoma formation have been postulated as an aetiological pathway. We report a case of a post-traumatic lipoma of the parotid gland to add to the available literature on this uncommon pathology. PMID:27106616

  10. The Relationship between Sexual Abuse and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, David Allen

    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a fairly recent inclusion in the literature as a psychiatric disorder. Currently, researchers are trying to relate PTSD to many different environmental and psychosocial stressors including physical abuse, emotional abuse, war trauma, and sexual abuse. This paper addresses research concerning the…

  11. Relationship between cortical thickness and cerebrospinal fluid YKL-40 in predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Daniel; Vilaplana, Eduard; Pegueroles, Jordi; Montal, Victor; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual; González-Suárez, Andrea; Pozueta, Ana; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Eloy; Bartrés-Faz, David; Vidal-Piñeiro, Dídac; González-Ortiz, Sofía; Medrano, Santiago; Carmona-Iragui, María; Sánchez-Saudinós, MaBelén; Sala, Isabel; Anton-Aguirre, Sofía; Sampedro, Frederic; Morenas-Rodríguez, Estrella; Clarimón, Jordi; Blesa, Rafael; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan

    2015-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid YKL-40 has been described as a marker of glial inflammation. We aimed to study the relationship between YKL-40 and brain structure and its interactions with core Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers. We measured cortical thickness (CTh) and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers (amyloid-β 1-42 [Aβ42], total tau, p-tau, and YKL-40) of 80 cognitively normal controls and 27 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Subjects were classified as Aβ42+ (<550 pg/mL) or Aβ42- (>550 pg/mL). CTh difference maps were derived from the interaction and correlation analyses in the whole sample and within clinical groups. There was a strong correlation between YKL-40 and markers of neurodegeneration (total tau and p-tau). In the whole sample, we found a negative correlation between YKL-40 and CTh in AD vulnerable areas in Aβ42+ subjects but not in Aβ42 participants. Our results suggest that YKL-40 could track the inflammatory processes associated to tau-related neurodegeneration in the presence of the AD pathophysiological process. PMID:25865441

  12. A 34-Day-Old With Fever, Cerebrospinal Fluid Pleocytosis, and Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Horner, Kimberly; Yamada, Masaki; Zuccoli, Giulio; Rosenberg, Stacy; Greene, Stephanie; Vellody, Kishore; Zuckerbraun, Noel S

    2016-01-01

    A 34-day-old previously healthy boy born full term presented to the emergency department with fever at home (38.1°C), fussiness, and decreased oral intake for 1 day. He was difficult to console at home. He had decreased oral intake without emesis, diarrhea, or a change in urine output. He did not have rhinorrhea, cough, or increased work of breathing noted by parents. He lived at home with his parents and 13-year-old brother, did not attend day care, and had no sick contacts. On examination, he was fussy but consolable. He was febrile to 39.3°C, tachycardic (180 beats per minute), and tachypneic (64 breaths per minute), with mottling and a capillary refill of 3 seconds. The remainder of his examination was normal, without an infectious focus for his fever. A complete blood cell count with differential revealed leukocytosis. A basic metabolic panel was normal. A catheter urinalysis was normal. Cerebrospinal fluid examination yielded pleocytosis, low glucose, and elevated protein. Blood cultures were persistently positive with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, but cerebrospinal fluid cultures remained negative. We present his case, management, and ultimate diagnosis. PMID:26644490

  13. A Rare Case of Spontaneous Pneumocephalus Associated with Nontraumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak.

    PubMed

    Baba, Murad; Tarar, Omer; Syed, Amer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Spontaneous nontraumatic pneumocephalus (PNC) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are both very uncommon conditions. We report a rare case of spontaneous pneumocephalus associated with CSF leak secondary to right sphenoid sinus bony defect without history of trauma. Case Description. 51-year-old Hispanic female with past medical history of hypertension and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) presented to the emergency room complaining of headache and clear discharge from the right nostril. Physical examination was significant for right frontal sinus tenderness and clear discharge from right nostril. Computed Tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed moderate amount of extra-axial air within the right cerebral hemisphere indicative of pneumocephalus. CT scan of facial bones showed bony defect along the right sphenoid sinus with abnormal CSF collection. The patient was started on intravenous antibiotics for meningitis prophylaxis and subsequently underwent transsphenoidal repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak with abdominal fat graft. CSF rhinorrhea stopped completely after the surgery with near complete resolution of pneumocephalus before discharge. Conclusions. Early identification of pneumocephalus and surgical intervention can help decrease the morbidity and avoid possible complications. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, although rare, can lead to CSF leak and pneumocepahlus. PMID:27217961

  14. The choroid plexus-cerebrospinal fluid interface in Alzheimer's disease: more than just a barrier

    PubMed Central

    Balusu, Sriram; Brkic, Marjana; Libert, Claude; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E.

    2016-01-01

    The choroid plexus is a complex structure which hangs inside the ventricles of the brain and consists mainly of choroid plexus epithelial (CPE) cells surrounding fenestrated capillaries. These CPE cells not only form an anatomical barrier, called the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), but also present an active interface between blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CPE cells perform indispensable functions for the development, maintenance and functioning of the brain. Indeed, the primary role of the choroid plexus in the brain is to maintain homeostasis by secreting CSF which contains different molecules, such as nutrients, neurotrophins, and growth factors, as well as by clearing toxic and undesirable molecules from CSF. The choroid plexus also acts as a selective entry gate for leukocytes into the brain. Recent findings have revealed distinct changes in CPE cells that are associated with aging and Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we review some recent findings that highlight the importance of the CPE-CSF system in Alzheimer's disease and we summarize the recent advances in the regeneration of brain tissue through use of CPE cells as a new therapeutic strategy. PMID:27212900

  15. Therapeutic implications of the choroid plexus-cerebrospinal fluid interface in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Demeestere, Delphine; Libert, Claude; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E

    2015-11-01

    The choroid plexus (CP) comprises an epithelial monolayer that forms an important physical, enzymatic and immunologic barrier, called the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). It is a highly vascularized organ located in the brain ventricles that is key in maintaining brain homeostasis as it produces cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and has other important secretory functions. Furthermore, the CP-CSF interface plays a putative role in neurogenesis and has been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases such as the neurodevelopmental disorders schizophrenia and autism. A role for this CNS border was also implicated in sleep disturbances and chronic and/or severe stress, which are risk factors for the development of neuropsychiatric conditions. Understanding the mechanisms by which disturbance of the homeostasis at the CP-CSF interface is involved in these different chronic low-grade inflammatory diseases can give new insights into therapeutic strategies. Hence, this review discusses the different roles that have been suggested so far for the CP in these neuropsychiatric disorders, with special attention to potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26116435

  16. Evidence for Elevated Cerebrospinal Fluid ERK1/2 Levels in Alzheimer Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Philipp; Schieb, Heinke; Kamrowski-Kruck, Heike; Otto, Markus; Chiasserini, Davide; Parnetti, Lucilla; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Schuchhardt, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Klafki, Hans-Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 33 patients with Alzheimer dementia (AD), 21 patients with mild cognitive impairment who converted to AD during followup (MCI-AD), 25 patients with stable mild cognitive impairment (MCI-stable), and 16 nondemented subjects (ND) were analyzed with a chemiluminescence immunoassay to assess the levels of the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2). The results were evaluated in relation to total Tau (tTau), phosphorylated Tau (pTau), and beta-amyloid 42 peptide (Aβ42). CSF-ERK1/2 was significantly increased in the AD group as compared to stable MCI patients and the ND group. Western blot analysis of a pooled cerebrospinal fluid sample revealed that both isoforms, ERK1 and ERK2, and low amounts of doubly phosphorylated ERK2 were detectable. As a predictive diagnostic AD biomarker, CSF-ERK1/2 was inferior to tTau, pTau, and Aβ42. PMID:22145083

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid α-synuclein predicts cognitive decline in Parkinson disease progression in the DATATOP cohort.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Tessandra; Liu, Changqin; Ginghina, Carmen; Cain, Kevin C; Auinger, Peggy; Cholerton, Brenna; Shi, Min; Zhang, Jing

    2014-04-01

    Most patients with Parkinson disease (PD) develop both cognitive and motor impairment, and biomarkers for progression are urgently needed. Although α-synuclein is altered in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with PD, it is not known whether it predicts motor or cognitive deterioration. We examined clinical data and α-synuclein in >300 unmedicated patients with PD who participated in the deprenyl and tocopherol antioxidative therapy of parkinsonism (DATATOP) study, with up to 8 years of follow-up. Longitudinal measures of motor and cognitive function were studied before (phase 1) and during (phase 2) levodopa therapy; cerebrospinal fluid was collected at the beginning of each phase. Correlations and linear mixed models were used to assess α-synuclein association with disease severity and prediction of progression in the subsequent follow-up period. Despite decreasing α-synuclein (phase 1 to phase 2 change of -0.05 ± 0.21 log-transformed values, P < 0.001), no correlations were observed between α-synuclein and motor symptoms. Longitudinally, lower α-synuclein predicted better preservation of cognitive function by several measures [Selective Reminding Test total recall α-synuclein × time interaction effect coefficient, -0.12 (P = 0.037); delayed recall, -0.05 (P = 0.002); New Dot Test, -0.03 (P = 0.002)]. Thus, α-synuclein, although not clinically useful for motor progression, might predict cognitive decline, and future longitudinal studies should include this outcome for further validation. PMID:24625392

  18. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid collaborates with the isthmic organizer to regulate mesencephalic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Martín, Cristina; Alonso, María I; Moro, José A; Bueno, David; Gato, Angel

    2005-11-01

    Early in development, the behavior of neuroepithelial cells is controlled by several factors acting in a developmentally regulated manner. Recently it has been shown that diffusible factors contained within embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) promote neuroepithelial cell survival, proliferation, and neurogenesis in mesencephalic explants lacking any known organizing center. In this paper, we show that mesencephalic and mesencephalic+isthmic organizer explants cultured only with basal medium do not express the typically expressed mesencephalic or isthmic organizer genes analyzed (otx2 and fgf8, respectively) and that mesencephalic explants cultured with embryonic CSF-supplemented medium do effect such expression, although they exhibit an altered pattern of gene expression, including ectopic shh expression domains. Other trophic sources that are able to maintain normal neuroepithelial cell behavior, i.e., fibroblast growth factor-2, fail to activate this ectopic shh expression. Conversely, the expression pattern of the analyzed genes in mesencephalic+isthmic organizer explants cultured with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid-supplemented medium mimics the pattern for control embryos developed in ovo. We demonstrate that embryonic CSF collaborates with the isthmic organizer in regulation of the expression pattern of some characteristic neuroectodermal genes during early stages of central nervous system (CNS) development, and we suggest that this collaboration is not restricted to the maintenance of neuroepithelial cell survival. Data reported in this paper corroborate the hypothesis that factors contained within embryonic CSF contribute to the patterning of the CNS during early embryonic development. PMID:16180222

  19. GWAS of cerebrospinal fluid tau levels identifies novel risk variants for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Kauwe, John S.K.; Harari, Oscar; Jin, Sheng Chih; Cai, Yefei; Karch, Celeste M.; Benitez, Bruno; Jeng, Amanda T.; Skorupa, Tara; Carrell, David; Bertelsen, Sarah; Bailey, Matthew; McKean, David; Shulman, Joshua M.; De Jager, Philip L.; Chibnik, Lori; Bennett, David A.; Arnold, Steve E.; Harold, Denise; Sims, Rebecca; Gerrish, Amy; Williams, Julie; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Galasko, Douglas; Fagan, Anne M.; Holtzman, David M.; Morris, John C.; Goate, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau, tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (ptau) and Aβ42 are established biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), and have been used as quantitative traits for genetic analyses. We performed the largest genome-wide association study for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau/ptau levels published to date (n=1,269), identifying three novel genome-wide significant loci for CSF tau and ptau: rs9877502 (P=4.89×10−9 for tau) located at 3q28 between GEMC1 and OSTN, rs514716 (P=1.07×10−8 and P=3.22×10−9 for tau and ptau respectively), located at 9p24.2 within GLIS3 and rs6922617 (P = 3.58×10−8 for CSF ptau) at 6p21.1 within the TREM gene cluster, a region recently reported to harbor rare variants that increase AD risk. In independent datasets rs9877502 showed a strong association with risk for AD, tangle pathology and global cognitive decline (P=2.67×10−4, 0.039, 4.86×10−5 respectively) illustrating how this endophenotype-based approach can be used to identify new AD risk loci. PMID:23562540

  20. A Rare Case of Spontaneous Pneumocephalus Associated with Nontraumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Tarar, Omer; Syed, Amer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Spontaneous nontraumatic pneumocephalus (PNC) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are both very uncommon conditions. We report a rare case of spontaneous pneumocephalus associated with CSF leak secondary to right sphenoid sinus bony defect without history of trauma. Case Description. 51-year-old Hispanic female with past medical history of hypertension and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) presented to the emergency room complaining of headache and clear discharge from the right nostril. Physical examination was significant for right frontal sinus tenderness and clear discharge from right nostril. Computed Tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed moderate amount of extra-axial air within the right cerebral hemisphere indicative of pneumocephalus. CT scan of facial bones showed bony defect along the right sphenoid sinus with abnormal CSF collection. The patient was started on intravenous antibiotics for meningitis prophylaxis and subsequently underwent transsphenoidal repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak with abdominal fat graft. CSF rhinorrhea stopped completely after the surgery with near complete resolution of pneumocephalus before discharge. Conclusions. Early identification of pneumocephalus and surgical intervention can help decrease the morbidity and avoid possible complications. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, although rare, can lead to CSF leak and pneumocepahlus. PMID:27217961

  1. [Advances in Biomarkers of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood].

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Li, Shang-xun; Li, Xue-jian; Xu, Hong-yun

    2015-12-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is defined as a mild brain trauma resulting in a short loss of consciousness and alteration of mental status. It may also occasionally develop persistent and progressive symptoms. It has been confirmed that MTBI causes changes of anatomic structures in central nervous system and biomarkers in the body fluid. However, there is no sufficient research on relevance among threshold for the brain injury, individual vulnerability and duration of disturbance of consciousness. Furthermore, there are no reliable diagnostic methods to establish whether a blow to the head is sufficient to cause the brain injury. This review provides references for biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid and blood associated with TBI. It also provides application status and potential prospects for further assessment and diagnosis of MTBI. PMID:27141807

  2. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolic Profiling of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Epileptic Dogs

    PubMed Central

    HASEGAWA, Tetsuya; SUMITA, Maho; HORITANI, Yusuke; TAMAI, Reo; TANAKA, Katsuhiro; KOMORI, Masayuki; TAKENAKA, Shigeo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with seizures, but diagnostic approaches in veterinary clinics remain limited. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a body fluid used for diagnosis in veterinary medicine. In this study, we explored canine epilepsy diagnostic biomarkers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolic profiling of CSF and multivariate data analysis. Profiles for subjects with idiopathic epilepsy differed significantly from those of healthy controls and subjects with symptomatic epilepsy. Among 60 identified metabolites, the levels of 20 differed significantly among the three groups. Glutamic acid was significantly increased in idiopathic epilepsy, and some metabolites including ascorbic acid were changed in both forms of epilepsy. These findings show that metabolic profiles of CSF differ between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsy and that metabolites including glutamic acid and ascorbic acid in CSF may be useful for diagnosis of canine epilepsy. PMID:24334864

  3. Membrane-Introduction Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Desflurane, Propofol and Fentanyl in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid for Estimation BBB Properties.

    PubMed

    Cherebillo, Vyacheslav Yu; Elizarov, Andrei Yu; Polegaev, Andrei V

    2015-09-01

    A possibility to use the Membrane-Introduction Mass Spectrometry (MIMS) with membrane separator interface has evolved into a powerful method for measurement of anaesthetic agents absolute concentration in blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid for the study of blood-brain barrier (BBB) properties. Recent advanced a new membrane material was used for drug concentration measurement in biologic fluids. A hydrophobic membrane was used in the interface to separate anaesthetic agents from biological fluids: inhalational anaesthetic desflurane,hypnotic propofol, analgesic fentanyl. The selective detection of volatile anesthetic agents in blood does not require long-term sample processing before injecting the sample into mass-spectrometer interface, in contrast to chromatographic methods. Mass-spectrometric interface for the measurement of anaesthetic agent concentration in biological fluids (blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid) is described. Sampling of biological fluids was performed during balanced inhalational (desflurane, fentanyl) anaesthesia and total intravenous (propofol, fentanyl) anaesthesia. PMID:26412969

  4. Studies on homocarnosine in cerebrospinal fluid in infancy and childhood. Part II. Homocarnosine levels in cerebrospinal fluid from children with epilepsy, febrile convulsion or meningitis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H

    1981-01-01

    To clarify the pathophysiological role of homocarnosine in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in children, homocarnosine levels in CSF were determined in patients with epilepsy (32 cases), febrile convulsion (5 cases) and meningitis (42 cases) with a high speed amino acid autoanalyzer (Hitachi Co.). Mean homocarnosine levels in CSF of controlled epileptic children, uncontrolled epileptic children and febrile convulsion cases were 0.61 +/- 0.25 mumol/dl, 1.03 +/- 0.37 mumol/dl and 1.09 +/- 0.04 mumol/dl, respectively. High homocarnosine levels in CSF of children with uncontrolled epilepsy or febrile convulsion may indicate the reduced turnover rate from homocarnosine to GABA. In patients with meningitis, the unconscious states were accompanied by significantly lower homocarnosine levels in CSF (0.39 +/- 0.20 mumol/dl) than those in the patients with clear conscious states (0.9 +/- 0.31 mumol/dl, however, in patients with clear conscious states homocarnosine in CSF were almost the same as those of normal children (0.89 +/- 0.23 mumol/dl). These data suggest that homocarnosine in CSF might be related to the convulsive tendency and consciousness. PMID:7283086

  5. Age-Related 1H NMR Characterization of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Newborn and Young Healthy Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Francesca; Elmi, Alberto; Romagnoli, Noemi; Bacci, Maria Laura

    2016-01-01

    When it comes to neuroscience, pigs represent an important animal model due to their resemblance with humans’ brains for several patterns including anatomy and developmental stages. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a relatively easy-to-collect specimen that can provide important information about neurological health and function, proving its importance as both a diagnostic and biomedical monitoring tool. Consequently, it would be of high scientific interest and value to obtain more standard physiological information regarding its composition and dynamics for both swine pathology and the refinement of experimental protocols. Recently, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy has been applied in order to analyze the metabolomic profile of this biological fluid, and results showed the technique to be highly reproducible and reliable. The aim of the present study was to investigate in both qualitative and quantitative manner the composition of Cerebrospinal Fluid harvested form healthy newborn (5 days old-P5) and young (30-P30 and 50-P50 days old) piglets using 1H NMR Spectroscopy, and to analyze any possible difference in metabolites concentration between age groups, related to age and Blood-Brain-Barrier maturation. On each of the analyzed samples, 30 molecules could be observed above their limit of quantification, accounting for 95–98% of the total area of the spectra. The concentrations of adenine, tyrosine, leucine, valine, 3-hydroxyvalerate, 3-methyl-2-oxovalerate were found to decrease between P05 and P50, while the concentrations of glutamine, creatinine, methanol, trimethylamine and myo-inositol were found to increase. The P05-P30 comparison was also significant for glutamine, creatinine, adenine, tyrosine, leucine, valine, 3-hydroxyisovalerate, 3-methyl-2-oxovalerate, while for the P30-P50 comparison we found significant differences for glutamine, myo-inositol, leucine and trimethylamine. None of these molecules showed at P30 concentrations

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid outflow resistance in rabbits with experimental meningitis. Alterations with penicillin and methylprednisolone.

    PubMed Central

    Scheld, W M; Dacey, R G; Winn, H R; Welsh, J E; Jane, J A; Sande, M A

    1980-01-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis may be associated with increased intracranial pressure, neurological sequelae such as communicating hydrocephalus, and a slow response to antibiotic therapy. Alterations in cerebrospinal hydrodynamics are at least partially responsible for these complications. Constant, low-flow short-duration manometric infusion studies through a hollow-bore pressure monitoring device in direct continuity with the supracortical subarachnoid space were performed in rabbits with experimental meningitis. Maximal resistance to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow from the subarachnoid to vascular space was markedly increaed in acute pneumococcal meningitis when compared to control, uninfected animals (6.77 +/- 3.52 vs. 0.26 +/- 0.04 mm Hg/microliter per min, P less than 0.001). Similar elevations (8.93 +/- 4.15 mm Hg/microliter per min were found in experimental Escherichia coli meningitis. Despite eradication of viable bacteria from the CSF by penicillin therapy during the acute stage of pneumococcal meningitis, resistance remained elevated (6.07 +/- 4.68 mm Hg/microliter per min) and had not returned to normal up to 15 d later. Administration of methylprednisolone during the early stages of acute pneumococcal meningitis reduced mean peak outflow resistance towards control values (0.59 mm Hg/microliter per min) and no "rebound" effect was apparent 24 h later. These hydrodynamic alterations in experimental meningitis prevent normal CSF absorption and decrease the ability of the bran to compensate for changes in intracranial volume and pressure. PMID:6995482

  7. Intracranial pressure, its components and cerebrospinal fluid pressure-volume compensation.

    PubMed

    Kasprowicz, M; Lalou, D A; Czosnyka, M; Garnett, M; Czosnyka, Z

    2016-09-01

    Clinical measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) is often performed to aid diagnosis of hydrocephalus. This review discusses analysis of ICP and its components' for the investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. The role of pulse, slow and respiratory waveforms of ICP in diagnosis, prognostication and management of hydrocephalus is presented. Two methods related to ICP measurement are listed: an overnight monitoring of ICP and a constant-rate infusion study. Due to the dynamic nature of ICP, a 'snapshot' manometric measurement of ICP is of limited use as it might lead to unreliable results. Therefore, monitoring of ICP over longer time combined with analysis of its waveforms provides more detailed information on the state of pressure-volume compensation. The infusion study implements ICP signal processing and CSF circulation model analysis in order to assess the cerebrospinal dynamics variables, such as CSF outflow resistance, compliance of CSF space, pressure amplitude, reference pressure, and CSF formation. These parameters act as an aid tool in diagnosis and prognostication of hydrocephalus and can be helpful in the assessment of a shunt malfunction. PMID:26666840

  8. Neural Differentiation of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    FARIVAR, Shirin; MOHAMADZADE, Zahra; SHIARI, Reza; FAHIMZAD, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective Wharton’s jelly (WJ) is the gelatinous connective tissue from the umbilical cord. It is composed of mesenchymal stem cells, collagen fibers, and proteoglycans. The stem cells in WJ have properties that are interesting for research. For example, they are simple to harvest by noninvasive methods, provide large numbers of cells without risk to the donor, the stem cell population may be expanded in vitro, cryogenically stored, thawed, genetically manipulated, and differentiated in vitro. In our study, we investigated the effect of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on neural differentiation of human WJ stem cells. Material & Methods The cells in passage 2 were induced into neural differentiation with different concentrations of human cerebrospinal fluid. Differentiation along with neural lineage was documented by expression of three neural markers: Nestin, Microtubule-Associated Protein 2 (MAP2), and Glial Fibrillary Astrocytic Protein (GFAP) for 21 days. The expression of the identified genes was confirmed by Reverse Transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Results Treatment with 100 and 200μg/ml CSF resulted in the expression of GFAP and glial cells marker on days 14 and 21. The expression of neural-specific genes following CSF treatment was dose-dependent and time-dependent. Treatment of the cells with a twofold concentration of CSF, led to the expression of MAP2 on day 14 of induction. No expression of GFAP was detected before day 14 or MAP2 before day 21, which shows the importance of the treatment period. In the present study, expression analysis for the known neural markers: Nestin, GFAP, and MAP2 using RT-PCR were performed. The data demonstrated that CSF could play a role as a strong inducer. Conclusion RT-PCR showed that cerebrospinal fluid promotes the expression of Nestin, MAP2, and GFAP mRNA in a dose-dependent manner, especially at a concentration of 200 μl/ml. In summary, CSF induces neurogenesis of WJ stem cells that encourages tissue engineering

  9. Longitudinal Metabolite Profiling of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Links Brain Metabolism with Exercise-Induced VEGF Production and Clinical Outcome.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Yang, Jun; Luciano, Mark; Shriver, Leah P

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus is a neurological disease caused by abnormal cerebrospinal fluid flow and presents with symptoms such as dementia. Current therapy involves the removal of excess cerebrospinal fluid by shunting. Not all patients respond to this therapy and biomarkers are needed that could facilitate the characterization of patients likely to benefit from this treatment. Here, we measure brain metabolism in normal pressure hydrocephalus patients by performing a novel longitudinal metabolomic profiling study of cerebrospinal fluid. We find that the levels of brain metabolites correlate with clinical parameters, the amount of vascular endothelial growth factor in the cerebrospinal fluid, and environmental stimuli such as exercise. Metabolomic analysis of normal pressure hydrocephalus patients provides insight into changes in brain metabolism that accompany cerebrospinal fluid disorders and may facilitate the development of new biomarkers for this condition. PMID:27084769

  10. An affective-cognitive processing model of post-traumatic growth.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Stephen; Murphy, David; Regel, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A topic that has begun to attract interest from clinical psychologists and psychotherapists is post-traumatic growth. First, we provide a general overview of the field, setting out the historical development, main concepts, measurement issues and research findings. Second, we review evidence showing that the relationship between post-traumatic stress and post-traumatic growth is likely curvilinear. Third, a new affective-cognitive processing model of post-traumatic growth will be introduced in which post-traumatic stress is understood to be the engine of post-traumatic growth. Fourth, points of clinical intervention are described showing the ways in which therapists can facilitate post-traumatic growth. PMID:22610981

  11. Post-traumatic stress disorder after car accidents.

    PubMed

    Kuch, K; Swinson, R P; Kirby, M

    1985-10-01

    Survivors of car crashes often suffer from a post-traumatic fear of driving, generalized anxiety and depression. Unremitting pains are also common. As part of a pilot study 30 referred subjects were exposed to imagery of driving and accidents. Seventy-seven percent were phobic of driving. Fifty-three percent responded with increased anxiety to the imagery. Twelve treatment referrals received exposure therapy and six improved markedly. An additional four improved when a Benzodiazepine was added temporarily. Four out of eight subjects lost their unremitting pains along with their fears. When guided imagery evoked intense anxiety this seemed to predict a favourable outcome. A resumption of pleasure trips was a reliable criterion of recovery. The frequency of phobic symptomatology and it's importance to the understanding and management of post-traumatic anxiety states is discussed. PMID:4063939

  12. Post-Traumatic Headache Therapy in the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Tad

    2016-06-01

    Post-traumatic headache can occur after any traumatic brain injury, regardless of severity. Headache is consistently the most common symptom following concussion and occurs in over 90 % of athletes with sports-related concussion. Despite this prevalence, the complaint of headache after a possible concussive injury is often dismissed. Even when sports-related concussion is accurately diagnosed, many athletes fall victim to mismanagement of this associated symptom by clinicians who are not well-versed in headache treatment. Furthermore, benign headaches may also occur incidentally in the context of head trauma. This complex, and often non-specific, nature of headaches provides a significant challenge in return to play decision-making. Post-traumatic headaches are generally categorized according to primary headache disorders in an attempt to guide treatment; however, there is minimal medical literature on headache management in the concussed athlete. There is clearly a continued need for prospective studies of existing treatments and new approaches. PMID:27184059

  13. Post-traumatic intracerebral pneumatocele: case report.

    PubMed

    Orebaugh, S L; Margolis, J H

    1990-12-01

    Pneumocephalus occurs in 0.5 to 1.0% of head trauma, but may also occur after neurologic surgery, or as a result of eroding infection or neoplasm. The pathophysiology involves the presence of craniodural fistula allowing ingress of air. A ball-valve mechanism may allow air to enter but not exit the cranium, or CSF leak permits air entrance as fluid leaves the intracranial space. While a "succession splash" is considered diagnostic of pneumocephalus, most patients have nonspecific signs and symptoms such as headache. Therefore, a high index of suspicion in a patient with recent head trauma is necessary. The diagnosis is made radiographically by CT scan. This is generally performed to rule out intracranial hematoma or cerebral contusion in head trauma, but will reveal even very small quantities of air to the unsuspecting physician. Therapy is often noninvasive, allowing the craniodural defect to heal spontaneously. Selected situations require immediate operative repair of the fistula. PMID:2258975

  14. Ferritin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid predict Alzheimer's disease outcomes and are regulated by APOE

    PubMed Central

    Ayton, Scott; Faux, Noel G.; Bush, Ashley I.; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack Jr., Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Khachaturian, Zaven; Sorensen, Greg; Kuller, Lew; Raichle, Marc; Paul, Steven; Davies, Peter; Fillit, Howard; Hefti, Franz; Holtzman, Davie; Marcel Mesulam, M.; Potter, William; Snyder, Peter; Schwartz, Adam; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Harvey, Danielle; Bernstein, Matthew; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Landau, Susan; Cairns, Nigel J.; Householder, Erin; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Faber, Kelley; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Thal, Leon; Buckholtz, Neil; Albert, Marylyn; Frank, Richard; Hsiao, John; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D'Agostino II, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Murali Doraiswamy, P.; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Saleem Ismail, M.; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging-Yuek; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristine; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Hudson, Leon; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B.; Kitzmiller, Tamar J.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Finger, Elizabether; Pasternak, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Elizabeth Smith, Karen; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Raudin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Fargher, Kristin; Ashok Raj, Balebail; Neylan, Thomas; Grafman, Jordan; Davis, Melissa; Morrison, Rosemary; Hayes, Jacqueline; Finley, Shannon; Friedl, Karl; Fleischman, Debra; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; James, Olga; Massoglia, Dino; Jay Fruehling, J.; Harding, Sandra; Peskind, Elaine R.; Petrie, Eric C.; Li, Gail; Yesavage, Jerome A.; Taylor, Joy L.; Furst, Ansgar J.

    2015-01-01

    Brain iron elevation is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, but the impact of iron on disease outcomes has not been previously explored in a longitudinal study. Ferritin is the major iron storage protein of the body; by using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of ferritin as an index, we explored whether brain iron status impacts longitudinal outcomes in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort. We show that baseline CSF ferritin levels were negatively associated with cognitive performance over 7 years in 91 cognitively normal, 144 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 67 AD subjects, and predicted MCI conversion to AD. Ferritin was strongly associated with CSF apolipoprotein E levels and was elevated by the Alzheimer's risk allele, APOE-ɛ4. These findings reveal that elevated brain iron adversely impacts on AD progression, and introduce brain iron elevation as a possible mechanism for APOE-ɛ4 being the major genetic risk factor for AD. PMID:25988319

  15. Quantification of Amino Acid Neurotransmitters in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, José Augusto; Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Background : Neurocysticercosis is a parasitic disease that affects the central nervous system. Its main clinical manifestations are epileptic seizures. The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between neurotransmitter concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the different evolutive forms of neurocysticercosis with or without seizures. Methods : Neurotransmitter concentrations (Aspartate, Glutamate, GABA, Glutamine, Glycine, Taurine) were determined in CSF samples from 42 patients with neurocysticercosis divided into patients with the active cystic form (n = 24, 12 with and 12 without seizures) and patients with calcified form (n = 18, 12 with and 6 without seizures), and a control group consisting of 59 healthy subjects. Results : Alterations in amino acid concentration were observed in all patients with neurocysticercosis. Conclusion : We conclude that disturbances in amino acid metabolism accompany the presentation of neurocysticercosis. Replacement of the terms inactive cyst by reactive inactive cyst and calcification by reactive calcification is suggested. PMID:26157521

  16. Beta-endorphin, somatostatin, and prolactin levels in cerebrospinal fluid of epileptic patients after generalised convulsion.

    PubMed Central

    Pitkänen, A; Jolkkonen, J; Riekkinen, P

    1987-01-01

    The possible role of different peptidergic systems in the postictal stage of human epilepsy was studied by measuring beta-endorphin, somatostatin, and prolactin levels by radioimmunoassay of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from nine epileptic patients. The first sample was taken within 2 hours after generalised tonic-clonic convulsion, and the second sample was obtained interictally after 1-4 days without any kind of clinically observable seizures. beta-endorphin was elevated postictally (p = 0.044) compared with interictal levels. SLI and PROL were similar in both samples. The present study suggests that in humans beta-endorphin is released into CSF during generalised seizures. This may indicate that neurons containing beta-endorphin are activated during a seizure. PMID:2890716

  17. Transient monoplegia and paraesthesia after an epidural blood patch for a spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alvin Ho-Kwan; Li, Lai-Fung; So, Vincent Ching; Leung, May Ka-Mei; Lui, Wai-Man

    2015-09-01

    We describe the very rare complication of new onset complete paralysis and numbness of one limb after an epidural blood patch in a 36-year-old woman. Intracranial hypotension resulting from a spinal cerebrospinal fluid fistula may be treated by epidural injection of autologous blood that is, a blood patch. This is usually a safe and effective procedure. The woman's muscle strength of hip flexion, extension, ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion decreased from 5/5 to 0/5 following the procedure. After symptom onset, an MRI of her spine showed no compressive or ischaemic lesions amenable to urgent intervention. The cause of neurological deficit was at that time unknown and steroids were administered. Her symptoms persisted for about 2 days and gradually improved. In this paper, the management plan and the course of this rare and alarming complication is reported. PMID:25986178

  18. Immunological studies of cerebrospinal fluid from patients with CNS symptoms after human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Matsudaira, Takashi; Nakano, Hitoshi; Nasu, Hirosato; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Nakaoka, Kentaro; Takayama, Rumiko; Oota, Masayasu

    2016-09-15

    In 32 patients with prolonged central nervous system symptoms after human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, we measured conventional and immunological markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and compared with the levels in disease controls. Our studies revealed significantly decreased chloride and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels in CSF of patients with CNS symptoms after HPV vaccination compared to disease controls. IL-4, IL-13, and CD4(+) T cells increased significantly in patients, and IL-17 increased significantly from 12 to 24months after symptom onset. Chemokines (IL-8 and MCP-1) were also elevated, but CD8(+) T cells, PDGF-bb and IL-12 were reduced. Antibodies to GluN2B-NT2, GluN2B-CT and GluN1-NT increased significantly. These results suggest biological, mainly immunological, changes in the CSF of patients after HPV vaccination. PMID:27609278

  19. Efavirenz pharmacokinetics in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma over a 24-hour dosing interval.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Aylin; Watson, Victoria; Dickinson, Laura; Back, David

    2012-09-01

    We determined the pharmacokinetics of efavirenz in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) over a 24-h dosing interval in a patient who had undergone a lumbar drain because of cryptococcal meningitis. Drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in paired CSF (n = 24) and plasma (n = 25) samples. The median plasma efavirenz concentration was 3,718 ng/ml (range, 2,439 to 4,952), and the median CSF concentration was 16.3 ng/ml (range, 7.3 to 22.3). The CSF/plasma area-under-the-curve ratio was 0.0044 corresponding to a CSF penetration of 0.44% of plasma. PMID:22687515

  20. Resistance to outflow of cerebrospinal fluid after central infusions of angiotensin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Severs, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    Infusions of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into the cerebroventricles of conscious rats can raise CSF pressure (CSFp). This response can be modified by some neuropeptides. One of these, angiotensin, facilitates the rise in CSFp. We measured CSFp in conscious rats with a computerized system and evaluated resistance to CSF outflow during infusion of artificial CSF, with or without angiotensin, from the decay kinetics of superimposed bolus injections. Angiotensin (10 ng/min) raised CSFp (P less than 0.05) compared with solvent, but the resistance to CSF outflow of the two groups was similar (P greater than 0.05). Because CSFp was increased by angiotensin without an increase in the outflow resistance, a change in some volume compartment is likely. Angiotensin may raise CSFp by increasing CSF synthesis; this possibility is supported, since the choroid plexuses contain an intrinsic isorenin-angiotensin system. Alternatively, angiotensin may dilate pial arteries, leading to an increased intracranial blood volume.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of phenylacetic acid in mental illness: behavioral associations and response to neuroleptic treatment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R P; Faull, K; Javaid, J I; Davis, J M

    1995-05-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid levels of phenylacetic acid (CSF PAA) were obtained from normal controls and from drug-free psychiatric inpatients (schizophrenia, major depression, mania, and schizoaffective disorder). Post-treatment CSF PAA levels were obtained from 16 patients after 4 weeks of neuroleptic treatment. Phenylacetic acid levels were higher in women and were significantly correlated with age. There were no differences in CSF PAA levels between the various diagnostic groups and no difference between the paranoid and the nonparanoid subtypes of schizophrenia. CSF PAA was significantly correlated with several measures of psychopathology, especially the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale hostility/suspiciousness factor. Neuroleptic treatment did not result in significant PAA changes. These findings are discussed in light of the amphetamine-like role ascribed to phenylethylamine, the precursor of PAA. PMID:7639084

  2. Ferritin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid predict Alzheimer's disease outcomes and are regulated by APOE.

    PubMed

    Ayton, Scott; Faux, Noel G; Bush, Ashley I

    2015-01-01

    Brain iron elevation is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, but the impact of iron on disease outcomes has not been previously explored in a longitudinal study. Ferritin is the major iron storage protein of the body; by using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of ferritin as an index, we explored whether brain iron status impacts longitudinal outcomes in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort. We show that baseline CSF ferritin levels were negatively associated with cognitive performance over 7 years in 91 cognitively normal, 144 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 67 AD subjects, and predicted MCI conversion to AD. Ferritin was strongly associated with CSF apolipoprotein E levels and was elevated by the Alzheimer's risk allele, APOE-ɛ4. These findings reveal that elevated brain iron adversely impacts on AD progression, and introduce brain iron elevation as a possible mechanism for APOE-ɛ4 being the major genetic risk factor for AD. PMID:25988319

  3. Endoscopic Repair of Frontal Sinus Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks after Firearm Injuries: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Camilo; Solares, C. Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe two cases of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak repair after gunshot wound to the head. Design Retrospective review of two cases. Settings A large regional tertiary care facility. Participants Two patients with gunshot wounds to the skull base. Main Outcome Measures Preoperative and postoperative physical and radiologic findings. Results Patients in this series underwent endoscopic surgery, debridement, and repair of CSF leaks after gunshot wounds to the head. To date, the patients are without CSF leak. Conclusions Endoscopic closure of anterior skull base CSF leaks in patients with gunshot wounds can be safe and effective. Treatment should be decided by the severity of neurologic deterioration throughout the emergency period and the existence or absence of associated intracranial lesions. Timing for surgery should be decided with great care and with a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26251818

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid profile and seroprevalence of antiganglioside reactivity in patients with neuralgic amyotrophy.

    PubMed

    Stich, Oliver; Glos, Daniela; Brendle, Marie; Dersch, Rick; Rauer, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), also known as acute brachial plexitis, is postulated as an autoimmune pathogenesis. In a well-defined cohort of patients with NA, we analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile and the prevalence of antiganglioside antibodies. Patients with Varicella zoster-associated radiculitis and healthy blood donors served as controls. An abnormal routine laboratory CSF profile was found in 29% of those with NA, mostly showing a disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Antibodies predominantly from the immunoglobulin M (IgM) isotype against at least one human ganglioside were detected in 36% of sera from patients with NA but in only 2% of controls. An NA-specific reactivity pattern was not detected, and there was no significant association with clinical or CSF parameters. This suggests that the seroprevalence of antiganglioside autoantibodies in patients with NA is nonspecific. PMID:26757215

  5. Longitudinal study of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid proteins and apolipoprotein E in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pirttilä, T; Koivisto, K; Mehta, P D; Reinikainen, K; Kim, K S; Kilkku, O; Heinonen, E; Soininen, H; Riekkinen, P; Wisniewski, H M

    1998-06-12

    Levels of soluble amyloid beta protein (sAbeta), amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) and apolipoprotein E (apoE) were examined in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained twice, at baseline and after 3-year follow-up, from 25 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). Levels of sAbeta and apoE from patients with the apoE4 allele decreased with time, whereas the levels were similar in patients without apoE4 allele. Changes of sAbeta and apoE concentrations correlated significantly with those of mini-mental state examination (MMSE) scores. Levels of sAbeta did not change with time in patients with mild dementia, whereas they decreased significantly in patients with moderate dementia. ApoE concentrations decreased in both groups whereas APP levels were similar. We conclude that measurements of CSF sAbeta and apoE levels may be helpful in monitoring progression of the disease. PMID:9672379

  6. Knowledge-base for interpretation of cerebrospinal fluid data patterns. Essentials in neurology and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Reiber, Hansotto

    2016-06-01

    The physiological and biophysical knowledge base for interpretations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) data and reference ranges are essential for the clinical pathologist and neurochemist. With the popular description of the CSF flow dependent barrier function, the dynamics and concentration gradients of blood-derived, brain-derived and leptomeningeal proteins in CSF or the specificity-independent functions of B-lymphocytes in brain also the neurologist, psychiatrist, neurosurgeon as well as the neuropharmacologist may find essentials for diagnosis, research or development of therapies. This review may help to replace the outdated ideas like "leakage" models of the barriers, linear immunoglobulin Index Interpretations or CSF electrophoresis. Calculations, Interpretations and analytical pitfalls are described for albumin quotients, quantitation of immunoglobulin synthesis in Reibergrams, oligoclonal IgG, IgM analysis, the polyspecific ( MRZ- ) antibody reaction, the statistical treatment of CSF data and general quality assessment in the CSF laboratory. The diagnostic relevance is documented in an accompaning review. PMID:27332077

  7. Enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces in opiate-dependent male patients: a stereological CT study.

    PubMed

    Danos, P; Van Roos, D; Kasper, S; Brömel, T; Broich, K; Krappel, C; Solymosi, L; Möller, H J

    1998-01-01

    Computed tomography was performed in 9 male patients with a diagnosis of opiate dependence and in 9 age-matched psychiatric controls (neurotic depression). Patients with a history or diagnosis of another substance dependence (alcohol, cocaine, cannabis) were excluded from the study. The volumes of internal and external components of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured with a point-counting stereological method. Analysis of variance with age as a covariate revealed a significant enlargement of external and external CSF spaces in male patients with opiate dependence. There was no significant correlation between the length of opiate dependence and the volumes of internal and external CSF spaces. The present results suggest that opiate dependence is associated with structural brain alterations. However, the relationship between opiate dependence and structural brain changes is complex and still not well understood. PMID:9732207

  8. Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after septoplasty: A potential complication of occult anterior skull base encephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Resha S.; Choudhry, Osamah J.; Liu, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea after septoplasty is a known entity resulting from errors in surgical technique and improper handling of the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone. When these occur, urgent management is necessary to prevent deleterious sequelae such as meningitis, intracranial abscess, and pneumocephalus. Encephaloceles are rare occurrences characterized by herniation of intracranial contents through a skull base defect that can predispose patients to CSF rhinorrhea. In this report, we present a case of CSF rhinorrhea occurring 2 weeks after septoplasty likely from manipulation of an occult anterior skull base encephalocele. To our knowledge, no previous similar case has been reported in the literature. Otolaryngologists should be aware of the possibility of occult encephaloceles while performing septoplasties because minimal manipulation of these entities may potentially result in postoperative CSF leakage. PMID:23772326

  9. Spontaneous sphenoid sinus cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningoencephalocele – are they due to patent Sternberg's canal?

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewska, Magdalena; Krzeski, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Sternberg's canal is a congenital bony defect in the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus. If it persists to adulthood, it may become a source of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak (CSF) and meningoencephalocele. The aim of the study was to describe the authors’ experience and review articles related to spontaneous sphenoid sinus CSF leaks and Sternberg's canal. We analysed patients managed surgicallly due to sphenoid sinus CSF leak and performed a PubMed database search. Two female patients with spontaneous CSF leak of sphenoid origin were found. Both patients underwent surgery with the endoscopic endonasal approach, and the defect was closed using the multi-layer technique. Twelve articles related to CSF leaks of sphenoid origin (due to Sternberg's canal) were found in the PubMed database. Lines of lesser resistance within sphenoid bone may underlie CSF leak pathology together with intracranial hypertension. The endoscopic transnasal approach to the sphenoid sinus is an excellent alternative to standard transcranial procedures. PMID:26240642

  10. [Revival of old diagnostic markers in the cerebrospinal fluid for the detection of infectious meningitis].

    PubMed

    Sakushima, Ken; Yabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis and tubercular meningitis are still neurological emergencies characterized by severe mortality and morbidity. Recent studies of meta-analysis have shown the usefulness of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate and CSF adenosine deaminase (ADA) as markers for the detection of bacterial meningitis and tubercular meningitis, respectively. CSF lactate has a high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis, but the sensitivity can be reduced by antibiotic pretreatment. CSF-ADA has a moderate sensitivity but a high specificity and is reliable for the diagnosis of tubercular meningitis. These old diagnostic markers can be evaluated in resource-poor settings including small general hospitals and non-specialized hospitals for infectious diseases, and they can contribute to the quick and accurate diagnosis of infectious meningitis. PMID:22260972