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Sample records for posterior ligamentous complex

  1. Spring Ligament Complex and Posterior Tibial Tendon: MR Anatomy and Findings in Acquired Adult Flatfoot Deformity.

    PubMed

    Mengiardi, Bernard; Pinto, Clinton; Zanetti, Marco

    2016-02-01

    The spring ligament complex is an important stabilizer of the medial ankle, together with the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) and the deltoid ligament complex. Lesions in these stabilizers result in acquired adult flatfoot deformity. The spring ligament complex includes three ligaments: the superomedial calcaneonavicular ligament, the medioplantar oblique calcaneonavicular ligament, and the inferoplantar longitudinal calcaneonavicular ligament. Normal MR imaging anatomy of the spring ligament complex and the PTT are described and illustrated in detail. Isolated lesions of the spring ligament complex are rare. In most cases, spring ligament complex lesions are secondary to PTT dysfunction. The best criteria for an injury of the clinically relevant superomedial calcaneonavicular ligament are increased signal on proton-density or T2-weighted sequences with thickening (> 5 mm), thinning (< 2 mm), or partial or complete discontinuity. A thickened ligament can be simulated by the gliding layer between the PTT and the superomedial calcaneonavicular ligament (thickness: 1-3 mm). The most common location of injury is the superior and distal portion of the superomedial calcaneonavicular ligament. A lesion seen by the orthopedic foot surgeon at the junction between the tibiospring ligament and the superomedial portion of the calcaneonavicular ligament is commonly classified as a spring ligament injury. In addition, an overview of MR imaging findings in different stages of the acquired adult flatfoot deformity is provided. PMID:27077591

  2. Posterior cruciate ligament of the knee (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a powerful ligament extending from the top-rear surface of the tibia to the bottom-front surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from posterior instability.

  3. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  4. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  5. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is located inside your knee joint and connects the bones of your upper and ... such as a knee dislocation , you will need knee surgery to repair the joint. For milder injuries, you may not need surgery. ...

  6. Posterior Cruciate Ligament: Focus on Conflicting Issues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Seuk

    2013-01-01

    There is little consensus on how to optimally reconstruct the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the natural history of injured PCL is also unclear. The graft material (autograft vs. allograft), the type of tibial fixation (tibial inlay vs. transtibial tunnel), the femoral tunnel position within the femoral footprint (isometric, central, or eccentric), and the number of bundles in the reconstruction (1 bundle vs. 2 bundles) are among the many decisions that a surgeon must make in a PCL reconstruction. In addition, there is a paucity of information on rehabilitation after reconstruction of the PCL and posterolateral structures. This article focused on the conflicting issues regarding the PCL, and the scientific rationales behind some critical points are discussed. PMID:24340144

  7. Tibial Tuberosity-Posterior Cruciate Ligament Distance.

    PubMed

    Daynes, Jake; Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Farr, Jack

    2016-08-01

    When trochlear dysplasia is present, it is difficult to measure the tibial tuberosity to trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance. A new measurement to assess tuberosity position was recently described by Seitlinger et al, which avoids the difficulty of identifying the TG as it references the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). To evaluate the reproducibility of the Seitlinger et al findings, 42 knees in 41 patients with a documented history of recurrent patellar instability and 84 knees in patients with no history of patellar instability or patellofemoral symptoms were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. The TT-PCL distance was increased in the instability group (mean, 21.6 mm) compared with the control group (mean, 19.0 mm). The TT-PCL distance is an independent risk factor for patients with recurrent patellar instability. Its role in surgical planning remains to be determined. PMID:26509659

  8. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Chang, Ji-Hoon

    2008-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity has been considered a risk factor causing late failure of reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments, although it is unknown whether that is the case for reconstructed posterior cruciate ligaments. We hypothesized patients with generalized joint laxity, compared with those without laxity, would have similar postoperative knee stability, range of motion, and functional scores after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The Beighton and Horan criteria were used to determine generalized joint laxity. We enrolled 24 patients with generalized joint laxity (Group L) and 29 patients without any positive findings of joint laxity (Group N) matched by gender and age. The average side-by-side differences of posterior tibial translation were 4.72 mm in Group L and 3.63 mm in Group N. We observed no differences in posterior tibial translation with differing graft materials or combined procedures. In Group L the International Knee Documentation Committee score was normal in 12.5% and nearly normal in 45.8% whereas in Group N, 24.1% were normal and 55.2% nearly normal. Patients with generalized joint laxity showed more posterior laxity than patients without joint laxity. Generalized joint laxity therefore appears to be a risk factor associated with posterior laxity after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Level of Evidence: Level III, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18843524

  9. Characteristics of the three ligaments of human spring ligament complex from a viewpoint of elements.

    PubMed

    Tohno, Yoshiyuki; Tohno, Setsuko; Taniguchi, Akira; Azuma, Cho; Minami, Takeshi; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2012-06-01

    To elucidate characteristics of the three ligaments constituting the spring ligament complex from a viewpoint of elements, the authors investigated age-related changes of elements, relationships among their elements, relationships among ligaments in the elements, and gender differences in the three ligaments of the spring ligament complex, the superomedial calcaneonavicular (SMCN), inferoplantar longitudinal calcaneonavicular (ICN), and third or medioplantar oblique calcaneonavicular (TCN) ligaments. After ordinary dissection at Nara Medical University was finished, the SMCN, ICN, and TCN ligaments of the spring ligament complex were removed from the subjects. The subjects consisted of 10 men and 12 women, ranging in age from 62 to 99 years (average age = 80.5 ± 9.7 years). After incineration with nitric acid and perchloric acid, the element contents were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. It was found that although the Ca and P content hardly changed in the SMCN ligament with aging, the Ca and P content in the ICN ligament increased to about three and five times higher in the 80s in comparison with the 60s, respectively, whereas in the TCN ligament, it increased about 40% and 90% higher in the 80s compared with the 60s, respectively. Regarding the relationships among elements, significant direct correlations were found among the contents of Ca, P, and Mg in all the three ligaments of the spring ligament complex. This finding was in agreement with the previous finding obtained with the three ligaments of the anterior cruciate ligament, posterior longitudinal ligament, and ligamentum capitis femoris. Whether there were significant correlations among the three ligaments of the spring ligament complex with regard to the Ca, P, S, Mg, Zn, and Fe contents was examined using Pearson's correlation. It was found that there were significant direct correlations between the SMCN and TCN ligaments in all the Ca, P, Mg, and Zn contents and

  10. A Worldwide Analysis of the Reliability and Perceived Importance of an Injury to the Posterior Ligamentous Complex in AO Type A Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Gregory D.; Kepler, Christopher K.; Koerner, John D.; Oner, F. Cumhur; Fehlings, Michael G.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Reinhold, Max; Kandziora, Frank; Bellabarba, Carlo; Chapman, Jens R.; Vialle, Luiz R.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Survey of spine surgeons. Objective To determine the reliability with which international spine surgeons identify a posterior ligamentous complex (PLC) injury in a patient with a compression-type vertebral body fracture (type A). Methods A survey was sent to all AOSpine members from the six AO regions of the world. The survey consisted of 10 cases of type A fractures (2 subtype A1, 2 subtype A2, 3 subtype A3, and 3 subtype A4 fractures) with appropriate imaging (plain radiographs, computed tomography, and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and the respondent was asked to identify fractures with a PLC disruption, as well as to indicate if the integrity of the PLC would affect their treatment recommendation. Results Five hundred twenty-nine spine surgeons from all six AO regions of the world completed the survey. The overall interobserver reliability in determining the integrity of the PLC was slight (kappa = 0.11). No substantial regional or experiential difference was identified in determining PLC integrity or its absence; however, a regional difference was identified (p < 0.001) in how PLC integrity influenced the treatment of type A fractures. Conclusion The results of this survey indicate that there is only slight international reliability in determining the integrity of the PLC in type A fractures. Although the biomechanical importance of the PLC is not in doubt, the inability to reliably determine the integrity of the PLC may limit the utility of the M1 modifier in the AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System. PMID:26430591

  11. Suture Bridge Fixation Technique for Posterior Cruciate Ligament Avulsion Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Lee, Gyu Sang; Choy, Won Sik

    2015-01-01

    We presented a surgical technique including a suture bridge technique with relatively small incision for the reduction and fixation of posterior ligament avulsion fractures. A suture anchor was used to hold the avulsed fragment and a knotless anchor was used to continuously compress the bony fragment into the fracture site, thereby maintaining reduction during healing. PMID:26640635

  12. FEMORAL INSERTION OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: AN ANATOMICAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Aihara, Tatsuo; Neto, Leopoldo Viana Batista; Goarayeb, Dedley Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify objective parameters to guide correct location of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in the femur. Methods: The PCLs of 20 human cadavers were resected. The following portions were measured: distance from the most distal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior edge of the cartilage (AB); distance from the most proximal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior cartilage (AC); distance between the two parts of the ligament close to the roof (BC); distance from the distal edge in its posterior portion, to the more posterior joint edge (DE); distance from the distal edge of the ligament in its posterior portion, to the intercondylar roof (DF); and finally, the format of the ligament insertion and area of coverage on the femoral condyle. Results: The PCL has the shape of a quarter ellipse, with an average area of 153.5mm2. The mean distances found were: AB of 2.1mm, AC of 10.7mm, BC of 8.6mm DE of 12.4mm and DF of 16.8mm. Conclusions: The edge close to the roof of the anterolateral bundle is closer to the joint cartilage (2.1mm) than the posteromedial bundle is, which is 12.4mm from the edge proximal to the cartilage. These references should assist in better and more accurate positioning of femoral tunnels in PCL reconstruction. PMID:27027059

  13. Anatomic Double-Bundle Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Nitri, Marco; Civitarese, David; Dean, Chase S; Moulton, Samuel G; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is known to be the main posterior stabilizer of the knee. Anatomic single-bundle PCL reconstruction, focusing on reconstruction of the larger anterolateral bundle, is the most commonly performed procedure. Because of the residual posterior and rotational tibial instability after the single-bundle procedure and the inability to restore the normal knee kinematics, an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction has been proposed in an effort to re-create the native PCL footprint more closely and to restore normal knee kinematics. We detail our technique for an anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction using Achilles and anterior tibialis tendon allografts. PMID:27284530

  14. Posterior Wall Blowout in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Justin J.; Dean, Chase S.; Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J.; Cram, Tyler R.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Violation of the posterior femoral cortex, commonly referred to as posterior wall blowout, can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and lead to loss of graft fixation or early graft failure. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and adherence to proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and alternative fixation techniques is imperative to ensure optimal patient outcomes. This article highlights anatomic considerations for femoral tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction and techniques for avoidance and salvage of a posterior wall blowout. PMID:27335885

  15. Ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament in a child.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Shamsi Abdul; Sujir, Premjit; Naik, Monappa A; Rao, Sharath K

    2012-04-01

    Ganglion cysts are more commonly associated with the anterior cruciate ligament than the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A literature review showed that all reported cases of ganglion cysts to date involved adults. We report a rare case of ganglion cyst in the PCL of a four-year-old boy, and discuss its aetiology, clinical presentation, imaging features and management. Ganglion cysts of the PCL may be confused with meniscal cysts arising from tears of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hence, the posterior horn of the medial meniscus has to be carefully evaluated to rule out a tear. MR imaging is the method of choice to confirm diagnosis, and arthroscopic resection is a safe treatment modality even in children. PMID:22511069

  16. Injuries to the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Bergfeld, J; Järvinen, M; Johnson, R J; Pope, M; Renström, P; Yasuda, K

    1991-08-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is the strongest ligament about the knee and is approximately twice as strong as the anterior cruciate ligament. Its main function is to prevent the posterior dislocation of the tibia in relation to the femur, providing 95% of the strength to resist the tibial posterior displacement. Along with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) the PCL controls the passive 'screw home' mechanism of the knee in terminal knee extension. It also provides mechanical support for the collateral ligaments during valgus or varus stress of the knee. PCL ruptures are uncommon apparently due to its strong fibre structure. The most frequent injury mechanism in isolated PCL tears is a direct blow on the anterior tibia with the knee flexed thus driving the tibia posteriorly. Automobile accidents (in which the knee hits the dashboard) and soccer injuries (in which an athlete receives a blow to the anterior surface of the tibia during knee flexion) characteristically produce this type of injury. In other PCL injury mechanisms (hyperextension, hyperflexion or rotational injuries with associated valgum/varum stress), other knee structures are also often damaged. The most characteristic diagnostic finding in a knee with a PCL rupture is the 'posterior sag sign' meaning the apparent disappearance of the tibial tubercle in lateral inspection when the knee is flexed 90 degrees. This is due to gravity-assisted posterior displacement of the tibia in relation to the femur. A positive posterior drawer test performed at 90 degrees of flexion and a knee hyperextension sign are sensitive but nonspecific tests. False negative findings are frequent, especially in acute cases. If necessary, the clinical diagnosis of the PCL tear can be verified by magnetic resonance imaging, examination under anaesthesia, arthroscopy, or a combination of these modalities. If a PCL avulsion fragment has been dislocated, surgical treatment is recommended. In isolated, complete midsubstance

  17. Lateral meniscal variant with absence of the posterior coronary ligament.

    PubMed

    Neuschwander, D C; Drez, D; Finney, T P

    1992-09-01

    We reviewed the cases of 3468 patients who had had arthroscopy of the knee between January 1976 and December 1988. Twenty-six patients (0.8 per cent) had a partial or a complete discoid lateral meniscus, and seven (0.2 per cent) had the Wrisberg-variant-type lateral meniscus. Of the seven patients, six had operative stabilization of the meniscus and one had a partial lateral meniscectomy because of an irreparable complex tear. Subjective, objective, and radiographic evaluations were performed on the patients who had had stabilization of the meniscus. According to the scale of Tegner and Lysholm, the result was excellent in four patients, good in one, and fair in one. None of the six patients had a tear of the sutured meniscus after an average follow-up of thirty-two months (range, twenty-four to forty months). Two patients had progressive symptoms attributable to osteoarthrosis, but the changes in the articular cartilage had been present at the time of the index procedure. None of the seven Wrisberg-variant-type menisci demonstrated a true discoid shape of the meniscus. We therefore classified this lesion as a lateral meniscal variant with absence of the posterior coronary ligament. PMID:1400547

  18. Mucoid Degeneration of Posterior Cruciate Ligament with Secondary Impingement of Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joon Ho; Jangir, Rajat R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mucoid degeneration of cruciate ligament is well known entity, but symptomatic lesions are rare. It is even rarer to find a symptomatic posterior cruciate ligament mucoid degeneration than anterior cruciate ligament. Case Report: A 65-years-old female presented to our hospital complaining of pain in right knee joint on terminal extension since 6 months. On clinical examination, there was a flexion deformity of 5 degree and a further flexion of 150 degree with mild pain exacerbated by extension. MRI of the right knee joint showed a diffusely thickened posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with increased intra ligamentous signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The arthroscopic findings of grossly thickened PCL with a yellowish hue are characteristic and the PCL was filled with a yellowish substance. We excised the yellowish substance from the PCL as precisely as possible not to damage the remaining PCL fiber (Limited Debulking). We did notchplasty of lateral wall and roof to accommodate the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and avoid impingement. Conclusion: Posterior cruciate ligament may enlarge significantly and may push the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in the notch and may lead to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) impingement symptoms. Partial Debulking of Posterior Cruciate Ligament and notchplasty is effective treatment with immediate postoperative pain relief and good functional results. PMID:27299097

  19. Potential role of the posterior cruciate ligament synovio-entheseal complex in joint effusion in early osteoarthritis: a magnetic resonance imaging and histological evaluation of cadaveric tissue and data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Binks, D.A.; Bergin, D.; Freemont, A.J.; Hodgson, R.J.; Yonenaga, T.; McGonagle, D.; Radjenovic, A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective This study explored posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) synovio-entheseal complex (SEC) microanatomy to determine whether it may participate in the early osteoarthritis (OA) disease process. Methods SEC microanatomy and OA features were evaluated in 14 non-arthritic cadaveric knees (mean age = 69.9) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. MRI images of 49 subjects selected from the progression cohort of the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) were evaluated by a musculoskeletal radiologist using an original semi-quantitative method for features associated with OA at the PCL tibial enthesis. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests to evaluate associations between SEC configuration and OA features. Results The PCL formed a SEC-like structure encompassing bone- and ligament-lining intra-articular cartilages to which the posterior root of the medial meniscus contributed. Degenerative features at the PCL-SEC included: neovascularisation (44%), enthesis chondrocyte clustering (44%), collagen matrix fissuring at the enthesis (56%) and in the PCL itself (67%), tidemark duplication (44%), bone remodelling (44%) and microscopic inflammatory changes (33%). In the OAI cohort, SEC-related pathology included bone marrow lesions (BMLs) (69%) and osteophytosis (94%) at locations that corresponded to SEC-related cartilages. Posterior joint recess effusion (49%) was linked to MRI abnormalities at PCL-SEC cartilages (χ2 = 7.27, P = 0.007). Conclusions The PCL has a prominent SEC configuration that is associated with microscopic OA changes in aged clinically non-diseased joints. MRI determined knee OA commonly exhibited pathological features at this site which was associated with adjacent joint effusion. Thus, the PCL-SEC could play a hitherto unappreciated role in the early OA disease process. PMID:25008208

  20. MRI of rupture of the spring ligament complex with talo-cuboid impaction.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, E C; Koulouris, G; Gopez, A; Zoga, A; Raikin, S; Morrison, W B

    2007-06-01

    The spring ligament complex is essential for the stability of the longitudinal arch of the foot and includes the ligaments between the calcaneus and the talus at the superomedial to inferoplantar aspect of the foot. Tears of the spring ligament complex are most commonly degenerative in etiology and secondary to concomitant abnormality of the posterior tibial tendon. We report MRI findings in a 30-year-old man who presented with traumatic rupture of the spring ligament complex, seen following dislocation of the talonavicular joint. We also describe the previously unreported MRI features of talo-cuboid impaction secondary to disruption of the spring ligament complex. PMID:17225153

  1. Ultrasound assessment of the spring ligament complex.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Ramy; Teh, James; Sharp, Robert J; Ostlere, Simon

    2008-11-01

    This study was conducted to document the normal ultrasound anatomy of the spring ligament in asymptomatic subjects and to prospectively determine the frequency of ultrasound abnormality of the spring ligament in patients with suspected posterior tibial tendinopathy. The superomedial calcaneonavicular ligament (CNL) of 10 healthy volunteers was examined by ultrasound. Nineteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of suspected posterior tibial tendinopathy and/or chronic pain along the course of the tendon were examined by ultrasound. The superomedial CNL thickness was measured. Normal anatomy of the superomedial CNL could be demonstrated in all the volunteers. The mean of the combined proximal measurements was 4 mm and of the distal measurements 3.6 mm. Sixteen patients with posterior tibial tendinopathy had increased thickness of the spring ligament, which was more evident on its distal portion over the talar head. One patient had superomedial CNL insufficiency with normal posterior tibial tendon. The mean proximal measurement in the study group was 5.1 mm and the distal measurement 6.1 mm. The differences between the measurements in the study group and controls were highly significant (proximal site P < 0.01, distal site P < 0.001). Spring-ligament laxity or tear is characterised by thickening. There is a strong association between posterior tibial tendinopathy and abnormality of the spring ligament. PMID:18523776

  2. Posterior Tibial Tendoscopy: Endoscopic Synovectomy and Assessment of the Spring (Calcaneonavicular) Ligament.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    A tear of the spring ligament is frequently associated with posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Repair of the damaged spring ligament is an important component of surgical reconstruction in the treatment of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction because it is a major anatomic contributor to the integrity of the medial longitudinal arch, particularly if the dynamic support of the posterior tibial tendon is compromised. Extensive dissection is required for exposure and repair of the ligament because it is a deep-seated structure. It is beneficial to confirm the presence of ligament tears before surgical exploration to avoid unnecessary dissection. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound studies have moderate sensitivity in the detection of these tears. We report an arthroscopic technique for assessment of the integrity of the spring ligament during endoscopic or open reconstruction of the posterior tibial tendon. This allows the surgeon to confirm the presence of a ligament tear before additional dissection to explore and repair the ligament. PMID:27284518

  3. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  4. Effect of posterior decompression extent on biomechanical parameters of the spinal cord in cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Khuyagbaatar, Batbayar; Kim, Kyungsoo; Park, Won Man; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament is a common cause of the cervical myelopathy due to compression of the spinal cord. Patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament usually require the decompression surgery, and there is a need to better understand the optimal surgical extent with which sufficient decompression without excessive posterior shifting can be achieved. However, few quantitative studies have clarified this optimal extent for decompression of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. We used finite element modeling of the cervical spine and spinal cord to investigate the effect of posterior decompression extent for continuous-type cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament on changes in stress, strain, and posterior shifting that occur with three different surgical methods (laminectomy, laminoplasty, and hemilaminectomy). As posterior decompression extended, stress and strain in the spinal cord decreased and posterior shifting of the cord increased. The location of the decompression extent also influenced shifting. Laminectomy and laminoplasty were very similar in terms of decompression results, and both were superior to hemilaminectomy in all parameters tested. Decompression to the extents of C3-C6 and C3-C7 of laminectomy and laminoplasty could be considered sufficient with respect to decompression itself. Our findings provide fundamental information regarding the treatment of cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and can be applied to patient-specific surgical planning. PMID:26951839

  5. REHABILITATION PROTOCOL AFTER ISOLATED POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Kiyomoto, Henry Dan; Rosal, Gustavo Fogolin; Bryk, Flávio Fernandes; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; de Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix

    2015-01-01

    To create a rehabilitation protocol following reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), through a literature review. The literature review was conducted in the Medline and Embase databases, to search for data on biomechanical concepts and analyses relating to the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee. The search strategy was set up using the following rules: problem or injury in association with anatomical location terms; or surgical intervention procedure in association with rehabilitation terms. We began the process in this manner and subsequently introduced restrictions on certain terms to improve the search specificity. To design the protocol, a table was created for better data assessment, based on the time that elapsed between surgery and the start of physiotherapy. A rehabilitation protocol was created to improve weight-bearing control in the initial weeks after surgery, with the aid of a knee brace. Our aim was to achieve gains in total range of motion of the knee, which should be attained by the third month, thereby avoiding contractures resulting from the tissue healing process. Strengthening exercises and sensory-motor training were guided accordingly, thus avoiding overload on the graft and respecting the healing phases. The protocol proposed through this review was based on the current evidence relating to this subject. PMID:27047844

  6. A Comparison of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Laxity Between Female and Male Basketball Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weesner, Carol L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament laxity of 90 uninjured male and female high school players were measured. No significant differences were found, indicating that the greater female injury rate may be due to inadequate conditioning, not greater knee ligament laxity. (Author/MT)

  7. Gross, histological, and microvascular anatomy and biomechanical testing of the spring ligament complex.

    PubMed

    Davis, W H; Sobel, M; DiCarlo, E F; Torzilli, P A; Deng, X; Geppert, M J; Patel, M B; Deland, J

    1996-02-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in the treatment of acquired pes planus. The breakdown of the medial longitudinal arch is most often seen at the talonaviculocalcaneal articulation. This suggests a relationship between the ligamentous complex at this articulation and acquired pes planus. This study was undertaken to gain a better understanding of the gross, histologic, and microvascular anatomy, as well as the biomechanics of the ligamentous structures surrounding the talonaviculocalcaneal articulation. Cadaver dissections of 38 fresh-frozen feet were performed. Detailed descriptions of the gross anatomy of the superomedial calcaneonavicular ligament, inferior calcaneonavicular ligament, and the superficial deltoid ligament were recorded. Their relationships to the posterior tibialis tendon and to the bones of the talonaviculocalcaneal articulation are described. The histology and microvascularity of these structures were also studied. Preliminary biomechanical testing was performed. It was found there are two definitive anatomic structures that are commonly called the spring ligament: the superomedial calcaneonavicular ligament (SMCN) and the inferior calcaneonavicular ligament (ICN). The SMCN ligament was found to have histologic properties that suggest significant load bearing. The histology of the ICN ligament suggests a pure tensile load function. The deltoid ligament and the posterior tibialis tendon had direct attachments to the SMCN ligament in all specimens. An articular facet composed of fibrocartilage was found in each SMCN ligament specimen. The microvascular structures showed an avascular articular facet present in the ligament. The biomechanical testing showed that the SMCN ligament and ICN ligament had strength similar to ankle ligaments. This study suggests this "spring ligament complex" has more of a "sling" function for the talar head. It is hoped that the better understanding of this region will add to our understanding of the

  8. Popliteal pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan J M; Driessen, Marcel J M

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the case of a 30-year-old motocross (BMX) cyclist with a third-degree posterior cruciate ligament rupture. The technique used for reconstruction was the transtibial single-bundle autologous hamstring technique. Unfortunately, the procedure was complicated by a popliteal pseudoaneurysm, which was located in line with the tibial canal. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with an end-to-end anastomosis and the patient recovered without further complaints. In this case, the popliteal artery was damaged most probably by the edge of the reamer or the guide wire during removal. Vascular complications can be limb- and life-threatening. This case report aims to increase the awareness of this serious complication with a review of the literature. PMID:25229050

  9. Emerging Updates on the Posterior Cruciate Ligament: A Review of the Current Literature.

    PubMed

    LaPrade, Christopher M; Civitarese, David M; Rasmussen, Matthew T; LaPrade, Robert F

    2015-12-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is recognized as an essential stabilizer of the knee. However, the complexity of the ligament has generated controversy about its definitive role and the recommended treatment after injury. A proper understanding of the functional role of the PCL is necessary to minimize residual instability, osteoarthritic progression, and failure of additional concomitant ligament graft reconstructions or meniscal repairs after treatment. Recent anatomic and biomechanical studies have elucidated the surgically relevant quantitative anatomy and confirmed the codominant role of the anterolateral and posteromedial bundles of the PCL. Although nonoperative treatment has historically been the initial treatment of choice for isolated PCL injury, possibly biased by the historically poorer objective outcomes postoperatively compared with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, surgical intervention has been increasingly used for isolated and combined PCL injuries. Recent studies have more clearly elucidated the biomechanical and clinical effects after PCL tears and resultant treatments. This article presents a thorough review of updates on the clinically relevant anatomy, epidemiology, biomechanical function, diagnosis, and current treatments for the PCL, with an emphasis on the emerging clinical and biomechanical evidence regarding each of the treatment choices for PCL reconstruction surgery. It is recommended that future outcomes studies use PCL stress radiographs to determine objective outcomes and that evidence level 1 and 2 studies be performed to assess outcomes between transtibial and tibial inlay reconstructions and also between single- and double-bundle PCL reconstructions. PMID:25776184

  10. Tibialis posterior tendon and deltoid and spring ligament injuries in the elite athlete.

    PubMed

    Ribbans, William John; Garde, Ajit

    2013-06-01

    The tibialis posterior tendon and the spring and deltoid ligament complexes combine to provide dynamic and passive stabilization on the medial side of the ankle and hindfoot. Some of the injuries will involve acute injury to previous healthy structures, but many will develop insidiously. The clinician must be aware of new treatment strategies and the level of accompanying scientific evidence regarding injuries sustained by athletes in these areas, while acknowledging that more traditional management applied to nonathletic patients is still likely to be appropriate in the setting of treatment for elite athletes. PMID:23707177

  11. Avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament in an uncommon location associated with distal injury to the patellar ligament☆

    PubMed Central

    e Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; da Palma, Idemar Monteiro; Cobra, Hugo; de Paula Mozella, Alan; Vaques, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament in unusual locations are rare injuries. We report the first case in the literature of an avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament associated with distal injury to the patellar ligament. The aim of this study was to present a novel case, the therapy used and the clinical follow-up. PMID:27218089

  12. Rupture of the posterior tibial tendon. Evaluation of injury of the spring ligament and clinical assessment of tendon transfer and ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Gazdag, A R; Cracchiolo, A

    1997-05-01

    Eighteen of twenty-two patients who were having a tendon transfer to treat rupture of the posterior tibial tendon had evidence of injury to the spring ligament. The injury consisted of a longitudinal tear in the ligament in seven patients, a lax ligament without a gross tear in seven, and a complete rupture of the ligament in four. The ruptured posterior tibial tendon was treated with transfer of the flexor digitorum longus in twenty of the twenty-two patients. A variety of methods were used to repair the ligament. It is essential to determine the status of the spring ligament when patients are managed for rupture of the posterior tibial tendon. Patients who have a torn or lax spring ligament in addition to the ruptured posterior tibial tendon may have more severe abnormalities of the hindfoot than those who have only a ruptured tendon. PMID:9160939

  13. Complex posterior urethral injury

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sanjay B.; Joshi, Pankaj M.; Hunter, Craig; Surana, Sandesh; Shahrour, Walid; Alhajeri, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess treatment strategies for seven different scenarios for treating complex pelvic fracture urethral injury (PFUI), categorised as repeat surgery for PFUI, ischaemic bulbar urethral necrosis (BUN), repair in boys and girls aged ⩽12 years, in patients with a recto-urethral fistula, or bladder neck incontinence, or with a double block at the bulbomembranous urethra and bladder neck/prostate region. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed the success rates and surgical procedures of these seven complex scenarios in the repair of PFUI at our institution from 2000 to 2013. Results In all, >550 PFUI procedures were performed at our centre, and 308 of these patients were classified as having a complex PFUI, with 225 patients available for follow-up. The overall success rates were 81% and 77% for primary and repeat procedures respectively. The overall success rate of those with BUN was 76%, using various methods of novel surgical techniques. Boys aged ⩽12 years with PFUI required a transpubic/abdominal approach 31% of the time, compared to 9% in adults. Young girls with PFUI also required a transpubic/abdominal urethroplasty, with a success rate of 66%. In patients with a recto-urethral fistula the success rate was 90% with attention to proper surgical principles, including a three-stage procedure and appropriate interposition. The treatment of bladder neck incontinence associated with the tear-drop deformity gave a continence rate of 66%. Children with a double block at the bulbomembranous urethra and at the bladder neck-prostate junction were all continent after a one-stage transpubic/abdominal procedure. Conclusion An understanding of complex pelvic fractures and their appropriate management can provide successful outcomes. PMID:26019978

  14. Posterior decompression with instrumented fusion for thoracic myelopathy caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masashi; Okawa, Akihiko; Fujiyoshi, Takayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated the clinical results of posterior decompression with instrumented fusion (PDF) for thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). A total of 24 patients underwent PDF, and their surgical outcomes were evaluated by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores (0-11 points) and by recovery rates calculated at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after surgery and at a mean final follow-up of 4 years and 5 months. The mean JOA score before surgery was 3.7 points. Although transient paralysis occurred immediately after surgery in one patient (3.8%), all patients showed neurological recovery at the final follow-up with a mean JOA score of 8.0 points and a mean recovery rate of 58.1%. The mean recovery rate at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after surgery was 36.7, 48.8, 54.0 and 56.8%, respectively. The median time point that the JOA score reached its peak value was 9 months after surgery. No patient chose additional anterior decompression surgery via thoracotomy. The present findings demonstrate that despite persistent anterior impingement of the spinal cord by residual OPLL, PDF can result in considerable neurological recovery with a low risk of postoperative paralysis. Since neurological recovery progresses slowly after PDF, we suggest that additional anterior decompression surgery is not desirable during the early stage of recovery. PMID:20049486

  15. Ligament fibre recruitment at the human ankle joint complex in passive flexion.

    PubMed

    Stagni, Rita; Leardini, Alberto; Ensini, Andrea

    2004-12-01

    Knowledge of ligament fibre recruitment at the human ankle joint complex is a fundamental prerequisite for analysing mobility and stability. Previous experimental and modelling studies have shown that ankle motion must be guided by fibres within the calcaneofibular and tibiocalcaneal ligaments, which remain approximately isometric during passive flexion. The purpose of this study was to identify these fibres. Three below-knee amputated specimens were analysed during passive flexion with combined radiostereometry for bone pose estimation and 3D digitisation for ligament attachment area identification. A procedure based on singular value decomposition enabled matching bone pose with digitised data and therefore reconstructing position in space of ligament attachment areas in each joint position. Eleven ordered fibres, connecting corresponding points on origin and insertion curves, were modelled for each of the following ligaments: posterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, anterior talofibular, posterior tibiotalar, tibiocalcaneal, and anterior tibiotalar. The measured changes in length for the ligament fibres revealed patterns of tightening and slackening. The most anterior fibre of the calcaneofibular and the medio-anterior fibre of the tibiocalcaneal ligament exhibited the most isometric behaviour, as well as the most posterior fibre of the anterior talofibular ligament. Fibres within the calcaneofibular ligament remain parallel in the transverse plane, while those within the tibiocalcaneal ligament become almost parallel in joint neutral position. For both these ligaments, fibres maintain their relative inclination in the sagittal plane throughout the passive flexion range. The observed significant change in both shape and orientation of the ankle ligaments suggest that this knowledge is fundamental for future mechanical analysis of their response to external forces. PMID:15519590

  16. Surgical Treatment of a Rare Isolated Bilateral Agenesis of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The isolated bilateral agenesis of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 17-year-old male came to our attention due to an alteration in gait pattern, pain, and tendency to walk on the forefoot with his knee flexed. The patient did not recall previous injuries. Upon physical examination anterior and posterior chronic instability were observed. Radiographic examination of both knees showed hypoplasia of the tibial eminence, a hypoplastic lateral femoral condyle, and a narrow intercondylar notch. MRI brought to light a bilateral agenesis of both posterior cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral isolated agenesis of both cruciate ligaments. We recommended a rehabilitation program to prepare the patient for the arthroscopic construction of both cruciate ligaments. PMID:25197599

  17. Suspensory Anterior Tibial Fixation in the Anatomic Transtibial Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elazab, Ashraf; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kang, Seo Goo

    2016-01-01

    The transtibial technique is the most relevant among many surgical techniques for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and many types of fixation devices are used for tibial fixation according to the technique and the length of the graft. However, bone density in the fixation areas should be taken into consideration when choosing the fixation device to achieve rigid and stable fixation. However, density is not a substantial issue for anteromedial cortical fixation using a cortical suspension device. We describe tibial fixation with a TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL), which is a cortical suspension device, in anatomic transtibial posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. PMID:27073781

  18. Compression of the Popliteal Artery after Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using the Tibial Inlay Technique

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seung Suk; Kim, Do Hun; Park, Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Popliteal artery compression rarely occurs after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using the tibial inlay technique that allows for direct visualization of the surgical field. However, we experienced a popliteal artery compression after PCL reconstruction performed using the technique, which eventually required re-operation. Here, we report this rare case and discuss reasons of popliteal artery compression. PMID:26673356

  19. Surgical treatment of avulsion fractures at the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament: functional result☆

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marcos Alexandre; Cervone, Gabriel Lopes de Faria; Costa, André Luis Serigatti

    2015-01-01

    Objective To objectively and subjectively evaluate the functional result from before to after surgery among patients with a diagnosis of an isolated avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament who were treated surgically. Method Five patients were evaluated by means of reviewing the medical files, applying the Lysholm questionnaire, physical examination and radiological examination. For the statistical analysis, a significance level of 0.10 and 95% confidence interval were used. Results According to the Lysholm criteria, all the patients were classified as poor (<64 points) before the operation and evolved to a mean of 96 points six months after the operation. We observed that 100% of the posterior drawer cases became negative, taking values less than 5 mm to be negative. Conclusion Surgical methods with stable fixation for treating avulsion fractures at the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament produce acceptable functional results from the surgical and radiological points of view, with a significance level of 0.042.

  20. Posterior Trans-Dural Repair of Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Herniation after Resection of Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Ki; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic spinal cord herniation is a rare complication following spinal surgery. We introduce a posterior trans-dural repair technique used in a case of thoracic spinal cord herniation through a ventral dural defect following resection of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the cervicothoracic spine. A 51-year-old female was suffering from paraplegia after laminectomy alone for cervicothoracic OPLL. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a severely compressed spinal cord with pseudomeningocele identified postoperatively. Cerebrospinal fluid leak and iatrogenic spinal cord herniation persisted despite several operations with duroplasty and sealing agent. Finally, the problems were treated by repair of the ventral dural defect with posterior trans-dural duroplasty. Several months after surgery, the patient could walk independently. This surgical technique can be applied to treat ventral dural defect and spinal cord herniation. PMID:27114779

  1. Postoperative paralysis following posterior decompression with instrumented fusion for thoracic myelopathy caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masashi; Okawa, Akihiko; Mannoji, Chikato; Fujiyoshi, Takayuki; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao

    2011-02-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). His spinal cord was severely impinged anteriorly by a beak-type OPLL and posteriorly by ossification of the ligamentum flavum at T4/5. He underwent surgical posterior decompression with instrumented fusion (PDF). Immediately after surgery, he developed a Brown-Séquard-type paralysis, which spontaneously resolved without requiring the addition of OPLL extirpation. This example highlights that the risk of postoperative neurological deterioration cannot be eliminated even when PDF is selected as the surgical procedure for thoracic OPLL, especially in instances in which the spinal cord is severely compressed. PMID:21030260

  2. All-Inside Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: GraftLink Technique

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Matthew R.; Stuart, Michael J.; King, Alexander H.; Sousa, Paul L.; Levy, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries account for nearly 20% of knee ligament injuries. PCL injuries can occur in isolation or, more commonly, in the setting of multiligamentous knee injuries. Isolated PCL disruptions are commonly treated nonoperatively; however, symptomatic grade III injuries, as well as PCL injuries found in multiligamentous injuries, are frequently treated surgically. Several reconstructive techniques exist for the treatment of PCL deficiency without a clear optimal approach. We describe our preferred operative technique to reconstruct the PCL using an all-inside arthroscopic approach with a quadrupled tibialis anterior or peroneus longus allograft with both tibial and femoral suspensory fixation. PMID:26900564

  3. All-Inside Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: GraftLink Technique.

    PubMed

    Prince, Matthew R; Stuart, Michael J; King, Alexander H; Sousa, Paul L; Levy, Bruce A

    2015-10-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries account for nearly 20% of knee ligament injuries. PCL injuries can occur in isolation or, more commonly, in the setting of multiligamentous knee injuries. Isolated PCL disruptions are commonly treated nonoperatively; however, symptomatic grade III injuries, as well as PCL injuries found in multiligamentous injuries, are frequently treated surgically. Several reconstructive techniques exist for the treatment of PCL deficiency without a clear optimal approach. We describe our preferred operative technique to reconstruct the PCL using an all-inside arthroscopic approach with a quadrupled tibialis anterior or peroneus longus allograft with both tibial and femoral suspensory fixation. PMID:26900564

  4. Arthroscopic single-bundle posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: retrospective review of hamstring tendon graft versus LARS artificial ligament

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Wen, Yu; Qian, Qirong; Wu, Yuli; Lin, Xiangbo

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to compare the results of reconstruction of isolated chronic posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury using a four-strand hamstring graft (4SHG) and a LARS artificial ligament. Thirty-six patients were divided into a 4SHG group (n = 15) and a LARS group (n = 21). The minimum follow-up time was two years. The outcome measures used were KT-1000 measurements, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scoring system, Lysholm knee scoring scale and Tegner activity rating. Both groups improved significantly between the preoperative and postoperative assessment in terms of the knee laxity and functional examination (P < 0.01). Meanwhile, knee stability was significantly improved in the LARS group when compared with the 4SHG group (P < 0.05); this was also the case for the Lysholm, Tegner and IKDC scores (P < 0.05). Our study indicates that using a LARS ligament for PCL reconstruction was clinically more useful than using a 4SHG in the treatment of the PCL-deficient knee. PMID:18654776

  5. Posterior dislocation of the elbow associated with fracture of the radial head and olecranon, and with medial collateral ligament disruption: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Tang, Peifu; Zhang, Boxun

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Fracture dislocations of the elbow appear extremely complex. Identification of the basic injury patterns can facilitate management. Case presentation A 38-year-old male motor-vehicle driver who fell on his right elbow after an accident was suffering from posterior dislocation of the elbow, without coronoid fracture, and with fracture of the radial head and olecranon, and medial collateral ligament disruption, which was not associated with any vascular or neural injury. Conclusion Posterior dislocation of the elbow associated with fracture of the radial head and olecranon, and medial collateral ligament disruption may be a rare subgroup of elbow dislocation. We should pay more attention to medial collateral ligament injury with elbow dislocation. PMID:18803834

  6. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients’ ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements. PMID:27134367

  7. Posterior cruciate ligament balancing in total knee arthroplasty: a numerical study with a dynamic force controlled knee model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adequate soft tissue balancing is a key factor for a successful result after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is the primary restraint to posterior translation of the tibia after cruciate retaining TKA and is also responsible for the amount of joint compression. However, it is complex to quantify the amount of ligament release with its effects on load bearing and kinematics in TKA and limited both in vivo and in vitro. The goal of this study was to create a dynamic and deformable finite element model of a full leg and analyze a stepwise release of the PCL regarding knee kinematics, pressure distribution and ligament stresses. Methods A dynamic finite element model was developed in Ansys V14.0 based on boundary conditions of an existing knee rig. A cruciate retraining knee prosthesis was virtually implanted. Ligament and muscle structures were simulated with modified spring elements. Linear elastic materials were defined for femoral component, inlay and patella cartilage. A restart algorithm was developed and implemented into the finite element simulation to hold the ground reaction force constant by adapting quadriceps force. After simulating the unreleased PCL model, two models were developed and calculated with the same boundary conditions with a 50% and 75% release of the PCL stiffness. Results From the beginning of the simulation to approximately 35° of flexion, tibia moves posterior related to the femur and with higher flexion anteriorly. Anterior translation of the tibia ranged from 5.8 mm for unreleased PCL to 3.7 mm for 75% PCL release (4.9 mm 50% release). A decrease of maximum von Mises equivalent stress on the inlay was given with PCL release, especially in higher flexion angles from 11.1 MPa for unreleased PCL to 8.9 MPa for 50% release of the PCL and 7.8 MPa for 75% release. Conclusions Our study showed that dynamic FEM is an effective method for simulation of PCL balancing in knee arthroplasty. A tight

  8. Tensions in the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments of the knee during passive loading: predicting ligament loads from in situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Vahey, J W; Draganich, L F

    1991-07-01

    Cruciate ligament tensions were predicted for anteroposterior (AP) tibial translation at 20 degrees, 30 degrees, 80 degrees, and 90 degrees of knee flexion based on in vitro measurements from six cadaver knees. A three-dimensional trigonometric equation was derived to calculate cruciate ligament tension as functions of AP force applied to the tibia and knee flexion angle (KFA). AP forces less than or equal to 150 N were applied. Ligament tension increased with applied AP force. The relationship between ligament tension and applied AP force appeared linear, but a Hotteling's T2 test failed to demonstrate a linear relationship. Tensions in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) attained magnitudes of approximately equal to 140 N. Tensions in the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) attained magnitudes of approximately equal to 220 N. An analysis was performed to determine the sensitivity of ligament tension to hypothetical errors in the experimentally measured parameters used to compute ligament tension. The new method we report can be used to determine tensions in the ligaments of the knee or other joints for various loading conditions. PMID:2045979

  9. [Updates on ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament. Effect of insulin/IGF-1 signals and leptin signals on ossification of the spinal ligament in Zucker fatty rats].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kengo; Kosaka, Taiichi

    2009-10-01

    The involvement of insulin/IGF-1 signals and leptin signals in spinal ligament cells was investigated using Zucker fatty rats (fa/fa) that carry mutation of the leptin receptor gene (fa) and monosodium glutamate-treated (MSG) rats that present obesity due to destruction of the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus. Zucker fatty rats (ZFR) , that have a with functional abnormality of leptin receptors are a spontaneous model of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament that develops sympathetic nerve hypoactivity. (insulin/IGF-1 signals) IRS-1-positive cells, IRS-1 protein were eminent by detected in the cartilage endplate and the enthesis region in ZFR group. On the other hand, IRS-2-positive cells were slightly less in the ZFR group than in the MSG and control groups. The results suggest that IRS-1-mediated signaling for cell proliferation was enhanced in ZFR, which may explain the ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. (Leptin signals) We investigated the effects of leptin on the spinal ligament in ZFR histopathologically and immunohistochemically. Since Ob-R does not play any role due to functional abnormality in ZFR, the direct involvement of leptin in ligament ossification may be slight in ZFR. beta(2)AR expression in the stage preceding ligament ossification was confirmed, suggesting that ossification of the spinal ligament may be inhibited by sympathetic nerve stimulation in ZFR. PMID:19794255

  10. What you need to know about ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament to optimize cervical spine surgery: A review.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    What are the risks, benefits, alternatives, and pitfalls for operating on cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL)? To successfully diagnose OPLL, it is important to obtain Magnetic Resonance Images (MR). These studies, particularly the T2 weighted images, provide the best soft-tissue documentation of cord/root compression and intrinsic cord abnormalities (e.g. edema vs. myelomalacia) on sagittal, axial, and coronal views. Obtaining Computed Tomographic (CT) scans is also critical as they best demonstrate early OPLL, or hypertrophied posterior longitudinal ligament (HPLL: hypo-isodense with punctate ossification) or classic (frankly ossified) OPLL (hyperdense). Furthermore, CT scans reveal the "single layer" and "double layer" signs indicative of OPLL penetrating the dura. Documenting the full extent of OPLL with both MR and CT dictates whether anterior, posterior, or circumferential surgery is warranted. An adequate cervical lordosis allows for posterior cervical approaches (e.g. lamionplasty, laminectomy/fusion), which may facilitate addressing multiple levels while avoiding the risks of anterior procedures. However, without lordosis and with significant kyphosis, anterior surgery may be indicated. Rarely, this requires single/multilevel anterior cervical diskectomy/fusion (ACDF), as this approach typically fails to address retrovertebral OPLL; single or multilevel corpectomies are usually warranted. In short, successful OPLL surgery relies on careful patient selection (e.g. assess comorbidities), accurate MR/CT documentation of OPLL, and limiting the pros, cons, and complications of these complex procedures by choosing the optimal surgical approach. Performing OPLL surgery requires stringent anesthetic (awake intubation/positioning) and also the following intraoperative monitoring protocols: Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), motor evoked potentials (MEP), and electromyography (EMG). PMID:24843819

  11. What you need to know about ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament to optimize cervical spine surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    What are the risks, benefits, alternatives, and pitfalls for operating on cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL)? To successfully diagnose OPLL, it is important to obtain Magnetic Resonance Images (MR). These studies, particularly the T2 weighted images, provide the best soft-tissue documentation of cord/root compression and intrinsic cord abnormalities (e.g. edema vs. myelomalacia) on sagittal, axial, and coronal views. Obtaining Computed Tomographic (CT) scans is also critical as they best demonstrate early OPLL, or hypertrophied posterior longitudinal ligament (HPLL: hypo-isodense with punctate ossification) or classic (frankly ossified) OPLL (hyperdense). Furthermore, CT scans reveal the “single layer” and “double layer” signs indicative of OPLL penetrating the dura. Documenting the full extent of OPLL with both MR and CT dictates whether anterior, posterior, or circumferential surgery is warranted. An adequate cervical lordosis allows for posterior cervical approaches (e.g. lamionplasty, laminectomy/fusion), which may facilitate addressing multiple levels while avoiding the risks of anterior procedures. However, without lordosis and with significant kyphosis, anterior surgery may be indicated. Rarely, this requires single/multilevel anterior cervical diskectomy/fusion (ACDF), as this approach typically fails to address retrovertebral OPLL; single or multilevel corpectomies are usually warranted. In short, successful OPLL surgery relies on careful patient selection (e.g. assess comorbidities), accurate MR/CT documentation of OPLL, and limiting the pros, cons, and complications of these complex procedures by choosing the optimal surgical approach. Performing OPLL surgery requires stringent anesthetic (awake intubation/positioning) and also the following intraoperative monitoring protocols: Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), motor evoked potentials (MEP), and electromyography (EMG). PMID:24843819

  12. A proposal for a new tibial guide system for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Pacagnan, André Valente; Loyola, Hugo Alexandre Guimarães; Cohen, Moisés; Camanho, Gilberto Luís; Forgas, Andrea

    2007-07-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is always a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. It is difficult when the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is intact. We propose a new guide system through the posteromedial portal, avoiding ACL damage. The arthroscope is inserted anteromedially (30 degrees), and anterolateral portals are used for instruments to confirm the diagnosis and inspect the joint to search for and treat associated lesions that may appear eventually. The posteromedial portal is located posterior to the collateral medial ligament superficially, adjacent to a portion of the posteromedial femoral condyle, which is located 1 cm proximal to the posteromedial tibial plate (where a skin marker must be used before insufflation of the knee). Our system is designed with an articular end in the form of a rasp, which helps prepare the area of the posterior tibia to be stripped before the tibial tunnel is drilled while being protected by the drill guide; this simplifies the preparation and creation of the tibial tunnel via a single device, which can be done with a 30 degrees arthroscope but is easier with a 70 degree arthroscope. The guide system through the posteromedial portal is used to determine a fixed 40 degrees angle of approach to the tibia in the anteroposterior direction to drill the tibial tunnel; this approach is particularly helpful in the presence of an intact ACL. The graft into the femoral tunnel is fixed with a bioabsorbable interference screw whose size must fit the graft and the tunnel walls. Before tibial graft fixation, it is necessary to reduce the posterior drawer. In the tibia the bundle corresponding to the anterolateral portion is tensioned and fixed under flexion, followed by the posteromedial portion in extension, by means of a Bottom Fix system (Smith & Nephew, Mayfield, MA) placed near the exit of the tibial tunnel. PMID:17637420

  13. Immunohistochemical analysis of the neural structures of the posterior cruciate ligament in osteoarthritis patients submitted to total knee arthroplasty: an analysis of thirty-four cases

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Glaucus Cajaty; Camanho, Gilberto; Rodrigues, Mara Ibis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many authors recommend posterior cruciate ligament-retaining arthroplasty with the intention to maintain the proprioception properties of this ligament. Preservation of the neuroreceptors and nervous fibers may be essential for retaining the proprioception function of the posterior cruciate ligament. The present study was thus developed to evaluate the presence of neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament resected during posterior stabilized arthroplasty in osteoarthritis patients. In particular, clinical, radiographic and histological parameters were correlated with the presence or absence of neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament. METHODS: In total, 34 posterior cruciate ligament specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Gomori trichrome. An immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against the S100 protein and neurofilaments was also performed. The presence of neural structures was correlated with parameters such as tibiofemoral angulation, histological degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament, Ahlbäck radiological classification, age, gender and the histologic pattern of the synovial neurovascular bundle around the posterior cruciate ligament. RESULTS: In total, 67.5% of the cases presented neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament. In 65% of the cases, the neurovascular bundle was degenerated. Nervous structures were more commonly detected in varus knees than in valgus knees (77% versus 50%). Additionally, severe histologic degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament was related to neurovascular bundle degeneration. CONCLUSIONS: Severe posterior cruciate ligament degeneration was related to neurovascular bundle compromise. Neural structures were more commonly detected in varus knees. Intrinsic neural structures were detected in the majority of the posterior cruciate ligaments of patients submitted to knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. PMID:25789514

  14. Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Outcomes of Nonoperative and Operative Management.

    PubMed

    Abiola, Rasheed; Rubery, Paul; Mesfin, Addisu

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective To provide an overview on the diagnosis, natural history, and nonoperative and operative management of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). OPLL is a multifactorial condition caused by ectopic hyperostosis and calcification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. Familial inheritance and genetic factors have been implicated in the etiology of OPLL. The cervical spine is most commonly affected followed by the thoracic spine. The clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to myelopathy or myeloradiculopathy. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to October 2014 with the keywords "OPLL, etiology"; "OPLL, genetics"; "OPLL, spinal cord injury"; "OPLL, natural history"; "OPLL, non-surgical management"; OPLL, surgical management"; "OPLL, surgical complications" were evaluated. Results The review addresses the etiology, epidemiology, classification, clinical presentation, imaging findings, and nonoperative and operative management of OPLL. Complications associated with surgical management of OPLL are also discussed. Conclusions OPLL commonly presents with myelopathy and radiculopathy. Spine providers should consider OPLL in their differential diagnosis and when reviewing images. If surgical intervention is pursued, imaging-based measurements and findings can help in choosing an anterior versus posterior surgical approach. PMID:26933622

  15. Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Outcomes of Nonoperative and Operative Management

    PubMed Central

    Abiola, Rasheed; Rubery, Paul; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective To provide an overview on the diagnosis, natural history, and nonoperative and operative management of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). OPLL is a multifactorial condition caused by ectopic hyperostosis and calcification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. Familial inheritance and genetic factors have been implicated in the etiology of OPLL. The cervical spine is most commonly affected followed by the thoracic spine. The clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to myelopathy or myeloradiculopathy. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to October 2014 with the keywords “OPLL, etiology”; “OPLL, genetics”; “OPLL, spinal cord injury”; “OPLL, natural history”; “OPLL, non-surgical management”; OPLL, surgical management”; “OPLL, surgical complications” were evaluated. Results The review addresses the etiology, epidemiology, classification, clinical presentation, imaging findings, and nonoperative and operative management of OPLL. Complications associated with surgical management of OPLL are also discussed. Conclusions OPLL commonly presents with myelopathy and radiculopathy. Spine providers should consider OPLL in their differential diagnosis and when reviewing images. If surgical intervention is pursued, imaging-based measurements and findings can help in choosing an anterior versus posterior surgical approach. PMID:26933622

  16. Genomic study of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine

    PubMed Central

    IKEGAWA, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL) is a common disease after the middle age. OPLL frequently causes serious neurological problems due to compression of the spinal cord and/or nerve roots. OPLL occurs in patients with monogenic metabolic diseases including rickets/osteomalacia and hypoparathyroidism; however most of OPLL is idiopathic and is considered as a multi-factorial (polygenic) disease influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Genomic studies for the genetic factors of OPLL have been conducted, mainly in Japan, including linkage and association studies. This paper reviews the recent progress in the genomic study of OPLL and comments on its future direction. PMID:25504229

  17. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Retention versus Posterior Stabilization for Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Bian, Yanyan; Feng, Bin; Weng, Xisheng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although being debated for many years, the superiority of posterior cruciate-retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and posterior-stabilized (PS) TKA remains controversial. We compare the knee scores, post-operative knee range of motion (ROM), radiological outcomes about knee kinematic and complications between CR TKA and PS TKA. Methods Literature published up to August 2015 was searched in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases, and meta-analysis was performed using the software, Review Manager version 5.3. Results Totally 14 random control trials (RCTs) on this topic were included for the analysis, which showed that PS and CR TKA had no significant difference in Knee Society knee Score (KSS), pain score (KSPS), Hospital for Special Surgery score (HSS), kinematic characteristics including postoperative component alignment, tibial posterior slope and joint line, and complication rate. However, PS TKA is superior to CR TKA regarding post-operative knee range of motion (ROM) [Random Effect model (RE), Mean Difference (MD) = -7.07, 95% Confidential Interval (CI) -10.50 to -3.65, p<0.0001], improvement of ROM (Fixed Effect model (FE), MD = -5.66, 95% CI -10.79 to -0.53, p = 0.03) and femoral-tibial angle [FE, MD = 0.85, 95% CI 0.46 to 1.25, p<0.0001]. Conclusions There are no clinically relevant differences between CR and PS TKA in terms of clinical, functional, radiological outcome, and complications, while PS TKA is superior to CR TKA in respects of ROM, while whether this superiority matters or not in clinical practice still needs further investigation and longer follow-up. PMID:26824368

  18. Arthroscopic repair of "peel-off" lesion of the posterior cruciate ligament at the femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Federica; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-02-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are uncommon, and most occur in association with other lesions. The treatment of PCL injuries remains controversial; in addition, PCL injuries have been documented to have a propensity to heal. In the literature several different patterns of PCL injury have been described including midsubstance tears/injuries, tibial bony avulsions, femoral bony avulsions, and femoral "peel-off" injuries. A peel-off injury is a complete or incomplete soft-tissue disruption of the PCL at its femoral attachment site without associated bony avulsion. In recent years arthroscopic repair of femoral avulsion and peel-off lesions of the PCL has been reported. In most of these articles, a transosseous repair with sutures passed through 2 bone tunnels into the medial femoral condyle has been described. We present a case of a femoral PCL avulsion in a 20-year-old collegiate football player with an associated medial collateral ligament injury, and we report about a novel technique for PCL repair using 2 No. 2 FiberWire sutures and two 2.9-mm PushLock anchors (Arthrex) to secure tensioning the ligament at its footprint. PMID:24749037

  19. All-arthroscopic treatment of tibial avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament

    PubMed Central

    Gwinner, Clemens; Hoburg, Arnd; Wilde, Sophie; Schatka, Imke; Krapohl, Björn Dirk; Jung, Tobias M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) avulsion fracture from its tibial insertion is a rare condition. Despite the further technical advent in refixation of avulsion fractures, the reported failure rate of current approaches remains high and the optimal surgical technique has not been elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study is to present an all-inside arthroscopic reconstruction technique for bony tibial avulsion fractures of the PCL and initial clinical outcomes. Methods: Patients underwent a thorough clinical and radiological examination of both knees at 3, 6, 12, 18, and if possible also at 24 months. Clinical evaluation included subjective and objective IKDC 2000, Lysholm score, and KOOS score. Radiographic imaging studies included CT scans for assessment of osseous integration and anatomic reduction of the bony avulsion. In addition to that posterior stress radiographs of both knees using the Telos device (Arthrex, Naples, USA) were conducted to measure posterior tibial translation. Results: A total of four patients (1 female, 3 male; ø 38 (± 18) years), who underwent arthroscopic refixation of a PCL avulsion fracture using the Tight Rope device were enrolled in this study. Mean follow up was 22 [18–24] months. The mean subjective IKDC was 72.6% (± 9.9%). Regarding the objective IKDC three patients accounted for grade A, one patient for grade C. The Lysholm score yielded 82 (± 6.9) points. The KOOS score reached 75% (± 13%; symptoms 76%, pain 81%, function 76%, sports 66%, QoL 64%). All patients showed complete osseous integration and anatomic reduction of the bony avulsion. The mean posterior tibial translation at final follow up was 2.8 [0–7] mm. Conclusions: All-arthroscopic treatment of tibial avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament provides satisfactory clinical results in a preliminary patient cohort. It is a reproducible technique, which minimizes soft tissue damage and obviates a second surgery for hardware

  20. Quantifiable Imaging Biomarkers for Evaluation of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament Using 3-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Katharine J.; Surowiec, Rachel K.; Ho, Charles P.; Devitt, Brian M.; Fripp, Jurgen; Smith, W. Sean; Spiegl, Ulrich J.; Dornan, Grant J.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as T2 and T2 star (T2*) mapping, have been used to evaluate ligamentous tissue in vitro and to identify significant changes in structural integrity of a healing ligament. These studies lay the foundation for a clinical study that uses quantitative mapping to evaluate ligaments in vivo, particularly the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). To establish quantitative mapping as a clinical tool for identifying and evaluating chronic or acute PCL injuries, T2 and T2* values first must be determined for an asymptomatic population. Purpose: To quantify T2 and T2* mapping properties, including texture variables (entropy, variance, contrast, homogeneity), of the PCL in an asymptomatic population. It was hypothesized that biomarker values would be consistent throughout the ligament, as measured across 3 clinically relevant subregions (proximal, middle, and distal thirds) in the asymptomatic cohort. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Unilateral knee MRI scans were acquired for 25 asymptomatic subjects with a 3.0-T MRI system using T2 and T2* mapping sequences in the sagittal plane. The PCL was manually segmented and divided into thirds (proximal, middle, and distal). Summary statistics for T2 and T2* values were calculated. Intra- and interrater reliability was assessed across 3 raters to 2 time points. Results: The asymptomatic PCL cohort had mean T2 values of 36.7, 29.2, and 29.6 ms in the distal, middle, and proximal regions, respectively. The distal PCL exhibited significantly higher mean, variance, and contrast and lower homogeneity of T2 values than the middle and proximal subregions (P < .05). T2* results exhibited substantial positive skew and were therefore presented as median and quartile (Q) values. Median T2* values were 7.3 ms (Q1-Q3, 6.8-8.9 ms), 7.3 ms (Q1-Q3, 7.0-8.5 ms), and 7.3 ms (Q1-Q3, 6.4-8.2 ms) in the distal, middle, and proximal subregions

  1. Surgical treatment for ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    An, Howard S; Al-Shihabi, Laith; Kurd, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Although classically associated with patients of East Asian origin, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) may cause myelopathy in patients of any ethnic origin. Degeneration of the PLL is followed by endochondral ossification, resulting in spinal cord compression. Specific genetic polymorphisms and medical comorbidities have been implicated in the development of OPLL. Patients should be evaluated with a full history and neurologic examination, along with cervical radiographs. Advanced imaging with CT and MRI allows three-dimensional evaluation of OPLL. Minimally symptomatic patients can be treated nonsurgically, but patients with myelopathy or severe stenosis are best treated with surgical decompression. OPLL can be treated via an anterior (ie, corpectomy and fusion) or posterior (ie, laminectomy and fusion or laminoplasty) approach, or both. The optimal approach is dictated by the classification and extent of OPLL, cervical spine sagittal alignment, severity of stenosis, and history of previous surgery. Anterior surgery is associated with superior outcomes when OPLL occupies >50% to 60% of the canal, despite increased technical difficulty and higher complication rates. Posterior surgery is technically easier and allows decompression of the entire cervical spine, but patients may experience late deterioration because of disease progression. PMID:24966248

  2. Minimally invasive central corpectomy for ossified posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Itoh, Yasunobu; Kubota, Keiichi; Watanabe, Sadayoshi; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Numazawa, Shinichi; Tomii, Masato; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive central corpectomy (MICC) for cervical segmental ossified posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is described. The procedure of MICC includes upper- or lower-half central corpectomy of the involved cervical spine, transdiscal decompression of the adjacent disc level, dissection and partial removal of the OPLL, removal of the OPLL behind the vertebral body via these windows, and fusion with cylindrical titanium cages. Anterior plate fixation is not necessary. From January 2008 to December 2009 we surgically treated three patients with cervical OPLL by MICC. All three patients showed remarkable improvement of their symptoms within a few days after the operation. No neurological or radiological complication was observed during that period. MICC is beneficial in avoiding complete corpectomy and long fusion, usage of an anterior plate, and usage of a large external orthosis. MICC also reduces the risk of postoperative esophageal perforation due to a screw backing out of the plate. PMID:20888772

  3. The Role of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament in Cervical Disc Replacement: An Ovine Cadaveric Biomechanical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Hao, Ding-Jun; Ma, Yu-Li; Huang, Da-Geng; Li, Hou-Kun; Feng, Hang; Hou, Qian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has been widely used to restore and maintain mobility and function of the treated and adjacent motion segments. Posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) resection has been shown to be efficient in anterior cervical decompression and fusion. However, less is known about the biomechanical effect of PLL removal versus preservation in cervical disc arthroplasty. MATERIAL AND METHODS Three motion segments of 24 ovine cervical spines (C2-C5) were evaluated in a robotic spine system with axial compressive loads of 50 N. These cervical spines were divided in three groups according to the following conditions: (1) intact spine, (2) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL preservation, and (3) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL removal. The ranges of motion (ROMs) were recorded and analyzed in each group. RESULTS The C3/C4 ROM in group 3 (CDR with PLL removed) increased significantly in flexion-extension and axial rotation compared with group 1 (intact spine). Moreover, in flexion-extension, the mean total ROM was significantly larger in group 3 than in group 1. All the ROM observed in group 2 (CDR with PLL preserved) did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in group 1. CONCLUSIONS Compared with intact spines, CDR with PLL removal partly increased ROM. Moreover, the ROM in CDR with PLL preservation did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in intact spines. The PLL appears to contribute to the balance and stability of the cervical spine and should thus be preserved in cervical disc replacement provided that the posterior longitudinal ligament is not degenerative and the compression can be removed without PLL takedown. PMID:27243444

  4. The Role of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament in Cervical Disc Replacement: An Ovine Cadaveric Biomechanical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Hao, Ding-Jun; Ma, Yu-Li; Huang, Da-Geng; Li, Hou-Kun; Feng, Hang; Hou, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has been widely used to restore and maintain mobility and function of the treated and adjacent motion segments. Posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) resection has been shown to be efficient in anterior cervical decompression and fusion. However, less is known about the biomechanical effect of PLL removal versus preservation in cervical disc arthroplasty. Material/Methods Three motion segments of 24 ovine cervical spines (C2–C5) were evaluated in a robotic spine system with axial compressive loads of 50 N. These cervical spines were divided in three groups according to the following conditions: (1) intact spine, (2) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL preservation, and (3) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL removal. The ranges of motion (ROMs) were recorded and analyzed in each group. Results The C3/C4 ROM in group 3 (CDR with PLL removed) increased significantly in flexion-extension and axial rotation compared with group 1 (intact spine). Moreover, in flexion-extension, the mean total ROM was significantly larger in group 3 than in group 1. All the ROM observed in group 2 (CDR with PLL preserved) did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in group 1. Conclusions Compared with intact spines, CDR with PLL removal partly increased ROM. Moreover, the ROM in CDR with PLL preservation did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in intact spines. The PLL appears to contribute to the balance and stability of the cervical spine and should thus be preserved in cervical disc replacement provided that the posterior longitudinal ligament is not degenerative and the compression can be removed without PLL takedown. PMID:27243444

  5. Mid- to long-term outcomes of posterior decompression with instrumented fusion for thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Koda, Masao; Furuya, Takeo; Okawa, Akihiko; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Aramomi, Masaaki; Ikeda, Osamu; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-05-01

    Posterior decompression with instrumented fusion (PDF) surgery has been previously reported as a relatively safe surgical procedure for any type of thoracic ossification of the longitudinal ligament (OPLL). However, mid- to long-term outcomes are still unclear. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mid- to long-term clinical outcome of PDF surgery for thoracic OPLL patients. The present study included 20 patients who had undergone PDF for thoracic OPLL and were followed for at least 5years. Increment change and recovery rate of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score were assessed. Revision surgery during the follow-up period was also recorded. Average JOA scores were 3.5 preoperatively and 7.1 at final follow-up. The average improvement in JOA score was 3.8 points and the average recovery rate was 47.0%. The JOA score showed gradual increase after surgery, and took 9months to reach peak recovery. As for neurological complications, two patients suffered postoperative paralysis, but both recovered without intervention. Six revision surgeries in four patients were related to OPLL. Additional anterior thoracic decompression for remaining ossification at the same level of PDF surgery was performed in one patient. Decompression surgery for deterioration of symptoms of pre-existing cervical OPLL was performed in three patients. One patient had undergone lumbar and cervical PDF surgery for de novo ossification foci of the lumbar and cervical spine. PDF surgery for thoracic OPLL is thus considered a relatively safe and stable surgical procedure considering the mid- to long-term outcomes. PMID:26794690

  6. Ossified Posterior Longitudinal Ligament With Massive Ossification of the Anterior Longitudinal Ligament Causing Dysphagia in a Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis Patient.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Shinichi; Tachibana, Toshiya; Maruo, Keishi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Tsuji, Shotaro; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2015-08-01

    Descriptive case report.To report a case of a diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) patient with both massive ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament (OALL) leading to severe dysphagia as well as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) causing mild cervical myelopathy, warranting not only an anterior approach but also a posterior one.Although DISH can cause massive OALL in the cervical spine, severe dysphagia resulting from DISH is a rare occurrence. OALLs are frequently associated with OPLL. Treatment for a DISH patient with OPLL in setting of OALL-caused dysphagia is largely unknown.A 70-year-old man presented with severe dysphagia with mild cervical myelopathy. Neurological examination showed mild spastic paralysis and hyper reflex in his lower extremities. Plane radiographs and computed tomography of the cervical spine revealed a discontinuous massive OALL at C4-5 and continuous type OPLL at C2-6. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed pronounced spinal cord compression due to OPLL at C4-5. Esophagram demonstrated extrinsic compression secondary to OALL at C4-5.We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. Severe dysphagia markedly improved without any complications.We considered that this patient not only required osteophytectomy and fusion by the anterior approach but also required decompression and spinal fusion by the posterior approach to prevent both deterioration of cervical myelopathy and recurrence of OALL after surgery. PMID:26266365

  7. Anatomical reconstruction of the spring ligament complex: "internal brace" augmentation.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Jorge; Vora, Anand

    2013-12-01

    The calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament complex is a critical static support of the medial arch of the foot. Compromise of this structure has been implicated as a primary causative factor of talar derotation leading to the clinical deformity of peritalar subluxation. Few procedures have been described to address this deficiency. The technique we describe here is a simple yet effective method to reconstruct the spring ligament complex that can easily be used in conjunction with other more commonly used procedures for extra-articular reconstructions of this deformity. We believe this procedure allows for a more powerful deformity correction and may decrease dependency on other nonanatomic reconstructive procedures. PMID:23925791

  8. Unique Anatomic Feature of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in Knees Associated With Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Nakamae, Atsuo; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Ikuta, Yasunari; Hayashi, Seiju; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a disorder in juveniles and young adults; however, its etiology still remains unclear. For OCD at the medial femoral condyle (MFC), it is sometimes observed that the lesion has a connection with fibers of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Although this could be important information related to the etiology of MFC OCD, there is no report examining an association between the MFC OCD and the PCL anatomy. Purpose: To investigate the anatomic features of knees associated with MFC OCD, focusing especially on the femoral attachment of the PCL, and to compare them with knees associated with lateral femoral condyle (LFC) OCD and non-OCD lesions. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients (46 knees) with OCD lesions who had undergone surgical treatment. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, the PCL attachment at the lateral wall of the MFC was measured on the coronal sections, and the knee flexion angle was also measured on the sagittal sections. As with non-OCD knees, we reviewed and analyzed 25 knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and 16 knees with meniscal injuries. Results: MRIs revealed that the femoral PCL footprint was located in a significantly more distal position in the patients with MFC OCD compared with patients with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle among the 4 groups. Conclusion: The PCL in patients with MFC OCD attached more distally at the lateral aspect of the MFC compared with knees with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. PMID:27294170

  9. Biomechanical Evaluation of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Quadriceps Versus Achilles Tendon Bone Block Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Brian; Haro, Marc S.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Collins, Michael J.; Arns, Thomas A.; Trella, Katie J.; Shewman, Elizabeth F.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term studies of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction suggest that normal stability is not restored in the majority of patients. The Achilles tendon allograft is frequently utilized, although recently, the quadriceps tendon has been introduced as an alternative option due to its size and high patellar bone density. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical strength of PCL reconstructions using a quadriceps versus an Achilles allograft. The hypothesis was that quadriceps bone block allograft has comparable mechanical properties to those of Achilles bone block allograft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) intact PCL, (2) PCL reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft, or (3) PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon allograft. After reconstruction, all supporting capsular and ligamentous tissues were removed. Posterior tibial translation was measured at neutral and 20° external rotation. Each specimen underwent a preload, 2 cyclic loading protocols of 500 cycles, then load to failure. Results: Construct creep deformation was significantly lower in the intact group compared with both Achilles and quadriceps allograft (P = .008). The intact specimens reached the greatest ultimate load compared with both reconstructions (1974 ± 752 N, P = .0001). The difference in ultimate load for quadriceps versus Achilles allograft was significant (P = .048), with the quadriceps group having greater maximum force during failure testing. No significant differences were noted between quadriceps versus Achilles allograft for differences in crosshead excursion during cyclic testing (peak-valley [P-V] extension stretch), creep deformation, or stiffness. Construct stiffness measured during the failure test was greatest in the intact group (117 ± 9 N/mm, P = .0001) compared with the Achilles (43 ± 11 N/mm) and quadriceps (43

  10. Total Knee Arthroplasty Designed to Accommodate the Presence or Absence of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Melinda K.; Bonin, Stephanie J.; Leslie, Chris J.; Banks, Scott A.; Hodge, W. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for selecting the same total knee arthroplasty prosthesis whether the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is retained or resected is rarely documented. This study reports prospective midterm clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes of a fixed-bearing design implanted using two different surgical techniques. The PCL was completely retained in 116 knees and completely resected in 43 knees. For the entire cohort, clinical knee (96 ± 7) and function (92 ± 13) scores and radiographic outcomes were good to excellent for 84% of patients after 5–10 years in vivo. Range of motion averaged 124° ± 9°, with 126 knees exhibiting ≥120° flexion. Small differences in average knee flexion and function scores were noted, with the PCL-resected group exhibiting an average of 5° more flexion but an average function score that was 7 points lower compared to the PCL-retained group. Fluoroscopic analysis of 33 knees revealed stable tibiofemoral translations. This study demonstrates that a TKA articular design with progressive congruency in the lateral compartment can provide for femoral condyle rollback in maximal flexion activities and achieve good clinical and functional performance in patients with PCL-retained and PCL-resected TKA. This TKA design proved suitable for use with either surgical technique, providing surgeons with the choice of maintaining or sacrificing the PCL. PMID:25374697

  11. Posterior Cruciate Ligament (pcl) Reconstruction by Transtibial Tunnel:. Suggestions of Lengthening and Slippage Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jay-Jung; Kim, Cheol-Woong

    This paper examined the biomechanical fatigue behavior of Achilles tendon autograft after posterior cruciate ligament (PLC) reconstructions. It experimented with various fixation devices and locations on the degree of initial lengthening and slippage to investigate the relationship between lengthening and slippage ratios among calcaneal and soft tissue fixation methods. Eight specimens of proximal tibia and Achilles tendon grafts were harvested from cadavers and classified into four groups according to the type of transtibial fixation technique. A cyclic load ranging from 50N to 250N was applied to each graft when fixed to the proximal tibia at 55 degrees. The soft tissue fixation method, which uses an interference screw, demonstrated a 56.4% ratio of slippage to total elongation. The use of a double cross-pin with the same method demonstrated a 45.4% slippage ratio. The former was associated with approximately 2 mm less total elongation and 13% more slippage than lengthening compared to the latter. This result was predominantly due to the poor standard of fixation compared to the same method using a double cross-pin.

  12. Anterior corpectomy and fusion for severe ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Deyu; Wang, Xinwei; Lu, Xuhai; Guo, Yongfei; He, Zhimin; Tian, Haijun

    2009-04-01

    Between May 2002 and October 2006, 19 patients (17 men and 2 women; average age 57.2; range 47-71 years) received anterior corpectomy and fusion for severe ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in our department. Preoperative radiological evaluation showed the narrowing by the OPLL exceeded 50% in all cases, and OPLL extended from one to three vertebrae. We followed-up all patients for 12-36 months (mean 18 months). The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score before surgery was 9.3 +/- 1.8 (range 5-12) which significantly increased to 14.2 +/- 1.3 (range 11-16) points at the last follow-up (P < 0.01). The improvement rate (IR) of neurological function ranged from 22.2-87.5%, with a mean of 63.2% +/- 15.2%. The operation also provided a significant increase in the cervical lordosis and the cord flatting rate (P < 0.01). No severe neurological complication developed. We therefore concluded that anterior decompression and fusion was effective and safe in the treatment of the selected patients, although OPLL exceeded 50% diameter of the spinal canal. PMID:18408927

  13. Acute augmentation for interstitial insufficiency of the posterior cruciate ligament. A two to five year clinical and radiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Terence Wai-kit; Kong, Chi-Chung; Del Buono, Angelo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background there is need to ascertain clinical and imaging outcomes after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) augmentation. Methods we performed a retrospective analysis of clinical, imaging and functional data on 21 physically active males who underwent arthroscopic trans-tibial augmentation of the PCL for symptomatic grade III PCL insufficiency. The average follow-up time was 50 months (24–60 months). The Lysholm knee score was administered to all the patients, ligament laxity was evaluated with the posterior drawer test, the KT-1000 arthrometer, and the anteromedial tibial step-off. Standing antero-posterior, lateral and Merchant’s view radiographs were taken preoperatively and at annual follow-up. Results post-operatively, ligament laxity and Lysholm knee scores were significantly improved than at baseline. Sixteen patients (73%) returned to pre-injury sport activity level, 3 patients (14%) returned to a lower level, 2 had to stop. We found radiographic degenerative changes in 5 of 22 affected knees (23%), with evidence of a statistically significant association between the occurrence of degenerative changes and the interval time from injury to surgery and duration of the follow up. Conclusions arthroscopic transtibial single bundle autograft hamstring augmentation significantly improves the function of the knee, with an overall satisfactory outcome of 82% at 2–5 years from surgery. PMID:27331032

  14. [Updates of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament. Clinical results and complication of surgery for thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masashi

    2009-10-01

    We performed 3 types of surgical procedures for thoracic myelopathy due to OPLL : posterior decompression, OPLL-extirpation, and posterior decompression with instrumented fusion (PDF) . A considerable degree of neurological recovery was obtained in all patients who underwent PDF, despite the anterior impingement of the spinal cord by OPLL remaining. In addition, the rate of post-operative complications was extremely low with PDF, when compared with posterior decompression and OPLL-extirpation groups. We recommend that one stage posterior decompression with instrumented fusion be selected for cases in whom the spinal cord is severely damaged pre-operatively. PMID:19794260

  15. Outcome of Simultaneous Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Hamstring Tendon Autograft: A Multicenter Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Ranajit; Kumari Mahapatra, Amita; Priyadarshi, Ashok; Singha Das, Dibya; Palo, Nishit; Ranjan Biswal, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiligamentous injuries of knee are a complex problem in orthopaedics. Combined ACL-PCL injuries are uncommon, usually associated with knee dislocations. Extremity vascular status is essential because of possible arterio-venous compromise. These complex injuries require a systematic evaluation and treatment. Single setting simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction or a staged approach can be adopted to treat these cases. Objectives: To evaluate functional outcome of simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft in multiligamentous knee injuries. Patients and Methods: This prospective study was performed on 20 patients with combined ACL-PCL injuries who underwent simultaneous arthroscopic ACL-PCL reconstruction with hamstring tendon. Evaluation of functional outcome was by IKDC and Lysholm-Tegner scores. Results: In 20 patients, mean age 34 years, return to full-time work and to full sports was 8 weeks and 6.2 months respectively. All patients had full range of motion except 2 patients with < 5 degrees flexion loss; 90% had negative Lachmann test; 95% had negative pivot shift and 10% patients had mild posterior drawer at 90 degrees (1+) at final follow up. Mean IKDC score was 90 (range 81 - 94); mean Tegner activity score was 7 and mean Lysholm knee score was 89. 85% returned to preinjury activity level and a 90% satisfaction rate. Conclusions: Simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstructions using hamstring tendon for combined ACL and PCL injuries is a clinically effective, safe, time saving and cost-effective procedure with better patient compliance and reproducible for a timely return of motion, strength, and function with favorable outcome. PMID:27217932

  16. Similar outcome after retention or sacrifice of the posterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Verra, Wiebe C; van den Boom, Lennard G H; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Schoones, Jan W; Wymenga, Ate B; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose To retain or to sacrifice the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a matter of discussion. In this systematic review, we wanted to find differences in functional and clinical outcome between the 2 methods. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis including all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs that have compared PCL retention with PCL sacrifice in TKA with a minimum of 1-year follow-up. Primary outcome was range of motion. Secondary outcomes were knee pain and clinical scoring systems that were preferably validated. Quality of evidence was graded using the GRADE approach. All outcomes available for data pooling were used for meta-analysis. Results 20 studies involving 1,877 patients and 2,347 knees were included. In meta-analysis, the postoperative flexion angle had a mean difference of 2 degrees (95% CI: 0.23–4.0; p = 0.03) and the KSS functional score was 2.4 points higher in favor of PCL sacrifice (95% CI: 0.41–4.3; p = 0.02). There were no statistically significant differences regarding other measured clinical outcomes such as WOMAC, KSS pain, clinical and overall score, HSS score, SF-12, radiolucencies, femoro-tibial angle, and tibial slope. The quality of the studies varied considerably. Risk of bias in most studies was unclear; 5 were judged to have a low risk of bias and 5 to have a high risk of bias. Interpretation We found no clinically relevant differences between retention and sacrifice of the PCL in TKA, in terms of functional and clinical outcomes. The quality of the studies ranged from moderate to low. Based on the current evidence, no recommendation can be made as to whether to retain or to sacrifice the PCL. PMID:25323799

  17. Healing of a surgically created partial detachment of the posterior cruciate ligament using marrow stimulation: an experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rodkey, William G; Arnoczky, Steven P; Steadman, J Richard

    2006-01-01

    The inability of intra-articular (cruciate) ligaments to generate a substantive reparative response may preclude the primary surgical repair of such lesions. A marrow stimulation technique that provides access to a fibrin scaffold, cytokines, and mesenchymal stem cells has been shown to be successful in generating a repair response in articular cartilage. We hypothesized that a similar approach may be effective in initiating and supporting a healing response in cruciate ligament injuries. The ability to treat cruciate ligament injuries by primary repair may have significant advantages over the more extensive reconstructive procedures currently advocated. Bilateral subtotal (75% of width) lacerations were made in the proximal aspect of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in 10 adult mongrel dogs. A marrow stimulation technique in which small holes were made through the femoral origin of the PCL into the marrow cavity immediately adjacent to the lesion was performed in one limb. The contralateral limb served as the non-stimulated control. Twelve weeks after surgery the extent of healing and the histological character of the repair tissue in both groups were compared. Marrow stimulation resulted in a statistically significant (P<.05) improvement in the healing of subtotal lacerations made in the PCL. The marrow-stimulated repair tissue was more cellular and had a more organized extracellular matrix than the repair tissue in the non-stimulated group. Our hypothesis was confirmed. Marrow stimulation can induce a "healing response" in intra-articular (cruciate) ligaments. This technique may have clinical applications in primary surgical repair of these structures. PMID:16468489

  18. Occupational consequences after isolated reconstruction of the insufficient posterior cruciate ligament

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background With incorrect or even without treatment, acute injuries of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can lead to chronic instability of the knee joint. After delayed treatment, negative occupational changes and reduced quality of life can occur. These aspects have not yet been investigated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate occupational consequences after isolated reconstruction in cases of chronic PCL insufficiency. Findings 12 patients treated with PCL reconstruction in a single bundle technique, using hamstring tendon grafts, were evaluated. All patients were operated upon at least 3 months after injury. Mean time of follow-up was 51 ± 18.2 months (14–75). Radiological assessment (Telos stress device) showed a side comparison of total translation of 4.5 ± 2.6 mm. Occupational consequences have been evaluated by the classification system “REFA”. Median time incapacity for work was 8 weeks. Nearly all patients achieved the mental status of the normal population (SF-36), but physical status was still restricted. A pre- to postoperative improvement of the clinical scores could be seen: Lysholm-Score: 46.4 ± 17.3 to 84.7 ± 14.1, HSS-Score: 74.3 ± 10.5 to 88.3 ± 10.7. Postoperative evaluated scores were: Tegner score: 4.8 ± 1.2, IKDC score: 80.0 ± 16.2, VPS: 3.4 ± 2.7. Patients with low physical load in their workplace described significantly better clinical results in every clinical score (p < .05) and less pain than patients with high physical load prior to the accident (VPS: REFA < 2: 2.4 ± 2.6, REFA ≥ 2: 5.5 ± 1.7; p < 0.05). Conclusions Operative treated patients with a chronic PCL insufficiency achieve an improvement of the clinical result. Patients with low physical load at their workplace achieve less restrictions. PMID:24684773

  19. Could failure of the spring ligament complex be the driving force behind the development of the adult flatfoot deformity?

    PubMed

    Williams, Geraint; Widnall, James; Evans, Paul; Platt, Simon

    2014-01-01

    We conducted an investigation into the relative associations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined pathologic features of the spring ligament and/or tibialis posterior tendon with radiographic evidence of a planovalgus foot position. A total of 161 patient images (MRI and plain radiographs) obtained from the foot and ankle clinic (2008 to 2011) were retrospectively reviewed. All 161 patients (64 male and 97 female; mean age 45.9 years, range 18 to 86) were included in the analysis. Lateral weightbearing radiographs were analyzed for the talo-first metatarsal angle ≥ 5°, calcaneal pitch ≤ 20°, and talocalcaneal angle ≥ 45°. A positive finding for ≥ 1 measurements identified a radiographic planovalgus position of the foot. The radiographic deformity was analyzed against the MRI evidence of either spring ligament or tibialis posterior tendon pathologic features for significance (p < .05). Evidence of a spring ligament abnormality was strongly associated with a planovalgus foot position, reaching high levels of statistical significance in all 3 categories of radiographic deformity (odds ratio 9.2, p < .0001). Abnormalities of the tibialis posterior tendon failed to demonstrate significance, unless grade I changes were excluded, and grade II and III appearances were analyzed in isolation (odds ratio 2.9, p = .04). Although absolute causal relationships were not tested, this investigation has clearly demonstrated that MRI-defined abnormalities of the spring ligament complex are possibly of at least equal importance to tibialis posterior dysfunction for the presence of a moderate to severe radiographic planovalgus foot position. PMID:24556481

  20. The Effect of Graft Strength on Knee Laxity and Graft In-Situ Forces after Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Huang, Chang-Hung; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Chan, Kam-Kong; Chang, Ting-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction is generally recommended for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries; however, the use of grafts is still a controversial problem. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element model of the human tibiofemoral joint with articular cartilage layers, menisci, and four main ligaments was constructed to investigate the effects of graft strengths on knee kinematics and in-situ forces of PCL grafts. Nine different graft strengths with stiffness ranging from 0% (PCL rupture) to 200%, in increments of 25%, of an intact PCL’s strength were used to simulate the PCL reconstruction. A 100 N posterior tibial drawer load was applied to the knee joint at full extension. Results revealed that the maximum posterior translation of the PCL rupture model (0% stiffness) was 6.77 mm in the medial compartment, which resulted in tibial internal rotation of about 3.01°. After PCL reconstruction with any graft strength, the laxity of the medial tibial compartment was noticeably improved. Tibial translation and rotation were similar to the intact knee after PCL reconstruction with graft strengths ranging from 75% to 125% of an intact PCL. When the graft’s strength surpassed 150%, the medial tibia moved forward and external tibial rotation greatly increased. The in-situ forces generated in the PCL grafts ranged from 13.15 N to 75.82 N, depending on the stiffness. In conclusion, the strength of PCL grafts have has a noticeable effect on anterior-posterior translation of the medial tibial compartment and its in-situ force. Similar kinematic response may happen in the models when the PCL graft’s strength lies between 75% and 125% of an intact PCL. PMID:26001045

  1. [Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament Found in a Case of Sudden Head-tilt Difficulty following Induction of General Anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Nishihara, Isao; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-05-01

    We report a case of sudden head-tilt difficulty after induction of general anesthesia which was postoperatively diagnosed as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. A 42-year-old man weighing 115 kg was scheduled for emergent laparoscopic appendectomy for acute appendicitis. Prior to induction of anesthesia, the patient could tilt his head, but was unable to do so afterwards. Following mask ventilation with jaw-thrust maneuver, we successfully performed tracheal intubation using the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope. After surgery, he was diagnosed with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament by an orthopedist. PMID:26422964

  2. Posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by means of tibial tunnel: anatomical study on cadavers for tunnel positioning☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    de Queiroz, Antônio Altenor Bessa; Janovsky, César; da Silveira Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo; Ramos, Leonardo Addêo; Granata Junior, Geraldo Sérgio Mello; Luzo, Marcos Vinicius Malheiros; Cohen, Moises

    2014-01-01

    Objective to determine the reference points for the exit of the tibial guidewire in relation to the posterior cortical bone of the tibia. Methods sixteen knees from fresh cadavers were used for this study. Using a viewing device and a guide marked out in millimeters, three guidewires were passed through the tibia at 0, 10 and 15 mm distally in relation to the posterior crest of the tibia. Dissections were performed and the region of the center of the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) was determined in each knee. The distances between the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL and the posterior tibial border (CB) and between the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL and wires 1, 2 and 3 (CW1, CW2 and CW3) were measured. Results in the dissected knees, we found the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL at 1.09 ± 0.06 cm from the posterior tibial border. The distances between the wires 1, 2 and 3 and the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL were respectively 1.01 ± 0.08, 0.09 ± 0.05 and 0.5 ± 0.05 cm. Conclusion the guidewire exit point 10 mm distal in relation to the posterior crest of the tibia was the best position for attempting to reproduce the anatomical center of the PCL. PMID:26229829

  3. Erupted complex odontoma of the posterior maxilla: A rarity

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonika; Arul, A. Sri Kennath J.; Arul, A. Sri Sennath J.; Chitra, S.

    2015-01-01

    Complex odontomas, hamartomas of aborted tooth development, mainly occur in posterior part of the mandible and rarely erupt into the oral cavity. The spontaneous eruption may be associated with pain, inflammation of adjacent soft tissues or recurrent infection. The present case of complex odontoma is of particular interest due to its apparent eruption in the maxillary posterior segment, its association with agenesis of the second molar and impacted third molar; with the lesion being completely asymptomatic. PMID:26604611

  4. Erupted complex odontoma of the posterior maxilla: A rarity.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sonika; Arul, A Sri Kennath J; Arul, A Sri Sennath J; Chitra, S

    2015-08-01

    Complex odontomas, hamartomas of aborted tooth development, mainly occur in posterior part of the mandible and rarely erupt into the oral cavity. The spontaneous eruption may be associated with pain, inflammation of adjacent soft tissues or recurrent infection. The present case of complex odontoma is of particular interest due to its apparent eruption in the maxillary posterior segment, its association with agenesis of the second molar and impacted third molar; with the lesion being completely asymptomatic. PMID:26604611

  5. Criteria for preserving posterior cruciate ligament depending on intra-operative gap measurement in total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kaneyama, R.; Otsuka, M.; Shiratsuchi, H.; Oinuma, K.; Miura, Y.; Tamaki, T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Because posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) resection makes flexion gaps wider in total knee replacement (TKR), preserving or sacrificing a PCL affects the gap equivalence; however, there are no criteria for the PCL resection that consider gap situations of each knee. This study aims to investigate gap characteristics of knees and to consider the criteria for PCL resection. Methods The extension and flexion gaps were measured, first with the PCL preserved and subsequently with the PCL removed (in cases in which posterior substitute components were selected). The PCL preservation or sacrifice was solely determined by the gap measurement results, without considering other functions of the PCL such as ‘roll back.’ Results Wide variations were observed in the extension and flexion gaps. The flexion gaps were significantly larger than the extension gaps. Cases with 18 mm or more flexion gap and with larger flexion than extension gap were implanted with cruciate retaining component. A posterior substitute component was implanted with the other cases. Conclusions In order to make adequate gaps, it is important to decide whether to preserve the PCL based on the intra-operative gap measurements made with the PCL intact. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:95–100. PMID:24719296

  6. Outcome of posterior decompression with instrumented fusion surgery for K-line (-) cervical ossification of the longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Saito, Junya; Maki, Satoshi; Kamiya, Koshiro; Furuya, Takeo; Inada, Taigo; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Iijima, Yasushi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Aramomi, Masaaki; Mannoji, Chikato; Koda, Masao

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the outcome of posterior decompression and instrumented fusion (PDF) surgery for patients with K-line (-) ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) of the cervical spine, who may have a poor surgical prognosis. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of a series of 27 patients who underwent PDF without correction of cervical alignment for K-line (-) OPLL and were followed-up for at least 1 year after surgery. We had performed double-door laminoplasty followed by posterior instrumented fusion without excessive correction of cervical spine alignment. The preoperative Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score for cervical myelopathy was 8.0 points and postoperative JOA score was 11.9 points on average. The mean JOA score recovery rate was 43.6%. The average C2-C7 angle was 2.2° preoperatively and 3.1° postoperatively. The average maximum occupation ratio of OPLL was 56.7%. In conclusion, PDF without correcting cervical alignment for patients with K-line (-) OPLL showed moderate neurological recovery, which was acceptable considering K-line (-) predicts poor surgical outcomes. Thus, PDF is a surgical option for such patients with OPLL. PMID:27591553

  7. Isolated lateral collateral ligament complex injury in rock climbing and Brazilian Jiu-jitsu.

    PubMed

    Davis, Bryan A; Hiller, Lucas P; Imbesi, Steven G; Chang, Eric Y

    2015-08-01

    We report two occurrences of high-grade tears of the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC), consisting of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) and fibular collateral ligament (FCL). One injury occurred in a rock climber and the other in a martial artist. Increasing awareness of isolated injuries of the LCLC will allow for appropriate diagnosis and management. We review and discuss the anatomy of the LCLC, the unique mechanism of isolated injury, as well as physical and imaging examination findings. PMID:25672946

  8. Ultrasound-guided aspiration and steroid injection of a posterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Vilella, Giuseppe Maria; Guerrisi, Pietro; Lucignani, Giulia; Pasquali, Gaia; Drudi, Francesco Maria

    2015-09-01

    Ganglion cysts are benign masses that originate from mucinous degeneration of the connective tissues and are quite rare when arising from the knee joint. Symptoms are often represented by pain, joint tenderness, effusion and occasional swelling with a palpable mass in the popliteal region of the knee. Percutaneous aspiration followed by a corticosteroid injection of a ganglion cyst has either a diagnostic or therapeutic meaning and its guidance through ultrasound allows the operator to make more accurate the procedure, ensuring the correct placement of the needle inside the lesion. We report our experience in the treatment of a voluminous ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament performed through the ultrasound guidance in a symptomatic young patient. PMID:26261469

  9. Interposition of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament into the Medial Compartment of the Knee Joint on Coronal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Su; Park, Ki Jeong; Wang, Joon Ho; Choe, Bong-Keun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of our study was to evaluate the overall prevalence and clinical significance of interposition of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) into the medial compartment of the knee joint in coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 317 consecutive patients referred for knee MRI at our institution between October 2009 and December 2009. Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint on proton coronal MRI was evaluated dichotomously (i.e., present or absent). We analyzed the interposition according to its prevalence as well as its relationship with right-left sidedness, gender, age, and disease categories (osteoarthritis, anterior cruciate ligament tear, and medial meniscus tear). Results Prevalence of interposition of PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint was 47.0% (149/317). There was no right (50.0%, 83/166) to left (43.7%, 66/151) or male (50.3%, 87/173) to female (43.1%, 62/144) differences in the prevalence. There was no significant association between the prevalence and age, or the disease categories. Conclusion Interposition of the PCL into the medial compartment of the knee joint is observed in almost half of patients on proton coronal MRI of the knee. Its presence is not associated with any particular factors including knee pathology and may be regarded as a normal MR finding. PMID:26957909

  10. Femoral Footprint Reconstruction With a Direct Viewing of the Posterior Insertion Using a Trans-Septal Portal in the Outside-In Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elazab, Ashraf; Lee, Yong Seuk; Kang, Seo Goo

    2015-01-01

    We established a technique for femoral tunnel preparation through direct vision of the femoral footprint with maximum preservation to the native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) remnant using a posterior trans-septal portal. Anterior arthroscopy is difficult for the proper tunnel placement without sacrificing the ACL remnant. Posterior arthroscopy could be helpful for viewing the posterior insertion of the ACL remnant that provides excellent femoral footprint exposure without sacrificing the native ACL remnant. Therefore, a posterolateral portal technique using a 70° arthroscope through a posterolateral portal is introduced. However, using the 70° arthroscope, an oblique view is displayed and distorted view could be seen. Therefore, to achieve the goal of posterior arthroscopy and avoid obstacles of the posterolateral view with the 70° arthroscope, we introduce this technique that uses the posterior trans-septal portal with a 30° arthroscope that provides an excellent viewing to the femoral footprint through a hole of the posterior septum. PMID:27073766

  11. A review of prognostic factors for surgical outcome of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; Jiang, Lei-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    For patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) who have neurological-symptoms, surgery is necessary but not always effective. Various clinical factors influence the surgical outcome. The studies identifying these factors have been inconclusive and conflicting. It is essential for surgeons to understand the significance of the factors and choose the optimal therapeutic strategy for OPLL. The objective of this review is to determine the clinical factors predictive of the surgical outcome of cervical OPLL. The authors conducted a review of literature published in the English language. They examined studies in which the correlation between clinical factors and outcome were statistically evaluated. The results showed that the traverse area of the spinal cord, the spinal cord-evoked potentials (SCEPs), the increase of the range of motion in the cervical spine (ROM), diabetes, history of trauma, the onset of ossification of the ligament flavum (OLF) in the thoracic spine, snake-eye appearance (SEA) and incomplete decompression may be predictive factors. Age at surgery seems to be closely related to the outcome of posterior surgical procedure. Whether the neurological score, OPLL type, pre-operative duration of symptoms, focal intra-medullar high signal intensity in T2-weighted (IMHSI) and progression of OPLL or kyphosis and expansion of the spinal canal predict the surgical outcome remains unclear. The use of uniform neurological score and proper statistic analysis should facilitate comparison of data from different studies. It is important to analyze the effect of each factor on groups with different surgical procedures as well as patients with different compressive pathology. Research on the etiology and pathology of cervical myelopathy due to OPLL should be helpful in precisely understanding these clinical factors and predicting surgical outcome. PMID:18704517

  12. Inside-Out Antegrade Tibial Tunnel Drilling Through the Posterolateral Portal Using a Flexible Reamer in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Stuart, Joseph J.; Choi, J.H. James; Toth, Alison P.; Moorman, Claude T.; Taylor, Dean C.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using the transtibial drilling or arthroscopic tibial-inlay technique has a risk of injury to the popliteal neurovascular bundle because a pin is drilled anterior to posterior. Intraoperative fluoroscopy is used to decrease the risk of neurovascular injury. In addition, graft passage in the transtibial technique may be problematic because of a sharp turn when placing the graft into the tibial tunnel, which may damage graft fibers. In the surgical technique described in this report, the posteromedial portal is used for visualization and the posterolateral portal is used for debridement of the PCL tibial footprint and the synovial fold closest to the PCL. A curved guide is placed from the posterolateral portal to the tibial footprint, and a flexible pin is drilled across the tibia. The tibial tunnel is then created using a flexible reamer under direct visualization up to the desired length, and a graft can be positioned in the tibial tunnel through the posterolateral portal. This technique has the potential advantages of decreasing the risk of injury to the popliteal neurovascular bundle (use of anteriorly directed, inside-out drilling), avoiding a sharp turn during graft passage, and allowing accurate and anatomic tibial tunnel placement without intraoperative fluoroscopy. PMID:26900551

  13. Inside-Out Antegrade Tibial Tunnel Drilling Through the Posterolateral Portal Using a Flexible Reamer in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Stuart, Joseph J; Choi, J H James; Toth, Alison P; Moorman, Claude T; Taylor, Dean C

    2015-10-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using the transtibial drilling or arthroscopic tibial-inlay technique has a risk of injury to the popliteal neurovascular bundle because a pin is drilled anterior to posterior. Intraoperative fluoroscopy is used to decrease the risk of neurovascular injury. In addition, graft passage in the transtibial technique may be problematic because of a sharp turn when placing the graft into the tibial tunnel, which may damage graft fibers. In the surgical technique described in this report, the posteromedial portal is used for visualization and the posterolateral portal is used for debridement of the PCL tibial footprint and the synovial fold closest to the PCL. A curved guide is placed from the posterolateral portal to the tibial footprint, and a flexible pin is drilled across the tibia. The tibial tunnel is then created using a flexible reamer under direct visualization up to the desired length, and a graft can be positioned in the tibial tunnel through the posterolateral portal. This technique has the potential advantages of decreasing the risk of injury to the popliteal neurovascular bundle (use of anteriorly directed, inside-out drilling), avoiding a sharp turn during graft passage, and allowing accurate and anatomic tibial tunnel placement without intraoperative fluoroscopy. PMID:26900551

  14. Cervical Myeloradiculopathy due to Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament with versus without Diffuse Idiopathic Spinal Hyperostosis.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Ryoji; Lee, Sang-Hun; Peters, Colleen; Imagama, Shiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Riew, K Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objectives Assess demographics, ossification characteristics, surgical outcomes, and complications in patients with both diffuse idiopathic spinal hyperostosis (DISH) and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) compared with patients who only have OPLL. Methods Clinical charts and radiographs of all patients treated surgically from February 2004 to July 2012 for cervical myeloradiculopathy due to DISH with OPLL or OPLL alone were reviewed retrospectively. All patients were observed for a minimum of 1 year. Pre- and postoperative Nurick grades were assessed for all patients. Results Forty-nine patients underwent surgical treatment for cervical myeloradiculopathy due to OPLL, and 8 also had DISH (average 58.9 years, range 37 to 70). The DISH with OPLL group had a significantly higher proportion of subjects with diabetes mellitus (50 versus 9.8% in the OPLL-only group). Everyone in the DISH with OPLL group had continuous or mixed-type OPLL, whereas 78% of patients in the OPLL-only group had primarily segmental type. Operative treatments for patients in the DISH with OPLL group included laminoplasty, anterior decompression and fusion, and posterior laminectomy with fusion. By Nurick grade, 5 patients improved and 3 showed no change. Conclusion Patients with both DISH and OPLL had a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus and either continuous or mixed-type OPLL classifications. Surgical outcomes were mostly satisfactory; there was no aggravation of symptoms after surgery during the follow up period. PMID:27190737

  15. Anatomical study of the posterior cruciate ligament with the knee flexed at 90°☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Daniel Kyubin; Rosa, Sthéphano Pellizzaro; Prestes, Guilherme Bello; da Cunha, Luiz Antônio Munhoz; de Moura, Márcio Fernando Aparecido; Stieven Filho, Edmar

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the anatomy of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and define anatomical parameters with the knee flexed at 90°. Methods Eight knees from cadavers were dissected in order to make measurements from the center of the anterolateral band to the roof (AL1), from the center of the anterolateral band to the anterior cartilage (AL2), from the center of the posteromedial band to the roof (PM1), from the center of the posteromedial band to the anterior cartilage (PM2), from the center of the tibial insertion to the medial region of the tibia (TIM), from the center of the tibial insertion to the lateral region of the tibia (TIL), from the center of the medial insertion to the medial meniscus (IMM) and the width of the origin of the PCL (WO). To obtain the results from each anatomical structure, the means and standard deviations of the measurements were calculated. Results The measurements in millimeters that were found were AL1, 6.2; AL2, 4.9; PM1, 11.7; PM2, 5.5; TIM, 32.5; TIL, 40.6; IMM, 9.4; and WO, 32.5. Conclusions The PCL has an extensive origin. The center of the anterolateral band is 6 mm from the roof and 5 mm from the anterior cartilage of the knee. The tibial insertion is slightly medial and 10 mm distal to the posterior cornu of the medial meniscus. PMID:26229851

  16. The anterior cruciate ligament-lateral meniscus complex: A histological study.

    PubMed

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kodama, Yuya; Maehara, Ami; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Fujii, Masataka; Tanaka, Takaaki; Inoue, Hiroto; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-03-01

    The anterior root of the lateral meniscus (LM) dives underneath the tibial attachment of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Although the distinct role of meniscal attachments has been investigated, the relationship between the LM anterior insertion (LMAI) and ACL tibial insertion (ACLTI) remains unclear. This study histologically analyzed the LMAI and ACLTI. Samples were divided into four regions in an anterior-to-posterior direction. Histological measurements of these insertion sites were performed using safranin O-stained coronal sections. Distribution and signal densities of type I and II collagen were quantified. The ACLTI and LMAI formed the ACL-LM complex via fiber connections. The anterior part of the ACLTI had a widespread attachment composed of dense fibers. Attachment fibers of the LMAI became dense and wide gradually at the middle-to-posterior region. The ACL-LM transition zone (ALTZ) was observed between the LMAI and the lateral border of the ACLTI at the middle part of the ACL tibial footprint. Type II collagen density of the LMAI was higher than that of the ACLTI and ALTZ. Our results can help create an accurate tibial bone tunnel within the dense ACL attachment during ACL reconstruction surgery. PMID:26631325

  17. Subtalar arthrodesis with flexor digitorum longus transfer and spring ligament repair for treatment of posterior tibial tendon insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J E; Cohen, B E; DiGiovanni, B F; Lamdan, R

    2000-09-01

    The surgical treatment of flexible pes planovalgus deformities resulting from Stage 2 posterior tibial tendon insufficiency is controversial and many techniques have been proposed. We retrospectively reviewed the results of subtalar arthrodesis combined with spring ligament repair/reefing and flexor digitorum longus (FDL) transfer to the navicular. There were sixteen patients (seventeen feet) with an average follow-up of 27 months (9-52). All deformities were passively correctable. The average age was 56 yrs (39-78). All patients had failed conservative management, 88% had previously been treated with orthotics, and 53% had lateral pain from subfibular impingement. Two patients were noted to have degenerative changes of the subtalar joint. Successful subtalar joint fusion occurred in all patients with an average time to radiographic union of 10.1 weeks (5-24). The average AOFAS hindfoot score and Maryland foot score postoperatively was 82 and 86 respectively. Standing radiographic analysis demonstrated an average improvement in the AP talo-1st metatarsal angle of 6 degrees (24 degrees preoperative, 18 degrees postoperative). The talonavicular coverage angle improved an average of 17 degrees (34 degrees preoperative, 17 degrees postoperative). The lateral talo-1st metatarsal angle improved an average of 10 degrees (18 degrees preoperative, 8 degrees postoperative). The lateral talocalcaneal angle decreased an average of 21o (55 degrees preoperative, 34 degrees postoperative). The distance of the medial cuneiform to the floor on the lateral radiograph averaged 12mm preoperatively and 18mm postoperatively (avg. improvement 6mm). The combination of the flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer and spring ligament repair with subtalar arthrodesis is an effective and reliable procedure which provides excellent correction of hindfoot valgus as well as forefoot abduction and restoration of the height of the longitudinal arch. These results compare favorably with flexor

  18. Relationship between Mucoid Degeneration of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Posterior Tibial Slope in Patients with Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Yoon-Seok; Cho, Hye-Yong; Jung, Seung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to analyze the relationship between posterior tibial slope (PTS) and mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in patients with total knee arthroplasty. Materials and Methods Four hundred and twenty-four patients (24 males and 400 females; 636 knees) who received total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis were included. Their mean age was 68.9 years (range, 48 to 88 years). The patients were classified into three groups according to the status of ACL; normal ACL group (group I), mucoid degeneration of ACL group (group II) and ruptured or absent ACL group (group III). Plain lateral radiographs were used to measure the PTS and the values were compared among groups. Results There were no significant differences with regard to gender, age and left-to-right side ratio among groups (p>0.05). The mean PTS was 9.9° (range, 0.6° to 20.1°) in group I (161 knees), 10.8° (range, 0.2° to 21.8°) in group II (342 knees) and 12.3° (range, 2° to 22.2°) in group III (133 knees), which showed significant differences (p<0.001). Conclusions The patients with mucoid degeneration of the ACL and those with ruptured or absent ACL had greater PTS than those with normal ACL. These findings suggest that an increased PTS may be one of the causative factors for mucoid degeneration of the ACL. PMID:26955611

  19. Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sacrificing Medial Pivot Knee: Minimum 5-year Follow-up Results

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Seon-Ho; Cho, Hye-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate minimum 5-year follow-up clinical and radiological results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using a posterior cruciate ligament sacrificing (PS), non-substituting Advance Medial Pivot Knee. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty knees in 80 patients who could be followed up for more than 5 years after TKA using the PS Advance Medial Pivot Knee were evaluated retrospectively. The evaluations included the preoperative and postoperative range of motion (ROM), tibiofemoral angle, Knee Society (KS) knee and function scores, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) score. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. Results The ROM increased from a preoperative mean flexion contracture of 7.6° and further flexion of 115.1° to a postoperative mean flexion contracture of 1.5° and further flexion of 120.5°. The tibiofemoral angle was changed from 4.6° varus preoperatively to 5.8° valgus postoperatively. The KS knee and function scores as well as WOMAC score significantly improved after surgery (p<0.05). Complications developed in 4 cases (3.3%): 2 cases of periprosthetic patellar fracture (1.7%) and 2 cases of aseptic loosening (1.7%). The seven-year survival rate was 98.1% in the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Conclusions The minimum 5-year follow-up results of TKA using the PS Medial Pivot Knee were satisfactory. PMID:25229042

  20. Chronic compression of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine is associated with abnormal discharge of middle cervical ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Qingguo; Jiang, Dongjie; Wang, Xinwei; Chen, Deyu; Yuan, Wen

    2014-01-01

    There are abundant sympathetic nerve fibers in cervical posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PLL in the occurrence of sympathetic symptoms. Ten healthy adult beagles were selected and anesthetized to establish a PLL compression model by C4/5 discectomy, nucleus pulposus tissue replantation, and plate internal fixation. The middle cervical ganglia (MCG) activities were recorded before modeling, shortly after modeling, and two months after modeling. The waveform parameters and spectral densities of autonomic discharge of MCG among the three periods were compared. There was significant difference only in terms of the area of waveform per unit time between before and shortly after modeling. Abnormal discharge waveforms of MCG were detected in two months after modeling. The wave amplitude and waveform area per unit time in two months after modeling were increased significantly compared with those in shortly after modeling. Functional spectral decomposition found a significant increase in 100-250 Hz in two months after modeling. In conclusion, abnormal discharge of MCG caused by chronic compression of PLL may be one of the pathological basis of sympathetic nervous symptoms. PMID:25550947

  1. Treatment of posterior cruciate ligament avulsion fractures of the tibia using a toothed plate and hollow lag screw

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Luo, Wei; Chen, Zhiqing; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION To investigate the feasibility and clinical efficacy of using a toothed plate and hollow lag screw in the surgical treatment of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) avulsion fractures of the tibia. METHODS A total of 21 patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using a toothed plate and hollow lag screw, through a posteromedial approach using an inverted L-shaped incision. The patients were allowed appropriate functional exercises, including knee flexion and extension, after removal of the plaster at postoperative weeks 3–6. The follow-up period was between six months and two years. RESULTS This was a retrospective study of patients with PCL avulsion fractures of the tibia caused by road traffic accidents (n = 9), sports-related injuries (n = 6), falls (n = 5) and machinery-related injuries (n = 1). 20 patients presented with fresh fractures and one with an old fracture. The patients (13 men, eight women) had a mean age of 41.5 (range 19–72) years. Anatomical reduction of the fracture and satisfactory fixation were achieved in all 21 patients. Bony union was achieved in all patients at 8–12 weeks after surgery. Six months after surgery, knee flexion was 121.9° ± 10.4° and extension was 0°. According to the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale, 19 patients were rated as ‘excellent’ and two as ‘good’. CONCLUSION The use of a toothed plate and hollow lag screw could be a simple and reliable approach for PCL avulsion fractures of the tibia. Patients achieved good knee function after surgery. PMID:26831316

  2. Consolidation of Complex Events via Reinstatement in Posterior Cingulate Cortex.

    PubMed

    Bird, Chris M; Keidel, James L; Ing, Leslie P; Horner, Aidan J; Burgess, Neil

    2015-10-28

    It is well-established that active rehearsal increases the efficacy of memory consolidation. It is also known that complex events are interpreted with reference to prior knowledge. However, comparatively little attention has been given to the neural underpinnings of these effects. In healthy adults humans, we investigated the impact of effortful, active rehearsal on memory for events by showing people several short video clips and then asking them to recall these clips, either aloud (Experiment 1) or silently while in an MRI scanner (Experiment 2). In both experiments, actively rehearsed clips were remembered in far greater detail than unrehearsed clips when tested a week later. In Experiment 1, highly similar descriptions of events were produced across retrieval trials, suggesting a degree of semanticization of the memories had taken place. In Experiment 2, spatial patterns of BOLD signal in medial temporal and posterior midline regions were correlated when encoding and rehearsing the same video. Moreover, the strength of this correlation in the posterior cingulate predicted the amount of information subsequently recalled. This is likely to reflect a strengthening of the representation of the video's content. We argue that these representations combine both new episodic information and stored semantic knowledge (or "schemas"). We therefore suggest that posterior midline structures aid consolidation by reinstating and strengthening the associations between episodic details and more generic schematic information. This leads to the creation of coherent memory representations of lifelike, complex events that are resistant to forgetting, but somewhat inflexible and semantic-like in nature. PMID:26511235

  3. Postoperative cerebrospinal-fluid fistula associated with erosion of the dura. Findings after anterior resection of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Smith, M D; Bolesta, M J; Leventhal, M; Bohlman, H H

    1992-02-01

    Of twenty-two patients who had had anterior decompression of the spinal canal for ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and cervical myelopathy, seven had absence of the dura adjacent to the ossified part of the ligament. The spinal cord and nerve-roots were visible through this defect. Although the arachnoid membrane appeared to be intact and watertight in most patients, a cerebrospinal-fluid fistula developed postoperatively in five, and three had a second operation to repair the defect in the dura. On the basis of this experience, we recommend use of autogenous muscle or fascial dural patches, immediate lumbar subarachnoid shunting, and modification of the usual postoperative regimen, such as limitation of mechanical pulmonary ventilation to the shortest time that is safely possible and use of anti-emetic and antitussive medications to protect the remaining coverings of the spinal cord when the dura is found to be absent adjacent to an ossified portion of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine. PMID:1541620

  4. Intercondylar Ganglion Cyst with Mucoid Degeneration of Posterior Cruciate Ligament of Knee: Report of A Rare Case and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Vandana V; DayanandaSagar, G; Narayan, Shamrendra; Gupta, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Mucoid degeneration and Ganglion cysts arising from the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) of the knee are rare. The aetiology, clinical features and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of PCL mucoid degeneration and intercondylar ganglion cyst are discussed. Case Report: We present a 36 year-old male patient who presented with chronic right knee pain for the duration of 5-6 months. No evidence of ligament instability on clinical examination was found. A diagnosis of PCL mucoid degeneration and intercondylar ganglion cyst was made on MRI. Conclusion: Mucoid degeneration and ganglion cyst involving PCL are uncommon lesions and represents the spectrum of same pathology. MR imaging is sensitive, specific, accurate and noninvasive, while providing multiplanar imaging and superior identification of the anatomical and morphological relationship of the synovial tissue to the surrounding structures, an additional intra-articular lesions can also be detected. PMID:27298942

  5. Consolidation of Complex Events via Reinstatement in Posterior Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Keidel, James L.; Ing, Leslie P.; Horner, Aidan J.

    2015-01-01

    It is well-established that active rehearsal increases the efficacy of memory consolidation. It is also known that complex events are interpreted with reference to prior knowledge. However, comparatively little attention has been given to the neural underpinnings of these effects. In healthy adults humans, we investigated the impact of effortful, active rehearsal on memory for events by showing people several short video clips and then asking them to recall these clips, either aloud (Experiment 1) or silently while in an MRI scanner (Experiment 2). In both experiments, actively rehearsed clips were remembered in far greater detail than unrehearsed clips when tested a week later. In Experiment 1, highly similar descriptions of events were produced across retrieval trials, suggesting a degree of semanticization of the memories had taken place. In Experiment 2, spatial patterns of BOLD signal in medial temporal and posterior midline regions were correlated when encoding and rehearsing the same video. Moreover, the strength of this correlation in the posterior cingulate predicted the amount of information subsequently recalled. This is likely to reflect a strengthening of the representation of the video's content. We argue that these representations combine both new episodic information and stored semantic knowledge (or “schemas”). We therefore suggest that posterior midline structures aid consolidation by reinstating and strengthening the associations between episodic details and more generic schematic information. This leads to the creation of coherent memory representations of lifelike, complex events that are resistant to forgetting, but somewhat inflexible and semantic-like in nature. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Memories are strengthened via consolidation. We investigated memory for lifelike events using video clips and showed that rehearsing their content dramatically boosts memory consolidation. Using MRI scanning, we measured patterns of brain activity while

  6. A Comparison of Arthroscopically Assisted Single and Double Bundle Tibial Inlay Reconstruction for Isolated Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Chul; Park, Chul Hyun; Kim, Won Ho; Jung, Kwang Am

    2010-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the clinical results of arthroscopically assisted single and double bundle tibial inlay reconstructions of an isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury. Methods This study reviewed the data for 14 patients who underwent a single bundle tibial inlay PCL reconstruction (Group A) and 16 patients who underwent a double bundle tibial inlay PCL reconstruction (Group B) between August 1999 and August 2002. The mean follow-up period in groups A and B was 90.5 months and 64 months, respectively. Results The Lysholm knee scores in groups A and B increased from an average of 43.3 ± 7.04 and 44.7 ± 5.02 preoperatively to 88.1 ± 7.32 and 88.7 ± 9.11 points at the final follow-up, respectively. In group A, stress radiography using a Telos device showed that the preoperative mean side-to-side differences (SSDs) of 9.5 ± 1.60 mm at 30° of flexion and 9.8 ± 1.70 mm at 90° of flexion were improved to 2.8 ± 1.19 mm and 3.0 ± 1.1 mm, respectively. In group B, the preoperative SSDs of 10.4 ± 1.50 mm at 30° of flexion and 10.7 ± 1.60 mm at 90° of flexion improved to 2.7 ± 1.15 mm and 2.6 ± 0.49 mm, respectively. There was no significant difference in the clinical scores and radiologic findings between the two groups. Conclusions Single bundle and double bundle PCL reconstructions using the tibial inlay technique give satisfactory clinical results in patients with an isolated PCL injury, and there are no significant differences in the clinical and radiological results between the two techniques. These results suggest that it is unnecessary to perform the more technically challenging double bundle reconstruction using the tibial inlay technique in an isolated PCL injury. PMID:20514264

  7. Arthroscopic fixation of an avulsion fracture of the tibia involving the posterior cruciate ligament: a modified technique in a series of 22 cases.

    PubMed

    Chen, L B; Wang, H; Tie, K; Mohammed, A; Qi, Y J

    2015-09-01

    A total of 22 patients with a tibial avulsion fracture involving the insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with grade II or III posterior laxity were reduced and fixed arthroscopically using routine anterior and double posteromedial portals. A double-strand Ethibond suture was inserted into the joint and wrapped around the PCL from anterior to posterior to secure the ligament above the avulsed bony fragment. Two tibial bone tunnels were created using the PCL reconstruction guide, aiming at the medial and lateral borders of the tibial bed. The ends of the suture were pulled out through the bone tunnels and tied over the tibial cortex between the openings of the tunnels to reduce and secure the bony fragment. Satisfactory reduction of the fracture was checked arthroscopically and radiographically. The patients were followed-up for a mean of 24.5 months (19 to 28). Bone union occurred six weeks post-operatively. At final follow-up, all patients had a negative posterior drawer test and a full range of movement. KT-1000 arthrometer examination showed that the mean post-operative side-to-side difference improved from 10.9 mm (standard deviation (sd) 0.7) pre-operatively to 1.5 mm (sd 0.6) (p = 0.001). The mean Tegner and the International Knee Documentation Committee scores improved significantly (p = 0.001). The mean Lysholm score at final follow-up was 92.0 (85 to 96). We conclude that this technique is convenient, reliable and minimally invasive and successfully restores the stability and function of the knee. PMID:26330588

  8. Variations in cell morphology in the canine cruciate ligament complex.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Vaughan-Thomas, A; Spiller, D G; Clegg, P D; Innes, J F; Comerford, E J

    2012-08-01

    Cell morphology may reflect the mechanical environment of tissues and influence tissue physiology and response to injury. Normal cruciate ligaments (CLs) from disease-free stifle joints were harvested from dog breeds with a high (Labrador retriever) and low (Greyhound) risk of cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Antibodies against the cytoskeletal components vimentin and alpha tubulin were used to analyse cell morphology; nuclei were stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, and images were collected using conventional and confocal microscopy. Both cranial and caudal CLs contained cells of heterogenous morphologies. Cells were arranged between collagen bundles and frequently had cytoplasmic processes. Some of these processes were long (type A cells), others were shorter, thicker and more branched (type B cells), and some had no processes (type C cells). Processes were frequently shown to contact other cells, extending longitudinally and transversely through the CLs. Cells with longer processes had fusiform nuclei, and those with no processes had rounded nuclei and were more frequent in the mid-substance of both CLs. Cells with long processes were more commonly noted in the CLs of the Greyhound. As contact between cells may facilitate direct communication, variances in cell morphology between breeds at a differing risk of CCL rupture may reflect differences in CL physiology. PMID:22465617

  9. Repair of acute injuries of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle by suture anchors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang-Fei; Fang, Yang; Cao, Zhong-Hua; Li, Guang-Feng; Yang, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical curative effect of stage I repair of acute injuries of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle by the application of suture anchors. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 18 cases of III degree acute injuries of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle. Results: There were statistically significant differences in preoperative and last follow-up VAS pain scores and AOFAS ankle hind-foot function scores. The X-ray talus displacement values in the anterior drawer test and pressure anteroposterior X-ray talar tilt in the ankle talar tilt test also showed statistically significant differences. Complications occurred in 2 patients, incision surface infection in one, and postoperative lateral dorsal skin numbness in one. All these cases were cured after symptomatic treatment. At the last follow-up all patients’ ankle joint activity recovered to their preinjury function levels. Conclusion: The application of suture anchors for small incision stage I repair of the lateral collateral ligament of ankle joint degree III injury, can effectively restored the stability of ankle joint, and prevent the occurrence of chronic ankle instability complications. It is effective and feasible for the treatment of ankle joint lateral collateral ligament injuries. PMID:26885144

  10. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding. PMID:27200163

  11. Use of an Ultrasonic Osteotome for Direct Removal of Beak-Type Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament in the Thoracic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chi Heon; Renaldo, Nicholas; Lee, Heui Seung

    2015-01-01

    Direct removal of beak-type ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament at thoracic spine (T-OPLL) is a challenging surgical technique due to the potential risk of neural injury. Slipping off the cutting surface of a high-speed drill may result in entrapment in neural structures, leading to serious complications. Removal of T-OPLL with an ultrasonic osteotome, utilizing back and forth micro-motion of a blade rather than rotatory-motion of drill, may reduce such complications. We have applied the ultrasonic osteotome for posterior circumferential decompression of T-OPLL for three consecutive patients with beak-type OPLL and have described the surgical techniques and patient outcomes. The preoperative chief complaint was gait disturbance in all patients. Japanese orthopedic association scores (JOA) was used for functional assessment. Scores measured 2/11, 5/11, 2/11, and 4/11 for each patient. The ventral T-OPLL mass was exposed after posterior midline approach, laminotomy and transeversectomy. The T-OPLL mass was directly removed with an ultrasonic osteotome and instrumented segmental fixation was performed. The surgeries were uneventful. Detailed surgical techniques were presented. Gait disturbance was improved in all patients. Dural tear occurred in one patient without squeal. Postoperative JOA was 6/11, 10/11, 8/11, and 8/11 (recovery rate; 44%, 83%, 67%, and 43%) respectively at 18, 18, 10, and 1 months postoperative. T-OPLL was completely removed in all patients as confirmed with computed tomography scan. We hope that surgical difficulties in direct removal of T-OPLL might be reduced by utilizing ultrasonic osteotome. PMID:26819697

  12. Comparison of clinical outcomes in decompression and fusion versus decompression only in patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Syed K; Alentado, Vincent J; Lee, Bryan S; Mroz, Thomas E; Benzel, Edward C; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is a pathological calcification or ossification of the PLL, predominantly occurring in the cervical spine. Although surgery is often necessary for patients with symptomatic neurological deterioration, there remains controversy with regard to the optimal surgical treatment. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, the authors identified differences in complications and outcomes after anterior or posterior decompression and fusion versus after decompression alone for the treatment of cervical myelopathy due to OPLL. METHODS A MEDLINE, SCOPUS, and Web of Science search was performed for studies reporting complications and outcomes after decompression and fusion or after decompression alone for patients with OPLL. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate effect summary mean values, 95% CIs, Q statistics, and I(2) values. Forest plots were constructed for each analysis group. RESULTS Of the 2630 retrieved articles, 32 met the inclusion criteria. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of excellent and good outcomes and of fair and poor outcomes between the decompression and fusion and the decompression-only cohorts. However, the decompression and fusion cohort had a statistically significantly higher recovery rate (63.2% vs 53.9%; p < 0.0001), a higher final Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (14.0 vs 13.5; p < 0.0001), and a lower incidence of OPLL progression (< 1% vs 6.3%; p < 0.0001) compared with the decompression-only cohort. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of complications between the 2 cohorts. CONCLUSIONS This study represents the only comprehensive review of outcomes and complications after decompression and fusion or after decompression alone for OPLL across a heterogeneous group of surgeons and patients. Based on these results, decompression and fusion is a superior surgical technique compared with posterior

  13. The Collateral Ligaments and Posterolateral Corner: What Radiologists Should Know.

    PubMed

    Vasilevska Nikodinovska, Violeta; Gimber, Lana H; Hardy, Jolene C; Taljanovic, Mihra S

    2016-02-01

    Ligamentous and tendinous structures of the posterolateral corner of the knee provide important static and dynamic stability to the knee joint and act in conjunction with anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. Injuries of these structures are not uncommon. Failure to treat posterolateral corner injuries leads to posterolateral instability of the knee and subsequently poor outcome of cruciate ligament reconstructions. Currently, MRI is the diagnostic modality of choice in the evaluation of posterolateral corner injuries of the knee. We review normal MR imaging anatomy of the complex anatomical structures of the posterolateral corner of the knee, their biomechanical function, injuries, and current treatment options. PMID:27077587

  14. Remnant Preservation is Helpful to Obtain Good Clinical Results in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Comparison of Clinical Results of Three Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hak; Lee, Han-Jun; Jung, Ho Joong; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to compare the clinical results of 3 posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction techniques according to the time from injury to surgery and remnant PCL status and to evaluate the efficiency of each technique. Methods The records of 89 patients who underwent primary PCL reconstructions with a posterolateral corner sling were analyzed retrospectively. Thirty-four patients were treated by anterolateral bundle (ALB) reconstruction with preservation of the remnant PCL using a transtibial tunnel technique in the acute and subacute stages of injury (group 1). Forty patients were treated with remnant PCL tensioning and an ALB reconstruction using the modified inlay technique in the chronic stage (group 2), and fifteen patients were treated with double-bundle reconstruction using the modified inlay technique (group 3). The double-bundle reconstruction was performed if there was a very weak or no PCL remnant. Results The mean side-to-side differences in posterior tibial translation on the stress radiographs were reduced from 10.1 ± 2.5 mm in group 1, 10.6 ± 2.4 mm in group 2, and 12.8 ± 3.2 mm in group 3 preoperatively to 2.3 ± 1.4 mm in group 1, 2.3 ± 1.5 mm in group 2, and 4.0 ± 2.5 mm in group 3 at the last follow-up (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). Statistical analyses revealed that group 1 and group 2 were similar in terms of side-to-side difference changes in posterior tibial translation on the stress radiographs; however, group 3 was inferior to group 1 and group 2 at the last follow-up (p = 0.022). The clinical results were not significantly different among the three groups. Conclusions Excellent posterior stability and good clinical results were achieved with ALB reconstruction preserving the injured remnant PCL in the acute and subacute stages and remnant PCL tensioning with ALB reconstruction in the chronic stage. The PCL injuries could be surgically corrected with different techniques

  15. Strain rate dependent properties of human craniovertebral ligaments.

    PubMed

    Mattucci, Stephen F E; Moulton, Jeffrey A; Chandrashekar, Naveen; Cronin, Duane S

    2013-07-01

    Craniovertebral ligaments were tested to failure under tensile loading. Ligaments tested included: transverse ligament, anterior atlanto occipital membrane, posterior atlanto occipital membrane, capsular ligaments between Skull-C1 and C1-C2, anterior atlantoaxial membrane, posterior atlantoaxial membrane and the tectorial membrane/vertical cruciate/apical/alar ligament complex. The objective of this study was to obtain mechanical properties of craniovertebral ligaments of a younger population, at varying strain rates representative of automotive crash scenarios, and investigate rate and gender effects for use in numerical models of the cervical spine. There have been few studies conducted on the mechanical properties of human craniovertebral ligaments. Only one study has tested all of the ligaments, and previous studies use older age specimens (mean age 67, from most complete study). Further, tests were often not performed at elongation rates representative of car crash scenarios. Previous studies did not perform tests in an environment resembling in vivo conditions, which has been shown to have a significant effect on ligament tensile behaviour. Fifty-four craniovertebral ligaments were isolated from twenty-one spines, and tested to failure in tension under simulated in vivo temperature and hydration levels, at quasi-static (0.5 s(-1)) and high strain rates (150 s(-1)). Values for failure force, failure elongation, stiffness, and toe region elongation were obtained from force-displacement curves. Values were analyzed for strain rate and gender effects. Increased strain rate produced several significant effects including: higher failure forces for the transverse ligament and capsular ligament (Skull-C1), lower failure elongation for the tectorial membrane complex, higher stiffness for the tectorial membrane complex and capsular ligament (Skull-C1), and lower toe region elongation for capsular ligament (Skull-C1). Gender effects were limited. Ligament tests

  16. Is atlantoaxial instability the cause of “high” cervical ossified posterior longitudinal ligament? Analysis on the basis of surgical treatment of seven patients

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multilevel ossified posterior longitudinal ligaments (OPLLs), particularly those that extend into the high cervical region, are formidable and challenging surgical problems. The aim of the presentation is to analyze the results of surgical treatment of seven consecutive patients having high cervical OPLL with atlantoaxial and subaxial facetal fixations. Objectives: We analyze the role of atlantoaxial instability in the management of OPLL that extended into the high cervical region, above the lower border of C3 vertebra. Materials and Methods: All patients in the series were males. The age of the patients ranged 48-65 years. Clinical evaluation was done by a 5-point clinical grading scale described by us, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, and visual analog scale (VAS). All patients were identified to have relatively “subtle” but definite atlantoaxial facetal instability on sagittal imaging and the instability was confirmed by direct handling of the facets during surgery. All patients were treated by multilevel facetal fixation that included fixation of atlantoaxial facets. The aim of surgery was stabilization and arthrodesis of the involved spinal segments, as instability was considered to be the prime pathogenetic factor of OPLL. Spinal canal decompression, either by anterior corpectomy or discoidectomy or by posterior laminectomy or laminoplasty was not done and no attempts were made to remove the OPLL. At an average follow-up of 8 months, all patients showed progressive symptomatic recovery. Conclusion: Atlantoaxial facetal instability can be a cause or an association of high cervical OPLL. Stabilization of the atlantoaxial joint forms a remarkably effective method of treatment. PMID:27041881

  17. Injury mechanisms of the ligamentous cervical C2-C3 Functional Spinal Unit to complex loading modes: Finite Element study.

    PubMed

    Mustafy, Tanvir; Moglo, Kodjo; Adeeb, Samer; El-Rich, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    The cervical spine sustains high rate complex loading modes during Motor Vehicle Crashes (MVCs) which may produce severe injuries accompanied with soft and/or hard tissue failure. Although previous numerical and experimental studies have provided insights on the cervical spine behavior under various loading scenarios, its response to complex impact loads and the resulting injury mechanisms are not fully understood. A validated Finite Element (FE) model of the ligamentous cervical C2-C3 Functional Spinal Unit (FSU) was utilized to assess the spinal response to six combined impact loading modes; flexion-extension combined with compression and distraction, and lateral bending and axial rotation combined with distraction. The FE model used time and rate-dependent material laws which permit assessing bone fracture and ligament failure. Spinal load-sharing, stresses in the spinal components, intradiscal pressure (IDP) change in the nucleus as well as contact pressure in the facet joints were predicted. Bone and ligaments failure occurrence and initiation instants were investigated. Results showed that spinal load-sharing varied with loading modes. Lateral bending combined with distraction was the most critical loading mode as it increased stresses and strains significantly and produced failure in most of the spinal components compared to other modes. The facet joints and surrounding cancellous bone as well as ligaments particularly the capsular (CL) and flavum (FL) ligaments were the most vulnerable structures to rapid flexion-extension, axial rotation and lateral bending combined with distraction or compression. The excessive stress and strain resulted from these loading modes produced rupture of the CL and FL ligaments and failure in the cancellous bone. The detection of failure initiation as well as fracture assessment demonstrated the vulnerability of ligaments to tensile combined loads and the major contribution of the bony structures in resisting compressive

  18. Effect of culture complex of BMSCs and sodium hydroxide- and GRGDSPC-treated PET on the reconstruction of injured anterior cruciate ligament in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianming; Chen, Fengrong; Jian, Guojian; Ye, Zhiyang; Wang, Zimin; Liu, Haoyuan; Kang, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Ligament reconstruction is an effective therapy for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligaments have recently gained popularity in clinical ACL reconstruction for its advantage in the improvement of keen function. However, the application of PET in clinical treatment is limited by its poor bioactivity and biocompatibility. Recently, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been widely studied in regenerative medical therapy due to their multi-lineage differentiation. Previous study also indicated that BMSCs may promote the healing of tendon-bone interface of injured ligament. We speculate that BMSCs may enhance the curative effect of PET artificial ligament on the tendon-bone-healing in ligament reconstruction. In this study, the PET materials were first modified with sodium hydroxide hydrolysis and GRGDSPC peptide which was able to improve its bioactivity and biocompatibility. Then, the effects of modified PET materials on the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs were examined. The in vitro co-culture of BMSCs and modified PET showed the modified PET promoted the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. Further, the effect of culture complex of BMSCs and modified PET artificial ligament co-culture system on the injured ligament reconstruction was investigated in vivo. Results showed not only better growth and differentiation of BMSCs but also satisfactory healing of the injured ligament was observed after implantation of this culture complex into the injured ligament of rabbits. Our study provides a brand-new solution for ACL reconstruction. PMID:26221227

  19. MR imaging of cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Naraghi, Ali; White, Lawrence M

    2014-11-01

    Cruciate ligament injuries, and in particular injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), are the most commonly reconstructed ligamentous injuries of the knee. As such, accurate preoperative diagnosis is essential in optimal management of patients with cruciate ligament injuries. This article reviews the anatomy and biomechanics of the ACL and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and describes the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearances of complete and partial tears. Normal postoperative appearances of ACL and PCL reconstructions as well as MR imaging features of postoperative complications will also be reviewed. PMID:25442023

  20. Do intramedullary spinal cord changes in signal intensity on MRI affect surgical opportunity and approach for cervical myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament?

    PubMed

    Sun, Qizhi; Hu, Hongwei; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yang; Chen, Linwei; Chen, Huajiang; Yuan, Wen

    2011-09-01

    Some controversy still exists over the optimal treatment time and the surgical approach for cervical myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). The aim of the current study was first to analyze the effect of intramedullary spinal cord changes in signal intensity (hyperintensity on T2-weighted imaging and hypointensity on T1-weighted imaging) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on surgical opportunity and approach for cervical myelopathy due to OPLL. This was a prospective randomized controlled study. Fifty-six patients with cervical myelopathy due to OPLL were enrolled and assigned to either group A (receiving anterior decompression and fusion, n = 27) or group P (receiving posterior laminectomy, n = 29). All the patients were followed up for an average 20.3 months (12-34 months). The clinical outcomes were assessed by the average operative time, blood loss, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, improvement rate (IR) and complication. To determine the relevant statistics, we made two factorial designs and regrouped the data of all patients to group H (with hyperintensity on MRI, n = 31), group L (with hypointensity on MRI, n = 19) and group N (no signal on MRI, n = 25), and then to further six subgroups as well: AH (with hyperintensity on MRI from group A, n = 15), PH (with hyperintensity on MRI from group P, n = 16), AL (with hypointensity on MRI from group A, n = 10), PL (with hypointensity on MRI from group P, n = 9), AN (no signal intensity on MRI from group A, n = 12) and PN (no signal intensity on MRI from group P, n = 13). Both hyperintensity on T2-weighted imaging and hypointensity on T1-weighted imaging had a close relationship with the JOA score and IR. The pre- and postoperative JOA score and postoperative IR of either group H or group L was significantly lower than that of group N (P < 0.05), regardless of whether the patients had received anterior or posterior surgery. On the other hand, both the JOA score and

  1. Prevalence and Distribution of Ossified Lesions in the Whole Spine of Patients with Cervical Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament A Multicenter Study (JOSL CT study).

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takashi; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Iwanami, Akio; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro; Mori, Kanji; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Kanichiro; Koda, Masao; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Takeshita, Katsushi; Abematsu, Masahiko; Haro, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Masahiko; Watanabe, Kei; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Kanno, Haruo; Imagama, Shiro; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Masashi; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Okawa, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) can cause severe and irreversible paralysis in not only the cervical spine but also the thoracolumbar spine. To date, however, the prevalence and distribution of OPLL in the whole spine has not been precisely evaluated in patients with cervical OPLL. Therefore, we conducted a multi-center study to comprehensively evaluate the prevalence and distribution of OPLL using multi-detector computed tomography (CT) images in the whole spine and to analyze what factors predict the presence of ossified lesions in the thoracolumbar spine in patients who were diagnosed with cervical OPLL by plain X-ray. Three hundred and twenty-two patients with a diagnosis of cervical OPLL underwent CT imaging of the whole spine. The sum of the levels in which OPLL was present in the whole spine was defined as the OP-index and used to evaluate the extent of ossification. The distribution of OPLL in the whole spine was compared between male and female subjects. In addition, a multiple regression model was used to ascertain related factors that affected the OP-index. Among patients with cervical OPLL, women tended to have more ossified lesions in the thoracolumbar spine than did men. A multiple regression model revealed that the OP-index was significantly correlated with the cervical OP-index, sex (female), and body mass index. Furthermore, the prevalence of thoracolumbar OPLL in patients with a cervical OP-index ≥ 10 was 7.8 times greater than that in patients with a cervical OP-index ≤ 5. The results of this study reveal that the extent of OPLL in the whole spine is significantly associated with the extent of cervical OPLL, female sex, and obesity. PMID:27548354

  2. Prevalence and Distribution of Ossified Lesions in the Whole Spine of Patients with Cervical Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament A Multicenter Study (JOSL CT study)

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Takashi; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Iwanami, Akio; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro; Mori, Kanji; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Kanichiro; Koda, Masao; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Takeshita, Katsushi; Abematsu, Masahiko; Haro, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Masahiko; Watanabe, Kei; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Kanno, Haruo; Imagama, Shiro; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Masashi; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Okawa, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) can cause severe and irreversible paralysis in not only the cervical spine but also the thoracolumbar spine. To date, however, the prevalence and distribution of OPLL in the whole spine has not been precisely evaluated in patients with cervical OPLL. Therefore, we conducted a multi-center study to comprehensively evaluate the prevalence and distribution of OPLL using multi-detector computed tomography (CT) images in the whole spine and to analyze what factors predict the presence of ossified lesions in the thoracolumbar spine in patients who were diagnosed with cervical OPLL by plain X-ray. Three hundred and twenty-two patients with a diagnosis of cervical OPLL underwent CT imaging of the whole spine. The sum of the levels in which OPLL was present in the whole spine was defined as the OP-index and used to evaluate the extent of ossification. The distribution of OPLL in the whole spine was compared between male and female subjects. In addition, a multiple regression model was used to ascertain related factors that affected the OP-index. Among patients with cervical OPLL, women tended to have more ossified lesions in the thoracolumbar spine than did men. A multiple regression model revealed that the OP-index was significantly correlated with the cervical OP-index, sex (female), and body mass index. Furthermore, the prevalence of thoracolumbar OPLL in patients with a cervical OP-index ≥ 10 was 7.8 times greater than that in patients with a cervical OP-index ≤ 5. The results of this study reveal that the extent of OPLL in the whole spine is significantly associated with the extent of cervical OPLL, female sex, and obesity. PMID:27548354

  3. Differences of Intra-Articular Graft Length between Sandwich-Style Reconstruction and Zhao-Style Non-Remnant-Preserving Double-Bundle Reconstruction of Posterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Caiqi; Zhao, Song; Dong, Shikui; Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Jinzhong

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate graft length within the joint and inside the osseous tunnel is essential for achieving posterior stability and adequate anchorage strength. Because of the curving path and thickness of the graft in double-bundle posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction, especially in double-bundle PCL augmentation (with remnant preservation), the actual intra-articular length of PCL grafts, which remains unknown, may be longer than previously published values. The main purpose of the current study is to measure the actual intra-articular graft length required in sandwich-style PCL reconstruction (remnant-preserving double-bundle PCL augmentation) and Zhao-style non-remnant-preserving double-bundle PCL reconstruction (semi-anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction using double-double tunnel with tibial medial and lateral arrangement). Nine matched pairs of intact cadaveric knees were randomized between two groups and respectively received sandwich-style PCL reconstruction (remnant-preserving group) and Zhao-style non-remnant-preserving double-bundle PCL reconstruction (non-remnant-preserving group). The tunnel positions were exactly the same in two groups. The anterolateral (AL) bundle was reconstructed with four-stranded semitendinosus tendon, and the posteromedial (PM) bundle was reconstructed with four-stranded gracilis tendon. For each bundle, the length of the graft portion within the joint was measured. The current study indicated that in remnant-preserving group, the average intra-articular exposed portion was 42.0 mm (SD, 1.3 mm; range, 40.0 mm to 43.4 mm) for the AL bundle and 32.5 mm (SD, 2.9 mm; range, 27.8 mm to 35.8 mm) for the PM bundle. In non-remnant-preserving group, the intra-articular exposed portion was 34.5 mm (SD, 1.0 mm; range, 32.7 mm to 36.0 mm) for the AL bundle and 29.1 mm (SD, 2.1 mm; range, 25.2 mm to 31.9 mm) for the PM bundle. For both the AL and PM bundles, significant differences were found in average intra-articular graft length

  4. Differences of Intra-Articular Graft Length between Sandwich-Style Reconstruction and Zhao-Style Non-Remnant-Preserving Double-Bundle Reconstruction of Posterior Cruciate Ligament.

    PubMed

    Shen, Peng; Li, Xiaoxi; Xu, Caiqi; Zhao, Song; Dong, Shikui; Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Jinzhong

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate graft length within the joint and inside the osseous tunnel is essential for achieving posterior stability and adequate anchorage strength. Because of the curving path and thickness of the graft in double-bundle posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction, especially in double-bundle PCL augmentation (with remnant preservation), the actual intra-articular length of PCL grafts, which remains unknown, may be longer than previously published values. The main purpose of the current study is to measure the actual intra-articular graft length required in sandwich-style PCL reconstruction (remnant-preserving double-bundle PCL augmentation) and Zhao-style non-remnant-preserving double-bundle PCL reconstruction (semi-anatomic double-bundle PCL reconstruction using double-double tunnel with tibial medial and lateral arrangement). Nine matched pairs of intact cadaveric knees were randomized between two groups and respectively received sandwich-style PCL reconstruction (remnant-preserving group) and Zhao-style non-remnant-preserving double-bundle PCL reconstruction (non-remnant-preserving group). The tunnel positions were exactly the same in two groups. The anterolateral (AL) bundle was reconstructed with four-stranded semitendinosus tendon, and the posteromedial (PM) bundle was reconstructed with four-stranded gracilis tendon. For each bundle, the length of the graft portion within the joint was measured. The current study indicated that in remnant-preserving group, the average intra-articular exposed portion was 42.0 mm (SD, 1.3 mm; range, 40.0 mm to 43.4 mm) for the AL bundle and 32.5 mm (SD, 2.9 mm; range, 27.8 mm to 35.8 mm) for the PM bundle. In non-remnant-preserving group, the intra-articular exposed portion was 34.5 mm (SD, 1.0 mm; range, 32.7 mm to 36.0 mm) for the AL bundle and 29.1 mm (SD, 2.1 mm; range, 25.2 mm to 31.9 mm) for the PM bundle. For both the AL and PM bundles, significant differences were found in average intra-articular graft length

  5. Comparison of anterior decompression and fusion versus laminoplasty in the treatment of multilevel cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weijun; Hu, Ling; Chou, Po-Hsin; Liu, Ming; Kan, Wusheng; Wang, Junwen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes, complications, reoperation rates, and late neurological deterioration between anterior decompression and fusion (ADF) and laminoplasty (LAMP) in the treatment of multilevel cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). Methods All related studies published up to August 2015 were acquired by searching PubMed and EMBASE. Exclusion criteria were case reports, revision surgeries, combined anterior and posterior surgeries, the other posterior approaches including laminectomy or laminectomy and instrumented fusion, non-English studies, and studies with quality assessment scores of <7. The main end points including Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, recovery rate of JOA, cervical lordosis, complication rate, reoperation rate, and late neurological deterioration were analyzed. All available data was analyzed using RevMan 5.2.0 and Stata 12.0. Results A total of seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. The mean surgical level of ADF was 3.1, and the mean preoperative occupation ratios of ADF and LAMP group were 55.9% and 51.9%, respectively. No statistical difference was observed with regard to preoperative occupation ratio and preoperative JOA score. Although LAMP group had a higher preoperative cervical lordosis than ADF group (P<0.05, weighted mean difference [WMD] =−5.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] =−9.67–−1.80), significantly decreased cervical lordosis was observed in LAMP group after operation. ADF group had higher postoperative JOA score (P<0.05, WMD =2.18, 95% CI =0.98–3.38) and neurological recovery rate (P<0.05, WMD =27.22, 95% CI =15.20–39.23). Furthermore, ADF group had a lower late neurological deterioration rate than the LAMP group (P<0.05, risk difference =0.16, 95% CI =0.04–0.73). The complication rates of both groups had no statistical difference. However, LAMP group had a significantly lower reoperation rate than ADF group

  6. Risk of spinal cord injury in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament: a national cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Fu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Chen, Yu-Chun; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Laura; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Lo, Su-Shun; Cheng, Henrich

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to estimate the risk of spinal cord injury (SCI) in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) with and without ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). Also, the study compared the incidence rates of SCI in patients who were managed surgically and conservatively. METHODS This retrospective cohort study covering 15 years analyzed the incidence of SCI in patients with CSM. All patients, identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database, were hospitalized with the diagnosis of CSM and followed up during the study period. These patients with CSM were categorized into 4 groups according to whether they had OPLL or not and whether they received surgery or not: 1) surgically managed CSM without OPLL; 2) conservatively managed CSM without OPLL; 3) surgically managed CSM with OPLL; and 4) conservatively managed CSM with OPLL. The incidence rates of subsequent SCI in each group during follow-up were then compared. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were performed to compare the risk of SCI between the groups. RESULTS Between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2013, there were 17,258 patients with CSM who were followed up for 89,003.78 person-years. The overall incidence of SCI in these patients with CSM was 2.022 per 1000 person-years. Patients who had CSM with OPLL and were conservatively managed had the highest incidence of SCI, at 4.11 per 1000 person-years. Patients who had CSM with OPLL and were surgically managed had a lower incidence of SCI, at 3.69 per 1000 person-years. Patients who had CSM without OPLL and were conservatively managed had an even lower incidence of SCI, at 2.41 per 1000 person-years. Patients who had CSM without OPLL and were surgically managed had the lowest incidence of SCI, at 1.31 per 1000 person-years. The Cox regression model demonstrated that SCIs are significantly more likely to happen in male patients and in those with OPLL (HR 2.00 and 2.24, p < 0.001 and p = 0

  7. Comparison of anterior corpectomy and fusion versus laminoplasty for the treatment of cervical ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zihao; Liu, Bin; Dong, Jianwen; Feng, Feng; Chen, Ruiqiang; Xie, Peigen; Zhang, Liangming; Rong, Limin

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of anterior corpectomy and fusion (ACF) with laminoplasty for the treatment of patients diagnosed with cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). METHODS The authors searched electronic databases for relevant studies that compared the use of ACF with laminoplasty for the treatment of patients with OPLL. Data extraction and quality assessment were conducted, and statistical software was used for data analysis. The random effects model was used if there was heterogeneity between studies; otherwise, the fixed effects model was used. RESULTS A total of 10 nonrandomized controlled studies involving 819 patients were included. Postoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score (p = 0.02, 95% CI 0.30-2.81) was better in the ACF group than in the laminoplasty group. The recovery rate was superior in the ACF group for patients with an occupying ratio of OPLL of ≥ 60% (p < 0.00001, 95% CI 21.27-34.44) and for patients with kyphotic alignment (p < 0.00001, 95% CI 16.49-27.17). Data analysis also showed that the ACF group was associated with a higher incidence of complications (p = 0.02, 95% CI 1.08-2.59) and reoperations (p = 0.002, 95% CI 1.83-14.79), longer operation time (p = 0.01, 95% CI 17.72 -160.75), and more blood loss (p = 0.0004, 95% CI 42.22-148.45). CONCLUSIONS For patients with an occupying ratio ≥ 60% or with kyphotic cervical alignment, ACF appears to be the preferable treatment method. Nevertheless, laminoplasty seems to be effective and safe enough for patients with an occupying ratio < 60% or with adequate cervical lordosis. However, it must be emphasized that a surgical strategy should be made based on the individual patient. Further randomized controlled trials comparing the use of ACF with laminoplasty for the treatment of OPLL should be performed to make a more convincing conclusion. PMID:27246491

  8. POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH AUTOGRAFT OF THE DOUBLE SEMITENDINOSUS MUSCLES AND MIDDLE THIRD OF THE QUADRICEPS TENDON WITH DOUBLE FEMORAL AND SINGLE TIBIAL TUNNELS: CLINICAL RESULTS IN TWO YEARS FOLLOW UP

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Ricardo de Paula Leite; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Aihara, Tatsuo; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; Avakian, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the surgical aspects that may offer good anatomic and functional results in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using an autologous graft of the quadriceps tendon and double semitendinosus through a double femoral tunnel. Methods: Fourteen patients with isolated PCL lesions, instability and pain were operated on by arthroscopy and evaluated according to the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scales. Posterior knee laxity was examined with a KT1000 arthrometer. Results: The mean postoperative posterior side-to-side difference was between 0-2 mm in 57.1% of patients and between 3 and 5 mm in 35.7% of cases. The average Lysholm score was 93 points in the final follow-up. In the IKDC evaluation, 3 patients were graded A, 10 were graded B, and 1 patient was graded C. Conclusions: Double bundle arthroscopic PCL reconstruction based on the anatomical positioning of the tunnels, with double semitendinosus tendon and single quadriceps, provides a clinically evident reduction in symptoms and restores satisfactory stability, although no statistically significant difference was found due to the small sample. PMID:27027083

  9. Mead acid (20:3n-9) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are not associated with risk of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification: results of a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hamazaki, Kei; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Nakano, Masato; Yasuda, Taketoshi; Seki, Shoji; Hori, Takeshi; Hamazaki, Tomohito; Kimura, Tomoatsu

    2015-05-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) involves the replacement of ligamentous tissue with ectopic bone. Although genetics and heritability appear to be involved in the development of OPLL, its pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. Given previous findings that 5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid [20:3n-9, Mead acid (MA)] has depressive effects on osteoblastic activity and anti-angiogenic effects, and that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have a preventive effect on heterotopic ossification, we hypothesized that both fatty acids would be involved in OPLL development. To examine the biological significance of these and other fatty acids in OPLL, we conducted this case-control study involving 106 patients with cervical OPLL and 109 age matched controls. Fatty acid composition was determined from plasma samples by gas chromatography. Associations between fatty acid levels and incident OPLL were evaluated by logistic regression. Contrary to our expectations, we found no significant differences between patients and controls in the levels of MA or n-3 PUFAs (e.g., eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid). Logistic regression analysis did not reveal any associations with OPLL risk for MA or n-3 PUFAs. In conclusion, no potential role was found for MA or n-3 PUFAs in ectopic bone formation in the spinal canal. PMID:25669698

  10. A novel proximal end stenting technique for assisting embolization of a complex true posterior communicating aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Jianmin; Ge, Jiajia; Li, Zi-Fu; Tian, Chun-Ou; Han, Jingfeng; Zhao, Rui; Hong, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Stent-assisted coiling has been widely used for endovascular treatment in recent years with satisfying clinical outcomes. The implantation of a stent using the regular approach, however, may not be safe or effective for certain aneurysms with complex structures. In this study, we report a novel stenting technique utilizing the proximal end of the stent for assisting embolization of a wide-neck irregular true posterior communicating aneurysm. This new method is a potential treatment strategy for wide-neck aneurysms located at the origin of a tortuous and thin vessel. PMID:26906925

  11. Response of individual thoracolumbar spine ligaments under high-rate deformation.

    PubMed

    Iwaskiw, Alexander S; Armiger, Robert S; Ott, Kyle A; Wickwire, Alexis C M; Merkle, Andrew C

    2012-01-01

    Under-Body Blast (UBB) has emerged as the predominant threat to ground vehicles and Warfighter survivability. The force transference from the vehicle structure to the human body has resulted in serious injuries, with the thoracolumbar spine frequently damaged. Computational models of the human body are being generated to model human response and develop injury mitigation strategies. To effectively model the spine mechanics, the thoracolumbar ligaments, which serve varying roles in contributing to spine stability, must be characterized at relevant strains and strain rates. Adaptation of cervical spine testing methods has allowed for testing of isolated spinal ligaments including the Anterior Longitudinal Ligament (ALL), Posterior Longitudinal Ligament (PLL), and Ligamentum Flavum (LF). A high-rate servo-hydraulic test machine was used to execute a tensile test protocol for 24 complexes with loading rates ranging from 240 - 2800 mm/s and displacements of 25%, 50%, 75%, 100%, and 300% of the measured ligament length. Non-contact strain field measurements were recorded to produce a three dimensional strain field of the ligament surface. In order to provide the ligament data in a form which can be incorporated in the human computational models, analytical methods for modeling the ligament response are being investigated. Ultimately, this model will be optimized to be utilized in computational models of the lumbar spine. PMID:22846283

  12. Total hip replacement through a posterior approach using a 22 mm diameter femoral head : the role of the transverse acetabular ligament and capsular repair in reducing the rate of dislocation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Sharma, S; James, J; Hodgkinson, J P; Hemmady, M V

    2014-09-01

    Despite a lack of long-term follow-up, there is an increasing trend towards using femoral heads of large diameter in total hip replacement (THR), partly because of the perceived advantage of lower rates of dislocation. However, increasing the size of the femoral head is not the only way to reduce the rate of dislocation; optimal alignment of the components and repair of the posterior capsule could achieve a similar effect. In this prospective study of 512 cemented unilateral THRs (Male:Female 230:282) performed between 2004 and 2011, we aimed to determine the rate of dislocation in patients who received a 22 mm head on a 9/10 Morse taper through a posterior approach with capsular repair and using the transverse acetabular ligament (TAL) as a guide for the alignment of the acetabular component. The mean age of the patients at operation was 67 years (35 to 89). The mean follow-up was 2.8 years (0.5 to 6.6). Pre- and post-operative assessment included Oxford hip, Short Form-12 and modified University of California Los Angeles and Merle D'Aubigne scores. The angles of inclination and anteversion of the acetabular components were measured using radiological software. There were four dislocations (0.78%), all of which were anterior. In conclusion, THR with a 22 mm diameter head performed through a posterior approach with capsular repair and using the TAL as a guide for the alignment of the acetabular component was associated with a low rate of dislocation. PMID:25183591

  13. Functional connectivity between posterior hippocampus and retrosplenial complex predicts individual differences in navigational ability.

    PubMed

    Sulpizio, Valentina; Boccia, Maddalena; Guariglia, Cecilia; Galati, Gaspare

    2016-07-01

    Individuals vary widely in their ability to orient and navigate within the environment. Previous neuroimaging research has shown that hippocampus (HC) and scene-responsive regions (retrosplenial complex [RSC] and parahippocampal gyrus/parahippocampal place area [PPA]) were crucial for spatial orienting and navigation. Resting-state functional connectivity and a self-reported questionnaire of navigational ability were used to examine the hypothesis that the pattern of reciprocal connections between these regions reflects individual differences in spatial navigation. It was found that the functional connectivity between the posterior HC and RSC was significantly higher in good than in poor navigators. These results confirmed the crucial role of hippocampal and extra-hippocampal regions in spatial navigation and provided new insight into how spontaneous brain activity may account for individual differences in spatial ability. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27013151

  14. Dependence Independence Measure for Posterior and Anterior EMG Sensors Used in Simple and Complex Finger Flexion Movements: Evaluation Using SDICA.

    PubMed

    Naik, Ganesh R; Baker, Kerry G; Nguyen, Hung T

    2015-09-01

    Identification of simple and complex finger flexion movements using surface electromyography (sEMG) and a muscle activation strategy is necessary to control human-computer interfaces such as prosthesis and orthoses. In order to identify these movements, sEMG sensors are placed on both anterior and posterior muscle compartments of the forearm. In general, the accuracy of myoelectric classification depends on several factors, which include number of sensors, features extraction methods, and classification algorithms. Myoelectric classification using a minimum number of sensors and optimal electrode configuration is always a challenging task. Sometimes, using several sensors including high density electrodes will not guarantee high classification accuracy. In this research, we investigated the dependence and independence nature of anterior and posterior muscles during simple and complex finger flexion movements. The outcome of this research shows that posterior parts of the hand muscles are dependent and hence responsible for most of simple finger flexion. On the other hand, this study shows that anterior muscles are responsible for most complex finger flexion. This also indicates that simple finger flexion can be identified using sEMG sensors connected only on anterior muscles (making posterior placement either independent or redundant), and vice versa is true for complex actions which can be easily identified using sEMG sensors on posterior muscles. The result of this study is beneficial for optimal electrode configuration and design of prosthetics and other related devices using a minimum number of sensors. PMID:25055388

  15. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  16. Ligamentous laxity across C0-C1-C2 complex. Axial torque-rotation characteristics until failure.

    PubMed

    Goel, V K; Winterbottom, J M; Schulte, K R; Chang, H; Gilbertson, L G; Pudgil, A G; Gwon, J K

    1990-10-01

    The axial torque until failure of the ligamentous occipito-atlanto-axial complex (C0-C1-C2) subjected to axial angular rotation (theta) was characterized using a biaxial MTS system. A special fixture and gearbox that permitted right axial rotation of the specimen until failure without imposing any additional constraints were designed to obtain the data. The average values for the axial rotation and torque at the point of maximum resistance were, respectively, 68.1 degrees and 13.6 N-m. The specimens offered minimal resistance (approximately 0.5 N-m), up to an average axial rotation of 21 degrees across the complex. The torque-angular rotation (T-theta) curve can be divided into four regions: regions of least and steadily increasing resistances, a transition zone that connects these two regions, and the increasing resistance region to the point of maximum resistance. The regions of least and steadily increasing resistances may be represented by two straight lines with average slopes of 0.028 and 0.383 N-m/degree, respectively. Post-test dissection of the specimens disclosed the following. The point of maximum resistance corresponded roughly to the value of axial rotation at which complete bilateral rotary dislocation of the C1-C2 facets occurred. The types of injuries observed were related to the magnitude of axial rotation imposed on a specimen during testing. Soft-tissue injuries alone (like stretch/rupture of the capsular ligaments, subluxation of the C1-C2 facets, etc.) were confined to specimens rotated up to or close to the point of maximum resistance. The specimens that were subjected to rotations up to the point of maximum resistance of the curve spontaneously reduced completely on removal from the testing apparatus. Spontaneous reduction was not possible for specimens tested slightly beyond their points of maximum resistance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2263977

  17. Representation of Perceptual Color Space in Macaque Posterior Inferior Temporal Cortex (the V4 Complex)

    PubMed Central

    Bohon, Kaitlin S.; Hermann, Katherine L.; Hansen, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The lateral geniculate nucleus is thought to represent color using two populations of cone-opponent neurons [L vs M; S vs (L + M)], which establish the cardinal directions in color space (reddish vs cyan; lavender vs lime). How is this representation transformed to bring about color perception? Prior work implicates populations of glob cells in posterior inferior temporal cortex (PIT; the V4 complex), but the correspondence between the neural representation of color in PIT/V4 complex and the organization of perceptual color space is unclear. We compared color-tuning data for populations of glob cells and interglob cells to predictions obtained using models that varied in the color-tuning narrowness of the cells, and the color preference distribution across the populations. Glob cells were best accounted for by simulated neurons that have nonlinear (narrow) tuning and, as a population, represent a color space designed to be perceptually uniform (CIELUV). Multidimensional scaling and representational similarity analyses showed that the color space representations in both glob and interglob populations were correlated with the organization of CIELUV space, but glob cells showed a stronger correlation. Hue could be classified invariant to luminance with high accuracy given glob responses and above-chance accuracy given interglob responses. Luminance could be read out invariant to changes in hue in both populations, but interglob cells tended to prefer stimuli having luminance contrast, regardless of hue, whereas glob cells typically retained hue tuning as luminance contrast was modulated. The combined luminance/hue sensitivity of glob cells is predicted for neurons that can distinguish two colors of the same hue at different luminance levels (orange/brown). PMID:27595132

  18. Representation of Perceptual Color Space in Macaque Posterior Inferior Temporal Cortex (the V4 Complex).

    PubMed

    Bohon, Kaitlin S; Hermann, Katherine L; Hansen, Thorsten; Conway, Bevil R

    2016-01-01

    The lateral geniculate nucleus is thought to represent color using two populations of cone-opponent neurons [L vs M; S vs (L + M)], which establish the cardinal directions in color space (reddish vs cyan; lavender vs lime). How is this representation transformed to bring about color perception? Prior work implicates populations of glob cells in posterior inferior temporal cortex (PIT; the V4 complex), but the correspondence between the neural representation of color in PIT/V4 complex and the organization of perceptual color space is unclear. We compared color-tuning data for populations of glob cells and interglob cells to predictions obtained using models that varied in the color-tuning narrowness of the cells, and the color preference distribution across the populations. Glob cells were best accounted for by simulated neurons that have nonlinear (narrow) tuning and, as a population, represent a color space designed to be perceptually uniform (CIELUV). Multidimensional scaling and representational similarity analyses showed that the color space representations in both glob and interglob populations were correlated with the organization of CIELUV space, but glob cells showed a stronger correlation. Hue could be classified invariant to luminance with high accuracy given glob responses and above-chance accuracy given interglob responses. Luminance could be read out invariant to changes in hue in both populations, but interglob cells tended to prefer stimuli having luminance contrast, regardless of hue, whereas glob cells typically retained hue tuning as luminance contrast was modulated. The combined luminance/hue sensitivity of glob cells is predicted for neurons that can distinguish two colors of the same hue at different luminance levels (orange/brown). PMID:27595132

  19. Cruciate ligament loading during common knee rehabilitation exercises.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Macleod, Toran D; Wilk, Kevin E; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2012-09-01

    Cruciate ligament injuries are common and may lead to dysfunction if not rehabilitated. Understanding how to progress anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament loading, early after injury or reconstruction, helps clinicians prescribe rehabilitation exercises in a safe manner to enhance recovery. Commonly prescribed therapeutic exercises include both weight-bearing exercise and non-weight-bearing exercise. This review was written to summarize and provide an update on the available literature on cruciate ligament loading during commonly used therapeutic exercises. In general, weight-bearing exercise produces smaller loads on the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament compared with non-weight-bearing exercise. The anterior cruciate ligament is loaded less at higher knee angles (i.e. 50-100 degrees). Squatting and lunging with a more forward trunk tilt and moving the resistance pad proximally on the leg during the seated knee extension unloads the anterior cruciate ligament. The posterior cruciate ligament is less loaded at lower knee angles (i.e. 0-50 degrees), and may be progressed from level ground walking to a one-leg squat, lunges, wall squat, leg press, and the two-leg squat (from smallest to greatest). Exercise type and technique variation affect cruciate ligament loading, such that the clinician may prescribe therapeutic exercises to progress ligament loading safely, while ensuring optimal recovery of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:23025167

  20. Association of miR-146a, miR-149, miR-196a2, and miR-499 Polymorphisms with Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament of the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young Joo; Kumar, Hemant; Sohn, Seil; Min, Hyoung Sik; Lee, Jang Bo; Kuh, Sung Uk; Kim, Keung Nyun; Kim, Jung Oh; Kim, Ok Joon; Ropper, Alexander E.; Kim, Nam Keun; Han, In Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) of the spine is considered a multifactorial and polygenic disease. We aimed to investigate the association between four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of pre-miRNAs [miR-146aC>G (rs2910164), miR-149T>C (rs2292832), miR-196a2T>C (rs11614913), and miR-499A>G (rs3746444)] and the risk of cervical OPLL in the Korean population. Methods The genotypic frequencies of these four SNPs were analyzed in 207 OPLL patients and 200 controls by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Findings For four SNPs in pre-miRNAs, no significant differences were found between OPLL patients and controls. However, subgroup analysis based on OPLL subgroup (continuous: continuous type plus mixed type, segmental: segmental and localized type) showed that miR-499GG genotype was associated with an increased risk of segmental type OPLL (adjusted odds ratio = 4.314 with 95% confidence interval: 1.109–16.78). In addition, some allele combinations (C-T-T-G, G-T-T-A, and G-T-C-G of miR-146a/-149/-196a2/-499) and combined genotypes (miR-149TC/miR-196a2TT) were associated with increased OPLL risk, whereas the G-T-T-G and G-C-C-G allele combinations were associated with decreased OPLL risk. Conclusion The results indicate that GG genotype of miR-499 is associated with significantly higher risks of OPLL in the segmental OPLL group. The miR-146a/-149/-196a2/-499 allele combinations may be a genetic risk factor for cervical OPLL in the Korean population. PMID:27454313

  1. Comparison of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Score and the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire Scores: Time-Dependent Changes in Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy and Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Motoki; Sakaura, Hironobu; Fujimori, Takahito; Nagamoto, Yukitaka; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To identify differences in time-dependent perioperative changes between the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and the JOA Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire (JOACMEQ) score in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) who underwent cervical laminoplasty. Overview of Literature The JOA score does not take into consideration patient satisfaction or quality of life. Accordingly, the JOACMEQ was designed in 2007 as a patient-centered assessment tool. Methods We studied 21 patients who underwent cervical laminoplasty. We objectively evaluated the time-dependent changes in JOACMEQ scores and JOA scores for all patients before surgery and at 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. Results The average total JOA score and the recovery rate improved significantly after surgery in both groups, with a slightly better recovery rate in the OPLL group. Cervical spine function improved significantly in the CSM group but not in the OPLL group. Upper- and lower-extremity functions were more stable in the CSM group than in the OPLL group. The effectiveness rate of the JOACMEQ for measuring quality of life was quite low in both groups. In both groups, the Spearman contingency coefficients were dispersed widely except for upper- and lower-extremity function. Conclusions Scores for upper- and lower-extremity function on the JOACMEQ correlated well with JOA scores. Because the JOACMEQ can also assess cervical spine function and quality of life, factors that cannot be assessed by the JOA score alone, the JOACMEQ is a more comprehensive evaluation tool. PMID:25705334

  2. Carpal Ligament Anatomy and Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Pulos, Nicholas; Bozentka, David J

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental understanding of the ligamentous anatomy of the wrist is critical for any physician attempting to treat carpal instability. The anatomy of the wrist is complex, not only because of the number of named structures and their geometry but also because of the inconsistencies in describing these ligaments. The complex anatomy of the wrist is described through a review of the carpal ligaments and their effect on normal carpal motion. Mastery of this topic facilitates the physician's understanding of the patterns of instability that are seen clinically. PMID:26205699

  3. Tensile properties of the inferior glenohumeral ligament.

    PubMed

    Bigliani, L U; Pollock, R G; Soslowsky, L J; Flatow, E L; Pawluk, R J; Mow, V C

    1992-03-01

    The tensile properties of the inferior glenohumeral ligament have been determined in 16 freshly frozen cadaver shoulders. The inferior glenohumeral ligament was divided into three anatomical regions: a superior band, an anterior axillary pouch, and a posterior axillary pouch. This yielded 48 bone-ligament-bone specimens, which were tested to failure in uniaxial tension. The superior band was consistently the thickest region, averaging 2.79 mm. The thickness of the inferior glenohumeral ligament decreased from antero-superiorly to postero-inferiorly. The resting length of all three anatomical regions was not statistically different. Total specimen strain to failure for all bone-ligament-bone specimens averaged 27%. Variations occurred between the three regions, with the anterior pouch specimens failing at a higher strain (34%) than those from the superior band (24%) or the posterior pouch (23%). Strain to failure for the ligament midsubstance (11%) was found to be significantly less than that for the entire specimen (27%). Thus, larger strain must occur near the insertion sites of the inferior glenohumeral ligament. Stress at failure was found to be nearly identical for the three regions of the ligament, averaging 5.5 MPa. These values are lower than those reported for other soft tissues, such as the anterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon. The anterior pouch was found to be less stiff than the other two regions, perhaps suggesting that it is composed of more highly crimped collagen fibers. Three failure sites were seen for the inferior glenohumeral ligament: the glenoid insertion (40%), the ligament substance (35%), and the humeral insertion (25%). In addition, significant capsular stretching occurred before failure, regardless of the failure mode. PMID:1740736

  4. Histological characteristics and ultrastructure of polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shao-Bin; Yang, Rong-Hua; Zuo, Zhong-Nan; Dong, Qi-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament were the remnant of LARS ligament used for repairing posterior cruciate ligament obtained from operation. We want to study histological characteristics and ultrastructure of polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament after the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament in rabbits. Therefore, we replaced the original ACL with polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament which was covering with the remnant of ACL in 9 rabbits (L-LARS group), while just only polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament were transplanted in 3 rabbits (LARS group) with the remnant of ACL. Compared with group LARS, inflammatory cell reaction and foreign body reaction were more significant in group L-LARS. Moreover, electron microscopy investigation showed the tissue near LARS fibers was highly cellular with a matrix of thin collagen fibrils (50-100 nm) in group L-LARS. These above findings suggest the polyethylene terephthalate LARS ligament possess the high biocompatibility, which contributes to the polyethylene terephthalate LARS covered with recipient connective tissues. PMID:25356104

  5. Chronic Multiple Knee Ligament Injuries: Epidemiological Analysis of More Than One Hundred Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bispo, Rosalvo Zosimo; Kawano, Cezar Teruyuki; Guedes, Alexandre Vieira

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diagnosis and treatment of multiple ligament injuries of the knee remain a real challenge for most surgeons. OBJECTIVE To find out the epidemiological profile of patients surgically treated at a Reference Service with more than one chronic ligament injury in the knee joint. MATERIALS AND METHODS Of a total of 978 operated patients, 109 presented at least two associated ligament injuries in the same knee. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated. RESULTS The anterior cruciate ligament group presented a larger number of cases of ligament injuries related with sports practice and falls, while the posterior cruciate ligament and anterior cruciate ligament + posterior cruciate ligament groups presented more cases related to traffic accidents and trauma with object (weight on the knee) (p<0.001). The varus group presented significantly higher values of time since injury (p<0.01). In the group with new anterior cruciate ligament injury (neoligament) associated with other ligament injuries the disruption times were higher, showing statistical significance (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Anterior cruciate ligament injury associated with other ligament injuries other than posterior cruciate ligament injury are related to sports practice and falls. Posterior cruciate ligament injury associated to other ligament injuries, including or not anterior cruciate ligament injury, are related to traffic accidents and direct trauma caused by an object on the knee. Significant delay between primary ligament injuries and their reconstructions generates varus deformity of the affected knee. In spite of the large delay in seeking medical treatment, few patients with neoligament anterior cruciate ligament injury and other combined disruptions will develop varus deformity. PMID:18297200

  6. Strain measurement at the knee ligament insertion sites.

    PubMed

    Hinterwimmer, S; Baumgart, R; Plitz, W

    2003-01-01

    We describe the modification of an existing method of ligament strain measurement at the knee joint in detail. At ten fresh joint specimens we used that technique where strain gauges are attached to the ligamentous insertions and origins. We both improved the preparation of the attachment site and the application of the strain gauges. In a special apparatus the specimens were moved from 0 degree extension to 100 degrees flexion while simulating muscle strength and axial force. Testing was performed at the posterior cruciate ligament with both intact and transsected anterior cruciate ligament. In contrast to other existing techniques it does not affect the motion of the joint or the integrity and the function of the ligaments. Unlike the original description of that method we could register a loading behaviour of the posterior cruciate ligament that is similar to those reported in the literature. PMID:12655843

  7. Imaging evaluation of traumatic ligamentous injuries of the ankle and foot.

    PubMed

    Nazarenko, Anna; Beltran, Luis S; Bencardino, Jenny T

    2013-05-01

    Sports ankle injuries are very common worldwide. In the United States, it is estimated that 2 million acute ankle sprains occur each year, averaging to $318 to $914 per sprain. Magnetic resonance imaging is excellent for depicting normal ankle anatomy and can elegantly demonstrate ligamentous injuries of the ankle and associated conditions after ankle sprain. This article encompasses epidemiology, biomechanics, normal anatomy, and pathologic conditions of the ankle and foot ligaments. The specific ligaments discussed include the syndesmotic ligaments, lateral ligament complex of the ankle, deltoid ligament, spring ligament, ligaments of the sinus tarsi, and the Lisfranc ligament. PMID:23622094

  8. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury -- aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, assistant professor, chief, sports medicine and shoulder service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, ...

  9. A model of human knee ligaments in the sagittal plane. Part 2: Fibre recruitment under load.

    PubMed

    Zavatsky, A B; O'Connor, J J

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical model of the knee ligaments in the sagittal plane is used to study the forces in the cruciate and collateral ligaments produced by anterior/posterior tibial translation. The model is based on ligament fibre functional architecture. Geometric analysis of the deformed configurations of the model ligaments provides the additional compatibility conditions necessary for calculation of the statically indeterminate distributions of strain and stress within the ligaments and the sharing of load between ligaments. The investigation quantifies the process of ligament fibre recruitment, which occurs when fibres made slack by passive flexion/extension of the knee stretch and change their spatial positions in order to resist applied loads. The calculated ligament forces are in reasonable agreement with experimental results reported in the literature. The model explains some subtleties of ligament function not incorporated in models that represent the ligaments by a small number of lines. PMID:1482509

  10. Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Hsueh, Pei-ling; Chen, Yun-feng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Operative intervention is recommended for complete acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation to restore AC stability, but the best operative technique is still controversial. Twelve fresh-frozen male cadaveric shoulders (average age, 62.8 ± 7.8 years) were equally divided into endobutton versus the modified Weaver-Dunn groups. Each potted scapula and clavicle was fixed in a custom made jig to allow translation and load to failure testing using a Zwick BZ2.5/TS1S material testing machine (Zwick/Roell Co, Germany). A systematic review of 21 studies evaluating reconstructive methods for coracoclavicular or AC joints using a cadaveric model was also performed. From our biomechanical study, after ligament reconstruction, the triple endobutton technique demonstrated superior, anterior, and posterior displacements similar to that of the intact state (P > 0.05). In the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction group, however, there was significantly greater anterior (P < 0.001) and posterior (P = 0.003) translation after ligament reconstruction. In addition, there was no significant difference after reconstruction between failure load of the triple endobutton group and that of the intact state (686.88 vs 684.9 N, P > 0.05), whereas the failure load after the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction was decreased compared with the intact state (171.64 vs 640.86 N, P < 0.001). From our systematic review of 21 studies, which involved comparison of the modified Weaver-Dunn technique with other methods, the majority showed that the modified Weaver-Dunn procedure had significantly (P < .05) greater laxity than other methods including the endobutton technique. The triple endobutton reconstruction proved superior to the modified Weaver-Dunn technique in restoration of AC joint stability and strength. Triple endobutton reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament is superior to the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction in controlling both superior and

  11. Spring ligament of the ankle: normal MR anatomy.

    PubMed

    Rule, J; Yao, L; Seeger, L L

    1993-12-01

    The plantar calcaneonavicular or spring ligament is visualized inconsistently and incompletely on routine MR images of the foot. This ligament is a vital stabilizer of the longitudinal arch of the foot, providing support for the head of the talus, which rests on the ligament's central portion. Laxity or rupture of the spring ligament permits plantar flexion of the talus. This motion results in valgus alignment of the calcaneus and a flatfoot deformity (pes planovalgus). Laxity or rupture of the spring ligament can develop in cases of chronic dysfunction of the posterior tibial tendon. In rupture of the posterior tibial tendon, surgical management may include plication of the spring ligament in addition to repair or reconstruction of the tendon to stabilize the medial column of the foot. Thus, the status of the spring ligament can be a significant consideration in preoperative planning. This pictorial essay illustrates the normal MR anatomy of the spring ligament, the planes of imaging required for optimal depiction of the ligament, and the neighboring structures with which the ligament can be confused. PMID:8249733

  12. Spring ligament reconstruction using the autogenous flexor hallucis longus tendon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Chun; Yi, Young

    2014-07-01

    The calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament complex is the soft tissue most often seen to fail in flatfoot pathology and is associated with deformity of the talonavicular joint. The spring ligament complex supports the talar head, preventing it from displacing into excessive plantar flexion/adduction. An anatomical reconstruction of the spring ligament should replicate this function. A new method of spring ligament reconstruction using autogenous flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer is reported. PMID:24992052

  13. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction. PMID:27327919

  14. Function of anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments during in-vivo motion of the ankle joint complex

    PubMed Central

    de Asla, Richard J; Kozánek, Michal; Wan, Lu; Rubash, Harry E; Li, Guoan

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the numerous in-vitro studies on the mechanical properties and simulated injury mechanisms of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), the in-vivo biomechanical behavior of these two ligaments has not yet been described. Methods Apparent length of the ATFL and CFL was measured in four ankles in healthy male subjects between 32 and 45 years of age (two left and two right) during a dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and supination-pronation arc of motion using a combined dual-orthogonal fluoroscopic and magnetic resonance imaging technique. Results The ATFL elongated from the neutral position at 16.3 +/- 3.0 mm to 20.8 +/- 2.7 mm at maximal plantarflexion and shortened significantly from the neutral position to 13.9 +/- 2.9 mm at maximal dorsiflexion (p = 0.01). The CFL shortened from the neutral position at 28.0 +/- 2.9 mm to 26.6 +/- 2.2 mm at maximal plantarflexion (p = 0.08) and elongated significantly from the neutral position to 29.9 +/- 3.0 mm at maximal dorsiflexion (p = 0.003). The ATFL elongated significantly from 14.8 +/- 2.5 mm at maximal pronation to 17.4 +/- 3.0 mm at maximal supination (p = 0.08). At the same time, the CFL shortened from 31.0 +/- 3.8 mm at maximal pronation to 26.9 +/- 3.6 mm at maximal supination (p = 0.02). Conclusion The results showed that the ATFL elongates more during plantarflexion and supination whereas the CFL increases in length with dorsiflexion and pronation. Concurrently, these data also demonstrated the reciprocal function between the two ligaments. While one shortens, the other one elongates. The different elongation of the ATFL and CFL during the same motion arc suggests that under excessive loading conditions the ATFL might be more vulnerable in plantarflexion and supination while the CFL might be more susceptible to injury in dorsiflexion and pronation. Furthermore, in the case of surgical reconstruction the grafts used to reconstruct the two ligaments may need to be

  15. Isolated posterior high ankle sprain: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Botchu, Rajesh; Allen, Patricia; Rennie, Winston J

    2013-12-01

    High ankle sprains are difficult to diagnose and account for 10% of all ankle sprains. A high index of suspicion is essential for diagnosis. High ankle sprains are managed symptomatically, with prolonged rehabilitation. The posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament is the strongest syndesmotic ligament; isolated injury of it is rare. We present 3 cases of isolated posterior high ankle sprain and discuss the relevant anatomy, mechanism of injury, and management. PMID:24366808

  16. Ligament-induced sacral fractures of the pelvis are possible.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Hanno; Hammer, Niels; Lingslebe, Uwe; Höch, Andreas; Klink, Thomas; Böhme, Jörg

    2014-07-01

    Pelvic ring stability is maintained passively by both the osseous and the ligamentous apparatus. Therapeutic approaches focus mainly on fracture patterns, so ligaments are often neglected. When they rupture along with the bone after pelvic ring fractures, disrupting stability, ligaments need to be considered during reconstruction and rehabilitation. Our aim was to determine the influence of ligaments on open-book injury using two experimental models with body donors. Mechanisms of bone avulsion related to open-book injury were investigated. Open-book injuries were induced in human pelves and subsequently investigated by anatomical dissection and endoscopy. The findings were compared to CT and MRI scans of open-book injuries. Relevant structures were further analyzed using plastinated cross-sections of the posterior pelvic ring. A fragment of the distal sacrum was observed, related to open-book injury. Two ligaments were found to be responsible for this avulsion phenomenon: the caudal portion of the anterior sacroiliac ligament and another ligament running along the ventral surface of the third sacral vertebra. The sacral fragment remained attached to the coxal bone by this second ligament after open-book injury. These results were validated using plastination and the structures were identified. Pelvic ligaments are probably involved in sacral avulsion caused by lateral traction. Therefore, ligaments should to be taken into account in diagnosis of open-book injury and subsequent therapy. PMID:24452928

  17. Medical restraints to anterior-posterior motion of the knee.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, D; Levy, I M; Sheskier, S; Torzilli, P A; Warren, R F

    1984-07-01

    We investigated the motion of cadaver knees before and after section of the medial structures and anterior cruciate ligament. The knees were tested using a 5-degrees-of-freedom in vitro knee-testing apparatus that measured anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, and axial displacement as well as internal-external and valgus-varus rotation. The flexion angle could be varied but was fixed for each individual test. A 125-newton anterior-posterior force was applied perpendicular to the tibial shaft and the resulting motion of the knee was measured. In five knees the anterior cruciate ligament was cut first, followed by progressive cuts of the structures on the medial side (superficial medial collateral ligament, deep medial ligament, oblique fibers of the superficial medial ligament, and the posteromedial part of the capsule). Conversely, in five knees the medial structures were progressively cut first, followed by section of the anterior cruciate ligament. Tests were performed after each cut. With an intact anterior cruciate ligament, progressive cutting of the medial side had no effect on anterior and posterior displacements. When section of the medial structures followed cutting of the anterior cruciate ligament, anterior displacement exceeded that seen after isolated section of the anterior cruciate ligament. The anterior and posterior load-tests were repeated with the tibia fixed in 5 degrees of internal and 5 degrees of external rotation. Fixed external rotation had no effect on anterior and posterior displacements. Fixed internal rotation significantly decreased anterior displacement only when both the anterior cruciate ligament and the medial structures were cut.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6736094

  18. Influence of Ligament Properties on Tibiofemoral Mechanics in Walking.

    PubMed

    Smith, Colin R; Lenhart, Rachel L; Kaiser, Jarred; Vignos, Michael F; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-02-01

    Computational knee models provide a powerful platform to investigate the effects of injury and surgery on functional knee behavior. The objective of this study was to use a multibody knee model to investigate the influence of ligament properties on tibiofemoral kinematics and cartilage contact pressures in the stance phase of walking. The knee model included 14 ligament bundles and articular cartilage contact acting across the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. The knee was incorporated into a lower extremity musculoskeletal model and was used to simulate knee mechanics during the stance phase of normal walking. A Monte Carlo approach was employed to assess the influence of ligament stiffness and reference strain on knee mechanics. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), medial collateral ligament (MCL), and posterior capsule properties exhibited significant influence on anterior tibial translation at heel strike, with the ACL acting as the primary restraint to anterior translation in mid-stance. The MCL and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) exhibited the greatest influence on tibial rotation from heel strike through mid-stance. Simulated tibial plateau contact location was dependent on the ACL, MCL, and LCL properties, while pressure magnitudes were most dependent on the ACL. A decrease in ACL stiffness or reference strain significantly increased the average contact pressure in mid-stance, with the pressure migrating posteriorly on the medial tibial plateau. These ligament-dependent shifts in tibiofemoral cartilage contact during walking are potentially relevant to consider when investigating the causes of early-onset osteoarthritis following knee ligament injury and surgical treatment. PMID:26408997

  19. Treatment of acute lateral ankle ligament rupture in the athlete. Conservative versus surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Lynch, S A; Renström, P A

    1999-01-01

    Acute lateral ankle ligament sprains are common in young athletes (15 to 35 years of age). Diagnostic and treatment protocols vary. Therapies range from cast immobilisation or acute surgical repair to functional rehabilitation. The lateral ligament complex includes 3 capsular ligaments: the anterior tibiofibular (ATFL), calcaneofibular (CFL) and posterior talofibular (PTFL) ligaments. Injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion; the ATFL is most commonly torn. The CFL and the PTFL can also be injured and, after severe inversion, subtalar joint ligaments are also affected. Commonly, an athlete with a lateral ankle ligament sprain reports having 'rolled over' the outside of their ankle. The entire ankle and foot must be examined to ensure there are no other injuries. Clinical stability tests for ligamentous disruption include the anterior drawer test of ATFL function and inversion tilt test of both ATFL and CFL function. Radiographs may rule out treatable fractures in severe injuries or when pain or tenderness are not associated with lateral ligaments. Stress radiographs do not affect treatment. Ankle sprains are classified from grades I to III (mild, moderate or severe). Grade I and II injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. A non-operative 'functional treatment' programme includes immediate use of RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation), a short period of immobilisation and protection with a tape or bandage, and early range of motion, weight-bearing and neuromuscular training exercises. Proprioceptive training on a tilt board after 3 to 4 weeks helps improve balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Treatment for grade III injuries is more controversial. A comprehensive literature evaluation and meta-analysis showed that early functional treatment provided the fastest recovery of ankle mobility and earliest return to work and physical activity without affecting late mechanical stability. Functional treatment was complication

  20. Neck ligament strength is decreased following whiplash trauma

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Ndu, Anthony B; Coe, Marcus P; Valenson, Arnold J; Ivancic, Paul C; Ito, Shigeki; Rubin, Wolfgang; Panjabi, Manohar M

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous clinical studies have documented successful neck pain relief in whiplash patients using nerve block and radiofrequency ablation of facet joint afferents, including capsular ligament nerves. No previous study has documented injuries to the neck ligaments as determined by altered dynamic mechanical properties due to whiplash. The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic mechanical properties of whiplash-exposed human cervical spine ligaments. Additionally, the present data were compared to previously reported control data. The ligaments included the anterior and posterior longitudinal, capsular, and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. Methods A total of 98 bone-ligament-bone specimens (C2–C3 to C7-T1) were prepared from six cervical spines following 3.5, 5, 6.5, and 8 g rear impacts and pre- and post-impact flexibility testing. The specimens were elongated to failure at a peak rate of 725 (SD 95) mm/s. Failure force, elongation, and energy absorbed, as well as stiffness were determined. The mechanical properties were statistically compared among ligaments, and to the control data (significance level: P < 0.05; trend: P < 0.1). The average physiological ligament elongation was determined using a mathematical model. Results For all whiplash-exposed ligaments, the average failure elongation exceeded the average physiological elongation. The highest average failure force of 204.6 N was observed in the ligamentum flavum, significantly greater than in middle-third disc and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments. The highest average failure elongation of 4.9 mm was observed in the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, significantly greater than in the anterior longitudinal ligament, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. The average energy absorbed ranged from 0.04 J by the middle-third disc to 0.44 J by the capsular ligament. The ligamentum flavum was the stiffest ligament, while the

  1. Spatiotemporal profiles of receptive fields of neurons in the lateral posterior nucleus of the cat LP-pulvinar complex.

    PubMed

    Piché, Marilyse; Thomas, Sébastien; Casanova, Christian

    2015-10-01

    The pulvinar is the largest extrageniculate thalamic visual nucleus in mammals. It establishes reciprocal connections with virtually all visual cortexes and likely plays a role in transthalamic cortico-cortical communication. In cats, the lateral posterior nucleus (LP) of the LP-pulvinar complex can be subdivided in two subregions, the lateral (LPl) and medial (LPm) parts, which receive a predominant input from the striate cortex and the superior colliculus, respectively. Here, we revisit the receptive field structure of LPl and LPm cells in anesthetized cats by determining their first-order spatiotemporal profiles through reverse correlation analysis following sparse noise stimulation. Our data reveal the existence of previously unidentified receptive field profiles in the LP nucleus both in space and time domains. While some cells responded to only one stimulus polarity, the majority of neurons had receptive fields comprised of bright and dark responsive subfields. For these neurons, dark subfields' size was larger than that of bright subfields. A variety of receptive field spatial organization types were identified, ranging from totally overlapped to segregated bright and dark subfields. In the time domain, a large spectrum of activity overlap was found, from cells with temporally coinciding subfield activity to neurons with distinct, time-dissociated subfield peak activity windows. We also found LP neurons with space-time inseparable receptive fields and neurons with multiple activity periods. Finally, a substantial degree of homology was found between LPl and LPm first-order receptive field spatiotemporal profiles, suggesting a high integration of cortical and subcortical inputs within the LP-pulvinar complex. PMID:26289469

  2. Deltoid ligament strain after correction of acquired flatfoot deformity by triple arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Song, S J; Lee, S; O'Malley, M J; Otis, J C; Sung, I H; Deland, J T

    2000-07-01

    Deltoid insufficiency represents a difficult surgical challenge. We have witnessed patients who have developed a valgus tibiotalar deformity following a properly positioned triple arthrodesis. To investigate whether the triple arthrodesis itself, by creating a rigid triple joint complex below the ankle, leads to increased strain of the deltoid complex, a flatfoot model was created in 8 fresh-frozen below-knee amputation specimens. Each specimen was loaded in three gait cycle (GC) positions: Heel strike (0% GC), midstance (10% GC), and heel rise (40% GC). The three components of the ground reaction force (GRF) and the tendon forces consistent with those respective positions were applied. To simulate a posterior tibial tendon insufficient state the posterior tibial tendon was not loaded. Strain at the tibiocalcaneal fibers of the superficial deltoid ligament complex was determined at each of the three foot positions. A triple arthrodesis was performed and the deltoid strains were again recorded for each position. A significant increase in the strain of the deltoid ligament was observed for only the heel rise position (p=0.007) in our cadaver model following triple arthrodesis. The results favor medializing the calcaneus following arthrodesis to protect the deltoid complex. PMID:10919623

  3. Posterior Tibial Labrum Injury in a Professional Soccer Player: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Maestu, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Ankle ligament injuries are one of the most frequent lesions identified in professional soccer players. In most cases, the ligaments involved are the anterior talofibular ligament and the calcaneal fibular ligament. In the present report, we describe a professional soccer player who sustained an ankle sprain that did not respond to initial therapy. The findings from radiographic and magnetic resonance images were inconclusive. Ultimately, rupture of the posterior, transverse ligament with avulsion of the tibial labrum was identified as the cause of his ongoing ankle pain. Confirmation of the pathologic findings and successful treatment were performed arthroscopically. PMID:25459088

  4. Artificial Ligaments: Promise or Panacea?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubell, Adele

    1987-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has approved a prosthetic ligament for limited use in persons with damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). This article addresses ligament repair, ACL tears, current treatment, development of the Gore-Tex artificial ligament, other artificial ligaments in process, and arguments for and against their use.…

  5. ACL/MCL transection affects knee ligament insertion distance of healing and intact ligaments during gait in the Ovine model.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Janet E; Funakoshi, Yusei; Hariu, Mitsuhiro; Marchuk, Linda; Thornton, Gail M; Ronsky, Janet L; Zernicke, Ron; Shrive, Nigel G; Frank, Cyril B

    2009-08-25

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of combined transection of the anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments on the intact and healing ligaments in the ovine stifle joint. In vivo 3D stifle joint kinematics were measured in eight sheep during treadmill walking (accuracy: 0.4+/-0.4mm, 0.4+/-0.4 degrees ). Kinematics were measured with the joint intact and at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 weeks after either surgical ligament transection (n=5) or sham surgery without transection (n=3). After sacrifice at 20 weeks, the 3D subject-specific bone and ligament geometry were digitized, and the 3D distances between insertions (DBI) of ligaments during the dynamic in vivo motion were calculated. Anterior cruciate ligament/medial collateral ligament (ACL/MCL) transection resulted in changes in the DBI of not only the transected ACL, but also the intact lateral collateral ligament (LCL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), while the DBI of the transected MCL was not significantly changed. Increases in the maximal ACL DBI (2 week: +4.2mm, 20 week: +5.7mm) caused increases in the range of ACL DBI (2 week: 3.6mm, 20 week: +3.8mm) and the ACL apparent strain (2 week: +18.9%, 20 week: +24.0%). Decreases in the minimal PCL DBI (2 week: -3.2mm, 20 week: -4.3mm) resulted in increases in the range of PCL DBI (2 week: +2.7mm, 20 week: +3.2mm). Decreases in the maximal LCL DBI (2 week: -1.0mm, 20 week: -2.0mm) caused decreased LCL apparent strain (2 week: -3.4%, 20 week: -6.9%). Changes in the mechanical environment of these ligaments may play a significant role in the biological changes observed in these ligaments. PMID:19643414

  6. Tendon and ligament imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  7. Case report ganglion cysts of the bilateral cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Kurosaka, M; Maeno, K; Mizuno, K

    1999-01-01

    Ganglion cysts originating from the cruciate ligaments have been reported rarely. A 38-year-old woman developed symptoms of knee pain with 10 degrees loss of knee extension. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed a well-demarcated cystic mass surrounding the posterior cruciate ligament so clearly that further examination was not recommended. Because examination under anesthesia confirmed full extension of the knee, we presumed that pain produced by compression caused the diminished extension, and that mechanical block was not the reason. During arthroscopic examination, a mass was impinged between the anterior cruciate ligament and the intercondylar notch when extension of the knee was attempted. The mass was resected and immediate improvement was noted. The patient had experienced the same episode in the contralateral knee and removal of a ganglion cyst on the cruciate ligament 10 years ago. At the latest follow-up she was completely symptom free in both knees without any sign of recurrence. PMID:10564867

  8. Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Intact Human Cervical Spine Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Ivancic, Paul C.; Coe, Marcus P.; Ndu, Anthony B.; Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Carlson, Erik J.; Rubin, Wolfgang; (FH), Dipl-Ing; Panjabi, Manohar M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Most previous studies have investigated ligaments mechanical properties at slow elongation rates of less than 25 mm/s. PURPOSE To determine the tensile mechanical properties, at a fast elongation rate, of intact human cervical anterior and posterior longitudinal, capsular, and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING In vitro biomechanical study. METHODS A total of 97 intact bone-ligament-bone specimens (C2–C3 to C7-T1) were prepared from six cervical spines (average age: 80.6 years, range, 71 to 92 years) and were elongated to complete rupture at an average (SD) peak rate of 723 (106) mm/s using a custom-built apparatus. Non-linear force vs. elongation curves were plotted and peak force, peak elongation, peak energy, and stiffness were statistically compared (P<0.05) among ligament. A mathematical model was developed to determine the quasi-static physiological ligament elongation. RESULTS Highest average peak force, up to 244.4 and 220.0 N in the ligamentum flavum and capsular ligament, respectively, were significantly greater than in the anterior longitudinal ligament and middle-third disc. Highest peak elongation reached 5.9 mm in the intraspinous and supraspinous ligaments, significantly greater than in the middle-third disc. Highest peak energy of 0.57 J was attained in the capsular ligament, significantly greater than in the anterior longitudinal ligament and middle-third disc. Average stiffness was generally greatest in the ligamentum flavum and least in the intraspinous and supraspinous ligaments. For all ligaments, peak elongation was greater than average physiological elongation computed using the mathematical model. CONCLUSIONS Comparison of the present results with previously reported data indicated that high speed elongation may cause cervical ligaments to fail at a higher peak force and smaller peak elongation and may be stiffer and absorb less energy, as compared to a

  9. [Age, activity and strength of knee ligaments].

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, W J; Rosocha, S; Bosch, U; Oestern, H J; Tscherne, H

    1991-07-01

    The cruciate ligaments of older persons are thought to have diminished biomechanical properties. On the other hand, joint immobilization also leads to similar functional losses in ligaments. It can be difficult to differentiate between these factors in older and immobile persons. The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments of six younger (average age 30 years) and six older (average age 64.7 years) donors with similar levels of activity were subjected to biomechanical testing. Each sample had to meet the following conditions: appropriate age, no chronic vascular and cardiopulmonary disease found on autopsy, no signs of osteoarthrosis and no knee injuries. The material properties of maximum stress (e.g. ACL: young/old 24/21N/mm2), elastic modulus (e.g. ACL: young/old 144/129 MPa), and strain (e.g. ACL: young/old 25/28%), did not differ significantly (p less than 0.05). This indicates that older persons who are active do not necessarily show functional losses in the cruciate ligaments. Other data found in the literature can be ascribed to immobilization influences. In this data many of the older test persons had chronic vascular insufficiency, cardiopulmonary disease or malignancies. PMID:1925614

  10. The Medial and Posteromedial Ligamentous and Capsular Structures of the Knee: Review of Anatomy and Relevant Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Roar R

    2016-02-01

    The medial and posteromedial regions of the knee are important for knee stability but also frequently injured. Medial ligaments and capsule are primary and secondary stabilizers of valgus, rotation, and anterior and posterior translation. In the setting of rupture of the cruciate ligaments, it is important to identify injuries in this region because it can possibly alter the treatment strategy and even delay or prevent successful reconstruction of the cruciate ligaments. Injuries may occur to the superficial and deep medial collateral ligament, the posterior oblique ligament, the posteromedial capsule, and the semimembranosus tendon and its attachments. Meniscocapsular separation is associated with these injuries, and if normal movement of the meniscus and tension of the capsule and ligaments is altered, instability and eventually osteoarthritis may occur. Injuries to the posteromedial corner may be underdiagnosed. This article reviews the anatomy and imaging findings in the medial and posteromedial regions of the knee. PMID:27077583

  11. The Characterization of Mechanical Properties of a Rabbit Femur-Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Tibia Complex During Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Hidetaka; Han, Jungsoo; Ryu, Jaiyoung; Han, Changsoo

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cyclic loading, which produced the condition of ACLs during sports activities, on tensile properties of femur-ACL-tibia complexes (FATCs). Paired FATCs of 40 New Zealand white rabbits were tested on a materials testing machine. One specimen of each pair was designated as a control and loaded until failure. The contralateral specimen was loaded cyclically (1.4 Hz, 1 hr.) with 20%, 30%, 40%, or 50% of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the control and then loaded until failure. The UTS and mode of failure were recorded after each test. Five specimens ruptured during cyclic loading in the 50% group. In the 40% group, the mean value of UTS of cycled specimens was significantly lower than that of controls. There was no statistically significant difference in UTS values between control and cycled specimens in the 20% and 30% groups. Cycled specimens had a significantly higher incidence of substance failure than controls. Our results demonstrated that FATCs have the strength to withstand cyclic loading within normal sports activity levels. However, FACTs can be damaged by cyclic loading under strenuous sports activity levels. We speculate that cyclic loading makes the ACL substance weaker than the insertion site.

  12. Bilateral posterior sternoclavicular dislocation.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Matthias; Vogel, Tobias; Weise, Kuno; Muratore, Tim; Trobisch, Per

    2010-07-01

    Posterior sternoclavicular dislocations are a rare injury, representing <5% of all sternoclavicular dislocations and 1 in 1600 shoulder girdle injuries. Proper imaging with computed tomography and prompt diagnosis are essential steps in preventing potentially lethal complications observed in approximately 3% of all posterior sternoclavicular dislocations. Surgical treatment is necessary if closed reduction fails. With the medial clavicular epiphysis being the last to close (between ages 22 and 25), children and adolescents typically present with epiphyseal fractures rather than joint dislocations. If closed reduction fails, open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) should be considered in fractures, whereas complex reconstructions with tendon graft procedures have been recommended for joint dislocations. This article presents a case of a traumatic bilateral posterior sternoclavicular dislocation due to an epiphyseal fracture in a 15-year-old boy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a bilateral posterior sternoclavicular dislocation. Attempted closed reduction failed with redislocation after 2 days. The patient subsequently required ORIF. This article describes our technique with anterior retraction of the medial clavicle, closure of the posterior periosteum, and ORIF using nonabsorbable sutures. Postoperative shoulder mobilization was started on day 1. At final follow-up, the patient was completely asymptomatic. PMID:20608625

  13. Quantifying the Nonlinear, Anisotropic Material Response of Spinal Ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Daniel J.

    Spinal ligaments may be a significant source of chronic back pain, yet they are often disregarded by the clinical community due to a lack of information with regards to their material response, and innervation characteristics. The purpose of this dissertation was to characterize the material response of spinal ligaments and to review their innervation characteristics. Review of relevant literature revealed that all of the major spinal ligaments are innervated. They cause painful sensations when irritated and provide reflexive control of the deep spinal musculature. As such, including the neurologic implications of iatrogenic ligament damage in the evaluation of surgical procedures aimed at relieving back pain will likely result in more effective long-term solutions. The material response of spinal ligaments has not previously been fully quantified due to limitations associated with standard soft tissue testing techniques. The present work presents and validates a novel testing methodology capable of overcoming these limitations. In particular, the anisotropic, inhomogeneous material constitutive properties of the human supraspinous ligament are quantified and methods for determining the response of the other spinal ligaments are presented. In addition, a method for determining the anisotropic, inhomogeneous pre-strain distribution of the spinal ligaments is presented. The multi-axial pre-strain distributions of the human anterior longitudinal ligament, ligamentum flavum and supraspinous ligament were determined using this methodology. Results from this work clearly demonstrate that spinal ligaments are not uniaxial structures, and that finite element models which account for pre-strain and incorporate ligament's complex material properties may provide increased fidelity to the in vivo condition.

  14. Acquired unilateral pes planus in a child caused by a ruptured plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament.

    PubMed

    Shuen, Vivien; Prem, Hari

    2009-05-01

    A traumatic cause for acquired pes planus in children is uncommon and it is not often considered as a primary diagnosis. We describe a patient, who ruptured her plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament and presented late with an acquired unilateral flat foot similar to a tibialis posterior rupture. Corrective surgery in the form of calcaneal osteotomy with iliac graft lengthening and medial advancement of tibialis posterior achieved excellent results with patient remaining asymptomatic and returning to routine activities. In the presence of an acute traumatic onset of unilateral pes planus, spring ligament and tibialis posterior tendon rupture should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:19373112

  15. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal. PMID:27284515

  16. Spatial Change of Cruciate Ligaments in Rat Embryo Knee Joint by Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Takaishi, Ryota; Higuchi, Shinya; Yamada, Shigehito; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Takakuwa, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the spatial developmental changes of rat cruciate ligaments by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction using episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC). Cruciate ligaments of Wister rat embryos between embryonic day (E) 16 and E20 were analyzed. Samples were sectioned and visualized using EFIC. 3D reconstructions were generated using Amira software. The length of the cruciate ligaments, distances between attachment points to femur and tibia, angles of the cruciate ligaments and the cross angle of the cruciate ligaments were measured. The shape of cruciate ligaments was clearly visible at E17. The lengths of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) increased gradually from E17 to E19 and drastically at E20. Distances between attachment points to the femur and tibia gradually increased. The ACL angle and PCL angle gradually decreased. The cross angle of the cruciate ligaments changed in three planes. The primordium of the 3D structure of rat cruciate ligaments was constructed from the early stage, with the completion of the development of the structures occurring just before birth. PMID:26098761

  17. Definition of the to be named ligament and vertebrodural ligament and their possible effects on the circulation of CSF.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nan; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Li, Yun-Fei; Chi, Yan-Yan; Gao, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Xin; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Sui, Hong-Jin; Sharkey, John

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted specifically on the dense connective tissue located in the posterior medial part of the cervical epidural space. This study was undertaken to examine the presence of this connection between the cervical dura mater and the posterior wall of spinal canal at the level of C1-C2. 30 head-neck specimens of Chinese adults were used. Gross dissection was performed on the suboccipital regions of the 20 specimens. Having been treated with the P45 plastination method, 10 specimens were sliced (9 sagittal and 1 horizontal sections). As a result, a dense fibrous band was identified in the nuchal ligament of 29 specimens (except for one horizontal section case). This fascial structure arose from the tissue of the posterior border of the nuchal ligament and then projected anteriorly and superiorly to enter the atlantoaxial interspace. It was termed as to be named ligament (TBNL). In all 30 specimens the existence of a fibrous connection was found between the posterior aspect of the cervical dura mater and the posterior wall of the spinal canal at the level of the atlas to the axis. This fibrous connection was identified as vertebrodural ligament (VDL). The VDL was mainly subdivided into three parts, and five variations of VDL were identified. These two structures, TBNL and VDL, firmly link the posterior aspect of cervical dura mater to the rear of the atlas-axis and the nuchal region. According to these findings, the authors speculated that the movements of the head and neck are likely to affect the shape of the cervical dural sleeve via the TBNL and VDL. It is hypothesized that the muscles directly associated with the cervical dural sleeve, in the suboccipital region, may work as a pump providing an important force required to move the CSF in the spinal canal. PMID:25084162

  18. Definition of the To Be Named Ligament and Vertebrodural Ligament and Their Possible Effects on the Circulation of CSF

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Nan; Yuan, Xiao-Ying; Li, Yun-Fei; Chi, Yan-Yan; Gao, Hai-Bin; Zhao, Xin; Sharkey, John

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted specifically on the dense connective tissue located in the posterior medial part of the cervical epidural space. This study was undertaken to examine the presence of this connection between the cervical dura mater and the posterior wall of spinal canal at the level of C1–C2. 30 head-neck specimens of Chinese adults were used. Gross dissection was performed on the suboccipital regions of the 20 specimens. Having been treated with the P45 plastination method, 10 specimens were sliced (9 sagittal and 1 horizontal sections). As a result, a dense fibrous band was identified in the nuchal ligament of 29 specimens (except for one horizontal section case). This fascial structure arose from the tissue of the posterior border of the nuchal ligament and then projected anteriorly and superiorly to enter the atlantoaxial interspace. It was termed as to be named ligament (TBNL). In all 30 specimens the existence of a fibrous connection was found between the posterior aspect of the cervical dura mater and the posterior wall of the spinal canal at the level of the atlas to the axis. This fibrous connection was identified as vertebrodural ligament (VDL). The VDL was mainly subdivided into three parts, and five variations of VDL were identified. These two structures, TBNL and VDL, firmly link the posterior aspect of cervical dura mater to the rear of the atlas-axis and the nuchal region. According to these findings, the authors speculated that the movements of the head and neck are likely to affect the shape of the cervical dural sleeve via the TBNL and VDL. It is hypothesized that the muscles directly associated with the cervical dural sleeve, in the suboccipital region, may work as a pump providing an important force required to move the CSF in the spinal canal. PMID:25084162

  19. Active knee motion after cruciate ligament rupture. Stereoradiography.

    PubMed

    Kärrholm, J; Selvik, G; Elmqvist, L G; Hansson, L I

    1988-04-01

    In 10 patients with an old injury of the anterior cruciate ligament, the three-dimensional movements of the knee joint were studied when the patients flexed their knees. Tibial motions were recorded using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis. Internal rotation and adduction of the tibia were reduced in the injured knees when compared with the intact knees; during flexion of the knee joint, the tibial intercondylar eminence occupied a more lateral and posterior position on the injured side. Our results may indicate that the knee joint is continuously exposed to abnormal stresses when the anterior cruciate ligament is torn. PMID:3364185

  20. Cervical ligamentous instability in a canine in vivo model.

    PubMed

    Whitehill, R; Moran, D J; Fechner, R E; Ruch, W W; Drucker, S; Hooper, W E; McCoig, J A

    1987-12-01

    A canine in vivo model of midcervical ligamentous instability was developed by dividing the anterior longitudinal ligament, anulus fibrosus, and all posterior ligamentous structures including the ligamentum flavum. The natural history of healing in the model, the effect on its healing by an adjacent one-level arthrodesis, and the effect of a one-level arthrodesis on normal adjacent ligamentous structures were studied radiographically, mechanically, and histologically. The authors determined that healing takes place primarily by anterior scar formation in their instability model but not to a degree sufficient to recreate normal mechanical stability. After three months, healing in the model was not affected by an adjacent arthrodesis; however, acutely, instability apparently was increased as three animals became quadriplegic between the second and fourth postoperative days. Arthrodesis did not affect adjacent normal ligamentous structures, during this period. Incomplete healing in the authors' model supports those who advocate arthrodesis as the treatment of choice for destabilizing cervical ligamentous injury. The authors previously reported the case of a patient who sustained bilateral facet dislocations adjacent to an arthrodesed segment and questioned whether this resulted from a stress-concentrating effect. This study indicates that this could well have been the case acutely. Thus, inadvertent exclusion of an unstable segment from an arthrodesis has potentially catastrophic results. Finally, the authors also have previously questioned whether arthrodesis of a midcervical segment could lead to instability of adjacent normal segments. This project does not support such a concern, at least for the three postoperative months of study. PMID:3441821

  1. [Therapy of posterior and posterolateral knee instability].

    PubMed

    Jakob, R P; Rüegsegger, M

    1993-11-01

    The natural course after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear is a slow process of degeneration starting in the medial compartment. Functional disability is mainly present in those instabilities that are combined with posterolateral insufficiency. The surgical treatment at present mainly addresses these combined types of posterior-posterolateral instability. It is generally agreed that suture of the torn PCL alone is insufficient and augmentation with autologous structures, such as the patellar ligament, are mandatory. Synthetic augmentation to facilitate after treatment is another adjunct. Because of the difficulty of precise tibial tunnel placement a two-stage procedure is advocated, an anterior approach with the patient supine being used for femoral graft placement. If a posterior approach with the patient prone is used, a straight posterior incision is made between the two heads of the gastrocnemius and the neuromuscular bundle. With this approach the tibial bone block is placed in a trough. The accuracy of graft placement and the immediate functional aftertreatment facilitated by the use of osseous fixation of a synthetic augmentation device at both ends have made better results of surgical reconstruction of the PCL possible. PMID:8309701

  2. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... often occur among active teens, especially athletes. A torn medial collateral ligament (MCL) — a ligament that helps ... the more serious injuries. Teens who have a torn MCL tend to play contact sports, like football ...

  3. Adult acquired flatfoot deformity at the talonavicular joint: reconstruction of the spring ligament in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Deland, J T; Arnoczky, S P; Thompson, F M

    1992-01-01

    The mobile unilateral flatfoot deformity of chronic posterior tibial tendon insufficiency has been difficult to correct by soft tissue procedures. The procedures can decrease pain, but they do not always correct the longitudinal arch or relieve all the symptoms. Using 10 fresh frozen cadaveric specimens and a rig for stimulation of weightbearing, the deformity associated with chronic posterior tibial tendon insufficiency was produced by multiple ligamentous release and documented by AP and lateral radiographs. Reconstruction of the spring ligament using a ligament bone autograft from the superficial deltoid ligament was then performed and tested under load. The mean correction was within 2.5 degrees of normal (over or undercorrection) on both the AP and lateral radiographs with the specimens under load. Clinical Relevance. In posterior tibial tendon insufficiency, it may be possible to address the ligament as well as tendon insufficiency to gain a corrected arch. The success of such a procedure will depend upon adequate tendon and ligament reconstruction in a fully mobile deformity. Questions remain as to the adequacy of this ligament graft, and a stronger free ligament graft, as well as correction of any bony malalignment, may be required. PMID:1398361

  4. Posterior Fixation for Atlantoaxial Subluxation in a Case with Complex Anomaly of Persistent First Intersegmental Artery and Assimilation in the C1 Vertebra

    PubMed Central

    Umebayashi, Daisuke; Hara, Masahito; Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Nishimura, Yusuke; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    We report a very rare case of atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS) with persistent first intersegmental artery (PFIA) and assimilation in the atlas (C1) vertebra. This case demonstrates the difficulty of deciding on a surgical strategy for complex anomalies. A 63-year-old man presented with gait disturbance, neck pain, and severe dysesthesia in his left arm. Past history included a whiplash injury. Dynamic X-ray studies demonstrated an irreducible AAS and assimilation of C1. This subluxation was slightly deteriorated in an extended position. A three-dimensional computed tomography angiography (3DCTA) indicated that the PFIA was located on the left side. We performed a C1 posterior arch resection and C1 lateral mass–axis pedicle screw (C1LM–C2PS) fixation using the modified technique of skewering the occipital condyle and C1 lateral mass. The patient had no postoperative morbidity and his symptoms disappeared immediately after operation. Complex anomalies cause difficulty in determining surgical strategy although several surgical methods for simple craniovertebral junction anomaly have been reported. To avoid significant morbidities associated with vertebral artery injury, surgical strategies for these complex conditions are discussed. The modified technique of a C1 lateral mass screw penetrating the occipital condyle is a viable treatment option. PMID:24097089

  5. Minimally invasive posterior hamstring harvest.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Trent J; Lubowitz, James H

    2013-01-01

    Autogenous hamstring harvesting for knee ligament reconstruction is a well-established standard. Minimally invasive posterior hamstring harvest is a simple, efficient, reproducible technique for harvest of the semitendinosus or gracilis tendon or both medial hamstring tendons. A 2- to 3-cm longitudinal incision from the popliteal crease proximally, in line with the semitendinosus tendon, is sufficient. The deep fascia is bluntly penetrated, and the tendon or tendons are identified. Adhesions are dissected. Then, an open tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons proximally; a closed, sharp tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons from the pes. Layered, absorbable skin closure is performed, and the skin is covered with a skin sealant, bolster dressing, and plastic adhesive bandage for 2 weeks. PMID:24266003

  6. Characterization and role of the immune response during ligament healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Connie S.

    Scar formation of ligaments after rupture remains a great challenge. Ligament healing involves a complex, coordinated series of events that form a neo-ligament, which is more disorganized and fibrotic in character than the native tissue. The repair process may extend from months to years, and the injured ligament never fully recovers its original mechanical properties. With little intrinsic healing potential, ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are usually reconstructed. The "healed" tissues, however, do not regenerate native tissues or recapitulate their mechanical function. ACL grafts often lengthen (incidents range from 40-100%) and their strength can drop by ˜50% after remodeling. Reconstructed knees are often less stable and fail to restore normal joint kinematics. Our overall goal is to improve healing, making ligaments more regenerative. The first 2 studies characterized ligament healing in a spatial and temporal manner over 28 days. The experiments demonstrated creeping substitution and the potential role of the immune system to control the repair and/or regenerative process. From these studies, macrophages were identified as significant players during healing. Macrophages paralleled creeping substitution, were abundant within the healing ligament, and potentially played a destructive role via matrix phagocytosis. The role of macrophages during early ligament healing was then evaluated using liposome-encapsulated clodronate to inhibit phagocytosing macrophages. Clodronate attenuated the early infiltration of macrophages, resulting in delayed structural and functional healing. Macrophage re-infiltration into the wound resulted in continued ligament healing. These results suggested that early inhibition of phagocytosing macrophages is detrimental to ligament healing. The final experiment evaluated the effects of interleukin-4 on ligament healing. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is reported to stimulate the Th2 lymphocyte/M2 macrophage pathway, reducing

  7. The role of the transverse carpal ligament in carpal stability: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tengrootenhuysen, Mike; van Riet, Roger; Pimontel, Paul; Bortier, Hilde; Van Glabbeek, Francis

    2009-08-01

    A biomechanical in vitro study was performed on 16 fresh frozen cadaver forearms to investigate the role of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) in carpal stability. The distance between the scaphoid and hamate was measured, as a reference for the length of the TCL. Distances were recorded in both loaded and unloaded conditions after gradual sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament, the palmar scapholunate, long radiolunate ligament and radioscapholunate ligament. The largest increase in spread of the carpal bones (55.3% of total spread) was noted after loading with the ligament intact. Thereafter, sectioning of the TCL resulted in a further 32.9% increase in the distance between the scaphoid and the hamate. We conclude that the intact carpal bones-ligament complex displays some elasticity. Progressive sectioning of the TCL ligament under loading further opens the palmar arch. Nevertheless it appears that the carpal arch will still retain reasonable intrinsic stability even without an intact TCL. PMID:19774812

  8. Discoid lateral meniscus: case report of arthroscopic attachment of a symptomatic Wrisberg-ligament type.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, T D; Paulos, L E; Parker, R D; Harner, C D; Gurley, W D

    1987-01-01

    The symptomatic discoid lateral meniscus is a well-known congenital anomaly that is of three different types: complete, incomplete, and Wrisberg-ligament type. The Wrisberg-ligament type has no meniscotibial attachment posteriorly, and in the past has been treated by total (open or arthroscopic) meniscectomy. In this article, we review the literature and report a previously unreported case of arthroscopic peripheral attachment after central partial meniscectomy of a Wrisberg-ligament type discoid lateral meniscus, with documentation of healing at arthroscopic second look 1 year following surgery. PMID:3689527

  9. MR Imaging of Wrist Ligaments.

    PubMed

    Ringler, Michael D; Murthy, Naveen S

    2015-08-01

    This article discusses the normal anatomy and pathologic appearances of the intrinsic and extrinsic wrist ligaments using MR Imaging. Technological advances in surface coil design and higher magnetic field strengths have improved radiologists' ability to consistently visualize these small ligaments in their entirety. Wrist ligament anatomy, in the context of proper physiologic function, is emphasized, including common normal variants, and their appearances on MR imaging. The spectrum of disorders, incorporating overlapping appearances of senescent degenerative changes, and destabilizing ligament tears, is outlined. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging to date for various ligament abnormalities is discussed, along with significant limitations. PMID:26216769

  10. Anatomic Reconstruction Technique for a Plantar Calcaneonavicular (Spring) Ligament Tear.

    PubMed

    Palmanovich, Ezequiel; Shabat, Shay; Brin, Yaron S; Feldman, Viktor; Kish, Benny; Nyska, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Acquired flatfoot deformity in adults is usually due to partial or complete tearing of the posterior tibial tendon, with secondary failure of other structures such as the plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament (SL), which maintain the medial longitudinal arch. In flexible cases, the tibialis posterior can be replaced with the flexor digitorum longus. It is common practice to suture the SL directly in the case of a tear; however, if the tear is complete, suturing directly to the ligament alone will not be possible. Reconstruction of the ligament is needed; however, no validated methods are available to reconstruct this ligament. The operative technique of SL reconstruction described in this report as a part of acquired flatfoot deformity reconstruction consists of augmenting remnants of the spring from the navicularis to the sustentaculum tali and suspending it to the medial malleolus using 2-mm-wide, long-chain polyethylene suture tape. This technique results in the firm anatomic reconstruction of the SL, in addition to "classic" medial arch reconstruction. We recommend SL reconstruction for medial arch reconstruction when the SL is torn. PMID:26253476

  11. Coracoacromial ligament division.

    PubMed

    Johansson, J E; Barrington, T W

    1984-01-01

    The object of this paper is to report on the findings of a retrospective study of 40 patients with 41 shoulders with persistent painful arc syndrome secondary to a chronic coracoacromial ligament inflammation who underwent simple coracoacromial ligament division at the Toronto East General and Orthopaedic Hospital between January 1973 and June 1979. Initial therapy was always nonoperative. Surgical intervention was reserved for patients who did not respond to conservative management and who had a painful arc with tenderness of the coracoacromial ligament. The aim of the coracoacromial ligament division was to relieve impingement by releasing the coracoacromial arch. Patients were carefully examined to rule out associated neck pathology, rotator cuff problems, and lesions of the acromioclavicular joint. Any patients with significantly large osteophytes under the anterior acromion were excluded. Forty patients (41 shoulders) were questioned and examined in followup. There were 29 males and 11 females. The ages ranged from 21 to 72 years (average 43.5 years). In 21 shoulders (51%), there was a history of trauma as the initiating factor. The follow-up ranged from 8 to 76 months (average 36.3 months). According to a described rating system, the results were satisfactory to excellent in 39 of 41 shoulders (95%) and unsatisfactory in two of 41 shoulders (5%). The back to work time ranged from 1 to 16 weeks (average 5.7 weeks).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6742288

  12. Tear of the plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament causing flatfoot. A case report.

    PubMed

    Borton, D C; Saxby, T S

    1997-07-01

    Acquired flatfoot deformity after injury is usually due to partial or complete tearing of the tendon of tibialis posterior, with secondary failure of the other structures which maintain the medial longitudinal arch. We describe a patient in whom the rupture of the plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament resulted in a clinical picture similar to that of rupture of the tendon of tibialis posterior. Operative repair of the ligament and transfer of the tendon of flexor digitorum gave an excellent result at four years with the patient returning to full sporting activities. PMID:9250756

  13. Neural Structures within Human Meniscofemoral Ligaments: A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Chinmay M.; Shaerf, Daniel A.; Sandison, Ann; Bull, Anthony M. J.; Amis, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the existence of neural structures within the meniscofemoral ligaments (MFLs) of the human knee. Methods. The MFLs from 8 human cadaveric knees were harvested. 5 μm sections were H&E-stained and examined under light microscopy. The harvested ligaments were then stained using an S100 monoclonal antibody utilising the ABC technique to detect neural components. Further examination was performed on 60–80 nm sections under electron microscopy. Results. Of the 8 knees, 6 were suitable for examination. From these both MFLs existed in 3, only anterior MFLs were present in 2, and an isolated posterior MFL existed in 1. Out of the 9 MFLs, 4 demonstrated neural structures on light and electron microscopy and this was confirmed with S100 staining. The ultrastructure of these neural components was morphologically similar to mechanoreceptors. Conclusion. Neural structures are present in MFLs near to their meniscal attachments. It is likely that the meniscofemoral ligaments contribute not only as passive secondary restraints to posterior draw but more importantly to proprioception and may therefore play an active role in providing a neurosensory feedback loop. This may be particularly important when the primary restraint has reduced function as in the posterior cruciate ligament—deficient human knee. PMID:25938111

  14. [VARIANT ANATOMY OF SPLENIC LIGAMENTS AND ARTERIES PASSING THROUGH THEM].

    PubMed

    Gaivoronskiy, I V; Kotiv, B N; Alekseyev, V S; Nichiporuk, G I

    2015-01-01

    The research was performed on 15 non embalmed bodies and 32 abdominal complexes of adult individuals. The comparative study of variant anatomy of splenic ligaments and architectonics of arteries passing through them was carried out to substantiate the mobilization of splenopancreatic complex. Anatomical and angiographic restudied were carried out using preparation, morphometry, injection of gastric, pancreatic and splenic vascular bed with red lead suspension. It was established that the form and sizes of splenic ligaments and their interrelation with the branches of the splenic artery were variable. The minimal and maximal sizes of gastrolienal, phrenicosplenic and splenocolic ligaments differed 2-3 times. In most cases, spleen was fixed in abdominal cavity by many short ligaments. It was shown that architectonics and topography of main branches of spleen artery were determined by morphometric characteristics of the spleen proper and its ligaments. The knowledge of splenic ligament variant anatomy allows a new perspective to approach to substantiate different methods of the mobilization of spleno-pancreatic complex during surgical operations on organs of the upper part of the peritoneal cavity and organ-preserving surgery of the spleen. PMID:26234038

  15. Simultaneous bicompartmental bucket-handle meniscal tears with intact anterior cruciate ligament: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Bucket handle tear of the menisci is a common type of lesion resulting from injury to the knee joint. Bucket handle injury of both menisci in almost all cases is associated with a lesion to either the anterior or the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee joint. We describe a case of acute bucket-handle tear of the medial and lateral menisci with intact anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments in a dancer. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of this type of injury in the literature. Case presentation A 28-year-old Caucasian Greek woman presented to the emergency department after sustaining an injury to her right knee during dancing. An MRI evaluation demonstrated tears in both menisci of the right knee, while the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments were found to be intact. A partial medial and lateral meniscectomy was then performed. At a follow-up examination six months after her injury, clinical tests demonstrated that our patient's right knee was stable, had a full range of motion and had no tenderness. She was satisfied with the outcome of the operation and returned to her pre-injury activities. Conclusion We present the first case in the literature that describes a combined bucket-handle injury of both the medial and lateral menisci with an intact anterior cruciate ligament. The clinical examination of the anterior cruciate ligament was unremarkable, with no signs of deficiency or rupture. The posterior cruciate ligament was also intact. On magnetic resonance imaging, the ligaments were visualised as intact in all their length. These findings were confirmed by arthroscopic evaluation. PMID:20181059

  16. Contribution of biomechanics to management of ligament and tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Woo, Savio L Y; Fisher, Matthew B; Feola, Andrew J

    2008-03-01

    The contribution of biomechanics to the advancement of management of ligament and tendon injuries has been significant. Thanks to Professor Y.C. Fung's writing and guidance, our field of research has done fundamental work on anatomy and biology of ligaments and tendons, developed methods to accurately determine mechanical properties, identified various experimental factors which could change the outcome measurements as well as examined biological factors that change tissue properties in-vivo. Professor Fung also gave us his quasi-linear viscoelastic theory for soft tissues so that the time and history dependent properties of ligaments and tendons could be properly described. We have further adopted Professor Fung's eight steps on methods of approach for biomechanical investigation to understand as well as enhance the treatment of ligament and tendon injuries during work or sports related activities. Examples on how to better treat the tears of the medial collateral ligament of the knee, as well as how to improve reconstruction procedures for the anterior cruciate ligament are presented in detail. Currently the use of functional tissue engineering for ligament and tendon healing is a topic of great interest. Here the use of biological scaffolds, such as porcine small intestinal submucosa, has shown promise. For the last 35 to 40 years, the field of biomechanics has made great strides in the treatment of ligament and tendon injuries, and many patients have benefited. The future is even brighter because of what has been done properly in the past. Exciting advances can be made in the field of tissue engineering through novel in-vitro culture and bioscaffold fabrication techniques. Recent technology can also allow the collection of in-vivo data so that ligament and tendon injuries can be better understood. Yet, solving new and more complex problems must still follow the stepwise methods of approach as taught by Professor Fung. PMID:18524246

  17. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor); Martin, Ivan (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  18. Medial collateral ligament insertion site and contact forces in the ACL-deficient knee.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Benjamin J; Lujan, Trevor J; Dalton, Michelle S; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2006-04-01

    The objectives of this research were to determine the effects of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency on medial collateral ligament (MCL) insertion site and contact forces during anterior tibial loading and valgus loading using a combined experimental-finite element (FE) approach. Our hypothesis was that ACL deficiency would increase MCL insertion site forces at the attachments to the tibia and femur and increase contact forces between the MCL and these bones. Six male knees were subjected to varus-valgus and anterior-posterior loading at flexion angles of 0 degrees and 30 degrees. Three-dimensional joint kinematics and MCL strains were recorded during kinematic testing. Following testing, the MCL of each knee was removed to establish a stress-free reference configuration. An FE model of the femur-MCL-tibia complex was constructed for each knee to simulate valgus rotation and anterior translation at 0 degrees and 30 degrees, using subject-specific bone and ligament geometry and joint kinematics. A transversely isotropic hyperelastic material model with average material coefficients taken from a previous study was used to represent the MCL. Subject-specific MCL in situ strain distributions were used in each model. Insertion site and contact forces were determined from the FE analyses. FE predictions were validated by comparing MCL fiber strains to experimental measurements. The subject-specific FE predictions of MCL fiber stretch correlated well with the experimentally measured values (R2 = 0.95). ACL deficiency caused a significant increase in MCL insertion site and contact forces in response to anterior tibial loading. In contrast, ACL deficiency did not significantly increase MCL insertion site and contact forces in response to valgus loading, demonstrating that the ACL is not a restraint to valgus rotation in knees that have an intact MCL. When evaluating valgus laxity in the ACL-deficient knee, increased valgus laxity indicates a compromised MCL. PMID

  19. Deltoid Ligament and Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Injury in Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation at 3T and Comparison with Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Ka-Young; Lee, Seok Hoon; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Jeong, Min-Sun; Kim, Dae-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of deltoid ligament and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI). Materials and Methods Fifty patients (mean age, 35 years) who had undergone preoperative 3T MRI and surgical treatment for CLAI were enrolled. The prevalence of deltoid ligament and syndesmosis injury were assessed. The complexity of lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) injury was correlated with prevalence of deltoid or syndesmosis injuries. The diagnostic accuracy of ankle ligament imaging at 3T MRI was analyzed using arthroscopy as a reference standard. Results On MRI, deltoid ligament injury was identified in 18 (36%) patients as follows: superficial ligament alone, 9 (50%); deep ligament alone 2 (11%); and both ligaments 7 (39%). Syndesmosis abnormality was found in 21 (42%) patients as follows: anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) alone, 19 (90%); and AITFL and interosseous ligament, 2 (10%). There was no correlation between LCLC injury complexity and the prevalence of an accompanying deltoid or syndesmosis injury on both MRI and arthroscopic findings. MRI sensitivity and specificity for detection of deltoid ligament injury were 84% and 93.5%, and those for detection of syndesmosis injury were 91% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion Deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injuries were common in patients undergoing surgery for CLAI, regardless of the LCLC injury complexity. 3T MRI is helpful for the detection of all types of ankle ligament injury. Therefore, careful interpretation of pre-operative MRI is essential. PMID:26356649

  20. Computational modelling of mobile bearing TKA anterior-posterior dislocation.

    PubMed

    Müller, J H; Zakaria, T; van der Merwe, W; D'Angelo, F

    2016-01-01

    Anterior-posterior stability in an unconstrained mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and one with rotational constraints is compared in a computational model based on an ASTM test. Both TKA designs dislocate at loads greater than reported maximum in vivo forces. The posterior drawer forces (mean: 3027 N vs. 1817 N) needed to induce subluxation increase with a greater anterior jump distance (12 mm vs. 7 mm; refers to the vertical height of the anterior or posterior border of the tibial insert's articulating surface). The posterior jump distance for both tested TKA differed by 1.5 mm and had minimal effect on the magnitude of the anterior drawer forces at dislocation in mid-flexion (unconstrained vs. constrained: 445 N vs. 412 N). The unconstrained insert dislocated by means of spin-out whereas in the constrained TKA the femur dislocated from the bearing during posterior drawer and the bearing from the baseplate during anterior drawer. MCL function is an important consideration during ligament balancing since a ± 10% variation in MCL tension affects dislocation forces by ± 20%. The simulation platform provided the means to investigate TKA designs in terms of anterior-posterior stability as a function of knee flexion, collateral ligament function and mechanical morphology. PMID:26047039

  1. Ligament tissue engineering: an evolutionary materials science approach.

    PubMed

    Laurencin, Cato T; Freeman, Joseph W

    2005-12-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is important for knee stabilization. Unfortunately, it is also the most commonly injured intra-articular ligament. Due to poor vascularization, the ACL has inferior healing capability and is usually replaced after significant damage has occurred. Currently available replacements have a host of limitations, this has prompted the search for tissue-engineered solutions for ACL repair. Presently investigated scaffolds range from twisted fiber architectures composed of silk fibers to complex three-dimensional braided structures composed of poly (L-lactic acid) fibers. The purpose of these tissue-engineered constructs is to apply approaches such as the use of porous scaffolds, use of cells, and the application of growth factors to promote ligament tissue regeneration while providing mechanical properties similar to natural ligament. PMID:16045982

  2. Synthetic ligaments. Current status.

    PubMed

    Funk, F J

    1987-06-01

    Many techniques for ligamentous reconstruction have been developed in recent years. In the United States, injuries of the knee have been increasingly treated with innovative methods of surgical reconstruction, most of which have used normal structures. There are obvious theoretic advantages in using synthetic materials that might simplify surgery, spare normal tissues, and possibly facilitate stronger repairs. To these ends, several synthetic substances have been used experimentally and clinically. This is a brief summary of eight of the materials that have been or are being investigated in the United States. Some are no longer in use, others are currently being used in clinical trials. As of this writing, only the Gortex ligament has received a general device release from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). PMID:3034461

  3. Ex Vivo Growth of Bioengineered Ligaments and Other Tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, Gregory; Kaplan, David L.; Martin, Ivan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    A method of growing bioengineered tissues for use in surgical replacement of damaged anterior cruciate ligaments has been invented. An anterior cruciate ligament is one of two ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) that cross in the middle of a knee joint and act to prevent the bones in the knee from sliding forward and backward relative to each other. Anterior cruciate ligaments are frequently torn in sports injuries and traffic accidents, resulting in pain and severe limitations on mobility. By making it possible to grow replacement anterior cruciate ligaments that structurally and functionally resemble natural ones more closely than do totally synthetic replacements, the method could create new opportunities for full or nearly full restoration of functionality in injured knees. The method is also adaptable to the growth of bioengineered replacements for other ligaments (e.g., other knee ligaments as well as those in the hands, wrists, and elbows) and to the production of tissues other than ligaments, including cartilage, bones, muscles, and blood vessels. The method is based on the finding that the histomorphological properties of a bioengineered tissue grown in vitro from pluripotent cells within a matrix are affected by the direct application of mechanical force to the matrix during growth generation. This finding provides important new insights into the relationships among mechanical stress, biochemical and cell-immobilization methods, and cell differentiation, and is applicable to the production of the variety of tissues mentioned above. Moreover, this finding can be generalized to nonmechanical (e.g., chemical and electromagnetic) stimuli that are experienced in vivo by tissues of interest and, hence, the method can be modified to incorporate such stimuli in the ex vivo growth of replacements for the various tissues mentioned above. In this method, a three-dimensional matrix made of a suitable material is seeded with pluripotent stem

  4. Identifying diagnostically-relevant resting state brain functional connectivity in the ventral posterior complex via genetic data mining in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Philip R; Curtis, Kaylah N; Patriquin, Michelle A; Wolf, Varina; Viswanath, Humsini; Shaw, Chad; Sakai, Yasunari; Salas, Ramiro

    2016-05-01

    Exome sequencing and copy number variation analyses continue to provide novel insight to the biological bases of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The growing speed at which massive genetic data are produced causes serious lags in analysis and interpretation of the data. Thus, there is a need to develop systematic genetic data mining processes that facilitate efficient analysis of large datasets. We report a new genetic data mining system, ProcessGeneLists and integrated a list of ASD-related genes with currently available resources in gene expression and functional connectivity of the human brain. Our data-mining program successfully identified three primary regions of interest (ROIs) in the mouse brain: inferior colliculus, ventral posterior complex of the thalamus (VPC), and parafascicular nucleus (PFn). To understand its pathogenic relevance in ASD, we examined the resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) of the homologous ROIs in human brain with other brain regions that were previously implicated in the neuro-psychiatric features of ASD. Among them, the RSFC of the VPC with the medial frontal gyrus (MFG) was significantly more anticorrelated, whereas the RSFC of the PN with the globus pallidus was significantly increased in children with ASD compared with healthy children. Moreover, greater values of RSFC between VPC and MFG were correlated with severity index and repetitive behaviors in children with ASD. No significant RSFC differences were detected in adults with ASD. Together, these data demonstrate the utility of our data-mining program through identifying the aberrant connectivity of thalamo-cortical circuits in children with ASD. Autism Res 2016, 9: 553-562. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26451751

  5. Mechanoreceptors of the ligaments and tendons around the knee.

    PubMed

    Çabuk, Haluk; Kuşku Çabuk, Fatmagül

    2016-09-01

    Proprioceptive inputs from the joints and limbs arise from mechanoreceptors in the muscles, ligaments and tendons. The knee joint has a wide range of movements, and proper neuroanatomical organization is critical for knee stability. Four ligaments (the anterior (ACL) and posterior (PCL) cruciate ligaments and the medial (MCL) and lateral (LCL) collateral ligaments) and four tendons (the semitendinosus (STT), gracilis (GT), popliteal (PoT), and patellar (PaT) tendons) from eight fresh frozen cadavers were harvested. Each harvested tissue was divided into its bone insertion side and its tendinous part for immunohistochemical examination using S100 staining. Freeman-Wyke's classification was used to identify the mechanoreceptors. The mechanoreceptors were usually located close to the bone insertion. Free nerve endings followed by Ruffini endings were the most common mechanoreceptors overall. No Pacini corpuscles were observed; free nerve endings and Golgi-like endings were most frequent in the PCL (PCL-PaT: P = 0.0.1, PCL-STT: P = 0.00), and Ruffini endings in the popliteal tendon (PoT-PaT: P = 0.00, Pot-STT: P = 0.00, PoT-LCL: P = 0.00, PoT-GT: P = 0.00, PoT-ACL: P = 0.09). The cruciate ligaments had more mechanoreceptors than the medial structures (MS) or the patellar tendon (CR-Pat: P = 0.000, CR-MS: P = 0.01). The differences in mechanoreceptor distributions between the ligaments and tendons could reflect the different roles of these structures in the dynamic coordination of knee motion. Clin. Anat. 29:789-795, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27376635

  6. Andreas Vesalius' 500th Anniversary: First Description of the Mammary Suspensory Ligaments.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Romy J; Hage, J Joris

    2016-09-01

    Sir Astley Paston Cooper has, to date, been acknowledged to be the first to describe the suspensory ligaments of the breast, or Cooper's ligaments, in 1840. We found these ligaments to be recorded in the first edition of 'De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem' by Andreas Vesalius, published in 1543. To commemorate Vesalius' 500th birthday, we quote and discuss this earlier record. Vesalius' record of the nature and function of the fleshy membrane between mammary gland and pectoral muscle, the hard fat intervening the mammary glands, and the fibers running from the fleshy membrane to the skin are a clear representation of posterior layer of the superficial fascial system, the fibro-adipose stroma surrounding and linking the mammary glandular elements, and the suspensory ligaments as we know them. Vesalius recorded the anatomy and function of the latter structures nearly 300 years before Sir Astley Paston Cooper did. PMID:26943658

  7. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  8. Anatomy and histology of apical support: a literature review concerning cardinal and uterosacral ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Ramanah, Rajeev; Berger, Mitchell B.; Parratte, Bernard M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to collect and summarize relevant literature on the anatomy, histology, and imaging of apical support of the upper vagina and the uterus provided by the cardinal (CL) and uterosacral (USL) ligaments. A literature search in English, French, and German languages was carried out with the keywords apical support, cardinal ligament, transverse cervical ligament, Mackenrodt ligament, parametrium, paracervix, retinaculum uteri, web, uterosacral ligament, and sacrouterine ligament in the PubMed database. Other relevant journal and textbook articles were sought by retrieving references cited in previous PubMed articles. Fifty references were examined in peer-reviewed journals and textbooks. The USL extends from the S2 to the S4 vertebra region to the dorsal margin of the uterine cervix and/or to the upper third of the posterior vaginal wall. It has a superficial and deep component. Autonomous nerve fibers are a major constituent of the deep USL. CL is defined as a perivascular sheath with a proximal insertion around the origin of the internal iliac artery and a distal insertion on the cervix and/or vagina. It is divided into a cranial (vascular) and a caudal (neural) portions. Histologically, it contains mainly vessels, with no distinct band of connective tissue. Both the deep USL and the caudal CL are closely related to the inferior hypogastric plexus. USL and CL are visceral ligaments, with mesentery-like structures containing vessels, nerves, connective tissue, and adipose tissue. PMID:22618209

  9. Anatomy and histology of apical support: a literature review concerning cardinal and uterosacral ligaments.

    PubMed

    Ramanah, Rajeev; Berger, Mitchell B; Parratte, Bernard M; DeLancey, John O L

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this work was to collect and summarize relevant literature on the anatomy, histology, and imaging of apical support of the upper vagina and the uterus provided by the cardinal (CL) and uterosacral (USL) ligaments. A literature search in English, French, and German languages was carried out with the keywords apical support, cardinal ligament, transverse cervical ligament, Mackenrodt ligament, parametrium, paracervix, retinaculum uteri, web, uterosacral ligament, and sacrouterine ligament in the PubMed database. Other relevant journal and textbook articles were sought by retrieving references cited in previous PubMed articles. Fifty references were examined in peer-reviewed journals and textbooks. The USL extends from the S2 to the S4 vertebra region to the dorsal margin of the uterine cervix and/or to the upper third of the posterior vaginal wall. It has a superficial and deep component. Autonomous nerve fibers are a major constituent of the deep USL. CL is defined as a perivascular sheath with a proximal insertion around the origin of the internal iliac artery and a distal insertion on the cervix and/or vagina. It is divided into a cranial (vascular) and a caudal (neural) portions. Histologically, it contains mainly vessels, with no distinct band of connective tissue. Both the deep USL and the caudal CL are closely related to the inferior hypogastric plexus. USL and CL are visceral ligaments, with mesentery-like structures containing vessels, nerves, connective tissue, and adipose tissue. PMID:22618209

  10. Rethinking "posterior" tongue-tie.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Currently, many clinicians who help with breastfeeding problems are diagnosing "posterior" tongue-tie in infants and performing or referring for frenotomy. In this "Speaking Out" article, I argue that the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie has successfully raised awareness of the importance of impaired tongue function in breastfeeding difficulty. However, the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie also applies a reductionist, medicalized theoretical frame to the complex problem of impaired tongue function, risking unintended outcomes. Impaired tongue function arises out of multiple interacting and co-evolving factors, including the interplay between social behaviors concerning breastfeeding and mother-infant biology. Consideration of theoretical frames is vital if we are to build an evidence base through efficient use of the scarce resources available for clinical breastfeeding research and minimize unintended outcomes. PMID:24143939

  11. CT of the pulmonary ligament

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, J.D.; Vock, P.; Osborne, D.R.

    1983-08-01

    Most computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest show the inferior pulmonary ligament and an associated septum in the lower lobe, although CT descriptions of these structures have not been reported. Conventional radiography of the ligament has relied on indirect signs: the position of the lower lobe in the presence of pneumothorax or pleural effusion, soft-tissue peaks along the upper surface of the diaphragm, and the rare traumatic paramediastinal pneumatocele (attributed to air in the ligament). CT clarifies the anatomic relations of the ligament and alterations caused by pleural effusion and pneumothorax. The ligament is probably responsible for some long linear shadows at the lung bases, and CT helps to distinguish these from scars, walls of bullae, and normal structures such as the phrenic nerve and the interlobar fissures.

  12. [Treitz and his ligament].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2011-01-01

    Václav (Wenzel) Treitz (1819-1872) grew up in the Czech community that was part of the Habsburg Empire. He studied medicine at the German Karl Ferdinand University in Prague where he specialised in pathological anatomy. He continued this specialisation in Vienna, under Rokitansky. In 1855, after a stint in Krakow (now Poland; then also under Austrian rule), he was appointed Professor of Pathological Anatomy in Prague during which time he discovered a small muscle that connected the duodenojejunal flexure with the coeliac axis. It was called the 'ligament of Treitz' for a long time, but is known today as the musculus suspensorius duodeni (suspensory muscle of duodenum). In addition to this, he focused on internal intestinal herniation alongside a peritoneal duplicature at the duodenojejunal junction ('arch of Treitz'). Treitz taught in Czech and became increasingly involved in patriotic agitations which estranged him from most of his colleagues. Eventually, his mental as well as physical health deteriorated. PMID:21557825

  13. Collateral ligament (CL) injury - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 66. Miller III RH, Azar, FM. Knee injuires. In: Canale ... Dr. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries (including revision). In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic ...

  14. Mastication and the Postorbital Ligament: Dynamic Strain in Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Susan W.; Rafferty, Katherine L.; Liu, Zi Jun; Lemme, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Although the FEED database focuses on muscle activity patterns, it is equally suitable for other physiological recording and especially for synthesizing different types of information. The present contribution addresses the interaction between muscle activity and ligamentary stretch during mastication. The postorbital ligament is the thickened edge of a septum dividing the orbital contents from the temporal fossa and is continuous with the temporal fascia. As a tensile element, this fascial complex could support the zygomatic arch against the pull of the masseter muscle. An ossified postorbital bar has evolved repeatedly in mammals, enabling resistance to compression and shear in addition to tension. Although such ossification clearly reinforces the skull against muscle pull, the most accepted explanation is that it helps isolate the orbital contents from contractions of the temporalis muscle. However, it has never been demonstrated that the contraction of jaw muscles deforms the unossified ligament. We examined linear deformation of the postorbital ligament in minipigs, Sus scrofa, along with electromyography of the jaw muscles and an assessment of changes in pressure and shape in the temporalis. During chewing, the ligament elongated (average 0.9%, maximum 2.8%) in synchrony with the contraction of the elevator muscles of the jaw. Although the temporalis bulged outward and created substantial pressure against the braincase, the superficial fibers usually retracted caudally, away from the postorbital ligament. In anesthetized animals, stimulating either the temporalis or the masseter muscle in isolation usually elongated the ligament (average 0.4–0.7%). These results confirm that contraction of the masticatory muscles can potentially distort the orbital contents and further suggest that the postorbital ligament does function as a tension member resisting the pull of the masseter on the zygomatic arch. PMID:21593142

  15. Role of the extra-geniculate pathway in visual guidance. II. Effects of lesioning the pulvinar-lateral posterior thalamic complex in the cat.

    PubMed

    Fabre-Thorpe, M; Viévard, A; Buser, P

    1986-01-01

    Eight cats were trained to perform a paw movement towards a moving target. The target was a lever which moved at a variable speed across an aperture situated in front of the animal, from left to right or right to left at random, but only once per trial. The animals were trained until performances stabilized in terms of precision (correct movements versus misguided ones) and speed (response time distribution of correctly guided movements). Then they underwent bilateral electrolytic lesions restricted to the pulvinar nucleus (4 cats) or to the lateral posterior nucleus (4 cats). Pre- and postoperative performances were compared. The results showed a clear difference between the two nuclei; postoperative performances after pulvinar lesion were in the preoperative range, both for precision and response time, thus allowing this group to be considered as a control lesion group. On the other hand, a marked impairment in visual guidance followed lateral posterior lesions. This deficit affected both the precision and the speed of the response, with all cats showing a tendency to increase the response time of their efficient movements. This impairment disappeared progressively except for one animal, whose lesion was especially large. We suggest that the nucleus lateral posterior is involved in the control of visually guided movements; and its role as a component of the tecto-thalamo-cortical pathway is discussed. PMID:3720888

  16. The Influence of Macrophage Depletion on Ligament Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Connie S.; Leiferman, Ellen M.; Frisch, Kayt E.; Wang, Sijian; Yang, Xipei; van Rooijen, Nico; Brickson, Stacey L; Vanderby, Ray

    2011-01-01

    Despite a complex cascade of cellular events to reconstruct damaged extracellular matrix, ligament healing results in a mechanically inferior, scar-like tissue. During normal healing the number of macrophages significantly increases within the wound site. Then, granulation tissue expands into any residual, normal ligamentous tissue (creeping substitution), resulting in a larger region of healing, greater mechanical compromise, and an inefficient repair process. To study the effects of macrophages on the repair process, rats underwent bilateral, surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments. Treatment animals received liposome-encapsulated clodronate 2 days before rupture to ablate phagocytosing macrophages. Ligaments were then collected at day 5, 11, and 28 for immunohistochemistry and/or mechanical testing. Clodronate treatment reduced both the M1 and M2 macrophages at day 5 and altered early healing. However, the macrophages effectively returned to control levels after day 5 and reinitiated a wound healing response. Our results suggest that an early macrophage response, which is necessary for debridement of damaged tissue in the wound, is also important for cytokine release to mediate normal repair processes. Additionally, non-specific inhibition of macrophages (without regard to specific macrophage populations) can control excessive granulation tissue formation but is detrimental to early matrix formation and ligament strength. PMID:21117894

  17. LARS Artificial Ligament Versus ABC Purely Polyester Ligament for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Iliadis, Dimitrios Ph.; Bourlos, Dimitrios N.; Mastrokalos, Dimitrios S.; Chronopoulos, Efstathios; Babis, George C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Graft choice for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is of critical importance. Various grafts have been used so far, with autografts long considered the optimal solution for the treatment of ACL-deficient knees. Limited data are available on the long-term survivorship of synthetic grafts. Purpose: To compare the functional outcome and survivorship of ACL reconstructions performed using the LARS (ligament augmentation and reconstruction system) ligament and the ABC (active biosynthetic composite) purely polyester ligament. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The results of 72 patients who underwent primary arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with the LARS ligament and 31 cases with an ABC purely polyester ligament were reviewed. The mean follow-up periods for the LARS and ABC groups were 9.5 and 5.1 years, respectively. A survivorship analysis of the 2 synthetic grafts was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method with a log-rank test (Mantel-Cox, 95% CI). Lysholm, Tegner activity, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores as well as laxity measurements obtained using a KT-1000 arthrometer were recorded for all intact grafts, and a Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison reasons. Results: The rupture rates for LARS and ABC grafts were 31% (95% CI, 20%-42%) and 42% (95% CI, 25%-59%), respectively. For intact grafts, the mean Lysholm score was good for both groups (90 for the LARS group and 89 for the ABC group), with the majority of patients returning to their preinjury level of activities, and the mean IKDC score was 90 for the LARS group and 86 for the ABC group. Conclusion: The rupture rates of both LARS and ABC grafts were both high. However, the LARS ligament provided significantly better survivorship compared with the ABC ligament at short- to midterm follow-up (95% CI). PMID:27453894

  18. Rotational stability of a posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Amador, D D

    1989-05-01

    The effect of the posterior stabilizing mechanism on rotational stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was investigated in six cadaver knees using a special knee-testing device. The device evaluated varus-valgus, rotational, and anteroposterior (AP) stability in the normal knee compared to a posterior stabilized TKA with either a rotationally constrained or an unconstrained articular surface. None of the stability parameters was significantly different from normal in either configuration of the tibial surface, but the constrained surface did decrease rotational deflection compared to the rotationally unconstrained surfaces. These findings show that rotational constraint in a posterior stabilized TKA is not necessary to achieve rotational stability as long as varus-valgus stability is achieved by appropriately tensioning the collateral ligaments. PMID:2706852

  19. Elastographic imaging of strain distribution in the anterior cruciate ligament and at the ligament-bone insertions.

    PubMed

    Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Gallina, Jason; Fung-Kee-Fung, Simon D; Konofagou, Elisa E; Lu, Helen H

    2006-10-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) functions as a mechanical stabilizer in the tibiofemoral joint, and is the most commonly injured knee ligament. To improve the clinical outcome of tendon grafts used for ACL reconstructions, our long-term goal is to promote graft-bone integration via the regeneration of the native ligament-bone interface. An understanding of strain distribution at this interface is crucial for functional scaffold design and clinical evaluation. Experimental determination, however, has been difficult due to the small length scale of the insertion sites. This study utilizes ultrasound elastography to characterize the response of the ACL and ACL-bone interface under tension. Specifically, bovine tibiofemoral joints were mounted on a material testing system and loaded in tension while radiofrequency (RF) data were acquired at 5 MHz. Axial strain elastograms between RF frames and a reference frame were generated using crosscorrelation and recorrelation techniques. Elastographic analyses revealed that when the joint was loaded in tension, complex strains with both compressive and tensile components occurred at the tibial insertion, with higher strains found at the insertion sites. In addition, the displacement was greatest at the ACL proper and decreased in value gradually from ligament to bone, likely a reflection of the matrix organization at the ligament-bone interface. Our results indicate that elastography is a novel method that can be readily used to characterize the mechanical properties of the ACL and its insertions into bone. PMID:16900541

  20. An extended posterior approach to the hip and pelvis for complex acetabular reconstruction that preserves the gluteal muscles and their neurovascular supply.

    PubMed

    Solomon, L B; Hofstaetter, J G; Bolt, M J; Howie, D W

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the detailed anatomy of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius and gluteus minimus and their neurovascular supply in 22 hips in 11 embalmed adult Caucasian human cadavers. This led to the development of a surgical technique for an extended posterior approach to the hip and pelvis that exposes the supra-acetabular ilium and preserves the glutei during revision hip surgery. Proximal to distal mobilisation of the gluteus medius from the posterior gluteal line permits exposure and mobilisation of the superior gluteal neurovascular bundle between the sciatic notch and the entrance to the gluteus medius, enabling a wider exposure of the supra-acetabular ilium. This technique was subsequently used in nine patients undergoing revision total hip replacement involving the reconstruction of nine Paprosky 3B acetabular defects, five of which had pelvic discontinuity. Intra-operative electromyography showed that the innervation of the gluteal muscles was not affected by surgery. Clinical follow-up demonstrated good hip abduction function in all patients. These results were compared with those of a matched cohort treated through a Kocher-Langenbeck approach. Our modified approach maximises the exposure of the ilium above the sciatic notch while protecting the gluteal muscles and their neurovascular bundle. PMID:24395310

  1. [Posterior capsule opacification].

    PubMed

    Milazzo, S; Grenot, M; Benzerroug, M

    2014-12-01

    Posterior capsule opacification (PCO) is the most common complication after cataract surgery, with an incidence of 30%. It tends to be considered a normal event in the natural history of cataract surgery. Better understanding of its pathophysiology and advancement of intraocular lens material and design along with the improvement of phacoemulsification technique have contributed to decrease the incidence of PCO. Although treatment by Nd: YAG laser posterior capsulotomy is quick and non-invasive, the opening of the posterior capsule may be associated with numerous complications. Prevention remains the best measure for controlling this pathology. PMID:25455552

  2. A framework for parametric modeling of ankle ligaments to determine the in situ response under gross foot motion.

    PubMed

    Nie, Bingbing; Panzer, Matthew Brian; Mane, Adwait; Mait, Alexander Ritz; Donlon, John-Paul; Forman, Jason Lee; Kent, Richard Wesley

    2016-09-01

    Ligament sprains account for a majority of injuries to the foot and ankle complex, but ligament properties have not been understood well due to the difficulties in replicating the complex geometry, in situ stress state, and non-uniformity of the strain. For a full investigation of the injury mechanism, it is essential to build up a foot and ankle model validated at the level of bony kinematics and ligament properties. This study developed a framework to parameterize the ligament response for determining the in situ stress state and heterogeneous force-elongation characteristics using a finite element ankle model. Nine major ankle ligaments and the interosseous membrane were modeled as discrete elements corresponding functionally to the ligamentous microstructure of collagen fibers and having parameterized toe region and stiffness at the fiber level. The range of the design variables in the ligament model was determined from existing experimental data. Sensitivity of the bony kinematics to each variable was investigated by design of experiment. The results highlighted the critical role of the length of the toe region of the ligamentous fibers on the bony kinematics with the cumulative influence of more than 95%, while the fiber stiffness was statistically insignificant with an influence of less than 1% under the given variable range and loading conditions. With the flexibility of variable adjustment and high computational efficiency, the presented ankle model was generic in nature so as to maximize its applicability to capture the individual ligament behaviors in future studies. PMID:26712301

  3. Posterior fossa tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the posterior fossa, it can block the flow of spinal fluid and cause increased pressure on the brain and ... the cancer early. A total blockage in the flow of spinal fluid can be life threatening. If tumors are found ...

  4. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  5. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases. PMID:16224109

  6. Elongation of the collateral ligaments after cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty and the maximum flexion of the knee.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwan Kyu; Hosseini, Ali; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Kwon, Young-Min; Li, Guoan

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms that affect knee flexion after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are still debatable. This study investigated the elongation of the superficial medial (sMCL) and lateral collateral ligaments (LCL) before and after a posterior cruciate retaining (CR) TKA. We hypothesized that overstretching of the collateral ligaments in high flexion after TKA could reduce maximal flexion of the knee. Three-dimensional models of 11 osteoarthritic knees of 11 patients including the insertions of the collateral ligaments were created using MR images. Each ligament was divided into three equal portions: anterior, middle and posterior portions. The shortest 3D wrapping length of each ligament portion was determined before and after the TKA surgery along a weight-bearing, single leg flexion path. The relationship between the changes of ligament elongation and the changes of the maximal knee flexion after TKAs was quantitatively analyzed. The sMCL showed significant increases in length only at low flexion after TKA; the LCL showed decreases in length at full extension, but increases with further flexion after TKA. The amount of increases of the maximum flexion angle after TKA was negatively correlated with the increases of the elongations of the anterior portion (p=0.010, r=0.733) and middle portion (p=0.049, r=0.604) of the sMCL as well as the anterior portion (p=0.010, r=0.733) of the LCL at maximal flexion of the knee. The results indicated that the increases of the length of the collateral ligaments at maximal flexion after TKA were associated with the decreases of the maximal flexion of the knee. Our data suggest that collateral ligament management should also be evaluated at higher knee flexion angles in order to optimize maximal flexion of the knee after TKAs. PMID:25555307

  7. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cohen, Mark S.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Cole, Brian J.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is a common surgery performed in professional, collegiate, and high school athletes. Purpose: To report patient demographics, surgical techniques, and outcomes of all UCLRs performed at a single institution from 2004 to 2014. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: All patients who underwent UCLR from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2014, at a single institution were identified. Charts were reviewed to determine patient age, sex, date of surgery, sport played, athletic level, surgical technique, graft type, and complications. Data were collected prospectively, and patients were contacted via phone calls to obtain the return-to-sport rate, Conway-Jobe score, Andrews-Timmerman score, and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) Shoulder and Elbow score. Continuous variable data were reported as weighted means, and categorical variable data were reported as frequencies with percentages. Results: A total of 187 patients (188 elbows) underwent UCLR during the study period (92% male; mean age, 19.6 ± 4.7 years; 78.2% right elbows). There were 165 baseball players (87.8% of all patients), 155 of whom were pitchers (82.5% of all patients). Ninety-seven (51.6%) were college athletes, 68 (36.2%) high school athletes, and 7 (3.7%) professional athletes at the time of surgery. The docking technique was used in 110 (58.5%) patients while the double-docking technique was used in 78 (41.5%). An ipsilateral palmaris longus graft was used in 110 (58.5%) patients while a hamstring autograft was used in 48 (25.5%) patients. The ulnar nerve was subcutaneously transposed in 79 (42%) patients. Clinical follow-up data were available on 85 patients. Mean follow-up was 60 ± 30.8 months. Overall, 94.1% of patients were able to return to sport and had a Conway-Jobe score of good/excellent while 4.3% had a score of fair. The mean KJOC score was 90.4 ± 6.7 and mean Andrews-Timmerman score was 92.5 ± 7

  8. Traumatic posterior dislocation of hip in children.

    PubMed

    Kutty, S; Thornes, B; Curtin, W A; Gilmore, M F

    2001-02-01

    Traumatic posterior dislocation of the hip joint in children is an uncommon injury. It constitutes a true orthopedic emergency. It makes up over 80% of pediatric hip dislocations. In children, it can occur as a result of minimal trauma, which is attributed to a soft pliable acetabulum and ligamentous laxity. In skeletally mature adolescents, a greater force is required to dislocate the hip joint. Delay in reduction is associated with long-term complications such as avascular necrosis and degenerative arthritis. Avascular necrosis is related to the duration of dislocation. A poorer prognosis is associated with delay in reduction beyond 6 hours, advanced skeletal maturity, or multiple traumas. Prompt reduction minimizes complications. We report two cases of traumatic posterior dislocation of hip in children aged 3 and 14 years. Both were reduced within 6 hours of dislocation, and review at 6 months revealed normal examination and no evidence of any post-traumatic changes. Post-reduction treatment remains without a consensus. This review highlights the clinical presentation, management, and time-sensitive complications of the injury. PMID:11265904

  9. LIGAMENT-CONTROLLED EFFERVESCENT ATOMIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The operating principles and performance of a new type of spray nozzle are presented. This nozzle, termed a "ligament-controlled effervescent atomizer," was developed to allow consumer product manufacturers to replace volatile organic compound (VOC) solvents with water and hydroc...

  10. Leiomyosarcoma of the Broad Ligament With Fever Presentation: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chaichian, Shahla; Mehdizadehkashi, Abolfazl; Tahermanesh, Kobra; Moazzami, Bahram; Jesmi, Fatemeh; Rafiee, Moezedinjavad; Goharimoghaddam, Katayoun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Leiomyosarcoma is a rare gynecologic malignancy that accounts for less than 1% of gynecological malignancies. Leiomyosarcoma of the broad ligament is an even rarer condition. According to Gardner’s criteria, the diagnosis is made when the mass is completely separated from the uterus and adnexa. So far, 23 cases of primary leiomyosarcoma of the broad ligament have been reported in the literature published in English. Case Presentation In September 2014, a 55-year-old, gravida 3, para 3 woman with a BMI of 30 and a chief complaint of fever and dizziness was admitted to the infectious-diseases ward of the Pars general hospital affiliated with Iran University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. Her symptoms had begun two weeks before. The results of a fever workup and examination for infectious, metabolic, and immunologic problems were all negative. Imaging modalities revealed an endometrial polyp, two calcified myoma in the body of the uterus, and a solid, heterogeneous 70-mm mass in the right para-cervical space, posterior to the broad ligament, and far from the ovary. After surgery, a histologic report revealed leiomyosarcoma. Conclusions Although a leiomyosarcoma of the broad ligament is rare, practitioners should consider it when dealing with masses in the region of the broad ligament. If there is any suspicion of malignancy, especially in the presence of fever, it is recommended to avoid morcellation during laparoscopy. PMID:27330834

  11. Simultaneous strain measurement with determination of a zero strain reference for the medial and lateral ligaments of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Satoru; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kaneda, Kiyoshi; Yamakoshi, Kenichi; Yamanoi, Takahiro

    2002-09-01

    The strain changes of the central part of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL), the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), and the tibiocalcaneal ligament (TCL) were measured simultaneously for a full range of ankle motion. Twelve fresh frozen amputated ankles were used. To measure the strain changes of the ligaments, a Galium-Indium-filled silastic strain transducer was implanted in the center of each ligament. The zero strain reference was determined immediately after the measurement of strain changes in five of the 12 ankles by tensile testing of each bone-ligament-bone preparation. The maximum strain change of the ATFL, the PTFL, the CFL and the TFL were 7.9%, 5.9%, 5.3% and 5.2%, respectively. The ATFL was elongated in plantar flexion and shortened in dorsiflexion. The PTFL and the CFL were shortened in plantar flexion and elongated in dorsiflexion. The TCL was the longest around the neutral position and became shorter in planter flexion and dorsiflexion. The results showed that the ATFL was taut in plantar flexion over 16.2 degrees, the PTFL and the CFL were taut in dorsiflexion over 18 degrees and 17.8 degrees respectively, and the TCL was taut between 9.5 degrees of dorsiflexion and 9.5 degrees of plantar flexion. The length change pattern was different among the ankle ligaments, although there was only a slight difference between that of the PTFL and the CFL. This study provides fundamental data useful in studying ankle ligament reconstruction. PMID:12356180

  12. The influence of interleukin-4 on ligament healing.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Connie S; Leiferman, Ellen M; Frisch, Kayt E; Wang, Sijian; Yang, Xipei; Brickson, Stacey L; Vanderby, Ray

    2011-01-01

    Despite a complex cascade of cellular events to reconstruct the damaged extracellular matrix, ligament healing results in a mechanically inferior scarred ligament. During normal healing, granulation tissue expands into any residual normal ligamentous tissue (creeping substitution), resulting in a larger region of healing, greater mechanical compromise and an inefficient repair process. To control creeping substitution and possibly enhance the repair process, the antiinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-4 (IL-4), was administered to rats before and after rupture of their medial collateral ligaments. In vitro experiments showed a time-dependent effect on fibroblast proliferation after IL-4 treatment. In vivo treatments with IL-4 (100 ng/mL IV) for 5 days resulted in decreased wound size and type III collagen and increased type I procollagen, indicating a more regenerative early healing in response to the IL-4 treatment. However, continued treatment of IL-4 to day 11 antagonized this early benefit and slowed healing. Together, these results suggest that IL-4 not only influences the macrophages and T lymphocytes but also stimulates fibroblasts associated with the proliferative phase of healing in a dose-, cell-, and time-dependent manner. Although treatment significantly influenced healing in the first week after injury, IL-4 alone was unable to maintain this early regenerative response. PMID:21518087

  13. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Patients with Generalized Joint Laxity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Kumar, Praveen

    2010-01-01

    Generalized joint laxity is a genetically determined component of overall joint flexibility. The incidence of joint laxity in the overall population is approximately 5% to 20%, and its prevalence is higher in females. Recently it was noticed that individuals with generalized joint laxity are not only prone to anterior cruciate ligament injuries but also have inferior results after a reconstruction. Therefore, an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in patients with generalized laxity should be undertaken with caution due to the higher expected failure rate from the complexity of problems associated with this condition. It is also necessary to identify the risk factors for the injury as well as for the post operative outcome in this population. A criterion that includes all the associated components is necessary for the proper screening of individuals for generalized joint laxity. Graft selection for an anterior cruciate reconstruction in patients with ligament laxity is a challenge. According to the senior author, a hamstring autograft is an inferior choice and a double bundle reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-bone autograft yields better results than a single bundle bone-patella tendon-bone autograft. Future studies comparing the different grafts available might be needed to determine the preferred graft for this subset of patients. Improved results after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can be achieved by proper planning and careful attention to each step beginning from the clinical examination to the postoperative rehabilitation. PMID:20808583

  14. Tibialis Posterior Tendon Entrapment Within Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fragment.

    PubMed

    Fantry, Amanda; Lareau, Craig; Vopat, Bryan; Blankenhorn, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Management of posterior malleolus fractures continues to be controversial, with respect to both need for fixation and fixation methods. Fixation methods include an open posterior approach to the ankle as well as percutaneous reduction and fixation with or without arthroscopy for visualization of the articular surface. Plain radiographs are unreliable in identifying fracture pattern and intraoperative reduction, making arthroscopy a valuable adjunct to posterior malleolus fracture management. In this article, we report a case of tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus fracture, as identified by arthroscopy and managed with open reduction. Tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus has not been previously reported. Ankle arthroscopy for posterior malleolus fractures provides an opportunity to identify soft-tissue or tendinous entrapment, articular surface reduction, and articular cartilage injuries unlikely to be identified with fluoroscopy alone and should be considered in reduction and fixation of posterior malleolus fractures. PMID:26991573

  15. Anatomic variations of the pelvic floor nerves adjacent to the sacrospinous ligament: a female cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, George; Grigorescu, Bogdan A; Olson, Todd R; Downie, Sherry A; Powers, Kenneth; Mikhail, Magdy S

    2008-05-01

    Our objective was to document variations in the topography of pelvic floor nerves (PFN) and describe a nerve-free zone adjacent to the sacrospinous ligament (SSL). Pelvic floor dissections were performed on 15 female cadavers. The course of the PFN was described in relation to the ischial spine (IS) and the SSL. The pudendal nerve (PN) passed medial to the IS and posterior to the SSL at a mean distance of 0.6 cm (SD = +/-0.4) in 80% of cadavers. In 40% of cadavers, an inferior rectal nerve (IRN) variant pierced the SSL at a distance of 1.9 cm (SD = +/-0.7) medial to the IS. The levator ani nerve (LAN), coursed over the superior surface of the SSL-coccygeus muscle complex at a mean distance of 2.5 cm (SD = +/-0.7) medial to the IS. Anatomic variations were found which challenge the classic description of PFN. A nerve-free zone is situated in the medial third of the SSL. PMID:18038107

  16. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake

    2013-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments. PMID:23072472

  17. [Arthroscopic tightening of the anterior cruciate ligament].

    PubMed

    Charrois, O; Cheyrou, E; Remi, J; Panarella, L; Jouve, F; Beaufils, P

    2008-02-01

    We present here the preliminary results obtained with arthroscopic tightening of the anterior cruciate ligament. Six patients underwent the technique. Four had had prior ligamentoplasty, two had sequelae of tibial spine fractures. Laxity persisted in all cases. The transplant or the ligament were continuous and insertion points were well-positioned. The procedure consisted in using a trephine to bore the tibial bone at the "foot" of the ligament or transplant in order to tighten the ligament. There was no evidence of instability after the arthroscopic tightening procedure. Mean pre- and postoperative differential anterior drawer values were successively 9.2 and 3.9 mm. For native or reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments, which are continuous and well-positioned but not loose, arthroscopic tightening spares the need for ligament transplant and appears to be free of specific morbidity. PMID:18342033

  18. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques

    PubMed Central

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-01-01

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal or ligamentous injuries accompany ACL ruptures and further deteriorate the resulting kinematics and clinical outcomes. Knowing the surgical options, anatomic relations and current evidence to restore ACL function and considering the influence of concomitant injuries on resulting kinematics to restore full function can together help to achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:26925379

  19. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-02-18

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal or ligamentous injuries accompany ACL ruptures and further deteriorate the resulting kinematics and clinical outcomes. Knowing the surgical options, anatomic relations and current evidence to restore ACL function and considering the influence of concomitant injuries on resulting kinematics to restore full function can together help to achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:26925379

  20. [Dorsal ligament reconstruction in scapholunate dissociation].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H

    1985-07-01

    After discussion of the importance of the palmar, dorsal and interosseous ligaments in cases of scapholunate subluxation, the radiologic signs of this carpal instability are described. Four cases with this instability were treated successfully by reconstruction of the dorsal ligaments. In three instances ligament reconstruction was performed with the split tendon of the extensor carpi radialis brevis passed through drill holes in the scaphoid and lunate similar to the method reported by Dobyns. PMID:4029764

  1. Open volar radiocarpal dislocation with extensive dorsal ligament and extensor tendon damage: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jardin, E; Pechin, C; Rey, P-B; Gasse, N; Obert, L

    2016-04-01

    The authors present the case of a patient with a rare combination of open volar radiocarpal dislocation and complete destruction of the dorsal capsule-ligament complex and tendons. The treatment consisted of open reduction and arthrorisis (temporary arthrodesis during 45 days) with four K-wires (radiocarpal and radioulnar). The capsule-ligament complex was fixed with anchors and the extensor tendons were repaired by suturing. A long-arm cast was applied for six weeks. After an 18-month follow-up, the Cooney-modified Green and O'Brien score was 70 and the wrist range of motion was 85°. Dynamic intraoperative X-rays are needed to look for bone or ligament (intracarpal or radioulnocarpal) injuries. Arthrography, arthroscopy or MRI may provide additional information. In cases of stable lesions without intracarpal ligament injuries, conservative treatment may be sufficient. Otherwise, surgical treatment is required, using temporary external fixation or arthrorisis (temporary arthrodesis) associated with anatomic repair of capsular ligaments. The average duration of postoperative immobilization is 6.6 weeks. An external fixator seems to be useful for reduction and for placing optimal tension on repaired ligament repair. Twenty-three cases of volar radiocarpal dislocation are described in published studies. None of them was associated with bone, tendon, skin or capsule-ligament complex injuries. Few studies describe the long-term functional and radiological outcomes of these injuries. PMID:27117127

  2. The Hox-4.8 gene is localized at the 5' extremity of the Hox-4 complex and is expressed in the most posterior parts of the body during development.

    PubMed

    Dollé, P; Izpisúa-Belmonte, J C; Boncinelli, E; Duboule, D

    1991-12-01

    We report the isolation and expression pattern of a novel mouse homeobox gene, Hox-4.8. Hox-4.8 is the most 5'-located homeobox gene in the HOX-4 complex. Sequence analysis confirmed that Hox-4.8 is a member of the subfamily of AbdominalB-related Hox-4 genes and revealed strong interspecies conservation. As for the human locus, Hox-4.8 is probably the last Hox gene in this part of the HOX-4 complex. During development, Hox-4.8 transcripts are restricted to the extremities of the embryonic anteroposterior axis and limbs as well as in the developing tail bud and to the most posterior segment of the gut (the rectum). Within the limb mesenchyme, Hox-4.8 is expressed in more posterodistal regions than those of its neighbour Hox-4.7. Hence, Hox-4.8 expression appears to be related to the last significant phenotypic changes towards the extremities of the embryonic body and limb axes. PMID:1685889

  3. Enhanced Fibroblast Cellular Ligamentization Process to Polyethylene Terepthalate Artificial Ligament by Silk Fibroin Coating.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia; Ai, Chengchong; Zhan, Zufeng; Zhang, Peng; Wan, Fang; Chen, Jun; Hao, Wei; Wang, Yaxian; Yao, Jinrong; Shao, Zhengzhong; Chen, Tianwu; Zhou, Liang; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-04-01

    Artificial ligaments utilized in reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are usually made of polyethylene terepthalate (PET) because of its good mechanical properties in vivo. However, it was found that the deficiencies in hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of PET hindered the process of ligamentization. Therefore, surface modification of the PET is deemed as a solution in resolving such problem. Silk fibroin (SF), which is characterized by good biocompatibility and low immunogenicity in clinical applications, was utilized to prepare a coating on the PET ligament (PET+SF) in this work. At first, decrease of hydrophobicity and appearance of amino groups were found on the surface of artificial PET ligament after coating with SF. Second, mouse fibroblasts were cultured on the two different kinds of ligament in order to clarify the possible effect of SF coating. It was proved that mouse fibroblasts display better adhesion and proliferation on PET+SF than PET ligament according to the results of several technical methods including SEM observation, cell adhesive force and spread area test, and mRNA analysis. Meanwhile, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide and DNA content tests showed that biocompatibility of PET+SF is better than PET ligament. In addition, collagen deposition tests also indicated that the quantity of collagen in PET+SF is higher than PET ligament. Based on these results, it can be concluded that SF coating is suggested to be an effective approach to modify the surface of PET ligament and enhance the "ligamentization" process in vivo accordingly. PMID:26526301

  4. Reliability of ultrasound imaging in the assessment of the dorsal Lisfranc ligament

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Lisfranc ligament plays an integral role in providing stability to the midfoot. Variable clinical presentations and radiographic findings make injuries to the Lisfranc ligament notoriously difficult to diagnose. Currently, radiographic evaluation is the mainstay in imaging such injuries; however, ultrasound has been suggested as a viable alternative. The objective of this study was to evaluate the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability in the measurement of the length of the dorsal Lisfranc ligament using ultrasound imaging in healthy, asymptomatic subjects. Methods The dorsal Lisfranc ligaments of fifty asymptomatic subjects (n = 100 feet) were imaged using a Siemens SONOLINE Antares Ultrasound Imaging System© under low, medium, and high stress loads at 0° and 15° abducted foot positions. The lengths of the ligaments were measured, and Interclass correlation coefficients were used to calculate within-session intra-rater reliability (n = 100 feet) as well as between-session intra-rater reliability (n = 40 feet) and between-session inter-rater reliability (n = 40 feet). Results The within-session intra-rater reliability results for dorsal Lisfranc ligament length had an average ICC of 0.889 (min 0.873 max 0.913). The average ICC for between-session intra-rater reliability was 0.747 (min 0.607 max 0.811). The average ICC for between-session inter-rater reliability was 0.685 (min 0.638 max 0.776). Conclusions The measurement of the dorsal Lisfranc ligament length using ultrasound imaging shows substantial to almost perfect reliability when evaluating asymptomatic subjects. This imaging modality methodology shows promise and lays the foundation for further work in technique development towards the diagnostic identification of pathology within the Lisfranc ligament complex. PMID:23453037

  5. Biomechanical Comparison of Fracture Risk Created by 2 Different Clavicle Tunnel Preparations for Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzo, Michael S.; Adamson, Gregory J.; Lee, Thay Q.; McGarry, Michelle H.; Husak, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: An anatomic reconstruction of coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments typically requires drilling tunnels in the clavicle. An increase in fracture complications has been associated with graft tunnel position. A method of drilling clavicle tunnels that would better re-create anatomic function of the CC ligaments without increasing fracture risk would be an improvement. Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of a novel single anterior-to-posterior tunnel technique and compare the biomechanical properties to the 2-tunnel technique in CC ligament reconstruction. The hypothesis was that the single tunnel will yield similar loads to failure as the 2-tunnel technique and better reproduce the native anatomy of the conoid and trapezoid ligaments. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Eight fresh-frozen matched pairs of human clavicles underwent testing. In 1 specimen of the matched pair, 2 bone tunnels were created as previously described. In the other, a single tunnel was placed obliquely from anterior to posterior. The relative position of the tunnels in relation to the conoid tuberosity was recorded. Specimens were tested on a materials testing machine. The ultimate load to failure, linear stiffness, distance of the conoid tuberosity to the conoid tunnel exit point, and mode of failure were recorded. Results: The ultimate load to failure in the single-tunnel group and the 2-tunnel group was 457.2 ± 139.8 and 488.8 ± 170.6, respectively. There was no significant difference (P = .5). The linear stiffness in the single-tunnel group and the 2-tunnel group was 94.6 ± 31.3 and 79.8 ± 33.5, respectively. There was no significant difference (P = .2). The 2-tunnel group had a significantly longer average maximum distance from the conoid tuberosity to the conoid tunnel exit point than the single-tunnel group (6.0 ± 2.1 vs 0.8 ± 1.9 mm; P = .05). The single-tunnel group was consistently more anatomic with regard to its relationship to the conoid tuberosity

  6. Bicruciate Ligament Reconstruction in a Professional Rugby Player: Clinical Presentation and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Bohu, Yoann; Klouche, Shahnaz; Herman, Serge; Gerometta, Antoine; Lefevre, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The association of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear and a posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury is rare in athletes, and to our knowledge it has never been described in a professional rugby player. We report the case of a 27-year-old international professional rugby player who presented with an ACL tear associated with chronic posterior laxity on a former PCL tear. The procedure associated arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction in a one-stage operation with two autografts, bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendon, respectively. At 7 months postoperatively, the patient had returned to playing rugby at the same level of play. The therapeutic strategy successfully met the established goals of returning to sports at the same level of play with excellent functional results after 2 years of follow-up. A literature review was performed via PubMed. The inclusion criteria were the studies in English language, assessing the return-to-sport after bicruciate ligament reconstruction in athletes. Eight studies were included in analysis. Only one study has focused on the return-to-sport in 24 competitive athletes and two other studies have included 1 professional athlete each. The overall rate of the return-to-sport after bicruciate reconstruction varied between 100% and 50%. PMID:26491590

  7. Mathematical modeling of ligaments and tendons.

    PubMed

    Woo, S L; Johnson, G A; Smith, B A

    1993-11-01

    Ligaments and tendons serve a variety of important functions in maintaining the structure of the human body. Although abundant literature exists describing experimental investigations of these tissues, mathematical modeling of ligaments and tendons also contributes significantly to understanding their behavior. This paper presents a survey of developments in mathematical modeling of ligaments and tendons over the past 20 years. Mathematical descriptions of ligaments and tendons are identified as either elastic or viscoelastic, and are discussed in chronological order. Elastic models assume that ligaments and tendons do not display time dependent behavior and thus, they focus on describing the nonlinear aspects of their mechanical response. On the other hand, viscoelastic models incorporate time dependent effects into their mathematical description. In particular, two viscoelastic models are discussed in detail; quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV), which has been widely used in the past 20 years, and the recently proposed single integral finite strain (SIFS) model. PMID:8302027

  8. Posterior Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  9. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  10. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883