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Sample records for posterior lumbar interbody

  1. Complications associated with posterior and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Chrastil, Jesse; Patel, Alpesh A

    2012-05-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion are commonly performed to obtain a 360° arthrodesis through a posterior-only approach. These techniques are currently used in the management of spondylolisthesis, degenerative scoliosis, pseudarthrosis, recurrent disk herniation, and chronic low back pain with associated degenerative disk disease. Several adverse events have been described, including intraoperative neurologic injury, implant migration or subsidence, dural tears, infection, heterotopic ossification, BMP-related radiculitis, and osteolysis. Although the use of newer materials (eg, bone morphogenetic proteins) and procedures (eg, minimally invasive surgery) is on the rise, they are associated with unique concerns. Understanding the potential adverse events and steps that can be taken to prevent, detect, and manage complications is critical in patient counseling and perioperative decision making. PMID:22553100

  2. A Comparative Study of Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander P.; Sama, Andrew A.; Girardi, Federico P.; Lebl, Darren R.; Cammisa, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Level 4 retrospective review. Purpose To compare the radiographic and clinical outcomes between posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) with posterior segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI) for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Both PLIF and LLIF have been performed for degenerative spondylolisthesis with good results, but no study has directly compared these two techniques so far. Methods The electronic medical and radiographic records of 78 matched patients were analyzed. In one group, 39 patients underwent PLIF with SSI at 41 levels (L3-4/L4-5), while in the other group, 39 patients underwent the LLIF procedure at 48 levels (L3-4/L4-5). Radiological outcomes such as restoration of disc height and neuroforaminal height, segmental lumbar lordosis, total lumbar lordosis, incidence of endplate fracture, and subsidence were measured. Perioperative parameters were also recorded in each group. Clinical outcome in both groups was assessed by the short form-12, Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale scores. The average follow-up period was 16.1 months in the LLIF group and 21 months in the PLIF group. Results The restoration of disc height, foraminal height, and segmental lumbar lordosis was significantly better in the LLIF group (p<0.001). The duration of the operation was similar in both groups, but the average blood loss was significantly lower in the LLIF group (p<0.001). However, clinical outcome scores were similar in both groups. Conclusions Safe, effective interbody fusion can be achieved at multiple levels with neuromonitoring by the lateral approach. LLIF is a viable treatment option in patients with new onset symptoms due to degenerative spondylolisthesis who have had previous lumbar spine surgery, and it results in improved sagittal alignment and indirect foraminal decompression. PMID:26435782

  3. Treatment of Surgical Site Infection in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Su; Chang, Byung Kwon; Lee, Jae Il

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective observational and case control study. Purpose To identify appropriate treatment options according to the types of surgical site infections (SSI) in instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Overview of Literature There has been no agreement or consensus with regard to this matter. Methods Thirty-two consecutive SSIs were included and followed for more than one year. The elapsed time to diagnosis (ETD) according to the type of SSI was analyzed. The treatment options for each type and consequent clinical results were reviewed. The risk factors of removing the implants were analyzed. Results There were 6/32 (19%) superficial incisional, 6/32 (19%) deep incisional, and 20/32 (62%) organ/space infection cases (SII, DII, and O/SI, respectively) (p=0.002). ETD was 8.5±2.3 days in SII, 8.7±2.3 days in DII, and 164.5±131.1 days in O/SI (p=0.013). All cases of SII and DII retained implants and were treated by repeated irrigation and secondary closure. Among O/SIs, 10/20 were treated conservatively. Nine out of ten underwent posterior one stage simultaneous revision (POSSR) and in one case, the cage was removed anteriorly. Those who had ETDs longer than 3 months showed a significant risk of implant removal (p=0.008, odds ratio [OR]=40.3). The Oswestry disability index (ODI) improved from 47.3% to 33.8% in SII, from 55.0% to 32.3% in DII, and from 53.4% to 42.1% in O/SI (p=0.002). There was no difference among the three groups (p=0.106); however, there was a partial correlation between ETD and final ODI (r=0.382, p=0.034). Conclusions Latent O/SI was the most common type of SSI in PLIF. In cases of SII and DII, early aggressive wound management and secondary closure was effective and implant removal was not necessary. In some cases of O/SI, implant removal was unavoidable. However, implant removal could be averted by an earlier diagnosis. POSSR was feasible and safe. Functional outcomes were improved; however, disability increased as ETD increased. PMID:26713114

  4. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  5. Comparison of posterior versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shujie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the influence of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) on adjacent segment degeneration. Methods: The study was carried out in the Traumatology and Orthopedics Laboratory, Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Medical School, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China, between December 2013 and November 2014. A normal, healthy finite element model of L3-5 was developed, a PLIF and a TLIF model were modified from the normal model, and interbody fusions were performed in the L4-5 segment. An 800 N compressive loading plus 10 Nm moments simulating flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were imposed on the L3 superior endplate. Intradiscal pressure and intersegmental rotation in L3-4 were investigated. Results: The values of intradiscal pressure and intersegmental rotation in the PLIF or TLIF model were higher than those in the normal, healthy model, but the values in the TLIF model were relatively lower than those in the PLIF model in all directions. Conclusion: Posterior lumbar interbody fusion has more adverse influence on the superior adjacent segment than TLIF. PMID:26219453

  6. Clinical and Radiological Results of Microsurgical Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Decompression without Posterior Instrumentation for Lateral Recess Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    ?i?man, Lokman; Türkmen, Faik; Efe, Duran; Pekince, O?uzhan; Göncü, Recep Gani; Sever, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A single-center, retrospective patient review of clinical and radiological outcomes of microsurgical posterior lumbar interbody fusion and decompression, without posterior instrumentation, for the treatment of lateral recess stenosis. Purpose This study documented the clinical and radiological results of microsurgical posterior lumbar interbody fusion and decompression of the lateral recess using interbody cages without posterior instrumentation for the treatment of lateral recess stenosis. Overview of Literature Although microsurgery has some advantages, various complications have been reported following microsurgical decompression, including cage migration, pseudoarthrosis, neurologic deficits, and persistent pain. Methods A total of 34 patients (13 men, 21 women), with a mean age of 56.65±9.1 years (range, 40-77 years) confirmed spinal stability, and preoperative radiological findings of lateral recess stenosis, were included in the study. Interbody polyetheretherketone cages and auto grafts were used in all patients. Posterior instrumentation was not used because of limited resection of the posterior lumbar structures. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging were assessed and compared to images taken at the final follow-up. Functional recovery was also evaluated according to the Macnab criteria at the final follow-up. Results The average follow-up time was 35.05±8.65 months (range, 24-46 months). The clinical results, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, and duration of hospital stay were similar to previously published results; the fusion rate (85.2%) was decreased and the migration rate (5.8%) was increased, compared with prior reports. Conclusions Although microsurgery has some advantages, migration and pseudoarthrosis remain challenges to achieving adequate lumbar interbody fusion. PMID:26435789

  7. Newer lumbar interbody fusion techniques.

    PubMed

    Nasca, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to update the reader on more recent, less invasive lumbar interbody fusion procedures. The article contains a brief history on the development of lumbar interbody fusion methods, as well as the indications and descriptions of the various open and minimally invasive procedures, their complications, and outcomes. In contrast to the more traditional open methods of performing anterior and posterior interbody fusions, surgeons doing the less invasive techniques of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, extreme lateral and direct lateral interbody fusion, and the presacral axial approach are reporting less morbidity, shorter hospital stays, high rates of fusion, and improved patient outcomes. Although each technique has a different anatomical plane of approach, the goal is to achieve a solid interbody fusion of the pain generating segment(s) without complications. PMID:23628562

  8. Postoperative Flat Back: Contribution of Posterior Accessed Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Spinopelvic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Deok Ryeng; Kim, Joo Seung

    2014-01-01

    Objective Posterior accessed lumbar interbody fusion (PALIF) has a clear objective to restore disc height and spinal alignment but surgeons may occasionally face the converse situation and lose lumbar lordosis. We analyzed retrospective data for factors contributing to a postoperative flat back. Methods A total of 105 patients who underwent PALIF for spondylolisthesis and stenosis were enrolled. The patients were divided according to surgical type [posterior lumbar inter body fusion (PLIF) vs. unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF)], number of levels (single vs. multiple), and diagnosis (spondylolisthesis vs. stenosis). We measured perioperative index level lordosis, lumbar lordosis, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, pelvic incidence, and disc height in standing lateral radiographs. The change and variance in each parameter and comparative group were analyzed with the paired and Student t-test (p<0.05), correlation coefficient, and regression analysis. Results A significant perioperative reduction was observed in index-level lordosis following TLIF at the single level and in patients with spondylolisthesis (p=0.002, p=0.005). Pelvic tilt and sacral slope were significantly restored following PLIF multilevel surgery (p=0.009, p=0.003). Sacral slope variance was highly sensitive to perioperative variance of index level lordosis in high sacral sloped pelvis. Perioperative variance of index level lordosis was positively correlated with disc height variance (R2=0.286, p=0.0005). Conclusion Unilateral TLIF has the potential to cause postoperative flat back. PLIF is more reliable than unilateral TLIF to restore spinopelvic parameters following multilevel surgery and spondylolisthesis. A high sacral sloped pelvis is more vulnerable to PALIF in terms of a postoperative flat back. PMID:25371781

  9. Outcome of posterior lumbar interbody fusion for L4-L5 degenerative spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Kato, Satoshi; Kawahara, Norio; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) has become the standard in the treatment for degenerative spondylolisthesis since improvement of spinal instrumentation However, few published studies have reported long term outcomes of PLIF using a same surgical procedure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a long term outcome of PLIF using a same surgical procedure for L4-L5 degenerative spondylolisthesis. Materials and Methods: Out of 45 patients who underwent L4-L5 PLIF for degenerative spondylolisthesis between 1995 and 2003, 37 patients (16 males and 21 females) were evaluated in this study. Mean age was 61.8 years. The average followup period was 121 months. We evaluated % slip, lordosis at L4/L5, lumbar lordosis, Japanese Orthopedic Association's (JOA) score and adjacent segment degeneration. Results: The % slip significantly improved from an average of 17.0% before surgery to 9.7% at the last followup. Lordosis at L4/L5 averaged 3.6° before surgery, 8.2° after surgery and 6.9° at the last followup. Although patients experienced some loss of correction at last followup, their lordosis at L4/L5 at last followup still was significantly different from their lordosis at L4/L5 before surgery. Lumbar lordosis did not significantly change. Mean JOA score was 13.4 before surgery and 24.5 at the last followup; mean recovery ratio was 71.2%. Adjacent segment degeneration occurred in 40.5% of patients, almost all of which occurred in the cranial adjacent segment. Three patients (8.1%) required reoperation due to adjacent segment degeneration, at an average of 76 months after their initial surgery. Conclusions: With more than 10-year followup after L4-L5 PLIF for degenerative spondylolisthesis, the adjacent segment degeneration occurred in 40.5% and reoperation was required in 8.1%. PMID:26015627

  10. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2015-08-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report?We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the drainage tube. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately, and the patients recovered successfully, but they showed severe motor loss after awakening. The results of laboratory data, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, computed tomography, and echocardiography ruled out pulmonary embolism, hemorrhagic shock, and cardiogenic shock. Although the reasons for the postoperative shock were obscure, reoperation was performed to explore the cause of paralysis. At reoperation, a cerebrospinal fluid collection and the incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets through a small dural tear were observed. The incarcerated cauda equina rootlets were reduced, and the dural defect was closed. In both cases, the reoperation was uneventful. From the intraoperative findings at reoperation, it was thought that the pathology was neurogenic shock via the vasovagal reflex. Conclusion?Incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets following the accidental dural tear by suction drainage caused a sudden decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and traction of the cauda equina, which may have led to the vasovagal reflex. PMID:26225287

  11. Hybrid Biosynthetic Autograft Extender for Use in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Safety and Clinical Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chedid, Mokbel K; Tundo, Kelly M; Block, Jon E; Muir, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Autologous iliac crest bone graft is the preferred option for spinal fusion, but the morbidity associated with bone harvest and the need for graft augmentation in more demanding cases necessitates combining local bone with bone substitutes. The purpose of this study was to document the clinical effectiveness and safety of a novel hybrid biosynthetic scaffold material consisting of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, 75:25) combined by lyophilization with unmodified high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (10-12% wt:wt) as an extender for a broad range of spinal fusion procedures. We retrospectively evaluated all patients undergoing single- and multi-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion at an academic medical center over a 3-year period. A total of 108 patients underwent 109 procedures (245 individual vertebral levels). Patient-related outcomes included pain measured on a Visual Analog Scale. Radiographic outcomes were assessed at 6 weeks, 3-6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Radiographic fusion or progression of fusion was documented in 221 of 236 index levels (93.6%) at a mean (±SD) time to fusion of 10.2+4.1 months. Single and multi-level fusions were not associated with significantly different success rates. Mean pain scores (+SD) for all patients improved from 6.8+2.5 at baseline to 3.6+2.9 at approximately 12 months. Improvements in VAS were greatest in patients undergoing one- or two-level fusion, with patients undergoing multi-level fusion demonstrating lesser but still statistically significant improvements. Overall, stable fusion was observed in 64.8% of vertebral levels; partial fusion was demonstrated in 28.8% of vertebral levels. Only 15 of 236 levels (6.4%) were non-fused at final follow-up PMID:26161161

  12. Particular Features of Surgical Site Infection in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hak; Kim, Jin Woo; Kim, Go We

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous reports have observed differences only in infection rates between posterolateral fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). There have been no reports that describe the particular features of surgical site infection (SSI) in PLIF. In this study, we endeavor to identify the distinguishing characteristics and risk factors of SSI in PLIF. Methods Our study undertook a review of a case series of an institute. Patients who had undergone PLIF consecutively in the author's hospital were reviewed. Two proactive procedures were introduced during the study period. One was irrigation of the autolocal bone, and the other was the intradiscal space irrigation with a nozzle. Infection rate and risk factors were analyzed. For subgroup analysis, the elapsed time to a diagnosis (ETD), clinical manifestations, hematologic findings, and causative bacteria were examined in patients with SSI. Results In a total of 1,831 cases, there were 30 cases of SSI (1.6%). Long operation time was an independent risk factor (p = 0.008), and local bone irrigation was an independent protective factor (p = 0.001). Two cases of referred SSI were included in the subgroup analysis. There were 6/32 (19%) superficial incisional infections (SII), 6/32 (19%) deep incisional infections (DII), and 20/32 (62%) organ/space infections (O/SI). The difference of incidence among three groups was significant (p = 0.002).The most common bacteria encountered were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis followed by methicillin-resistant S. aureus in incisional infections, and no growth followed by S. epidermidis in O/SI. ETD was 8.5 ± 2.3 days in SII, 8.7 ± 2.3 days in DII and 164.5 ± 131.1 days in O/SI (p = 0.013). Conclusions The rate of SSI in PLIF was 1.6%, with the most common type being O/SI. The causative bacteria of O/SI was of lower virulence than in the incisional infection, and thus diagnosis was delayed due to its latent and insidious feature. Contamination of auto-local bone was presumed attributable to the progression of SSI. Irrigation of auto-local bone helped in the reduction of SSI. PMID:26330956

  13. Fueling the debate: Are outcomes better after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) or after posterolateral fusion (PLF) in adult patients with low-grade adult isthmic spondylolisthesis?

    PubMed Central

    Barbanti Bròdano, G.; Lolli, F.; Martikos, K.; Gasbarrini, A.; Bandiera, S.; Greggi, T.; Parisini, P.; Boriani, S.

    2010-01-01

    Study design:?Retrospective cohort study. Clinical question:?Do more adult patients affected by low grade isthmic spondylolisthesis have significant clinical and radiological improvement following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) than those who receive posterolateral fusion (PLF)? Methods:?One hundred and fourteen patients affected by adult low grade isthmic spondylolisthesis, treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion or posterolateral fusion, were reviewed. Clinical outcome was assessed by means of the questionnaires ODI, RMDQ and VAS. Radiographic evaluation included CT, MRI, and x-rays. The results were analyzed using the Student t-test. Results:?The two groups were similar with respect to demographic and surgical characteristics. At an average follow-up of 62.1 months, 71 patients were completely reviewed. Mean ODI, RMDQ and VAS scores didn't show statistically significant differences. Fusion rate was similar between the two groups (97% in PLIF group, 95% in PLF group). Major complications occurred in 5 of 71 patients reviewed (7%): one in the PLIF group (3.6%), four in the PLF group (9.3%). Pseudarthrosis occurred in one case in the PLIF group (3,6%) and in two cases in PLF group (4.6%). Conclusions:?In our series, there does not appear to be a clear advantage of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) over posterolateral fusion (PLF) in terms of clinical and radiological outcome for treatment of adult low grade isthmic spondylolisthesis. PMID:23544021

  14. Single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis treated with mini-open anterior debridement and fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified anterior lumbar interbody fusion approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang; Li, Feng; Chen, Wenjian; Zeng, Heng; Chen, Anmin; Xiong, Wei

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation for single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis. METHODS This is a retrospective study. Twenty-two patients with single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis underwent mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) approach. Patients underwent follow-up for 24 to 38 months. Clinical data, etiological examinations, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grade, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) lumbar function score, visual analog scale (VAS) score, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), postoperative complications, and the bony fusion rate were recorded. RESULTS The mean operative time was 181.1 ± 22.6 minutes (range 155-240 minutes). The mean intraoperative blood loss was 173.2 ± 70.1 ml (range 100-400 ml). Infection was found in lumbar vertebrae L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 in 2, 6, and 14 patients, respectively. Bacterial cultures were positive in 15 patients, including 4 with Staphylococcus aureus, 6 with Staphylococcus epidermidis, 4 with Streptococcus, and 1 with Escherichia coli. Postoperative complications included urinary retention, constipation, and numbness in the thigh in 5, 3, and 2 patients, respectively. Compared with before surgery, the VAS scores and ODI were significantly lower at the final follow-up, the JOA scores were significantly higher, and the ASIA grades had improved. All patients achieved good intervertebral bony fusion. CONCLUSIONS Mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified ALIF approach results in little surgical trauma and intraoperative blood loss, acceptable postoperative complications, and is effective and safe for the treatment of single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis. This approach could be an alternative to the conventional open surgery. PMID:26340382

  15. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion: Analogous procedures in decreasing the index of disability in patients with spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Alijani, Babak; Emamhadi, Mohamahreza; Behzadnia, Hamid; Aramnia, Ali; Chabok, Shahrokh Yousefzadeh; Ramtinfar, Sara; Leili, Ehsan Kazemnejad; Golmohamadi, Shabnam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the disability in patients with spondylolisthesis who assigned either to posterolateral fusion (PLF) or posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and to compare it between two groups. Methods: In a prospective observational study, 102 surgical candidates with low-grade degenerative and isthmic spondylolisthesis enrolled from 2012 to 2014, and randomly assigned into two groups: PLF and PLIF. Evaluation of disability has been done by a questionnaire using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). The questionnaire was completed by all patients before the surgery, the day after surgery, after 6 months and after 1-year. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in terms of age and sex distribution and pre-operation ODI between groups (P > 0.05). Comparison of the mean ODI scores of two groups over the whole study period showed no significant statistical difference (P = 0.074). ODIs also showed no significant differences between two groups the day after surgery, 6th months and 1-year after surgery (P = 0.385, P = 0.093, P = 0.122 and P = 433) respectively. Analyzing the course of ODI over the study period, showed a significant descending pattern for either of groups (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Both surgical fusion techniques (PLF and PLIF) were efficient to lessen the disability of patients with spondylolisthesis, and none of the fusion techniques were related to a better outcome in terms of disability. PMID:25767584

  16. Mini-Open Anterior Retroperitoneal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Oblique Lateral Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Spinal Degeneration Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Toyone, Tomoaki; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Surgery for lumbar spinal degeneration disease is widely performed. While posterior decompression and fusion are popular, anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is also used for treatment. Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) is commonly used for noninvasive ALIF; however, several complications, such as spinal nerve and psoas muscle injury, have been reported. In the current study, we examined the clinical efficacy and complications of oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) for lumbar spinal degeneration disease. Materials and Methods Thirty-five patients with degenerated spondylolisthesis, discogenic pain, and kyphoscoliosis were examined. All patients underwent OLIF surgery (using a cage and bone graft from the iliac crest) with or without posterior decompression, without real-time electromyography monitoring. Posterior screws were used in all patients. Visual analog scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were evaluated before and 6 months after surgery. Surgical complications were also evaluated. Results Pain scores significantly improved after surgery, compared to those before surgery (p<0.05). There was no patient who underwent revision surgery. There was no spinal nerve, major vessel, peritoneal, or urinary injury. Few patients showed symptoms from psoas invasion. Conclusion OLIF surgery produced good surgical results without any major complication. PMID:26069130

  17. Incidence of microbiological contamination of local bone autograft used in posterior lumbar interbody fusion and its association with postoperative spinal infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Kang, Kyung-Chung; Chung, Sung-Soo; Kim, Ki-Tack; Shin, Seong-Kee

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to examine the results of microbiological cultures from local bone autografts used in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and to identify their association with postoperative spinal infection. METHODS The authors retrospectively evaluated cases involving 328 patients who had no previous spinal surgeries and underwent PLIF for degenerative diseases with a minimum 1-year follow-up. Local bone was obtained during laminectomy, and microbiological culture was performed immediately prior to bone grafting. The associations between culture results from local bone autografts and postoperative spinal infections were evaluated. RESULTS The contamination rate of local bone was 4.3% (14 of 328 cases). Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (29%) was the most common contaminant isolated, followed by Streptococcus species and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Of 14 patients with positive culture results, 5 (35.7%) had postoperative spinal infections and were treated with intravenous antibiotics for a minimum of 4 weeks. One of these 5 patients also underwent reoperation for debridement during this 4-week period. Regardless of the microbiological culture results, the infection rate after PLIF with local bone autograft was 2.4% (8 of 328 cases), with 5 (62.5%) of 8 patients showing positive results on autograft culture. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of contamination of local bone autograft during PLIF was considerable, and positive culture results were significantly associated with postoperative spinal infection. Special attention focused on the preparation of local bone for autograft and its microbiological culture will be helpful for the control of postoperative spinal infection. PMID:26360142

  18. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumented posterolateral fusion in adult spondylolisthesis: description and association of clinico-surgical variables with prognosis in a series of 36 cases

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Moreta, Juan A.; Hernandez-Vicente, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background We present our experience in the treatment of patients with isthmic or degenerative spondylolisthesis, by means of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and instrumented posterolateral fusion (IPLF), and we compare them with those published in the literature. We analyse whether there exists any statistical association between the clinical characteristics of the patient, radiological characteristics of the disease and our surgical technique, with the complications and the clinical-radiological prognosis of the cases. Method We designed a prospective study. A total of 36 cases were operated. The patients included were 14 men and 22 women, with an average age of 57.17±27.32 years. Our technique consists of PLIF+IPLF, using local bone for the fusion. The clinical results were evaluated with the Visual Analogical Scale (VAS) and the Kirkaldy-Willis criteria. The radiological evaluation followed the Bratingan (PLIF) and Lenke (IPLF) methodology. A total of 42 variables were statistically analysed by means of SPSS18. We used the Paired Student's T-test, logistic regression and Pearson's Chi-square-test. Results The spondylolisthesis was isthmic in 15 cases and degenerative in 21 cases. The postoperative evaluations had excellent or good results in 94.5% (n = 34), with a statistically significant improvement in the back pain and sciatica (p < 0.01). The rate of circumferential fusion reached was approximately 92%. We had 13.88% of transitory morbility and 0% of mortality associated with our technique. A greater age, degree of listhesis or length of illness before the intervention, weakly correlated with worse clinical results (p< -0.2). In our series, the logistical regression showed that the clinical characteristics of the patient, radiological characteristics of the lesion and our surgical technique were not associated with greater postoperative complications. Conclusion Although a higher level of training is necessary, we believe that the described technique is a very effective decision in cases of spondylolisthesis, isthmic or degenerative, refractory to conservative treatment, for the obtaining the best clinical results and rates of fusion, with similar risks to those of the other published techniques. Our statistical analysis could contribute to improve outcomes after surgery. PMID:26196029

  19. Extreme lateral interbody fusion with posterior instrumentation for spondylodiscitis.

    PubMed

    Blizzard, Daniel J; Hills, Christopher P; Isaacs, Robert E; Brown, Christopher R

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate our initial experience utilizing extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF; NuVasive, San Diego, CA, USA) with percutaneous posterior instrumentation to treat 11 spondylodiscitis patients between January 2011 and February 2014. Although medical management is the first line treatment for spondylodiscitis, many patients fail antibiotic therapy and bracing, or present with instability, neurologic deficits, or sepsis, requiring operative debridement and stabilization. High rates of fusion and infection clearance have been reported with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), but this approach requires a morbid exposure, associated with non-trivial rates of vascular and peritoneal complications. XLIF is an increasingly popular interbody fusion technique which utilizes a fast and minimally invasive approach, sparing the anterior longitudinal ligament, and allowing sufficient visualization of the intervertebral discs and bodies to debride and place a large, lordotic cage. The outcome measures for this study included lumbar lordosis, sagittal balance, subsidence, fusion, pain, neurological deficit, and microbiology/laboratory evidence of infection. The mean follow-up time was 9.3months. All patients had improvements in pain and neurological symptoms. The mean lordosis change was 11.0°, from 23.1° preoperatively to 34.0° postoperatively. Fusion was confirmed with CT scans in five of six patients. At the last follow-up, all patients had normalization of inflammatory markers, no symptoms of infection, and none required repeat surgical treatment for spondylodiscitis. XLIF with percutaneous posterior instrumentation is a minimally invasive technique with reduced morbidity for lumbar spine fusion which affords adequate exposure to the vertebral bodies and discs to aggressively debride necrotic and infected tissue. This study suggests that XLIF may be a safe and effective alternative to ALIF for the treatment of spondylodiscitis. PMID:26138052

  20. Biomechanical analysis of an expandable lateral cage and a static transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion cage with posterior instrumentation in an in vitro spondylolisthesis model.

    PubMed

    Mantell, Matthew; Cyriac, Mathew; Haines, Colin M; Gudipally, Manasa; O'Brien, Joseph R

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Insufficient biomechanical data exist from comparisons of the stability of expandable lateral cages with that of static transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) cages. The purpose of this biomechanical study was to compare the relative rigidity of L4-5 expandable lateral interbody constructs with or without additive pedicle screw fixation with that of L4-5 static TLIF cages in a novel cadaveric spondylolisthesis model. METHODS Eight human cadaver spines were used in this study. A spondylolisthesis model was created at the L4-5 level by creating 2 injuries. First, in each cadaver, a nucleotomy from 2 channels through the anterior side was created. Second, the cartilage of the facet joint was burred down to create a gap of 4 mm. Light-emitting-diode tracking markers were placed at L-3, L-4, L-5, and S-1. Specimens were tested in the following scenarios: intact model, bilateral pedicle screws, expandable lateral 18-mm-wide cage (alone, with unilateral pedicle screws [UPSs], and with bilateral pedicle screws [BPSs]), expandable lateral 22-mm-wide cage (alone, with UPSs, and with BPSs), and TLIF (alone, with UPSs, and with BPSs). Four of the spines were tested with the expandable lateral cages (18-mm cage followed by the 22-mm cage), and 4 of the spines were tested with the TLIF construct. All these constructs were tested in flexion-extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. RESULTS The TLIF-alone construct was significantly less stable than the 18- and 22-mm-wide lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) constructs and the TLIF constructs with either UPSs or BPSs. The LLIF constructs alone were significantly less stable than the TLIF construct with BPSs. However, there was no significant difference between the 18-mm LLIF construct with UPSs and the TLIF construct with BPSs in any of the loading modes. CONCLUSIONS Expandable lateral cages with UPSs provide stability equivalent to that of a TLIF construct with BPSs in a degenerative spondylolisthesis model. PMID:26384133

  1. Clinical study of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability

    PubMed Central

    GUO, SHUGUANG; SUN, JUNYING; TANG, GENLIN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the clinical effects of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability. The 48 patients comprised 27 males and 21 females, aged 47–72 years. Three cases had first and second degree lumbar spondylolisthesis and all received bilateral vertebral lamina fenestration for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using a threaded fusion cage (TFC), which maintains the three-column spinal stability. Attention was given to ensure the correct pre-operative fenestration, complete decompression and the prevention of adhesions. After an average follow-up of 26.4 months, the one year post-operative X-ray radiographs suggested that the successful fusion rate was 88.1%, and this was 100% in the two-year post-operative radiographs. Moreover, the functional recovery rate was 97.9%. Bilateral vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion is an ideal surgical method for the treatment of lower lumbar instability. The surgical method retains the spinal posterior column and middle column and results in full decompression and reliable fusion by a limited yet effective surgical approach. PMID:23407794

  2. Complications and Morbidities of Mini-open Anterior Retroperitoneal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Oblique Lumbar Interbody Fusion in 179 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Hilmi, Radwan; Roussouly, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study including 179 patients who underwent oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) at one institution. Purpose To report the complications associated with a minimally invasive technique of a retroperitoneal anterolateral approach to the lumbar spine. Overview of Literature Different approaches to the lumbar spine have been proposed, but they are associated with an increased risk of complications and a longer operation. Methods A total of 179 patients with previous posterior instrumented fusion undergoing OLIF were included. The technique is described in terms of: the number of levels fused, operative time and blood loss. Persurgical and postsurgical complications were noted. Results Patients were age 54.1 ± 10.6 with a BMI of 24.8 ± 4.1 kg/m2. The procedure was performed in the lumbar spine at L1-L2 in 4, L2-L3 in 54, L3-L4 in 120, L4-L5 in 134, and L5-S1 in 6 patients. It was done at 1 level in 56, 2 levels in 107, and 3 levels in 16 patients. Surgery time and blood loss were, respectively, 32.5 ± 13.2 minutes and 57 ± 131 ml per level fused. There were 19 patients with a single complication and one with two complications, including two patients with postoperative radiculopathy after L3-5 OLIF. There was no abdominal weakness or herniation. Conclusions Minimally invasive OLIF can be performed easily and safely in the lumbar spine from L2 to L5, and at L1-2 for selected cases. Up to 3 levels can be addressed through a 'sliding window'. It is associated with minimal blood loss and short operations, and with decreased risk of abdominal wall weakness or herniation. PMID:22708012

  3. Simultaneous Lateral Interbody Fusion and Posterior Percutaneous Instrumentation: Early Experience and Technical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Drazin, Doniel; Kim, Terrence T.; Johnson, J. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar fusion surgery involving lateral lumbar interbody graft insertion with posterior instrumentation is traditionally performed in two stages requiring repositioning. We describe a novel technique to complete the circumferential procedure simultaneously without patient repositioning. Twenty patients diagnosed with worsening back pain with/without radiculopathy who failed exhaustive conservative management were retrospectively reviewed. Ten patients with both procedures simultaneously from a single lateral approach and 10 control patients with lateral lumbar interbody fusion followed by repositioning and posterior percutaneous instrumentation were analyzed. Pars fractures, mobile grade 2 spondylolisthesis, and severe one-level degenerative disk disease were matched between the two groups. In the simultaneous group, avoiding repositioning leads to lower mean operative times: 130 minutes (versus control 190 minutes; p = 0.009) and lower intraoperative blood loss: 108?mL (versus 93?mL; NS). Nonrepositioned patients were hospitalized for an average of 4.1 days (versus 3.8 days; NS). There was one complication in the control group requiring screw revision. Lateral interbody fusion and percutaneous posterior instrumentation are both readily accomplished in a single lateral decubitus position. In select patients with adequately sized pedicles, performing simultaneous procedures decreases operative time over sequential repositioning. Patient outcomes were excellent in the simultaneous group and comparable to procedures done sequentially. PMID:26649303

  4. Outcomes of extended transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Talia, Adrian J; Wong, Michael L; Lau, Hui C; Kaye, Andrew H

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to assess the results of extended transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for a two surgeon, single institution series. In total, extended TLIF with bilateral decompression was performed in 57 patients. Pain, American Spinal Injury Association scores, patient demographics, body mass index (BMI), perioperative indices and radiographic measurements were recorded and analysed. The surgeries were performed between February 2011 and January 2014 on 38 women and 19 men. The mean patient age was 62.86years, and the mean BMI was 30.31kg/m(2). In 49 patients, spondylolisthesis was the primary indication. The mean intraoperative time was 284.65min, and this decreased as the series progressed. The median length of stay was 5days (range: 2-9). The surgical complication rate was 19.3%. Two patients died from cardiopulmonary complications. Single level TLIF was performed in 78.9% of the cohort, with L4/5 the most commonly fused level. Significant pain reduction was achieved from a mean (±standard deviation) preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) of 8.28±1.39 to 1.50±1.05 at 12months postoperatively. No patients deteriorated neurologically. Spondylolisthesis was significantly corrected from a preoperative mean of 6.82mm to 2.80mm postoperatively. Although there is a learning curve associated with the procedure, extended TLIF with bilateral facet joint removal and decompression appeared to be a safe and effective alternative to other fusion techniques, and our results were comparable to other published case series. The stabilisation and correction of spinal deformity reduces pain, aids neurologic recovery and improves quality of life. PMID:26358199

  5. Mini-Open Anterior Retroperitoneal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Oblique Lateral Interbody Fusion for Degenerated Lumbar Spinal Kyphoscoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Mannoji, Chikato; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Toyone, Tomoaki; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective case series. Purpose To examine the clinical efficacy of mini-open anterior retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion: oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) for degenerated lumbar spinal kyphoscoliosis. Overview of Literature The existing surgical procedures for the treatment of spinal kyphotic deformity, including Smith-Petersen osteotomy, pedicle subtraction osteotomy, and vertebral column resection procedures, are invasive in nature. Extreme lateral interbody fusion to provide less invasive treatment of the deformity has been reported, but complications including spinal nerve and psoas muscle injury have been noted. In the current study, we examined the clinical efficacy and complications of OLIF for degenerated lumbar spinal kyphoscoliosis. Methods Twelve patients with degenerated lumbar spinal kyphoscoliosis were examined. All patients underwent OLIF surgery (using a cage and bone graft from the iliac crest) with open pedicle screws or percutaneous pedicle screws, without real-time monitoring by electromyography. Visual analog scale score and Oswestry disability index were evaluated before and 12 months after surgery, and fusion rate at OLIF cage, correction of the deformity, total blood loss, and surgical complications were also evaluated. Results Pain scores significantly improved after surgery (p<0.05). Fusion rate was found to be 90%, balance parameters also improved after surgery (p<0.05), and average total blood loss was less than 350 mL. There was no spinal nerve, major vessel, peritoneal, or urinary injury, or breakage of instrumentation. Conclusions OLIF surgery for degenerated lumbar spinal kyphoscoliosis is less invasive than other procedures and good surgical results were produced without major complications. PMID:26240716

  6. Oblique Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion (OLLIF): Technical Notes and Early Results of a Single Surgeon Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background context: Lower back pain is one of the most prevalent and expensive health conditions in the Western world. The standard treatment, interbody fusion, is an invasive procedure that requires the stripping of muscles and soft tissue, leading to surgical morbidity. Current minimally invasive (MI) spinal fusions are technically demanding and suffer from technical limitations. Purpose: Oblique lumbar lateral interbody fusion (OLLIF) is a new technique for fusion of the lumbar spine that overcomes these complications. Outcome measures include patient demographics, reported outcomes, and surgical outcomes. Study design/Setting: Kambin's Triangle can easily be located as a silent window with an electrophysiological probe. Discectomy is performed through a single access portal with a 10 mm diameter. After a discectomy, the disc space is packed with beta-tricalcium phosphate soaked in autologous bone marrow, aspirated, and the cage is inserted. Finally, a minimally invasive posterior fixation is performed. Methods: OLLIF’s major innovation is to approach the disc through Kambin’s Triangle, aided by bilateral fluoroscopy. Results: We present data from 69 consecutive OLLIF surgeries on 128 levels with a control group of 55 consecutive open transformational lumbar interbody fusions (TLIFs) on 125 levels. For a single level OLLIF, the mean surgery time is 69 minutes (min) and blood loss is 29 ml. Surgery time was approximately twice as fast as open TLIF (mean: 135 min) and blood loss is reduced by over 80% compared to TLIF (mean: 355 ml). Conclusions: OLLIF is a minimally invasive fusion that significantly reduces surgery times compared to open surgery. OLLIF overcomes the difficulties of traditional open fusions, making it a safe and technically less demanding surgery than open or minimally invasive TLIF. 

  7. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Disorders: Mini-open TLIF and Corrective TLIF

    PubMed Central

    HARA, Masahito; NISHIMURA, Yusuke; NAKAJIMA, Yasuhiro; UMEBAYASHI, Daisuke; TAKEMOTO, Masaya; YAMAMOTO, Yuu; HAIMOTO, Shoichi

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) as a short fusion is widely accepted among the spine surgeons. However in the long fusion for degenerative kyphoscoliosis, corrective spinal fixation by an open method is thought to be frequently selected. Our objective is to study whether the mini-open TLIF and corrective TLIF contribute to the improvement of the spinal segmental and global alignment. We divided the patients who performed lumbar fixation surgery into three groups. Group 1 (G1) consisted of mini-open TLIF procedures without complication. Group 2 (G2) consisted of corrective TLIF without complication. Group 3 (G3) consisted of corrective TLIF with instrumentation-related complication postoperatively. In all groups, the lumbar lordosis (LL) highly correlated with developing surgical complications. LL significantly changed postoperatively in all groups, but was not corrected in the normal range in G3. There were statistically significant differences in preoperative and postoperative LL and mean difference between the pelvic incidence (PI) and LL between G3 and other groups. The most important thing not to cause the instrumentation-related failure is proper correction of the sagittal balance. In the cases with minimal sagittal imbalance with or without coronal imbalance, short fusion by mini-open TLIF or long fusion by corrective TLIF contributes to good clinical results if the lesion is short or easily correctable. However, if the patients have apparent sagittal imbalance with or without coronal imbalance, we should perform proper correction of the sagittal spinal alignment introducing various technologies. PMID:26119895

  8. Acute Contralateral Radiculopathy after Unilateral Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Young-Baeg; Park, Yong-Sook; Nam, Taek-Kyun; Lee, Young-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cases of contralateral radiculopathy after a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with a single cage (unilateral TLIF) had been reported, but the phenomenon has not been explained satisfactorily. The purpose of this study was to determine its incidence, causes, and risk factors. Methods We did retrospective study with 546 patients who underwent a unilateral TLIF, and used CT and MRI to study the causes of contralateral radicular symptoms that appeared within a week postoperatively. Clinical and radiological results were compared by dividing the patients into the symptomatic group and asymptomatic group. Results Contralateral symptoms occurred in 32 (5.9%) of the patients underwent unilateral TLIF. The most common cause of contralateral symptoms was a contralateral foraminal stenosis in 22 (68.8%), screw malposition in 4 (12.5%), newly developed herniated nucleus pulposus in 3 (9.3%), hematoma in 1 (3.1%), and unknown origin in 2 patients (6.3%). 16 (50.0%) of the 32 patients received revision surgery. There was no difference in visual analogue scale and Oswestry disability index between the two groups at discharge. Both preoperative and postoperative contralateral foraminal areas were significantly smaller, and postoperative segmental angle was significantly greater in the symptomatic group comparing to those of the asymptomatic group (p<0.05). Conclusion The incidence rate is not likely to be small (5.9%). If unilateral TLIF is performed for cases when preoperative contralateral foraminal stenosis already exists or when a large restoration of segmental lordosis is required, the probability of developing contralateral radiculopathy is increased and caution from the surgeon is needed. PMID:26587189

  9. Finite Element Analysis of a New Pedicle Screw-Plate System for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Changqing; Liu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) is increasingly popular for the surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar disc diseases. The constructs intended for segmental stability are varied in MI-TLIF. We adopted finite element (FE) analysis to compare the stability after different construct fixations using interbody cage with posterior pedicle screw-rod or pedicle screw-plate instrumentation system. Methods A L3–S1 FE model was modified to simulate decompression and fusion at L4–L5 segment. Fixation modes included unilateral plate (UP), unilateral rod (UR), bilateral plate (BP), bilateral rod (BR) and UP+UR fixation. The inferior surface of the S1 vertebra remained immobilized throughout the load simulation, and a bending moment of 7.5 Nm with 400N pre-load was applied on the L3 vertebra to recreate flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Range of motion (ROM) and Von Mises stress were evaluated for intact and instrumentation models in all loading planes. Results All reconstructive conditions displayed decreased motion at L4–L5. The pedicle screw-plate system offered equal ROM to pedicle screw-rod system in unilateral or bilateral fixation modes respectively. Pedicle screw stresses for plate system were 2.2 times greater than those for rod system in left lateral bending under unilateral fixation. Stresses for plate were 3.1 times greater than those for rod in right axial rotation under bilateral fixation. Stresses on intervertebral graft for plate system were similar to rod system in unilateral and bilateral fixation modes respectively. Increased ROM and posterior instrumentation stresses were observed in all loading modes with unilateral fixation compared with bilateral fixation in both systems. Conclusions Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion augmentation with pedicle screw-plate system fixation increases fusion construct stability equally to the pedicle screw-rod system. Increased posterior instrumentation stresses are observed in all loading modes with plate fixation, and bilateral fixation could reduce stress concentration. PMID:26649749

  10. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion for sagittal balance correction and spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Rao, Prashanth J; Scherman, Daniel B; Dandie, Gordon; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a systematic review to assess the safety and clinical and radiological outcomes of the recently introduced, direct or extreme lateral lumbar interbody fusion (XLIF) approach for degenerative spinal deformity disorders. Open fusion and instrumentation has traditionally been the mainstay treatment. However, in recent years, there has been an increasing emphasis on minimally invasive fusion and instrumentation techniques, with the aim of minimizing surgical trauma and blood loss and reducing hospitalization. From six electronic databases, 21 eligible studies were included for review. The pooled weighted average mean of preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores was 6.8, compared to a postoperative VAS score of 2.9 (p<0.0001). The weighted average preoperative and postoperative coronal segmental Cobb angles were 3.6 and 1.1°, respectively. The weighted average preoperative and postoperative coronal regional Cobb angles were 19.1 and 10.0°, respectively. Regional lumbar lordosis also significantly improved from 35.8 to 43.3°. Sagittal alignment was comparable pre- and postoperatively (34mm versus 35.1mm). The weighted average operative duration was 125.6minutes, whilst the mean estimated blood loss was 155mL. The weighted average hospitalization length was 3.6days. Whilst the available data is limited, minimally invasive XLIF procedures appear to be a promising alternative for the treatment of scoliosis, with improved functional VAS and Oswestry disability index outcomes and restored coronal deformity. Future comparative studies are warranted to assess the long term benefits and risks of XLIF compared to anterior and posterior procedures. PMID:26190218

  11. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Deep Vein Thrombosis in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Si-Dong; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Da-Long; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Feng, Shi-Qing; Zhao, Feng-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional study was designed to obtain the current prevalence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and analyze related risk factors in patients undergoing lumbar interbody fusion. Medical record data were collected from Department of Spinal Surgery, The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, between July 2014 and March 2015. Both univariate analysis and binary logistic regression analysis were performed to determine risk factors for DVT. A total of 995 patients were admitted into this study, including 484 men and 511 women, aged from 14 to 89 years old (median 50, IQR 19). The detection rate of lower limb DVT by ultrasonography was 22.4% (223/995) in patients undergoing lumbar interbody fusion. Notably, average VAS (visual analog scale) score in the first 3 days after surgery in the DVT group was more than that in the non-DVT group (Z?=??21.69, P?lumbar interbody fusion surgery. PMID:26632909

  12. Instrumented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with bioabsorbable polymer implants and iliac crest autograft.

    PubMed

    Coe, Jeffrey D

    2004-03-15

    Object. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic results in 31 patients from one center who underwent instrumented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for primarily degenerative indications. Methods. Bioabsorbable polymer spacers manufactured with a copolymer of 70:30 poly(L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide) and filled with iliac crest autograft bone were used for the TLIF procedure. In this paper the details of this procedure, intermediate (1- to 2-year) clinical and radiographic outcomes, and the basic science and rationale for the use of bioabsorbable polymers are discussed. At a mean of 18.4 months of follow up, 30 patients (96.8%) were judged to have attained solid fusions and 25 patients (81%) had good to excellent results. Three patients (9.7%) experienced complications, none of which were directly or indirectly attributable to the use of the bioabsorbable polymer implant. Only one implant in one patient (3.2%) demonstrated mechanical failure on insertion, and that patient experienced no clinical sequelae. Conclusions. This is the first clinical series to be published in which the mean follow-up duration equals or exceeds the biological life expectancy of this material (12-18 months). Both the clinical and radiographic results of this study support the use of interbody devices manufactured from biodegradable polymers for structural interbody support in the TLIF procedure. PMID:15198499

  13. Clinical and Radiological Outcomes of Segmental Spinal Fusion in Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Spinous Process Tricortical Autograft

    PubMed Central

    Tangviriyapaiboon, Teera

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose To investigate clinical and radiological outcomes when using spinous process as a tricortical autograft for segmental spinal fusion in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Overview of Literature Interbody spinal fusion is one of the important procedures in spinal surgery. Many types of autografts are harvested at the expense of complications. Clinical and radiographic results of patients who underwent TLIF with intraoperative harvested spinous process autograft in Prasat Neurological Institue, Bangkok, Thailand, were assessed as new technical innovation. Methods Between October 2005 to July 2009, 30 cases of patients who underwent TLIF with spinous process tricortical autograft were included. Clinical evaluations were assessed by visual analog scales (VAS) and Prolo functional and economic scores at the preoperation and postoperation and at 2 years postoperation. Static and dynamic plain radiograph of lumbar spine were reviewed for achievement of fusion. Results Initial successful fusion time in lumbar interbody fusion with spinous process tricortical autograft was 4.72 months (range, 3.8-6.1 months) postoperation and 100% fusion rate was reported at 2 years. Our initial successful fusion time in lumbar interbody fusion was compared to the other types of grafts in previous literatures. Conclusions The use of intraoperative harvested spinous process tricortical autograft has overcome many disadvantages of harvesting autograft with better initial successful fusion time (4.72 months). VAS and Prolo scores showed some improvement in the outcomes between the preoperative and postoperative periods. PMID:24761199

  14. Non-union rate with stand-alone lateral lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Robert; Watkins, Robert; Hanna, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective radiographic analysis.To determine the fusion rate of stand-alone lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). Biomechanical studies have indicated that LLIF may be more stable than anterior or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. Early clinical reports of stand-alone LLIF have shown success in obtaining fusion and indirectly decompressing nerve roots. A consecutive case series of stand-alone LLIF was analyzed with chart and radiographic review. Non-union was determined by symptomatology consistent with non-union and absence of bridging bone on the CT scan. Thirty-nine levels of stand alone LLIF were performed in 23 patients. Eleven patients received 1-level surgery, 7 patients received 2-level surgery, 3 patients received 3-level surgery, and 1 patient received 4-level surgery. Excluding 1 infected case, we analyzed 37 levels of stand alone LLIF in 22 patients. Non-union incidence was 7 levels in 6 patients. Non-union rate was 7/37 (19%) per level and 6/22 (27%) per patient. While our study population was relatively low, a non-union rate of 19% to 27% is concerning for modern spine surgery. Currently in our practice, we occasionally still perform stand-alone LLIF utilizing 22 mm wide grafts in low-demand levels in non-smoking and non-osteoporotic patients. However, in a majority of patients, we provide supplemental fixation: bilateral pedicle screws in most patients and unilateral pedicle screws or spinous process plates in some patients. PMID:25546670

  15. Non-Union Rate With Stand-Alone Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Robert; Watkins, Robert; Hanna, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Retrospective radiographic analysis. To determine the fusion rate of stand-alone lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). Biomechanical studies have indicated that LLIF may be more stable than anterior or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. Early clinical reports of stand-alone LLIF have shown success in obtaining fusion and indirectly decompressing nerve roots. A consecutive case series of stand-alone LLIF was analyzed with chart and radiographic review. Non-union was determined by symptomatology consistent with non-union and absence of bridging bone on the CT scan. Thirty-nine levels of stand alone LLIF were performed in 23 patients. Eleven patients received 1-level surgery, 7 patients received 2-level surgery, 3 patients received 3-level surgery, and 1 patient received 4-level surgery. Excluding 1 infected case, we analyzed 37 levels of stand alone LLIF in 22 patients. Non-union incidence was 7 levels in 6 patients. Non-union rate was 7/37 (19%) per level and 6/22 (27%) per patient. While our study population was relatively low, a non-union rate of 19% to 27% is concerning for modern spine surgery. Currently in our practice, we occasionally still perform stand-alone LLIF utilizing 22?mm wide grafts in low-demand levels in non-smoking and non-osteoporotic patients. However, in a majority of patients, we provide supplemental fixation: bilateral pedicle screws in most patients and unilateral pedicle screws or spinous process plates in some patients. PMID:25546670

  16. Comparison of complication rates of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and lateral lumbar interbody fusion: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jacob R; Smith, Brandon W; La Marca, Frank; Park, Paul

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) and lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) are 2 currently popular techniques for lumbar arthrodesis. The authors compare the total risk of each procedure, along with other important complication outcomes. METHODS This systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Relevant studies (up to May 2015) that reported complications of either MI-TLIF or LLIF were identified from a search in the PubMed database. The primary outcome was overall risk of complication per patient. Secondary outcomes included risks of sensory deficits, temporary neurological deficit, permanent neurological deficit, intraoperative complications, medical complications, wound complications, hardware failure, subsidence, and reoperation. RESULTS Fifty-four studies were included for analysis of MI-TLIF, and 42 studies were included for analysis of LLIF. Overall, there were 9714 patients (5454 in the MI-TLIF group and 4260 in the LLIF group) with 13,230 levels fused (6040 in the MI-TLIF group and 7190 in the LLIF group). A total of 1045 complications in the MI-TLIF group and 1339 complications in the LLIF group were reported. The total complication rate per patient was 19.2% in the MI-TLIF group and 31.4% in the LLIF group (p < 0.0001). The rate of sensory deficits and temporary neurological deficits, and permanent neurological deficits was 20.16%, 2.22%, and 1.01% for MI-TLIF versus 27.08%, 9.40%, and 2.46% for LLIF, respectively (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p = 0.002, respectively). Rates of intraoperative and wound complications were 3.57% and 1.63% for MI-TLIF compared with 1.93% and 0.80% for LLIF, respectively (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.034, respectively). No significant differences were noted for medical complications or reoperation. CONCLUSIONS While there was a higher overall complication rate with LLIF, MI-TLIF and LLIF both have acceptable complication profiles. LLIF had higher rates of sensory as well as temporary and permanent neurological symptoms, although rates of intraoperative and wound complications were less than MI-TLIF. Larger, prospective comparative studies are needed to confirm these findings as the current literature is of relative poor quality. PMID:26424344

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Uninstrumented Posterolateral Fusion in the Degenerative Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Jalalpour, Kourosh; Neumann, Pavel; Johansson, Christer; Hedlund, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Randomized controlled trial. Objective?Despite a large number of publications of outcomes after spinal fusion surgery, there is still no consensus on the efficacy of the several different fusion methods. The aim of this study was to determine whether transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) results in an improved clinical outcome compared with uninstrumented posterolateral fusion (PLF) in the surgical treatment for chronic low back pain. Methods?This study included 135 patients with degenerative disk disease (n?=?96) or postdiskectomy syndrome (n?=?39). Inclusion criteria were at least 1?year of back pain with or without leg pain in patients aged 20 to 65 with one- or two-level disease. Exclusion criteria were sequestration of disk hernia, psychosocial instability, isthmic spondylolisthesis, drug abuse, and previous spine surgery other than diskectomy. Pain was assessed by visual analog scale (pain index). Functional disability was quantified by the disability rating index and Oswestry Disability Index. The global outcome was assessed by the patient and classified as much better, better, unchanged, or worse. The patients were randomized to conventional uninstrumented PLF (n?=?67) or TLIF (n?=?68). PLF was performed in a standardized fashion using autograft. TLIF was performed with pedicle titanium screw fixation and a porous tantalum interbody spacer with interbody and posterolateral autograft. The clinical outcome measurements were obtained preoperatively and at 12 and 24 months postoperatively. The 2-year follow-up rate was 98%. Results?The two treatment groups improved significantly from preoperatively to 2 years' follow-up. At final follow-up, the results in the TLIF group were significantly superior to those in the PLF group in pain index (2.0 versus 3.9, p?=?0.007) and in disability rating index (22 versus 36, p?=?0.003). The Oswestry Disability Index was better in the TLIF group (20 versus 28, p?=?0.110, not significant). The global assessment was clearly superior in the TLIF group: 63% of patients scored “much better” in the TLIF group as compared with 48% in the PLF group (p?=?0.017). Conclusions?The results of the current study support the use of TLIF rather than uninstrumented PLF in the surgical treatment of the degenerative lumbar spine. The less optimal outcome after uninstrumented PLF may be explained by the much higher reoperation rate. PMID:26225282

  18. [Is posterior lumbar epidural space partitioned?].

    PubMed

    Morisot, P

    1992-01-01

    The anatomy of the posterior lumbar epidural space (PLES) has been extensively studied. Besides the anatomists, surgeons, radiologists and anaesthetists have taken an interest in this. However, because each one has considered the PLES from his own specialist field, descriptions are not always concordant. In particular, the reality of a medial partition in the PLES has been suggested by epidurography and intraoperative observations. Lewit and Sereghy and Luyendijk opened the debate by reporting, on antero-posterior epidurographic films, a clear-cut, medial, vertical and narrow picture which partitioned the PLES. However, this was not constant. Savolaine et al. also recognized this partition on epidurographic CT scans. During laminectomies, Luyendijk has taken photographs of a medial fold of the dura mater which appeared to hold it to the posterior vertebral arch, being collapsed on either side of the midline. He named it "plica mediana dorsalis durae matris" (PMD). Several anaesthetists considered that this could explain why epidural analgesia sometimes acted on one side only. Husemeyer and White, and Harrison et al., have tried to confirm this experimentally by making casts with polymerizing resins in cadavers. They did not get very convincing results. Blomberg also tried to see this space by epiduroscopy in the cadaver. Unfortunately, for technical reasons, his photographs were of poor quality. He, however, reported having seen each time the PMD and a band of connective tissue fixing it to the vertebral arch in the midline. However, all these anatomical studies used methods which alter the natural structures. Their results are therefore questionable. The PLES is a virtual space. Histological studies have shown that it is filled with fatty tissue between the dura and the vertebral arch. It is therefore conceivable that any liquid injected into the PLES, such as contrast medium or local anaesthetic, must push back the dura, the only tissue which can move to give it any room. The fatty tissue could therefore be compressed and take any of the shapes which have been described on epidurography. On the other hand, should it be torn, it seems this fatty tissue could make up these haphazard fibrous tracts tensed between the dura and the vertebral arch, such as described in classical anatomy, as Bonica recalled. These can be clearly seen during surgical and anatomical dissections, and during endoscopies carried out on cadavers with sufficient optical means, as opposed to the medial fibrous band fixing the dura to the vertebral arch.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1443817

  19. Comparison Between Posterior Short-segment Instrumentation Combined With Lateral-approach Interbody Fusion and Traditional Wide-open Anterior-Posterior Surgery for the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Fractures.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Lu, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the radiographic and clinical outcomes between posterior short-segment pedicle instrumentation combined with lateral-approach interbody fusion and traditional anterior-posterior (AP) surgery for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures.Lateral-approach interbody fusion has achieved satisfactory results for thoracic and lumbar degenerative disease. However, few studies have focused on the use of this technique for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures.Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established. All patients who meet the above criteria were prospectively treated by posterior short-segment instrumentation and secondary-staged minimally invasive lateral-approach interbody fusion, and classified as group A. A historical group of patients who were treated by traditional wide-open AP approach was used as a control group and classified as group B. The radiological and clinical outcomes were compared between the 2 groups.There were 12 patients in group A and 18 patients in group B. The mean operative time and intraoperative blood loss of anterior reconstruction were significantly higher in group B than those in group A (127.1?±?21.7 vs 197.5?±?47.7?min, P?posterior short-segment pedicle instrumentation, combined with minimally invasive lateral-approach interbody fusion, can achieve similar clinical results with significant less operative time, blood loss, and surgical complication. This procedure seems to be a reasonable treatment option for selective patients with thoracolumbar fractures. PMID:26554800

  20. Accidental Durotomy in Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Frequency, Risk Factors, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Florian; Krüger, Marie T.; Kogias, Evangelos; Rölz, Roland; Sircar, Ronen; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the frequency, risk factors, and management of accidental durotomy in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF). Methods. This single-center study retrospectively investigates 372 patients who underwent MIS TLIF and were mobilized within 24 hours after surgery. The frequency of accidental durotomies, intraoperative closure technique, body mass index, and history of previous surgery was recorded. Results. We identified 32 accidental durotomies in 514 MIS TLIF levels (6.2%). Analysis showed a statistically significant relation of accidental durotomies to overweight patients (body mass index ?25?kg/m2; P = 0.0493). Patient age older than 65 years tended to be a positive predictor for accidental durotomies (P = 0.0657). Mobilizing patients on the first postoperative day, we observed no durotomy-associated complications. Conclusions. The frequency of accidental durotomies in MIS TLIF is low, with overweight being a risk factor for accidental durotomies. The minimally invasive approach seems to minimize durotomy-associated complications (CSF leakage, pseudomeningocele) because of the limited dead space in the soft tissue. Patients with accidental durotomy can usually be mobilized within 24 hours after MIS TLIF without increased risk. The minimally invasive TLIF technique might thus be beneficial in the prevention of postoperative immobilization-associated complications such as venous thromboembolism. This trial is registered with DRKS00006135. PMID:26075294

  1. Minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion for adult degenerative scoliosis with 1 or 2 dislocated levels.

    PubMed

    Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri; Ratte, Louis; Poignard, Alexandre; Auregan, Jean-Charles; Queinnec, Steffen; Hernigou, Philippe; Allain, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Frequent complications of posterolateral instrumented fusion have been reported after treatment of degenerative scoliosis in elderly patients. Considering that in some cases, most of the symptomatology of adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS) is a consequence of the segmental instability at the dislocated level, the use of minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) to manage symptoms can be advocated to reduce surgical morbidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the midterm outcomes of 1- or 2-level minimally invasive ALIFs in ADS patients with 1- or 2-level dislocations. METHODS A total of 47 patients (average age 64 years; range 43-80 years) with 1- or 2-level ALIF performed for ADS (64 levels) in a single institution were included in the study. An independent spine surgeon retrospectively reviewed all the patients' medical records and radiographs to assess operative data and surgery-related complications. Clinical outcome was reported using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the visual analog scale (VAS) for lumbar and leg pain. Intraoperative data and complications were collected. Fusion and risk for adjacent-level degeneration were assessed. RESULTS The mean follow-up duration was 3 years (range 1-10 years). ODI, and back and leg pain VAS scores were significantly improved at last follow-up. A majority of patients (74%) had a statistically significant improvement in their ODI score of more than 20 points at latest follow-up and 1 had a worsening of his disability. The mean operating time was 166 minutes (range 70-355 minutes). The mean estimated blood loss was 410 ml (range 50-1700 ml). Six (5 major and 1 minor) surgical complications (12.7% of patients) and 13 (2 major and 11 minor) medical complications (27.7% of patients) occurred without death or wound infection. Fusion was achieved in 46 of 47 patients. Surgery resulted in a slight but significant decrease of the Cobb angle, and improved the pelvic parameters and lumbar lordosis, but had no effect on the global sagittal balance. At latest follow-up, 9 patients (19.1%) developed adjacent-segment disease at a mean of 2 years' delay from the index surgery; 4 were symptomatic but treated medically, and none required iterative surgery. CONCLUSIONS Single- or 2-level minimally invasive fusion through a minimally invasive anterior approach in some selected cases of ADS produced a good functional outcome with a high fusion rate. They were associated with a significantly lower rate of complications in this study than the historical control. PMID:26315959

  2. Vasculopathy, Ischemia, and the Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery: Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Allison, David W; Allen, Richard T; Kohanchi, David D; Skousen, Collin B; Lee, Yu-Po; Gertsch, Jeffrey H

    2015-12-01

    Multi-modal neurophysiologic monitoring consisting of triggered and spontaneous electromyography and transcranial motor-evoked potentials may detect and prevent both acute and slow developing mechanical and vascular nerve injuries in lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) surgery. In case report 1, a marked reduction in the transcranial motor-evoked potentials on the operative side alerted to a 28% decrease in mean arterial blood pressure in a 54-year-old woman during an L3-4, L4-5 LLIF. After hemodynamic stability was regained, transcranial motor-evoked potentials returned to baseline and the patient suffered no postoperative complications. In case report 2, a peroneal nerve train-of-four stimulation threshold of 95 mA portended the potential for a triggered electromyography false negative in a 70-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and body mass index of 30.7 kg/m undergoing an L3-4, L4-5 LLIF. Higher triggered electromyography threshold values were applied to this patient's relatively quiescent triggered electromyography and the patient suffered no postoperative complications. In case report 3, the loss of right quadriceps motor-evoked potentials detected a retractor related nerve injury in a 59-year-old man undergoing an L4-5 LLIF. The surgery was aborted, but the patient suffered persistent postoperative right leg paresthesia and weakness. These reports highlight the sensitivity of peripheral nerve elements to ischemia (particularly in the presence of vascular risk factors) during the LLIF procedure and the need for dynamic multi-modal intraoperative monitoring. PMID:26629762

  3. Open and Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Comparison of Intermediate Results and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Hee, Hwan Tak

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Purpose To compare clinical and radiological outcomes of open vs. minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF). Overview of Literature MI-TLIF promises smaller incisions and less soft tissue dissection resulting in lower morbidity and faster recovery; however, it is technically challenging. Methods Twenty-five patients with MI-TLIF were compared with 25 matched open TLIF controls. A minimum 2 year follow-up and a statistical analysis of perioperative and long-term outcomes were performed. Potential complications were recorded. Results The mean ages for the open and MI-TLIF cases were 44.4 years (range, 19-69 years) and 43.6 years (range, 20-69 years), respectively. The male:female ratio was 13:12 for both groups. Average follow-up was 26.9 months for the MI-TLIF group and 29.3 months for the open group. Operative duration was significantly longer in the MI-TLIF group than that in the open group (p<0.05). No differences in estimated blood loss, duration to ambulation, or length of stay were found. Significant improvements in the Oswestry disability index and EQ-5D functional scores were observed at 6-, 12-, and 24-months in both groups, but no significant difference was detected between the groups. Fusion rates were comparable. Cage sizes were significantly smaller in the MI-TLIF group at the L5/S1 level (p<0.05). One patient had residual spinal stenosis at the MI-TLIF level, and one patient who underwent two-level MI-TLIF developed a deep vein thrombosis resulting in a pulmonary embolism. Conclusions MI-TLIF and open TLIF had comparable long-term benefits. Due to technical constraints, patients should be advised on the longer operative time and potential undersizing of cages at the L5S1 level. PMID:25901228

  4. BMP-2-induced Neuroforaminal Bone Growth in the Setting of a Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Junyoung; Tabaraee, Ehsan; Singh, Kern

    2015-06-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) has become a popular alternative to traditional methods of lumbar decompression and fusion. When compared with the open technique, the minimally invasive approach can result in decreased pain and blood loss as well as a shorter length of hospitalization. However, the narrower working channel through the tubular retractor increases the difficulty of decortication and bone grafting. Therefore, recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMP-2) is often utilized (although this is off-label) to create a more favorable interbody fusion environment. Recently, the use of rhBMP-2 has been associated with excessive bone growth in an MIS-TLIF. If this bone growth compresses the neighboring neural structures, patients may present with either new or recurrent radicular pain. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging can demonstrate heterotopic bone growth extending from the disk space into either the ipsilateral neuroforamen or lateral recess, which may result in the compression of the exiting or traversing root, respectively. The purpose of this article and the accompanying video is to demonstrate a technique for defining and resecting rhBMP-2-induced heterotopic bone growth following a previous MIS-TLIF. PMID:25978140

  5. Clear Zone Formation around Screws in the Early Postoperative Stages after Posterior Lumbar Fusion Using the Cortical Bone Trajectory Technique

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To evaluate the initial fixation using the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique for posterior lumbar fusion through assessment of the clear zones around the screws and the risk factors involved. Overview of Literature Postoperative radiolucent zones (clear zones) are an indicator of poor conventional pedicle screw fixation. Methods Between January 2013 and April 2014, 19 patients (8 men and 11 women) underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion or posterior lumbar fusion using the CBT technique. A total of 109 screws were used for evaluation with measurement of the maximum insertional torque of last two screw rotations. Clear zone-positivity on plain radiographs was investigated 6 months after surgery. The relation between intraoperative insertional torque and clear zone-positivity was investigated by one-way analysis of variance. In addition, the correlation between clear zone-positivity and gender, age (<75 years old or >75 years old), or operative stabilization level (<2 or >3 vertebral levels) was evaluated using the chi-square test. Results Clear zones were observed around six screws (5.50%) in five patients (26.3%). The mean insertional torque (4.00±2.09 inlbs) of clear zone-positive screws was lower than that of clear zone-negative screws (8.12±0.50 in-lbs), but the difference was not significant. There was a significant correlation between clear zone-positivity and operative level of stabilization. Conclusions The low incidence of clear zone-positive screws indicates good initial fixation using the CBT technique. Multilevel fusions may be risk factors for clear zone generation. PMID:26713120

  6. Lateral Pressure and VAS Pain Score Analysis for the Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion Procedure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) procedure is a minimally invasive procedure that has become widely utilized. The LLIF procedure typically involves bending the table to access the disc spaces of interest due to anatomical constraints. It is unknown if this bending process is painful or what pressures are exhibited on the downside part of the body. The goal of the study was to determine whether sex, height, weight, body mass index, bed angle, or positioning relative to the break of the bed affects the downside skin pressures and VAS pain scores in awake volunteers. Methods Fifty-six volunteers were placed in the lateral decubitus position and pressure sensors were placed at the downside part of their anatomy (shoulder, T10 rib , iliac crest, and greater trochanter). The pressures were checked with the iliac crest or greater trochanter at 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 degree bed angles. VAS scores were checked when the iliac crest or greater trochanter were at the maximum bed break angles. Results A significant positive association was found between increased bed angle and pressure at all five areas on the downside body locations (p<0.0001). The greatest pressures were located at the iliac crest and greater trochanter when these specific locations were centered over the break of the bed (p<0.0001). When the iliac crest was placed at maximal bed break, each unit increase in BMI increased the VAS pain by 0.13 (p<0.0001)and men had 1.96 (p=0.0009)higher VAS scores then women. When the greater trochanter was placed at the maximal bed break, each unit increase in BMI decreased VAS pain by 0.19 (p<0.0001) and women had 1.55 (p=0.0002)higher VAS pain scores then men. Conclusions In awake volunteers, the pressure at the iliac crest or greater trochanter at the break of the bed increases by increasing the bed angle. Women with a lower BMI had high VAS pain scores when their greater trochanter was at maximal bed break. Men with higher BMI had high VAS pain scores when their iliac crest was at maximal bed break. An awareness of the iliac crest or greater trochanter at the break of the bed should be considered to prevent pain and increased pressure based on the patient's sex and BMI. PMID:26512342

  7. Analysis of spinal lumbar interbody fusion cage subsidence using Taguchi method, finite element analysis, and artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassau, Christopher John; Litofsky, N. Scott; Lin, Yuyi

    2012-09-01

    Subsidence, when implant penetration induces failure of the vertebral body, occurs commonly after spinal reconstruction. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages may subside into the vertebral body and lead to kyphotic deformity. No previous studies have utilized an artificial neural network (ANN) for the design of a spinal interbody fusion cage. In this study, the neural network was applied after initiation from a Taguchi L 18 orthogonal design array. Three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to address the resistance to subsidence based on the design changes of the material and cage contact region, including design of the ridges and size of the graft area. The calculated subsidence is derived from the ANN objective function which is defined as the resulting maximum von Mises stress (VMS) on the surface of a simulated bone body after axial compressive loading. The ANN was found to have minimized the bone surface VMS, thereby optimizing the ALIF cage given the design space. Therefore, the Taguchi-FEA-ANN approach can serve as an effective procedure for designing a spinal fusion cage and improving the biomechanical properties.

  8. Anterior lumbar interbody surgery for spondylosis results from a classically-trained neurosurgeon.

    PubMed

    Chatha, Gurkirat; Foo, Stacy W L; Lind, Christopher R P; Budgeon, Charley; Bannan, Paul E

    2014-09-01

    Anterior lumbar surgery for degenerative disc disease (DDD) is a relatively novel technique that can prevent damage to posterior osseous, muscular and ligamentous spinal elements. This study reports the outcomes and complications in 286 patients who underwent fusion - with artificial disc implants or combined fusion and artificial disc implants - by a single-operator neurosurgeon, with up to 24 months of follow-up. The visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 (SF36) and prospective log of adverse events were used to assess the clinical outcome. Radiographic assessments of implant position and bony fusion were analysed. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were also recorded. Irrespective of pre-surgical symptoms (back pain alone or back and leg pain combined), workers' compensation status and type of surgical implant, clinically significant improvements in VAS, ODI and SF36 were primarily observed at 3 and/or 6 month follow-up, and improvements were maintained at 24 months after surgery. A 94% fusion rate was obtained; the overall complication was 9.8% which included 3.5% with vascular complications. The anterior lumbar approach can be used for treating DDD for both back pain and back and leg pain with low complication rates. With appropriate training, single-operator neurosurgeons can safely perform these surgeries. PMID:24786717

  9. Viscoelastic Disc Arthroplasty Provides Superior Back and Leg Pain Relief in Patients with Lumbar Disc Degeneration Compared to Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Burkhard; Smith, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) is one of the most frequently diagnosed spinal diseases. The symptoms these disorders cause are anticipated to increase as the population in Western countries ages. Purpose Compare back and leg pain alleviation in patients with LDD and a viscoelastic disc prosthesis documented in the SWISSspine registry versus patients with anterior lumbar interbody fusion documented in the Spine Tango registry. Study Design Prospectively collected clinical and outcome data in two independent spine registries. Outcome Measures were back and leg pain relief on 0 to 10 numerical rating scales. Materials and Methods The analysis included a single surgeon series of 48 patients with viscoelastic total disc replacement (VTDR) from the SWISSspine registry which were compared to 131 patients with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) from the Spine Tango registry. Two linear multivariate regression models were built to assess the associations of patient characteristics with back and leg pain relief. The following covariates were included in the models: patient age and sex, disc herniation as additional diagnosis, number of treated segments, level of treated segment, treatment type (VTDR, ALIF), preoperative back and leg pain levels and follow-up interval. Results Both models showed VTDR to be associated with significantly higher back (2.76 points; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.78 - 3.73; p < 0.001) and leg pain (2.12 points; 95% CI 1.12 to 3.13; p < 0.001) relief than ALIF. Other influential factors for higher back pain relief were female sex compared with male sex (1.03 additional points; 95% CI 0.27 to 1.78; p = 0.008), monosegmental surgery compared with bisegmental surgery (1.02 additional points; 95% CI 0.21 to 1.83; p = 0.014), and higher back pain at baseline (0.87 points additional pain relief per level of preoperative back pain; 95% CI 0.70 to 1.03; p < 0.001). Other influential factors for leg pain relief were monosegmental surgery (0.93 additional points; 95% CI 0.10 to 1.77; p = 0.029) and higher leg pain at baseline (0.83 points additional pain relief per level of preoperative leg pain; 95% CI 0.70 to 0.96). In both models the L3/4 segment showed 2.36 points (95% CI -4.27 to -0.45; p = 0.016) and 3.69 points (95% CI -5.66 to -1.71; p < 0.001) less pain relief than L5/S1. Discussion Significantly higher back and leg pain relief were observed after viscoelastic total disc replacement in comparison with anterior lumbar interbody fusion. The new less rigid materials used in the second generation total disc replacements (TDRs) may make artificial disc replacement an increasingly attractive option for patients with degenerative lumbar disc disease. Further controlled and long-term follow-up studies are required for more detailed comparisons of the outcomes of these types of disc implants. The Freedom Lumbar Disc is limited by U.S. federal law to investigational use only. PMID:26196033

  10. The Use of a Dehydrated Amnion/Chorion Membrane Allograft in Patients Who Subsequently Undergo Reexploration after Posterior Lumbar Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Subach, Brian R.; Copay, Anne G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Context. Products that can reduce development of epidural fibrosis may reduce risk for ongoing pain associated with development of scar tissue and make subsequent epidural reexploration easier. Purpose. To evaluate the use of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM) on the formation of soft tissue scarring in the epidural space. Study Design. Case series. Patient Sample. Five patients having transforaminal lumbar interbody lumbar fusion (TLIF) with posterior instrumentation and implantation of dHACM in the epidural space and subsequent epidural reexploration. Outcome Measures. Degree of scar tissue adjacent to the epidural space at reexploration. Intraoperative and postoperative complications related to dHACM and patient reported outcomes. Methods. The degree of scar tissue adjacent to the epidural space was assessed during the reexploration surgery. Patients' outcomes were collected using standard validated questionnaires. Results. Four of 5 cases had easily detachable tissue during epidural reexploration. Angiolipoma of 10% was noted in 1 case and 5% in 2 cases. Significant improvements in patient reported outcomes were observed. No intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that dHACM implant during TLIF may have favorable effects on epidural fibrosis and is well tolerated. Further studies with larger cohorts are required to prove our results. PMID:25653880

  11. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Deep Vein Thrombosis in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery: A Single-Center Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si-Dong; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Da-Long; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Feng, Shi-Qing; Zhao, Feng-Dong

    2015-12-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to obtain the current prevalence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and analyze related risk factors in patients undergoing lumbar interbody fusion.Medical record data were collected from Department of Spinal Surgery, The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, between July 2014 and March 2015. Both univariate analysis and binary logistic regression analysis were performed to determine risk factors for DVT.A total of 995 patients were admitted into this study, including 484 men and 511 women, aged from 14 to 89 years old (median 50, IQR 19). The detection rate of lower limb DVT by ultrasonography was 22.4% (223/995) in patients undergoing lumbar interbody fusion. Notably, average VAS (visual analog scale) score in the first 3 days after surgery in the DVT group was more than that in the non-DVT group (Z?=?-21.69, P?lumbar interbody fusion surgery. PMID:26632909

  12. Sacrum fracture following L5-S1 stand-alone interbody fusion for isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-11-01

    We report a 72-year-old man with a rare sacral fracture following stand-alone L5-S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion for isthmic spondylolisthesis. The man underwent a minimally invasive management strategy using posterior percutaneous pedicle fixation and partial reduction of the deformity. We also discuss the current literature on fusion procedures for isthmic spondylolisthesis. PMID:26100158

  13. Minimally Invasive Unilateral vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation and Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Treatment of Multi-Segment Lumbar Degenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Guangrun; Wang, Jiefeng; Zhang, Heqing

    2015-01-01

    Background The choice for instrumentation with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in treatment of degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD) remains controversial. The goal of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes in consecutive patients with multi-segment DLD treated with unilateral pedicle screw (UPS) vs. bilateral pedicle screw (BPS) instrumented TLIF. Material/Methods Eighty-four consecutive patients who had multi-level MIS-TLIF were retrospectively reviewed. All data were collected to compare the clinical outcomes between the 2 groups. Results Both groups showed similar clinical function scores in VAS and ODI. The two groups differed significantly in operative time (P<0.001), blood loss (P<0.001), and fusion rate (P=0.043), respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated similar clinical outcomes between UPS fixation and BPS procedure after MIS-TLIF for multi-level DLD. Moreover, UPS technique was superior in operative time and blood loss, but represented lower fusion rate than the BPS construct did. PMID:26603050

  14. Minimally Invasive Unilateral vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation and Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Treatment of Multi-Segment Lumbar Degenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Guangrun; Wang, Jiefeng; Zhang, Heqing

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The choice for instrumentation with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in treatment of degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD) remains controversial. The goal of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes in consecutive patients with multi-segment DLD treated with unilateral pedicle screw (UPS) vs. bilateral pedicle screw (BPS) instrumented TLIF. MATERIAL AND METHODS Eighty-four consecutive patients who had multi-level MIS-TLIF were retrospectively reviewed. All data were collected to compare the clinical outcomes between the 2 groups. RESULTS Both groups showed similar clinical function scores in VAS and ODI. The two groups differed significantly in operative time (P<0.001), blood loss (P<0.001), and fusion rate (P=0.043), respectively. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated similar clinical outcomes between UPS fixation and BPS procedure after MIS-TLIF for multi-level DLD. Moreover, UPS technique was superior in operative time and blood loss, but represented lower fusion rate than the BPS construct did. PMID:26603050

  15. Biomechanical evaluation of a spherical lumbar interbody device at varying levels of subsidence

    PubMed Central

    Rundell, Steven A.; Isaza, Jorge E.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ulf Fernström implanted stainless steel ball bearings following discectomy, or for painful disc disease, and termed this procedure disc arthroplasty. Today, spherical interbody spacers are clinically available, but there is a paucity of associated biomechanical testing. The primary objective of the current study was to evaluate the biomechanics of a spherical interbody implant. It was hypothesized that implantation of a spherical interbody implant, with combined subsidence into the vertebral bodies, would result in similar ranges of motion (RoM) and facet contact forces (FCFs) when compared with an intact condition. A secondary objective of this study was to determine the effect of using a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) versus a cobalt chrome (CoCr) implant on vertebral body strains. We hypothesized that the material selection would have a negligible effect on vertebral body strains since both materials have elastic moduli substantially greater than the annulus. Methods A finite element model of L3-L4 was created and validated by use of ROM, disc pressure, and bony strain from previously published data. Virtual implantation of a spherical interbody device was performed with 0, 2, and 4 mm of subsidence. The model was exercised in compression, flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. The ROM, vertebral body effective (von Mises) strain, and FCFs were reported. Results Implantation of a PEEK implant resulted in slightly lower strain maxima when compared with a CoCr implant. For both materials, the peak strain experienced by the underlying bone was reduced with increasing subsidence. All levels of subsidence resulted in ROM and FCFs similar to the intact model. Conclusions The results suggest that a simple spherical implant design is able to maintain segmental ROM and provide minimal differences in FCFs. Large areas of von Mises strain maxima were generated in the bone adjacent to the implant regardless of whether the implant was PEEK or CoCr. PMID:25802664

  16. Miniopen Oblique Lateral L5-S1 Interbody Fusion: A Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Keijiro; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) has been widely used for minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), but an approach to L5-S1 is difficult because of the iliac crest. In the current study, we present 2 cases using minimally invasive oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) of L5-S1. The patients showed foraminal stenosis between L5 and S1 and severe low back and leg pain. The patients were placed in a lateral decubitus position and underwent OLIF surgery (using a cage and bone graft from the iliac crest) without posterior decompression. Posterior screws were used in the patients. Pain scores significantly improved after surgery. There was no spinal nerve, major vessel, peritoneal, or urinary injury. OLIF surgery was minimally invasive and produced good surgical results without complications. PMID:25400963

  17. Miniopen oblique lateral L5-s1 interbody fusion: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Keijiro; Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Toyone, Tomoaki; Inoue, Gen; Hanaoka, Eiji; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) has been widely used for minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), but an approach to L5-S1 is difficult because of the iliac crest. In the current study, we present 2 cases using minimally invasive oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) of L5-S1. The patients showed foraminal stenosis between L5 and S1 and severe low back and leg pain. The patients were placed in a lateral decubitus position and underwent OLIF surgery (using a cage and bone graft from the iliac crest) without posterior decompression. Posterior screws were used in the patients. Pain scores significantly improved after surgery. There was no spinal nerve, major vessel, peritoneal, or urinary injury. OLIF surgery was minimally invasive and produced good surgical results without complications. PMID:25400963

  18. Perioperative Surgical Complications and Learning Curve Associated with Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Single-Institute Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Bin; Seok, Sang Ok; Jo, Byung Woo; Ha, Joong Won

    2015-01-01

    Background As surgical complications tend to occur more frequently in the beginning stages of a surgeon's career, knowledge of perioperative complications is important to perform a safe procedure, especially if the surgeon is a novice. We sought to identify and describe perioperative complications and their management in connection with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of our first 124 patients who underwent minimally invasive TLIF. The primary outcome measure was adverse events during the perioperative period, including neurovascular injury, implant-related complications, and wound infection. Pseudarthroses and adjacent segment pathologies were not included in this review. Adverse events that were not specifically related to spinal surgery and did not affect recovery were also excluded. Results Perioperative complications occurred in 9% of patients (11/124); including three cases of temporary postoperative neuralgia, two deep wound infections, two pedicle screw misplacements, two cage migrations, one dural tear, and one grafted bone extrusion. No neurologic deficits were reported. Eight complications occurred in the first one-third of the series and only 3 complications occurred in the last two-thirds of the series. Additional surgeries were performed in 6% of patients (7/124); including four reoperations (two for cage migrations, one for a misplaced screw, and one for an extruded graft bone fragment) and three hardware removals (one for a misplaced screw and two for infected cages). Conclusions We found perioperative complications occurred more often in the early period of a surgeon's experience with minimally invasive TLIF. Implant-related complications were common and successfully managed by additional surgeries in this series. We suggest greater caution should be exercised to avoid the potential complications, especially when surgeon is a novice to this procedure. PMID:25729524

  19. Midline Lumbar Fusion with Cortical Bone Trajectory Screw

    PubMed Central

    MIZUNO, Masaki; KURAISHI, Keita; UMEDA, Yasuyuki; SANO, Takanori; TSUJI, Masanori; SUZUKI, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    A novel cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw technique provides an alternative fixation technique for lumbar spine. Trajectory of CBT screw creates a caudo-cephalad path in sagittal plane and a medio-lateral path in axial plane, and engages cortical bone in the pedicle. The theoretical advantage is that it provides enhanced screw grip and interface strength. Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF) is composed of posterior mid-line approach, microsurgical laminectomy, and CBT screw fixation. We adopted the MIDLF technique for lumbar spondylolisthesis. Advantages of this technique include that decompression and fusion are available in the same field, and it minimizes approach-related damages. To determine whether MIDLF with CBT screw is as effective as traditional approach and it is minimum invasive technique, we studied the clinical and radiological outcomes of MIDLF. Our results indicate that MIDLF is effective and minimum invasive technique. Evidence of effectiveness of MIDLF is that patients had good recovery score, and that CBT screw technique was safety in clinical and stable in radiological. MIDLF with CBT screw provides the surgeon with additional options for fixation. This technique is most likely to be useful for treating lumbar spondylolisthesis in combination with midline decompression and insertion of an interbody graft, such as the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion or posterior lumbar interbody fusion techniques. PMID:25169139

  20. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after depletive lumbar puncture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a rare entity. Its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. Case presentation We report the case of a 69-year-old White European woman who presented complete and proportional right hemiplegia, confusion, deviation of her head and eyes to the right, cortical blindness, and generalized tonic-clonic seizure 12 hours following a depletive lumbar puncture. Emergency cerebral magnetic resonance imaging showed bioccipital and left-side basal ganglia hyperintensities in the fluid attenuated inversion recovery and the diffusion-weighted images suggesting a radiological diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Conclusions The diagnosis is established on clinical and radiological signs. This is the first report of this kind in the literature. We present a case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after depletive lumbar puncture and we discuss the pathophysiology. PMID:25063365

  1. Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial of The Stabilis Stand Alone Cage (SAC) Versus Bagby and Kuslich (BAK) Implants for Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, William; McLain, Robert F.; Rufo-Smith, Candace; Gurd, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Degenerative disc disease is common and debilitating for many patients. If conservative extensive care fails, anterior lumbar interbody fusion has proven to be an alternative form of surgical management. The Stabilis Stand Alone Cage(SAC) was introduced as a method to obtain stability and fusion. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Stabilis Stand Alone Cage (SAC) is comparable in safety and efficacy to the Bagby and Kuslich (BAK) device. Methods As part of a prospective, randomized, controlled FDA trial, 73 patients underwent anterior interbody fusion using either the SAC(56%) or the BAK device (44%). Results Background characteristics were similar between the two groups. There was no significant difference between the SAC and BAK groups in mean operative time or mean blood loss during surgery. Adverse event rates did not differ between the groups. Assessment of plain radiographs could not confirm solid fusion in 63% of control and 71% of study patients. Functional scores from Owestry and SF-36 improved in both groups by the two-year follow-up. There were no significant differences between the SAC and BAK patients with respect to outcome. Conclusions Both the Stabilis Stand Alone Cage and the BAK Cage provided satisfactory improvement in function and pain relief, despite less than expected radiographic fusion rates. The apparent incongruency between fusion rates and functional outcomes suggests that either radiographs underestimate the true incidence of fusion, or that patients are obtaining good pain relief and improved function despite a lower rate of fusion than previously reported. This was a Level III study. PMID:25694930

  2. Clinical Use of 3D Printing Guide Plate in Posterior Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongliang; Wu, Dongying; Yang, Huilin; Guo, Kaijin

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of use of a 3D printing guide plate in posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. Material/Methods We enrolled 43 patients receiving posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. The experimental group underwent 3D printing guide plate-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation, while the control group underwent traditional x-ray-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. After surgery, CT scanning was done to evaluate the accuracy of screw placement according to the Richter standard. Results All patients were followed up for 1 month. The mean time of placement for each screw and the amount of hemorrhage was 4.9±2.1 min and 8.0±11.1 mL in the experimental group while 6.5±2.2 min and 59.9±13.0 mL in the control group, respectively, with significant differences (p<0.05). The fluoroscopy times of each screw placement was 0.5±0.4 in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group 1.2±0.7 (p<0.05). The excellent and good screw placement rate was 100% in the experimental group and 98.4% in the control group, without any statistical difference (P>0.05). No obvious complications were reported in either group. Conclusions Compared with the traditional treatment methods, the intra-operative application of 3D printing guide plate can shorten the operation time and reduce the amount of hemorrhage. It can also reduce the fluoroscopy times compared with the traditional fluoroscopy, which cannot improve the accuracy rate of screw placement. PMID:26681388

  3. Clinical Use of 3D Printing Guide Plate in Posterior Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongliang; Wu, Dongying; Yang, Huilin; Guo, Kaijin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of use of a 3D printing guide plate in posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 43 patients receiving posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. The experimental group underwent 3D printing guide plate-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation, while the control group underwent traditional x-ray-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. After surgery, CT scanning was done to evaluate the accuracy of screw placement according to the Richter standard. RESULTS All patients were followed up for 1 month. The mean time of placement for each screw and the amount of hemorrhage was 4.9±2.1 min and 8.0±11.1 mL in the experimental group while 6.5±2.2 min and 59.9±13.0 mL in the control group, respectively, with significant differences (p<0.05). The fluoroscopy times of each screw placement was 0.5±0.4 in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group 1.2±0.7 (p<0.05). The excellent and good screw placement rate was 100% in the experimental group and 98.4% in the control group, without any statistical difference (P>0.05). No obvious complications were reported in either group. CONCLUSIONS Compared with the traditional treatment methods, the intra-operative application of 3D printing guide plate can shorten the operation time and reduce the amount of hemorrhage. It can also reduce the fluoroscopy times compared with the traditional fluoroscopy, which cannot improve the accuracy rate of screw placement. PMID:26681388

  4. Surgical Data and Early Postoperative Outcomes after Minimally Invasive Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a Prospective, Multicenter, Observational Data-Monitored Study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Paulo; Buzek, David; Franke, Jörg; Senker, Wolfgang; Kosmala, Arkadiusz; Hubbe, Ulrich; Manson, Neil; Rosenberg, Wout; Assietti, Roberto; Martens, Frederic; Barbanti Brodano, Giovanni; Scheufler, Kai-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion (MILIF) offers potential for reduced operative morbidity and earlier recovery compared with open procedures for patients with degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD). Firm conclusions about advantages of MILIF over open procedures cannot be made because of limited number of large studies of MILIF in a real-world setting. Clinical effectiveness of MILIF in a large, unselected real-world patient population was assessed in this Prospective, monitored, international, multicenter, observational study. Objective: To observe and document short-term recovery after minimally invasive interbody fusion for DLD. Materials and Methods: In a predefined 4-week analysis from this study, experienced surgeons (?30 MILIF surgeries pre-study) treated patients with DLD by one- or two-level MILIF. The primary study objective was to document patients’ short-term post-interventional recovery (primary objective) including back/leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS]), disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]), health status (EQ-5D) and Patient satisfaction. Results: At 4 weeks, 249 of 252 patients were remaining in the study; the majority received one-level MILIF (83%) and TLIF was the preferred approach (94.8%). For one-level (and two-level) procedures, surgery duration was 128 (182) min, fluoroscopy time 115 (154) sec, and blood-loss 164 (233) mL. Time to first ambulation was 1.3 days and time to study-defined surgery recovery was 3.2 days. Patients reported significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced back pain (VAS: 2.9 vs 6.2), leg pain (VAS: 2.5 vs 5.9), and disability (ODI: 34.5% vs 45.5%), and a significantly (P < 0.0001) improved health status (EQ-5D index: 0.61 vs 0.34; EQ VAS: 65.4 vs 52.9) 4 weeks postoperatively. One adverse event was classified as related to the minimally invasive surgical approach. No deep site infections or deaths were reported. Conclusions: For experienced surgeons, MILIF for DLD demonstrated early benefits (short time to first ambulation, early recovery, high patient satisfaction and improved patient-reported outcomes) and low major perioperative morbidity at 4 weeks postoperatively. PMID:25811615

  5. Sponge-induced granuloma ("gauzoma") as a complication of posterior lumbar surgery.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Mehmet; Akyüz, Orhan; Ozsunar, Yelda; Kacar, Füruzan

    2005-04-01

    A 45-year-old woman presented with complaints of low back pain and sciatica on the left persisting for 2 years. She had undergone left hemilaminectomy and discectomy for L4-5 intervertebral disc herniation at another medical center. Spinal computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a mass lesion in the posterior paravertebral region. The mass was hypointense with ring enhancement on the T(1)-weighted images and hyperintense on the T(2)-weighted images. Surgery found a retained sponge within the paraspinal mass cavity which was removed totally. Foreign-body granuloma ("gauzoma") induced by forgotten sponge material is not an unusual complication of posterior lumbar surgery and should be considered as a potential cause in cases of surgical wound infections. MR imaging is essential to achieve the correct differential diagnosis. PMID:15849460

  6. Posterior Laminoplastic Laminotomy Combined with a Paraspinal Transmuscular Approach for Removing a Lumbar Dumbbell-shaped Schwannoma: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    NGERAGEZA, Japhet Gideon; ITO, Kiyoshi; AOYAMA, Tatsuro; MURATA, Takahiro; HORIUCHI, Tetsuyoshi; HONGO, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The surgical strategies and methods used to treat dumbbell-shaped tumors located in the lumbar-foraminal region are controversial. Although a total facetectomy and combined intra- and extraspinal canal approach provide a wide operative field, facet fusion is required, which can be rather invasive. Here, we report a successful removal of a lumbar dumbbell-shaped schwannoma using a combined laminoplastic laminotomy with Wiltse’s paraspinal surgical approach. This was performed under an operating microscope without a complete facetectomy, fusion, and posterior fixation. Briefly, we treated two patients with lumbar foraminal tumors, both dumbbell-shaped schwannomas located in the intra- and extradural portion. After a laminoplastic laminotomy, the intradural tumor was removed. The tumor located at the extracanalicular site was removed after drilling the pars interarticularis of the lamina, which was performed to enlarge the intervertebral foramen via Wiltse’s paraspinal surgical approach. During surgery, facetectomy with posterior fixation was not needed to remove the intraforaminal component. There was no lumbar instability or complication after surgery. Our results suggest that a combined posterior laminoplastic laminotomy and Wiltse’s paraspinal surgical approach is useful and less invasive for treating patients with lumbar foraminal tumors. PMID:26345670

  7. Adjacent level disease following lumbar spine surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instrumented lumbar spine surgery is associated with an increased risk of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Multiple studies have explored the various risk factors contributing to ASD that include; fusion length (especially, three or more levels), sagittal malalignment, facet injury, advanced age, and prior cephalad degenerative disease. Methods: In this selective review of ASD, following predominantly instrumented fusions for lumbar degenerative disease, patients typically underwent open versus minimally invasive surgery (MIS), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusions (TLIFs), posterior lumbar interbody fusions (PLIFs), or rarely posterolateral lumbar instrumented or noninstrumented fusions (posterolateral lumbar fusion). Results: The incidence of ASD, following open or MI lumbar instrumented fusions, ranged up to 30%; notably, the addition of instrumentation in different series did not correlate with improved outcomes. Alternatively, in one series, at 164 postoperative months, noninstrumented lumbar fusions reduced the incidence of ASD to 5.6% versus 18.5% for ASD performed with instrumentation. Of interest, dynamic instrumented/stabilization techniques did not protect patients from ASD. Furthermore, in a series of 513 MIS TLIF, there was a 15.6% incidence of perioperative complications that included; a 5.1% frequency of durotomy and a 2.3% instrumentation failure rate. Conclusions: The incidence of postoperative ASD (up to 30%) is greater following either open or MIS instrumented lumbar fusions (e.g., TLIF/PLIF), while decompressions with noninstrumented fusions led to a much smaller 5.6% risk of ASD. Other findings included: MIS instrumented fusions contributed to higher perioperative complication rates, and dynamic stabilization did not protect against ASD.

  8. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome: Temporary Visual Loss After Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kueper, Janina; Loftus, Michael L; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba; Lebl, Darren

    2015-11-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare cause of temporary postoperative visual loss (POVL) after spinal deformity surgery. We report on 2 patients diagnosed with PRES after spinal deformity surgery, who were closely examined postoperatively. A 78-year-old woman with severe disability due to degenerative lumbar spondylosis after laminectomy was treated with transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion from L1 to L4 and posterior spinal fusion from T10 to pelvis. She developed confusion and bilateral visual loss on postoperative day 7. A second patient, a 51-year-old woman with progressive pain and decompensation caused by adult scoliosis, was treated with posterior spinal fusion from T3 to pelvis and interbody fusion from L4 to S1 via a presacral interbody fusion approach. She developed bilateral visual loss on postoperative day 15. Both patients achieved a complete recovery of their vision after medical management of PRES. Timely diagnosis of PRES and prompt intervention allow for a good patient prognosis and complete recovery of eyesight. PMID:26566564

  9. Percutaneous Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (pTLIF) with a Posterolateral Approach for the Treatment of Denegerative Disk Disease: Feasibility and Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Interbody fusion by open discectomy is the usual treatment for degenerative disk disease but requires a relatively long recovery period. The transforaminal posterolateral approach is a well-known standard in endoscopic spine surgery that allows direct access to the disk with progressive tissue dilation. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of percutaneous transforaminal interbody fusion (pTLIF) with insertion of an expandable or a standard rigid interbody implant for patients with degenerative disk disease with or without spondylolisthesis and for revision surgery. Methods Between 2009 and 2014, the pTLIF procedure was performed in 30 patients. Ten patients underwent insertion of a rigid implant (group A) and the remaining 20 underwent insertion of an expandable titanium interbody implant as the initial procedure (n = 10) (group B) or after failed back surgery (n = 10) (group C). Patient outcomes were scored with visual analogic scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI) and modified Macnab criteria. Results The mean follow-up period was 38 (17) (range 11 to 67) months. The outcome was excellent in 18, good in 10 and fair in 2. No poor results and no major complications were reported. No differences in VAS and ODI scores according to the study group were found. Median postoperative time until hospital discharge was 26 hours (20 to 68 hours). Postoperative values for VAS and ODI scores improved significantly (p<0.05) compared to preoperative data in all study groups. Conclusions These preliminary results have shown the feasibility and efficacy of the pTLIF procedure using a posterolateral approach for the treatment of degenerative disk disease with or without spondylolisthesis up to grade 2 and in revision surgery. No significant differences in outcome were observed between an expandable and a rigid cage. Median postoperative time until hospital discharge was faster compared to standard TLIF (26 hours vs. 9.3 days). PMID:26484004

  10. Congenital Posterior Spinal Agenesis Leads to L2-L3 Instability: a Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Samadian, Mohammad; Hosseinzadeh Bakhtevari, Mehrdad; Jahangiri Babadi, Armin; Nabizadeh, Naveed; Rezaei, Omidvar

    2015-12-01

    Congenital absence of posterior elements of the lumbar column is an extremely uncommon anomaly and we found no any reported cases of incomplete congenital absence of the posterior elements of lumbar vertebra in the literature.  Here, we present a case with congenital absence of posterior elements of lumbar vertebra. The patient was a 51-year-old man with a history of 20 years of back pain. Imaging of the lumbar spine revealed instability in L2 and L3 and there was evidence of retrolisthesis, agenesis of pars interarticularis, spinous processes, lamina, transverse processes and facets at L2 and L3. The patient underwent lumbar discectomy and posterior spinal fixation and instrumentation was then done using pedicle screw fixation. Four pedicle screws, two rods, and one cross link were employed to bilaterally fix the L2 and L3 and then we used autograft and allograft bone for interbody fusion, substitutes from iliac crest for posterior fusion. There were no postoperative complications, and at 6, 12 and 24 months of follow-up, his leg and back pain had improved, and the patient did not need any analgesic for pain relief. Complete congenital absence of the lumbar posterior element has been rarely reported in the literature. Patients whose congenital anomalies lead to segmental instability are surgical fusion candidates, but if these anomalies occur in pars interarticularis such as spondylolysis isthmus, fixation and inter segmental fusion techniques are useful. PMID:26621021

  11. Lumbar Laminectomy and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... have. Most things in spinal surgery, other than spinal cord compression in the neck or in the thoracic ... do here. If we were in the cervical spinal cord, we cannot touch it because we can paralyze ...

  12. Time-sequential changes of differentially expressed miRNAs during the process of anterior lumbar interbody fusion using equine bone protein extract, rhBMP-2 and autograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da-Fu; Zhou, Zhi-Yu; Dai, Xue-Jun; Gao, Man-Man; Huang, Bao-Ding; Liang, Tang-Zhao; Shi, Rui; Zou, Li-Jin; Li, Hai-Sheng; Bünger, Cody; Tian, Wei; Zou, Xue-Nong

    2014-03-01

    The precise mechanism of bone regeneration in different bone graft substitutes has been well studied in recent researches. However, miRNAs regulation of the bone formation has been always mysterious. We developed the anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model in pigs using equine bone protein extract (BPE), recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS), and autograft as bone graft substitute, respectively. The miRNA and gene expression profiles of different bone graft materials were examined using microarray technology and data analysis, including self-organizing maps, KEGG pathway and Biological process GO analyses. We then jointly analyzed miRNA and mRNA profiles of the bone fusion tissue at different time points respectively. Results showed that miRNAs, including let-7, miR-129, miR-21, miR-133, miR-140, miR-146, miR-184, and miR-224, were involved in the regulation of the immune and inflammation response, which provided suitable inflammatory microenvironment for bone formation. At late stage, several miRNAs directly regulate SMAD4, Estrogen receptor 1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C for bone formation. It can be concluded that miRNAs play important roles in balancing the inflammation and bone formation.

  13. Fixed lumbar apical vertebral rotation predicts spinal decompensation in Lenke type 3C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis after selective posterior thoracic correction and fusion.

    PubMed

    Behensky, Hannes; Cole, Ashley A; Freeman, Brian J C; Grevitt, Michael P; Mehdian, Hossein S; Webb, John K

    2007-10-01

    Retrospective radiographic review of surgically treated double major curves (Lenke type 3C) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. To evaluate the role of selective posterior thoracic correction and fusion in double major curves with third generation instrumentation and to identify preoperative radiographic parameters that predict postoperative coronal spinal decompensation. Traditionally the surgical treatment of double major curves consists of fusion of both the thoracic and the lumbar curve. Few attempt to perform selective thoracic fusion in this curve pattern because of the potential to create spinal imbalance. Thirty-six patients with Lenke type 3C curves underwent a selective posterior thoracic correction and fusion with either Cotrel-Dubousset instrumentation or the Universal Spine System. Radiographs were evaluated to assess coronal and sagittal balance, curve flexibility, and curve correction at a minimum follow up of 2 years. Postoperative coronal spinal decompensation was investigated with respect to preoperative radiographic parameters on standing anteroposterior (AP), standing lateral radiographs, thoracic and lumbar supine side-bending radiographs. Coronal spinal decompensation was defined as plumbline deviation of C7 of more than 2 cm with respect to the centre sacral vertical line (CSVL) within 2 years of surgery. Twenty-six patients (72%) showed satisfactory frontal plane alignment patients (28%) showed coronal spinal decompensation. Significant group differences, however, were identified for lumbar apical vertebral rotation, measured according to Perdriolle (La scoliose. Son êtude tridimensionnelle. Maloine, Paris, pp 179, 1979) (A 16 degrees , B 22 degrees , P = 0.02), percentage correction (derotation) of lumbar apical vertebrae in lumbar supine side-bending films in comparison to standing AP radiographs (A 49%, B 27%, P = 0.002) and thoracic curve flexibility (A 43%, B 25%, P = 0.03). High correlation was noted between postoperative decompensation and derotation of lumbar apical vertebrae in pre-operative lumbar supine side-bending films with a critical value of 40% (Pearson correlation coefficient; P = 0.62, P < 0.001). Ten of 36 patients (28%) with Lenke type 3C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis showed coronal spinal decompensation of more than 2 cm after selective posterior thoracic correction and fusion. Lumbar apical vertebral derotation of less than 40% provided the radiographic prediction of postoperative coronal spinal imbalance. We advise close scrutiny of the transverse plane in the lumbar supine bending film when planning surgical strategy. PMID:17520294

  14. Fixed lumbar apical vertebral rotation predicts spinal decompensation in lenke type 3c adolescent idiopathic scoliosis after selective posterior thoracic correction and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Ashley A.; Freeman, Brian J. C.; Grevitt, Michael P.; Mehdian, Hossein S.; Webb, John K.

    2007-01-01

    Retrospective radiographic review of surgically treated double major curves (Lenke type 3C) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. To evaluate the role of selective posterior thoracic correction and fusion in double major curves with third generation instrumentation and to identify preoperative radiographic parameters that predict postoperative coronal spinal decompensation. Traditionally the surgical treatment of double major curves consists of fusion of both the thoracic and the lumbar curve. Few attempt to perform selective thoracic fusion in this curve pattern because of the potential to create spinal imbalance. Thirty-six patients with Lenke type 3C curves underwent a selective posterior thoracic correction and fusion with either Cotrel–Dubousset instrumentation or the Universal Spine System. Radiographs were evaluated to assess coronal and sagittal balance, curve flexibility, and curve correction at a minimum follow up of 2 years. Postoperative coronal spinal decompensation was investigated with respect to preoperative radiographic parameters on standing anteroposterior (AP), standing lateral radiographs, thoracic and lumbar supine side-bending radiographs. Coronal spinal decompensation was defined as plumbline deviation of C7 of more than 2 cm with respect to the centre sacral vertical line (CSVL) within 2 years of surgery. Twenty-six patients (72%) showed satisfactory frontal plane alignment patients (28%) showed coronal spinal decompensation. Significant group differences, however, were identified for lumbar apical vertebral rotation, measured according to Perdriolle (La scoliose. Son êtude tridimensionnelle. Maloine, Paris, pp 179, 1979) (A 16°, B 22°, P = 0.02), percentage correction (derotation) of lumbar apical vertebrae in lumbar supine side-bending films in comparison to standing AP radiographs (A 49%, B 27%, P = 0.002) and thoracic curve flexibility (A 43%, B 25%, P = 0.03). High correlation was noted between postoperative decompensation and derotation of lumbar apical vertebrae in pre-operative lumbar supine side-bending films with a critical value of 40% (Pearson correlation coefficient; P = 0.62, P < 0.001). Ten of 36 patients (28%) with Lenke type 3C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis showed coronal spinal decompensation of more than 2 cm after selective posterior thoracic correction and fusion. Lumbar apical vertebral derotation of less than 40% provided the radiographic prediction of postoperative coronal spinal imbalance. We advise close scrutiny of the transverse plane in the lumbar supine bending film when planning surgical strategy. PMID:17520294

  15. Characteristics of Back Muscle Strength in Patients with Scheduled for Lumbar Fusion Surgery due to Symptomatic Lumbar Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Won Hah; Lee, Chong Suh; Kang, Kyung Chung

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional study. Purpose To evaluate characteristics of back muscle strength in patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery. Overview of Literature Little is known regarding muscle strength in patients with symptomatic lumbar degenerative diseases who require fusion surgery. Methods Consecutive 354 patients scheduled for posterior lumbar interbody fusion due to symptomatic degenerative diseases were approached for participation. 316 patients were enrolled. Before surgery, muscle strength was assessed by measuring maximal isometric extension strength at seven angular positions (0°, 12°, 24°, 36°, 48°, 60°, and 72°) and mean isometric strength was calculated. The Oswestry Disability Index (0-100) and visual analogue scale (0-100) for back pain were recorded. Muscle strength was compared according to gender, age (<60, 60-70, and ?70 years) and scheduled fusion level (short, <3; long, ?3). Results Isometric strength was significantly decreased compared with previously reported results of healthy individuals, particularly at extension positions (0°-48°, p<0.05). Mean isometric strength was significantly lower in females (p<0.001) and older patients (p<0.05). Differences of isometric strength between short and long level fusion were not significantly different (p>0.05). Isometric strengths showed significant, but weak, inverse correlations with age and Oswestry Disability Index (r<0.4, p<0.05). Conclusions In patients with symptomatic lumbar degenerative diseases, back muscle strength significantly decreased, particularly at lumbar extension positions, and in females and older patients. PMID:25346820

  16. [Anesthetic management of posterior lumbar spinal fusion in a patient suspected of having acute exacerbation of chronic interstitial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Mayuko; Takenami, Tamie; Otsuka, Tomohisa; Hayashi, Norito; Yoshino, Kazuhisa; Matsumoto, Shigehiro; Okamoto, Hirotsugu

    2014-02-01

    A patient complicated with interstitial pneumonia required emergency posterior lumbar spinal fusion. The blood gas analysis showed relatively benign values (PaO2 81 torr, PaCO2 44 torr, under room air), but the honeycombing lungs were noted in the bilateral lung fields on CT, and the KL-6 level was high (1,000 U x ml(-1)), for which the acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia was suspected. Sivelestat sodium administration was initiated during the surgery and continued postoperatively. During surgery, setting the FIO2 at 0.34, the P/F ratio and intra-airway pressure could be maintained at 500 and 25 mmHg, respectively. To reduce postoperative respiratory complication, anesthesia was maintained with desflurane, which is dissipated easily, and 0.5% ropivacaine 15 ml was subcutaneously injected to the surgical field at the time of wound closure to reduce the total doses of intraoperative fentanyl and postoperative analgesics. After the completion of surgery, the endotracheal tube was removed with head elevated position, and the patient was transported back to the ward. No acute exacerbation occurred thereafter, and the patient was discharged 67 days after surgery. The prediction of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia is difficult. Moreover, there is no established preventive method, although the mortality is high. Therefore, physicians should be thoroughly informed about the currently available evidence, including developmental factors. PMID:24601111

  17. Intradural lumbar disc herniation after percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Yasuaki; Sakai, Toshinori; Miyagi, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takefumi; Shimakawa, Tateaki; Sairyo, Koichi; Chikawa, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    A 64-year-old man was referred to the authors with low-back pain (LBP) and right leg pain with a history of previously diagnosed lumbar disc herniation (LDH) at L4-5. He had undergone 2 percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomies (PELDs) for the herniation at another institution, and according to the surgical record of the second surgery, a dural tear occurred intraoperatively but was not repaired. Postoperative conservative treatments such as an epidural block and blood patch had not relieved his persistent LBP or right leg pain. Upon referral to the authors, MRI and myelography revealed an intradural LDH. The herniated mass was removed by durotomy, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion was performed. His symptoms were partially improved after surgery. Primary suture is technically difficult when a dural tear occurs during PELD. Therefore, close attention should be paid to avoiding such tears, and surgeons should increase their awareness of intradural LDH as a possible postoperative complication of PELD. PMID:26068274

  18. Retrospective, Demographic, and Clinical Investigation of the Causes of Postoperative Infection in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Who Underwent Posterior Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Yaldiz, Can; Yaldiz, Mahizer; Ceylan, Nehir; Kacira, Ozlem Kitiki; Ceylan, Davut; Kacira, Tibet; Kizilcay, Gokhan; Tanriverdi, Taner

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Owing to the increasing population of elderly patients, a large number of patients with degenerative spondylosis are currently being surgically treated. Although basic measures for decreasing postoperative surgical infections (PSIs) are considered, it still remains among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this retrospective analysis is to present possible causes leading to PSI in patients who underwent surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylosis and highlight how it can be avoided to decrease morbidity and mortality. The study included 540 patients who underwent posterior stabilization due to degenerative lumbar stenosis between January 2013 and January 2014. The data before and after surgery was retrieved from the hospital charts. Patients with degenerative lumbar stenosis who were operated upon in this study had >2 levels of laminectomy and facetectomy. For this reason, posterior stabilization was performed for all the patients included in this study. Determining the causes of postoperative infection (PI) following spinal surgeries performed with instrumentation is a struggle. Seventeen different parameters that may be related to PI were evaluated in this study. The presence of systemic diseases, unknown glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions were among the parameters that increased the prevalence of PI. Alternatively, prolene sutures, double-layered gloves, and the use of rifampicin Sv (RIS) decreased the incidence of PI. Although the presence of systemic diseases, unnoticed glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions increased PIs, prolene suture material, double-layered gloves, and the use of RIS decreased PIs. PMID:26200620

  19. The VariLift® Interbody Fusion System: expandable, standalone interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Emstad, Erik; del Monaco, Diana Cardenas; Fielding, Louis C; Block, Jon E

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral fusion cages have been in clinical use since the 1990s. Cages offer the benefits of bone graft containment, restored intervertebral and foraminal height, and a more repeatable, stable procedure compared to interbody fusion with graft material alone. Due to concerns regarding postoperative stability, loss of lordosis, and subsidence or migration of the implant, interbody cages are commonly used with supplemental fixation such as pedicle screw systems or anterior plates. While providing additional stability, supplemental fixation techniques increase operative time, exposure, cost, and morbidity. The VariLift® Interbody Fusion System (VariLift® system) has been developed as a standalone solution to provide the benefits of intervertebral fusion cages without the requirement of supplemental fixation. The VariLift® system, FDA-cleared for standalone use in both the cervical and lumbar spine, is implanted in a minimal profile and then expanded in situ to provide segmental stability, restored lordosis, and a large graft chamber. Preclinical testing and analyses have found that the VariLift® System is durable, and reduces stresses that may contribute to subsidence and migration of other standalone interbody cages. Fifteen years of clinical development with the VariLift® system have demonstrated positive clinical outcomes, continued patient maintenance of segmental stability and lordosis, and no evidence of implant migration. The purpose of this report is to describe the VariLift® system, including implant characteristics, principles of operation, indications for use, patient selection criteria, surgical technique, postoperative care, preclinical testing, and clinical experience. The VariLift® System represents an improved surgical option for a stable interbody fusion without requiring supplemental fixation. PMID:26060414

  20. Iatrogenic neurologic deficit after lumbar spine surgery: A review.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, George M; Williams, Kim A; Arnold, Paul; Fehlings, Michael; Harrop, James S

    2015-12-01

    Iatrogenic neurologic deficits after lumbar spine surgery are rare complications, but important to recognize and manage. Complications such as radiculopathy, spinal cord compression, motor deficits (i.e. foot drop with L5 radiculopathy), and new onset radiculitis, while uncommon do occur. Attempts at mitigating these complications with the use of neuromonitoring have been successful. Guidance in the literature as to the true rate of iatrogenic neurologic deficit is limited to several case studies and retrospective designed studies describing the management, prevention and treatment of these deficits. The authors review the lumbar spinal surgery literature to examine the incidence of iatrogenic neurologic deficit in the lumbar spinal surgery literature. An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 14th, 2015 from January 1, 2004 through May 14, 2015, using the following MeSH search terms "postoperative complications," then subterms "lumbar vertebrae," treatment outcome," "spinal fusion," and "radiculopathy" were included together with "postoperative complications" in a single search. Postoperative complications including radiculopathy, weakness, and spinal cord compression were included. The definition of iatrogenic neurologic complication was limited to post-operative radiculopathy, motor weakness or new onset pain/radiculitis. An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 14th, 2015 using all of the above terms together yielded 21 results. After careful evaluation, 11 manuscripts were excluded and 10 were carefully reviewed. The most common indications for surgery were degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylosis, scoliosis, and lumbar stenosis. In 2783 patients in 12 total studies, there were 56 patients who had reported a postoperative neurologic deficit for a rate of 5.7. The rates of deficits ranged from 0.46% to 17% in the studies used. The average rate of reported neurologic complications within these papers was 9% (range 0.46-24%). Thirty patients of a total of 731 (4.1%) had a new onset neurologic injury after anterior lumber interbody fusion or lateral lumber interbody fusion. Thirty-seven out of 2052 (1.9%) patients had a neurologic injury after posterior decompression and fusion. Screw malposition was responsible for 11 deficits. Spinal surgery for lumbar degenerative disease carries a low but definite rate of neurologic deficits. Despite the introduction of neuromonitoring, these complications still occur. Interpretation of neurologic injury rates for lumbar surgery is limited by the few prospective and cohort-matched controlled studies. Likewise, most injuries were associated with the placement of instrumentation despite the type of approach. PMID:26386902

  1. Operative treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis with posterior stabilization and ALIF. Cages versus autogenous bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Pankowski, Rafal; Smoczynski, Andrzej; Roclawski, Marek; Ceynowa, Marcin; Kloc, Wojciech; Wasilewski, Wojciech; Jende, Piotr; Liczbik, Wieslaw; Beldzinski, Piotr; Libionka, Witold; Pierzak, Olaf; Adamski, Stanislaw; Niedbala, Miroslaw

    2012-01-01

    In the following study the use of cages and autogenous bone grafts were compared in the operative treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis with the posterior stabilization and Anterior Lumbosacral Interbody Fusion (ALIF). 55 patients were divided into two groups. Autogenous bone grafts were used in the first group (34 patients) and titanium interbody implants (cages) in the second group (21 patients). The mean follow up period in the first group was 8.6 years and 3.4 years in the second group. The radiological outcome was based upon the evaluation of the degree of spondylolisthesis, the angle of the lumbar lordosis, the height of the interbody space and intervertebral foramen and the evaluation of the spinal fusion. The objective clinical outcome assessment was based on Oswestry Disability Index. Subjective clinical evaluation was performed with the use of Visual Analog Pain Score (VAS) and the two questions concerning the evaluation of success of the operative treatment and a possible agreement to the following operation if necessary. The use of autogenous bone grafts alone in ALIF was related to the significant loss of achieved segmental spine anatomy restoration. The implantation of the cages prevented the loss of slippage correction, permanently reconstructed the anatomical conditions in the area of the operated spinal segment. PMID:22744517

  2. Repeated microendoscopic discectomy for recurrent lumbar disk herniation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Tianyong; Zhou, Qiang; Dai, Fei; Luo, Fei; He, Qingyi; Zhang, Jinsong; Xu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the microendoscopic discectomy technique and inclusion criteria for the treatment of recurrent lumbar disc herniation and to supply feasible criteria and technical notes to avoid complications and to increase the therapeutic effect. METHODS: A consecutive series of 25 patients who underwent posterior microendoscopic discectomy for recurrent lumbar disc herniation were included. The inclusion criteria were as follows: no severe pain in the lumbar region, no lumbar instability observed by flexion-extension radiography and no intervertebral discitis or endplate damage observed by magnetic resonance imaging. All patients were diagnosed by clinical manifestations and imaging examinations. RESULTS: Follow-up visits were carried out in all cases. Complications, such as nerve injuries, were not observed. The follow-up outcomes were graded using the MacNab criteria. A grade of excellent was given to 12 patients, good to 12 patients and fair to 1 patient. A grade of excellent or good occurred in 96% of cases. One patient relapsed 3 months after surgery and then underwent lumbar interbody fusion and inner fixation. The numerical rating scale of preoperative leg pain was 7.4± 1.5, whereas it decreased to 2.1±0.8 at 7 days after surgery. The preoperative Oswestry disability index of lumbar function was 57.5±10.0, whereas it was 26.0±8.5 at 7 days after surgery. CONCLUSION: In these cases, microendoscopic discectomy was able to achieve satisfactory clinical results. Furthermore, it has advantages over other methods because of its smaller incision, reduced bleeding and more efficient recovery. PMID:25789521

  3. Global and segmental kinematic changes following sequential resection of posterior osteoligamentous structures in the lumbar spine: An in vitro biomechanical investigation using pure moment testing protocols.

    PubMed

    Chamoli, Uphar; Korkusuz, Mert H; Sabnis, Ashutosh B; Manolescu, Andrei R; Tsafnat, Naomi; Diwan, Ashish D

    2015-11-01

    Lumbar spinal surgeries may compromise the integrity of posterior osteoligamentous structures implicating mechanical stability. Circumstances necessitating a concomitant surgery to achieve restabilisation are not well understood. The main objective of this in vitro study was to quantify global and segmental (index and adjacent levels) kinematic changes in the lumbar spine following sequential resection of the posterior osteoligamentous structures using pure moment testing protocols. Six fresh frozen cadaveric kangaroo lumbar spines (T12-S1) were tested under a bending moment in flexion-extension, bilateral bending, and axial torsion in a 6-degree-of-freedom Kinematic Spine Simulator. Specimens were tested in the following order: intact state (D0), after interspinous and supraspinous ligaments transection between L4 and L5 (D1), further after a total bilateral facetectomy between L4 and L5 (D2). Segmental motions at the cephalad, damaged, and caudal levels were recorded using an infrared-based motion tracking device. Following D1, no significant change in the global range of motion was observed in any of the bending planes. Following D2, a significant increase in the global range of motion from the baseline (D0) was observed in axial torsion (median normalised change +20%). At the damaged level, D2 resulted in a significant increase in the segmental range of motion in flexion-extension (+77%) and axial torsion (+492%). Additionally, a significant decrease in the segmental range of motion in axial torsion (-35%) was observed at the caudal level following D2. These results suggest that a multi-segment lumbar spine acts as a mechanism for transmitting motions, and that a compromised joint may significantly alter motion transfer to adjacent segments. We conclude that the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments play a modest role in restricting global spinal motions within physiologic limits. Following interspinous and supraspinous ligaments transection, a total bilateral facetectomy resulted in a significant increase in axial torsion motion, both at global and damaged levels, accompanied with a compensatory decrease in motion at the caudal level. PMID:26503842

  4. Surgical treatment of low lumbar osteoporotic vertebral collapse: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Uchida, Kenzo; Honjoh, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Takumi; Kitade, Makoto; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Low lumbar osteoporotic vertebral collapse (OVC) has not been well documented compared with OVC of the thoracolumbar spine. The differences between low lumbar and thoracolumbar lesions should be studied to provide better treatment. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical and imaging features as well as outcomes of low lumbar OVC and to discuss the appropriate surgical treatment. METHODS Thirty patients (10 men; 20 women; mean age 79.3 ± 4.7 years [range 70-88 years]) with low lumbar OVC affecting levels below L-3 underwent surgical treatment. The clinical symptoms, morphological features of affected vertebra, sagittal spinopelvic alignment, neurological status before and after surgery, and surgical procedures were reviewed at a mean follow-up period of 2.4 years. RESULTS The main clinical symptom was radicular leg pain. Most patients had old compression fractures at the thoracolumbar level. The affected vertebra was flat-type and concave or H-shaped type, not wedge type as often found in thoracolumbar OVC. There were mismatches between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis on plain radiographs. On CT and MR images, foraminal stenosis was seen in 18 patients (60%) and canal stenosis in 24 patients (80%). Decompression with short fusion using a posterior approach was performed. Augmentations of vertebroplasty, posterolateral fusion, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion were performed based on the presence/absence of local kyphosis of lumbar spine, cleft formation, and/or intervertebral instability. Although the neurological and visual analog scale scores improved postoperatively, 8 patients (26.7%) developed postoperative complications mainly related to instrumentation failure. In patients with postoperative complications, lumbar spine bone mineral density was significantly low, but the spinopelvic alignment showed no correlation when compared with those without complications. CONCLUSIONS The main types of low lumbar OVC were flat-type and concave type, which resulted in neurological symptoms by retropulsed bony fragments generating foraminal stenosis and/or canal stenosis. For patients with low lumbar OVC, decompression of the foraminal and canal stenosis with short fusion surgery via posterior approach can improve neurological symptoms. Since these patients are elderly with poor bone quality and other complications, treatments for both OVC and osteoporosis should be provided to achieve good clinical outcome. PMID:26384132

  5. Sagittal Balance in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: A Radiographic Study of Spinopelvic Compensation After Selective Posterior Fusion of Thoracolumbar/Lumbar (Lenke 5C) Curves.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xi-Ming; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Xiao-Yi; Liu, Zi-Xuan; Wei, Xian-Zhao; Bai, Yu-Shu; Li, Ming

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between spinal sagittal alignment and pelvic parameters is well known in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. However, few studies have reported the sagittal spinopelvic relationship after selective posterior fusion of thoracolumbar/lumbar (TL/L) curves.We evaluated the relationship between spinal sagittal alignment and the pelvis, and analyzed how the pelvic sagittal state is adjusted in Lenke type 5C patients.We conducted a retrospective study of 36 patients with Lenke type 5C curves who received selective posterior TL/L curve fusion. Coronal and spinopelvic sagittal parameters were pre and postoperatively compared. Pearson coefficients were used to analyze the correlation between all spinopelvic sagittal parameters before and after surgery. We also evaluated 3 pelvic morphologies (anteverted, normal, and retroverted) before and after surgery.Preoperatively, the mean pelvic incidence was 46.0°, with a pelvic tilt and sacral slope (SS) of 8.2° and 37.8°, respectively, and 25% (9/36) of patients had an anteverted pelvis, whereas the other 75% had a normal pelvis. Postoperatively, 42% (15/36) of patients had a retroverted pelvis, 53% (19/36) had a normal pelvis, and 2 patients had an anteverted pelvis. Logistic regression analyses yielded 2 factors that were significantly associated with the risk for a postoperative unrecovered anteverted pelvis, including increased lumbar lordosis (LL) (odds ratio [OR] 4.8, P?=?0.029) and increased SS (OR 5.6, P?=?0.018). Four factors were significantly associated with the risk of a postoperative newly anteverted pelvis, including LL at the final follow-up (OR 6.9, P?=?0.009), increased LL (OR 8.9, P?=?0.003), LL below fusion (OR 9.4, P?=?0.002), and increased SS (OR 11.5, P?=?0.001).The pelvic state may be adjusted after selective posterior TL/L curve fusion in Lenke 5C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients. It is difficult to improve an anteverted pelvis in patients who have an LL that is increased by more than 11.6° or an SS that is increased by more than 4.7° after surgery. The anteverted pelvic state will generally occur with posterior correction surgery for patients with an LL that is greater than 63.7°, or an LL or SS that is respectively increased by more than 17.6° or 9.0° postoperatively. PMID:26559289

  6. New possibilities in L2-L5 lumbar arthrodesis using a lateral retroperitoneal approach assisted by laparoscopy: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    de Peretti, F; Hovorka, I; Fabiani, P; Argenson, C

    1996-01-01

    Four patients underwent lumbar interbody fusion, performed via a video-assisted retroperitoneal laparoscopic approach, complementary to posterior osteosynthesis at the L2-L3, L3-L4 and/or L4-L5 level. In three cases the interventions were for lumbar fractures, and in one case for microcristalline arthritis. After surgical training on human cadavers and several porcine operative sessions, retroperitoneal lateral approaches on the left side were performed by the authors without CO2 insufflation, assisted by videoscopy. The fusion process was monitored by fluoroscopy. It is possible to perform this technique cranially above L2 or caudally below L5. Minimal blood loss was observed. Average time for these interventions was 127 min. Interbody fusion was achieved in the first, second and fourth cases; the outcome in the third case at the final check-up, 6 months after operation, was uncertain. The first patient had a complication of ureteral wound, which was certainly caused by insufficient experience with the new technique. The authors hope to extend the application of this technique to other procedures as they become more experienced. PMID:8831128

  7. The Extended Posterior Circumferential Decompression Technique in the Management of Tubercular Spondylitis with and without Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Rathinavelu, Barani; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Amritanand, Rohit; Sundararaj, Gabriel David

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective clinical series. Purpose To study the clinical, functional and radiological results of patients with tuberculous spondylitis with and without paraplegia, treated surgically using the "Extended Posterior Circumferential Decompression (EPCD)" technique. Overview of Literature With the increasing possibility of addressing all three columns by a single approach, posterior and posterolateral approaches are gaining acceptance. A single exposure for cases with neurological deficit and kyphotic deformity requiring circumferential decompression, anterior column reconstruction and posterior instrumentation is helpful. Methods Forty-one patients with dorsal/dorsolumbar/lumbar tubercular spondylitis who were operated using the EPCD approach between 2006 to 2009 were included. Postoperatively, patients were started on nine-month anti-tuberculous treatment. They were serially followed up to thirty-six months and both clinical measures (including pain, neurological status and ambulatory status) and radiological measures (including kyphotic angle correction, loss of correction and healing status) were used for assessment. Results Disease-healing with bony fusion (interbody fusion) was seen in 97.5% of cases. Average deformity (kyphosis) correction was 54.6% in dorsal spine and 207.3% in lumbar spine. Corresponding loss of correction was 3.6 degrees in dorsal spine and 1.9 degrees in the lumbar spine. Neurological recovery in Frankel B and C paraplegia was 85.7% and 62.5%, respectively. Conclusions The EPCD approach permits all the advantages of a single or dual session anterior and posterior surgery, with significant benefits in terms of decreased operative time, reduced hospital stay and better kyphotic angle correction. PMID:25558312

  8. Surgical Management of Pyogenic Discitis of Lumbar Region

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, R; Renjith Kumar, J

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review of patients who had pyogenic discitis and were managed surgically. Purpose To analyze the bacteriology, pathology, management and outcome of pyogenic discitis of the lumbar region treated surgically. Overview of Literature Surgical management of pyogenic discitis is still an infrequently used modality of treatment. Methods A total of 42 patients comprised of 33 males and 9 females who had pyogenic discitis with a mean age of 51.61 years (range, 16-75 years) were included in this study. All the cases were confirmed as having pyogenic discitis by pus culture report and histopathological examination. The mean follow-up period was 41.9 months. Results Debridement and posterior lumbar interbody fusion with autologous iliac bone graft was done in all cases. Thirteen (30.95%) patients had other medical co-morbidities. Five cases had a previous operation of the spine, and three cases had a history of vertebral fracture. Three patients were operated for gynaecological problems, and four cases had a history of urological surgery. L4-5 level was the most frequent site of pyogenic discitis. The most common bacterium isolated was Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Radiologically good fusion was seen in the majority of patients. Conclusions Pyogenic discitis should be suspected in people having pain and local tenderness in the spinal region with a rise in inflammatory parameters in blood. The most common bacterium was S. aureus, but there were still a greater number of patients infected with other types of bacteria. Therefore, antibiotics therapy should be started only after isolating the bacteria and making the culture sensitivity report. PMID:24761200

  9. Spine interbody implants: material selection and modification, functionalization and bioactivation of surfaces to improve osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Rao, Prashanth J; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2014-05-01

    The clinical outcome of lumbar spinal fusion is correlated with achievement of bony fusion. Improving interbody implant bone on-growth and in-growth may enhance fusion, limiting pseudoarthrosis, stress shielding, subsidence and implant failure. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and titanium (Ti) are commonly selected for interbody spacer construction. Although these materials have desirable biocompatibility and mechanical properties, they require further modification to support osseointegration. Reports of extensive research on this topic are available in biomaterial-centric published reports; however, there are few clinical studies concerning surface modification of interbody spinal implants. The current article focuses on surface modifications aimed at fostering osseointegration from a clinician's point of view. Surface modification of Ti by creating rougher surfaces, modifying its surface topography (macro and nano), physical and chemical treatment and creating a porous material with high interconnectivity can improve its osseointegrative potential and bioactivity. Coating the surface with osteoconductive materials like hydroxyapatite (HA) can improve osseointegration. Because PEEK spacers are relatively inert, creating a composite by adding Ti or osteoconductive materials like HA can improve osseointegration. In addition, PEEK may be coated with Ti, effectively bio-activating the coating. PMID:24890288

  10. A novel approach to the lumbar sympathetic chain: lateral access.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Shaun D; Engler, John A; Perin, Noel L

    2013-07-01

    Plantar hyperhydrosis is a disabling condition of excessive, symmetric, focal sweating of the feet with social, psychological, and medical implications. Treatment options include topical agents, iontophoresis, botulinum toxin injection, and surgical disruption of the lumbar sympathetic chain. Surgical corridors include transperitoneal and retroperitoneal approaches. We report our technique with a novel minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal approach commonly used for lateral interbody fusions. The lateral approach for sectioning of the sympathetic chain in the treatment of hyperhydrosis appears safe. The approach may be advantageous for the patient and surgeons familiar with lateral interbody fusion. Further studies may elucidate the long term efficacy and safety of the lateral approach. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/Q82SGpmAXng. PMID:23829842

  11. Anterior column realignment following lateral interbody fusion for sagittal deformity correction.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Luiz; Fortti, Fernanda; Oliveira, Leonardo; Marchi, Luis; Jensen, Rubens; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Amaral, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    Degenerative and iatrogenic diseases may lead to loss of lordosis or even kyphotic thoracolumbar deformity and sagittal misalignment. Traditional surgery with three-column osteotomies is associated with important neurologic risks and postoperative morbidity. In a novel technique, the lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) is complemented with the sacrifice of the anterior longitudinal ligament and anterior portion of the annulus followed by the insertion of a hyperlordotic interbody cage. This is a less invasive lateral technique named anterior column realignment (ACR) and aims to correct sagittal misalignment in adult spinal deformity (ASD), with or without the addition of minor posterior osteotomies. In this article, we provide an account of the evolution to the ACR technique, the literature, and the Brazilian experience in the treatment of adult spinal deformity with this novel advanced application of LTIF. In the presence of ASD, the risk-to-benefit ratio of a surgical correction must be evaluated. Less invasive surgical strategies can be alternatives to treat the deformity and provide better quality of life to the patient. ACR is an advanced application of lateral transpsoas approach, up to date has shown to be reliable and effective when used for ASD, and may minimize complications and morbidity from traditional surgical procedures. Long-term follow-up and comparative studies are needed to evaluate real benefit. PMID:25971442

  12. A 10-year follow-up of transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or intervertebral B-Twin system in failed back surgery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; Lorente, Francisco de Asis; Gomez, Joaquin; Eiras, Jose; Agrawal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: The spine surgeons have been combining anterior and posterolateral fusion (circumferential fusion) as the final solution to treat spinal disorders and many have been using it to treat failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). In present study, we analyzed and compared the clinical and radiological outcomes in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral B-Twin system for FBSS with a follow-up period of 10 years after the surgery. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective case study performed on 55 patients with FBSS. Clinical and radiological changes were compared between the two groups of patients on the basis of improvement of back pain, radicular pain, and work capacity. Outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year from before surgery until 2012. We analyzed the evolution of 55 cases of FBSS those underwent segmental circumferential posterior fusions from June 2001 to February 2003, operated by a single surgeon and followed up during 10 years until February 2012. The patients were divided into 2 groups: In 25 patients, posterolateral fusions with Legacy™ (Medtronic, Inc. NYSE: MDT) screws and intersomatic autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft was performed, and, in 30 patients, posterolateral fusions with the same screws and intersomatic fusion B-Twin (Biomet Spain Orthopaedics, S.L.) system was performed. In all cases, we used posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF)/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) approach for intervertebral graft, and the artrodesis was supplemented at intertransverse level with Autologus Growth Factor (AGF-MBA INCORPORADO, S.A.). The outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year and compared from before surgery to the final follow-up visit. Preoperative and postoperative scores were available for all patients. Results: The average age of these patients was comparable in both groups (mean age 42.6 versus 50.2 years). The average follow-up period was 200.6 months in the first group (screws and intersomatic bone) and 184.4 months in the second group (screws and B-Twin). In the autologus bone graft group, the CT scan and Rx study revealed loss of height of intervertebral space between 25% and 45% of 24 h postoperative height of intervertebral operated disc, and the patients continued to lose the height until 20 months after the surgery. In the B Twin group, the CT scan and Rx study revealed a loss of height of the intervertebral level of 8-12% over a period of 9 months follow-up, followed by stability. A total of 31 patients (55%) had improved Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index >40% of the total possible points, although this did not reflect in PSI or return to work rate. Conclusions: The patients with rigid fixation do well in terms of correction of lumbar lordosis, but they do not do well in terms of recurrence of pain. Furthermore, they need some kind of intervention to control pain after the first year after surgery. In patients in whom bone graft is used, although they do not maintain and sustain the lumbar lordosis in the long term, they have less recurrence of pain with less chances of intervention for pain control. PMID:25972934

  13. Applying hierarchical task analysis to improving the patient positioning for direct lateral interbody fusion in spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Al-Hakim, Latif; Maiping, Tanaphon; Sevdalis, Nick

    2014-07-01

    The present study brings together for the first time the techniques of hierarchical task analysis (HTA), human error identification (HEI), and business process management (BPM) to select practices that can eliminate or reduce potential errors in a surgical setting. We applied the above approaches to the improvement of the patient positioning process for lumbar spine surgery referred to as 'direct lateral interbody fusion' (DLIF). Observations were conducted to gain knowledge on current DLIF positioning practices, and an HTA was constructed. Potential errors associated with the practices specific to DLIF patient positioning were identified. Based on literature review and expert views alternative practices are proposed aimed at improving the DLIF patient positioning process. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to use BPM in association with HEI/HTA for the purpose of improving the performance and safety of a surgical process - with promising results. PMID:24332824

  14. Posterior Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Uy, Harvey Siy; Yu-Keh, Ellen; Chan, Pik Sha

    2016-01-01

    Posterior uveitis is a major cause of ocular morbidity worldwide. Systemic corticosteroids (CS) remain the primary method of treatment for noninfectious posterior uveitis; however, CS are associated with many side effects. Immunomodulatory therapy (IMT) is recommended when inflammatory control is not attained with a tolerable level of systemic CS (<10 mg/day of prednisone). IMT agents are associated with several toxicities and limited benefits in some patients. Locally administered therapies (e.g. intravitreal CS implants) offer the promise of providing therapeutic levels of anti-inflammatory agents while avoiding systemic complications. This chapter will briefly discuss common posterior uveitis entities that are amenable to retinal pharmacotherapy. PMID:26502276

  15. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Akhaddar, Ali; Boulahroud, Omar; Elasri, Abad; Elmostarchid, Brahim; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2010-07-01

    Intraradicular lumbar disc herniation is a rare complication of disc disease that is generally diagnosed only during surgery. The mechanism for herniated disc penetration into the intradural space is not known with certainty, but adhesion between the radicular dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament was suggested as the most important condition. The authors report the first case of an intraradicular lumbar disc herniation without subdural penetration; the disc hernia was lodged between the two radicular dura layers. The patient, a 34-year-old soldier, was admitted with a 12-month history of low back pain and episodic left sciatica. Neurologic examination showed a positive straight leg raising test on the left side without sensory, motor or sphincter disturbances. Spinal CT scan and MRI exploration revealed a left posterolateral osteophyte formation at the L5-S1 level with an irregular large disc herniation, which migrated superiorly. An intradural extension was suspected. A left L5 hemilaminectomy and S1 foraminotomy were performed. The exploration revealed a large fragment of disc material located between the inner and outer layers of the left S1 radicular dura. The mass was extirpated without cerebrospinal fluid outflow. The postoperative course was uneventful. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation should be suspected when a swollen, hard and immobile nerve root is present intraoperatively. PMID:19888608

  16. Is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome a Cause of Post-Operative Syndrome in the Lumbar Spine? - A Case Report -

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Kyun; Shim, Dae Moo; Kim, Yeung Jin; Choi, Deok Hwa

    2009-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) along with post-operative syndrome in the lumbar spine shows confusing and duplicated symptoms, and this makes it difficult to make a clear differential diagnosis. Therefore, the patient with post-operative syndrome in the lumbar spine suffers losses of time and money, and the surgeon who diagnoses and treats post-operative syndrome in the lumbar spine also agonize from the patient's losses. It is necessary to provide these patients with a multidisciplinary approach to their disease and symptoms. We diagnosed herniation of an intervertebral disc of the lumbar spine (L4/5) and we performed discetomy twice in different hospitals. However, the symptoms did not improve, so we re-operated and performed discetomy along with monosegmental fixation using pedicular screws and interbody cages. There was improvement of pre-operation symptoms, but neurogenic symptoms occurred and then progressed after the surgery. Therefore, we report here on the case of CRPS that was diagnosed with the exclusion of the causes of post-operative syndrome in the lumbar spine, and the patient was finally effectively treated with spinal cord stimulation. Although differentiating post-operative syndrome in the lumbar spine from CRPS is difficult, we recommend suspecting CRPS as the cause of post-operative syndrome in the lumbar spine and taking CRPS as the main interest in order to diagnose and treat CRPS more effectively and accurately. PMID:20404955

  17. Is Hydronephrosis a Complication after Anterior Lumbar Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Ruth M.; Behrbalk, Eyal; Mosharraf, Syed; Müller, Roger M.; Boszczyk, Bronek M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Prospective follow-up design. Objective?Ureteral injury is a recognized complication following gynecologic surgery and can result in hydronephrosis. Anterior lumbar surgery includes procedures like anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and total disk replacement (TDR). Anterior approaches to the spine require mobilization of the great vessels and visceral organs. The vascular supply to the ureter arising from the iliac arteries may be compromised during midline retraction of the ureter, which could theoretically lead to ureter ischemia and stricture with subsequent hydronephrosis formation. Methods?Potential candidates with previous ALIF or TDR via anterior retroperitoneal access between January 2008 and March 2012 were chosen from those operated on by a single surgeon in a university hospital setting (n?=?85). Renal ultrasound evaluation of hydronephrosis was performed on all participants. Simple descriptive and inferential statistics were used to generate results. Results?A total of 37 voluntary participants were recruited (23 male, 14 female subjects; average age 51.8 years). The prevalence of hydronephrosis in our population was 0.0% (95% confidence interval 0 to 8.1%). Conclusions?Retraction of the ureter across the midline in ALIF and TDR does not result in an increase in hydronephrosis and appears to be a safe surgical technique. PMID:26682096

  18. Complication with Removal of a Lumbar Spinal Locking Plate

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Brooke; Lenarz, Christopher; Watson, J. Tracy; Alander, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The use of locking plate technology for anterior lumbar spinal fusion has increased stability of the vertebral fusion mass over traditional nonconstrained screw and plate systems. This case report outlines a complication due to the use of this construct. Case. A patient with a history of L2 corpectomy and anterior spinal fusion presented with discitis at the L4/5 level and underwent an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) supplemented with a locking plate placed anterolaterally for stability. Fifteen months after the ALIF procedure, he returned with a hardware infection. He underwent debridement of the infection site and removal of hardware. Results. Once hardware was exposed, removal of the locking plate screws was only successful in one out of four screws using a reverse thread screw removal device. Three of the reverse thread screw removal devices broke in attempt to remove the subsequent screws. A metal cutting drill was then used to break hoop stresses associated with the locking device and the plate was removed. Conclusion. Anterior locking plates add significant stability to an anterior spinal fusion mass. However, removal of this hardware can be complicated by the inherent properties of the design with significant risk of major vascular injury. PMID:25838956

  19. Posterior Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Grumet, Robert C.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Posterior hip pain is a relatively uncommon but increasingly recognized complaint in the orthopaedic community. Patient complaints and presentations are often vague or nonspecific, making diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions difficult. The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy and pathophysiology related to posterior hip pain in the athletic patient population. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature via a MEDLINE search of all relevant articles between 1980 and 2010. Results: Many patients who complain of posterior hip pain actually have pain referred from another part of the body—notably, the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint. Treatment options for posterior hip pain are typically nonoperative; however, surgery is warranted in some cases. Conclusions: Recent advancements in the understanding of hip anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment options have enabled physicians to better diagnosis athletic hip injuries and select patients for appropriate treatment. PMID:23015944

  20. Paraplegia with lumbar artery compression by the diaphragmatic crus.

    PubMed

    Batt, Michel; Rogopoulos, André; Benchimol, Daniel; Chapot, René; Jean-Baptiste, Elixène; Baque, Patrick

    2008-10-01

    The authors report three cases of transient and recurrent paraplegia due to compression of the second right lumbar artery by the diaphragmatic crus. Circumstances of appearance are suggestive when paraplegia occurs in dorsolumbar hyperlordosis and low cardiac output is an associated hemodynamic risk factor. Selective medullary arteriography is indispensable for diagnosis and can demonstrate three signs: an anterior spinal dorsolumbar artery (artery of Adamkiewicz) that does not descend to the conus medullaris; posterior spinal arteries arising from the second lumbar arteries that vascularize the conus medullaris; existence of a tight stenosis on the second right lumbar artery that is aggravated during dynamic maneuvers. Section of the right diaphragmatic crus and release of the second right lumbar artery from the aorta to the fibrous arcade of the psoas permits definitive cure of symptoms. PMID:18586436

  1. Facet joint changes after application of lumbar nonfusion dynamic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects on adjacent-segment pathology after nonfusion dynamic stabilization is unclear, and, in particular, changes at the adjacent facet joints have not been reported in a clinical study. This study aims to compare changes in the adjacent facet joints after lumbar spinal surgery. METHODS Patients who underwent monosegmental surgery at L4-5 with nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system (Dynesys group) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation (fusion group) were retrospectively compared. Facet joint degeneration was evaluated at each segment using the CT grading system. RESULTS The Dynesys group included 15 patients, while the fusion group included 22 patients. The preoperative facet joint degeneration CT grades were not different between the 2 groups. Compared with the preoperative CT grades, 1 side of the facet joints at L3-4 and L4-5 had significantly more degeneration in the Dynesys group. In the fusion group, significant facet joint degeneration developed on both sides at L2-3, L3-4, and L5-S1. The subjective back and leg pain scores were not different between the 2 groups during follow-up, but functional outcome based on the Oswestry Disability Index improved less in the fusion group than in the Dynesys group. CONCLUSIONS Nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system had a greater preventative effect on facet joint degeneration in comparison with that obtained using fusion surgery. The Dynesys system, however, resulted in facet joint degeneration at the instrumented segments and above. An improved physiological nonfusion dynamic stabilization system for lumbar spinal surgery should be developed. PMID:26721580

  2. Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Carolynne M; Forbes, Raeburn B

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture is one of the most commonly performed invasive tests in clinical medicine. Evaluation of an acute headache and investigation of inflammatory or infectious disease of the nervous system are the most common indications. Serious complications are rare, and correct technique will minimise diagnostic error and maximise patient comfort. We review the technique of diagnostic Lumbar Puncture including anatomy, needle selection, needle insertion, measurement of opening pressure, Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) specimen handling and after care. We also make some quality improvement suggestions for those designing services incorporating diagnostic Lumbar Puncture. PMID:25075138

  3. A Clinical Investigation of Contralateral Neurological Symptom after Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF)

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jiayue; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yapeng; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze treatment outcomes and morbidity of contralateral neurological symptom in patients after TLIF surgery and to explore its possible causes. Material/Methods A retrospective study was conducted involving a total of 476 patients who underwent TILF from 2009 to 2012 in our hospital. These cases were divided into a symptomatic group (Group S) and a non-symptomatic group. The differences in contralateral foramen area and disc-height index(DHI) before and after surgery were compared between Group S and a random sample of 40 cases of non-symptomatic group patients (group N). In addition, according to whether the patient underwent second surgery, Group S patients were further divided into a transient neurologic symptoms group (Group T) and an operations exploration group (Group O). The time of symptom appearance, duration, and symptomatic severity (JOA VAS score) were compared between Group T and O. Results Among the 476 patients, 18 had postoperative contralateral neurological symptoms; thus, the morbidity was 3.7815%. The indicators in Group S were lower than in Group N in the differences in contralateral foramen area and disc-height index(DHI) before and after surgery (p<0.05). Five patients (Group O) in Group S had second surgery because of invalid conservative treatment. The surgical exploration rate was 1.0504%. Compared with Group T, the symptoms of Group O patients appeared earlier, persisted longer, and were more serious (p<0.05). Conclusions Contralateral neurological symptom is a potential complication after TLIF, and its causes are diverse. Surgical explorations should be conducted early for those patients with the complication who present with obvious nerve damage. PMID:26109143

  4. Intraoperative posterior capsule flutter in posterior lentiglobus.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Mamidipudi R; Vasavada, Abhay R; Koul, Archana; Ravat, Farida A; Trivedi, Rupal H; Shah, Sajani K; Vasavada, Vaishali A

    2010-08-01

    Posterior capsules of pediatric eyes with lens disorders have complex morphological variations with differing etiologies and visual prognoses. We describe a unique case of intraoperative posterior capsule flutter in an eye of a child undergoing cataract surgery, which we interpret as a possible expression of posterior lentiglobus. PMID:20598928

  5. Clinical comparison of Zero-profile interbody fusion device and anterior cervical plate interbody fusion in treating cervical spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Bin; Nie, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: the aim of the study was to compare the clinical effect of Zero-profile interbody fusion device (Zero-P) with anterior cervical plate interbody fusion system (PCB) in treating cervical spondylosis. Methods: a total of 98 patients with cervical spondylosis (110 segments) in February 2011 to January 2013 were included in our hospital. All participants were randomly divided into observation group and control group with 49 cases in each group. The observation group was treated with Zero-P, while the control group received PCB treatment. Comparison of the two groups in neurological function score (JOA), pain visual analogue scale (VAS), the neck disability index (NDI), quality of life score (SF-36) and cervical curvature (Cobb angle) change were recorded and analyzed before and after treatment. Results: The observation group was found with 90% excellent and good rate, which was higher than that of the control group (80%). Dysphagia rate in observational group was 16.33% (8/49), which was significantly less than that in control group (46.94%). Operation time and bleeding volume in the observation group was less than those in control group. Postoperative improvements of JOA score, VAS score, and NDI in observational group were also significantly better than that in control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: The clinical effect of Zero-P and PCB for the treatment of cervical spondylosis was quite fair, but Zero-P showed a better therapeutic effect with improvement of life quality. PMID:26550337

  6. Effects of interspinous spacers on lumbar degenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, DONG; NONG, LU-MING; DU, RUI; GAO, GONG-MING; JIANG, YU-QING; XU, NAN-WEI

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the early effects of interspinous spacers on lumbar degenerative disease. The clinical outcomes of 23 patients with lumbar degenerative disease, treated using interspinous spacer implantation alone or combined with posterior lumbar fusion, were retrospectively studied and assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Pre-operative and post-operative interspinous distance, disc space height, foraminal width and height and segmental lordosis were determined. The early effects and complications associated with the interspinous spacers were recorded. The surgical procedures performed with the in-space treatment were easy and minimally invasive. The VAS scores and ODI were improved post-operatively compared with pre-operatively. Significant changes in the interspinous distance, disc space height, foraminal width and height and segmental lordosis were noted. In-space treatment for degenerative lumbar disease is easy and safe, with good early effects. The in-space system provides an alternative treatment for lumbar degenerative disease. PMID:23407682

  7. [Topography, relations and transformation of lumbar lymphatic sacs].

    PubMed

    Sharkus, Ye A

    2015-01-01

    The peculiarities of the structure, skeletotopy, and syntopy of the lumbar lymphatic collector were studied on 20 5-8 week-old embryos and on 80 9-36 week-old fetuses using a complex macro-microscopic method. It is found that the lumbar lymphatic collector in fetuses at 9-10 weeks was represented by retroperitoneal and retroaortic lymphatic sacs that had a fusion mode of formation and were interconnected. Retroperitoneal sac was located in the projection of L(I)-L(IV) and was in contact with the anterior surface of the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava, aortic lumbar paraganglia, abdominal aortic plexus and ganglia of sympathetic trunk. Retroaortic sack at L(I)-L(II) was adjacent to posterior surface of the aorta, the lumbar vertebrae and the medial crus of the diaphragm. These topical relations were preserved throughout the whole fetal period. However, in fetuses of 11-13 weeks lymphatic sacs formed the lymphatic plexuses, while in fetuses of 14-36 weeks they formed lumbar lymph nodes and their interconnecting vessels. PMID:25958724

  8. Single transverse-orientation cage via MIS-TLIF approach for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease: a technical note

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Jin; Han, Ying-Chao; Pan, Fu-Min; Ma, Bin; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Single transverse cage placed in the anterior vertebral column can better maintain lumbar lordosis and sagittal alignment and is frequently used via the lateral transpsoas approach. However, there is no clear description in the literature of the steps required to place the single transverse cage during the instrumented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) procedure for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease. The objective of this study is to describe the technique using single transverse-orientation cage when performing TLIF procedures. Materials and methods: We present 18 illustrative cases in which single transverse-orientation cage was placed according to a step-by-step technique that can be used during the TLIF procedure. Information acquired included procedure time, intraoperative blood loss and postoperative complications. The preoperative and postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were recorded. Changes in disc height and segmental lordosis were measured at radiographs. Results: The single transverse-orientation cage was successfully placed in 18 patients in a stepwise technique to achieve lumbar fusion. Using this technique, the patients significantly improved clinically and radiographically at postoperative visits. Conclusions: This is the first report demonstrating the safety and efficacy of instrumented TLIF with single transverse-orientation cage for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease. Single transverse-orientation cage via MIS-TLIF approach can maintain greater lumbar lordosis and avoid the unique complications of lateral transpsoas approach. Understanding the options for cage placement is important for surgeons considering the use of this technique. PMID:26550387

  9. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chad, David A

    2007-05-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis may be congenital or acquired. A classic clinical presentation is described as neurogenic claudication. Physical signs of sensory loss, weakness, and attenuation of reflexes often are mild and limited in distribution. Neuroimaging of the lumbosacral spine with MRI and electrodiagnostic (electromyographic [EMG]) tests are the most informative diagnostic modalities. Conservative management often is successful, but surgical decompression may be indicated in refractory cases. PMID:17445736

  10. Intradural lumbar disc herniations associated with epidural adhesion : report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Han, In-Ho; Kim, Keun-Su; Jin, Byung-Ho

    2009-08-01

    Intradural lumbar disc herniation (ILDH) is rare. In this report, authors present 2 cases of ILDHs associated with severe adhesion between the dural sac and posterior longitudinal ligament. In a 40-year-old man, ILDH occurred in association with epidural adhesion due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). In other 31-year-old man, ILDH occurred in presence of epidural adhesion due to previous spine surgery. PMID:19763222

  11. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: a clinico-radiological study of 74 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Nose, T; Egashira, T; Enomoto, T; Maki, Y

    1987-01-01

    A clinico-radiological analysis of 74 cases of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament is reported. Eighteen cases (24%) were asymptomatic or only had neck or shoulder pain; 16 cases (22%) showed signs of radiculopathy, and the remaining 40 cases (54%) had myelopathy. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament developed most frequently at C5, and was rare in thoracic and lumbar regions. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament led to stenosis of the spinal canal; more marked stenosis caused clinical myelopathy. The data showed that 30% of stenosis caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament was critical for the production of myelopathy. Images PMID:3104541

  12. [Fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine].

    PubMed

    Gonschorek, O; Hauck, S; Weiß, T; Bühren, V

    2015-09-01

    Fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine result from high velocity trauma, assuming bone density is normal. The main location of fractures is the thoracolumbar junction. Most injuries can be treated conservatively; however, patients transferred to hospitals and spine centers represent a preselection with more severe trauma and a higher incidence of operative treatment. There is a large variety of operative techniques that can be used, which can be principally differentiated by the approach: posterior or anterior. Dorsal approaches are differentiated by the instrumentation for spondylodesis as open or percutaneous techniques. Minimally invasive options are favored more and more. For osteoporotic bone, cement augmented solutions may be used. Correct reduction of mainly kyphotic malalignment is crucial for the long-term outcome. Biomechanically stable reconstruction of the anterior spinal column is important mainly for the thoracolumbar junction. PMID:26307631

  13. Single-stage posterior-only approach treating single-segment thoracic tubercular spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiongjie; Liu, Hongzhe; Wang, Guoping; Liu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    There are quite a few controversies on surgical management of single-segment thoracic spinal tuberculosis (STB) with neurological deficits. The present study was to compare single-stage posterior-only transpedicular debridement, interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation (posterior-only surgery) with a combined posterior-anterior surgical approach for treatment of single-segment thoracic STB with neurological deficits and to determinethe clinical feasibility and effectiveness of posterior-only surgical treatment. Sixty patients with single-segment thoracic STB with neurological deficits were treated with one of two surgical procedures in our center from January 2003 to January 2013. Thirty patients were treated with posterior-only surgery (Group A) andthirty were treated with combined posterior-anterior surgery (Group B). The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) score system to evaluate the neurological deficits, thevisual analogue scale (VAS) to assess the degree of pain, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) to judge the activity of tuberculosis (TB), surgery duration, intraoperative blood loss, length of hospitalization, bonyfusion rates, and kyphosis correction of the two groups were compared. The average follow-up period was 36.5 ± 9.2 months for Group A and 34.6 ± 10.2 months for Group B. Under the ASIA score system, all patients improved with treatment. STB was completely cured and grafted bones were fused within 5-11 months in allpatients. There were no persistent or recurrent infections orobvious differences in radiological results between thegroups. The kyphosis deformity was significantly corrected after surgical management. The average operative duration, blood loss, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complication rateof Group A were lower than those of Group B. In conclusions, posterior-only surgery is feasible and effective, resulting in better clinical outcomes than combined posterior-anterior surgeries, especially in surgical time, blood loss, hospital stay, and complications. PMID:26617823

  14. Mimickers of lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Bennett Douglas; Blessinger, Brian Joseph; Darden, Bruce Vaiden; Brigham, Craig D; Kneisl, Jeffrey S; Laxer, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons frequently treat patients who report pain that radiates from the back into the lower extremity. Although the most common etiology is either a herniated disk or spinal stenosis, a myriad of pathologies can mimic the symptoms of radiculopathy, resulting in differences in the clinical presentation and the workup. Therefore, the clinician must be able to distinguish the signs and symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy from pathologies that may have a similar presentation. Being cognizant of these other possible conditions enables the physician to consider a breadth of alternative diagnoses when a patient presents with radiating lower extremity pain. PMID:25538126

  15. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187... Test Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.187 Lumbar spine. (a) The lumbar spine assembly consists of parts shown in drawing 175-5500. For purposes of this test, the lumbar spine is mounted within...

  16. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.187 Lumbar spine. (a) The lumbar spine assembly consists of parts shown in drawing 175-5500. For purposes of this test, the lumbar spine is mounted within...

  17. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.187 Lumbar spine. (a) The lumbar spine assembly consists of parts shown in drawing 175-5500. For purposes of this test, the lumbar spine is mounted within...

  18. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187... Test Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.187 Lumbar spine. (a) The lumbar spine assembly consists of parts shown in drawing 175-5500. For purposes of this test, the lumbar spine is mounted within...

  19. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.187 Lumbar spine. (a) The lumbar spine assembly consists of parts shown in drawing 175-5500. For purposes of this test, the lumbar spine is mounted within...

  20. Cerulean posterior capsule opacity.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Miran; Oetting, Thomas A

    2007-09-01

    We present a case of light-blue posterior capsule opacification (PCO) in a patient who had cerulean cataracts removed 1 year earlier. The color of the PCO was similar to that of the cerulean cataracts prior to extraction. Posterior capsule opacification is a common complication after cataract surgery; however, we could not find a similar case of cerulean posterior capsule opacity in the literature. The findings in this case suggest that the mechanism of the light-blue color formation in the cataract was also present in the lens epithelial cells forming the posterior capsule opacity. PMID:17720089

  1. Posterior pharyngeal wall augmentation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Colleen F; Brigger, Matthew T

    2015-01-01

    Posterior pharyngeal wall augmentation is a useful technique in selected patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency who have a small central velopharyngeal gap. Options for augmenting this region include using posterior pharyngeal wall flaps to create bulk and implanting various materials to fill in the central deficiency. Autologous and nonautologous implant materials are available and may be implanted through an incision or directly injected into the posterior pharyngeal wall. Previously described materials for implantation include cartilage, fat, fascia, silicone, acellular dermis, polytetrafluoroethylene, and calcium hydroxyapatite. Patient evaluation and surgical techniques for posterior pharyngeal wall augmentation are described. PMID:25733235

  2. Early postoperative dislocation of the anterior Maverick lumbar disc prosthesis: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Seex, Kevin A; Eisermann, Lukas G; Claydon, Matthew H; Malham, Gregory M

    2013-08-01

    The authors report on 2 cases of anterior dislocation of the Maverick lumbar disc prosthesis, both occurring in the early postoperative period. These cases developed after experience with more than 50 uneventful cases and were therefore thought to be unrelated to the surgeon's learning curve. No similar complications have been previously reported. The anterior Maverick device has a ball-and-socket design made of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum metal plates covered with hydroxyapatite. The superior and inferior endplates have keels to resist translation forces. The patient in Case 1 was a 52-year-old man with severe L4-5 discogenic pain; and in Case 2, a 42-year-old woman with disabling L4-5 and L5-S1 discogenic back pain. Both patients were without medical comorbidities and were nonsmokers with no risk factors for osteoporosis. Both had undergone uneventful retroperitoneal approaches performed by a vascular access surgeon. Computed tomography studies on postoperative Day 2 confirmed excellent prosthesis placement. Initial recoveries were uneventful. Two weeks postoperatively, after stretching (extension or hyperextension) in bed at home, each patient suffered the sudden onset of severe abdominal pain with anterior dislocation of the Maverick prosthesis. The patients were returned to the operating room and underwent surgery performed by the same spinal and vascular surgeons. Removal of the Maverick prosthesis and anterior interbody fusion with a separate cage and plate were performed. Both patients had recovered well with good clinical and radiological recovery at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Possible causes of the anterior dislocation of the Maverick prosthesis include the following: 1) surgeon error: In both cases the keel cuts were neat, and early postoperative CT confirmed good placement of the prosthesis; 2) equipment problem: The keel cuts may have been too large because the cutters were worn, which led to an inadequate press fit of the implants; 3) prosthesis fault: Both plates of the dislocated implants looked normal and manufacturer analysis reported no fault; 4) patient factors: Both dislocations happened early in the postoperative period, after hyperextension of the spine while the patient was supine in bed. Bracing would not have reduced hyperextension. Dislocation of a lumbar spinal implant represents a life-threatening complication and should therefore be considered and recognized early. Radiographic and CT studies of both the lumbar spine (for prosthesis) and the abdomen (for hematoma) should be performed, as should CT angiography (for vessel damage or occlusion). Any anterior lumbar revision surgery is hazardous, and it is strongly advisable to have a vascular surgeon scrubbed. In cases of dislocation or extrusion of a lumbar interbody prosthesis, the salvage revision strategy is fusing the segment via the same anterior approach. Surgeons should be aware of the risk of anterior dislocation of the Maverick prosthesis. Keel cutters should be regularly checked for sharpness, as they may be implicated in the loosening of implants. Patients and their physical therapists should also avoid lumbar hyperextension in the early postoperative period. PMID:23768025

  3. Ossified Posterior Longitudinal Ligament With Massive Ossification of the Anterior Longitudinal Ligament Causing Dysphagia in a Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Shinichi; Tachibana, Toshiya; Maruo, Keishi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Tsuji, Shotaro; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Descriptive case report. To report a case of a diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) patient with both massive ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament (OALL) leading to severe dysphagia as well as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) causing mild cervical myelopathy, warranting not only an anterior approach but also a posterior one. Although DISH can cause massive OALL in the cervical spine, severe dysphagia resulting from DISH is a rare occurrence. OALLs are frequently associated with OPLL. Treatment for a DISH patient with OPLL in setting of OALL-caused dysphagia is largely unknown. A 70-year-old man presented with severe dysphagia with mild cervical myelopathy. Neurological examination showed mild spastic paralysis and hyper reflex in his lower extremities. Plane radiographs and computed tomography of the cervical spine revealed a discontinuous massive OALL at C4-5 and continuous type OPLL at C2-6. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed pronounced spinal cord compression due to OPLL at C4-5. Esophagram demonstrated extrinsic compression secondary to OALL at C4-5. We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. Severe dysphagia markedly improved without any complications. We considered that this patient not only required osteophytectomy and fusion by the anterior approach but also required decompression and spinal fusion by the posterior approach to prevent both deterioration of cervical myelopathy and recurrence of OALL after surgery. PMID:26266365

  4. Posterior shoulder approach.

    PubMed

    Norwood, L A; Matiko, J A; Terry, G C

    1985-12-01

    A posterior shoulder surgical approach combines the subperiosteal detachment of the deltoid from the scapular spine, described by McWhorter, with a lateral extension to include the lateral deltoid splitting of Codman. The glenohumeral joint is superiorly approached between the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons, or inferiorly between the infraspinatus and teres minor tendons. This approach was used in 42 shoulders with rotator cuff tears or posterior instability without complications of infection, failure of deltoid healing, or compromise of suprascapular or axillary nerves. This combined surgical approach provides excellent exposure of the superior and posterior shoulder, which is difficult to obtain by anterior or superior approaches. This approach may be used for repair of rotator cuff tears, posterior instability, and displaced posterior glenoid fractures. PMID:4064401

  5. Use of autologous growth factors in lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Lowery, G L; Kulkarni, S; Pennisi, A E

    1999-08-01

    The results of spinal fusion, especially posteriorly above the lumbosacral junction, have been mixed. Autologous growth factor concentrate (AGF) prepared by ultraconcentration of platelets contains multiple growth factors having a chemotactic and mitogenic effect on mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts and may play a role in initiating bone healing. The purpose of this retrospective study is to review our results with AGF in lumbar spinal fusions. To date, AGF has been used in 39 patients having lumbar spinal fusion. The study group consisted of the first 19 consecutive cases to allow at least 6 months follow-up. The average follow-up was 13 months (range 6 to 18 months). Follow-up compliance was 91%. There were 7 men and 12 women. Average age was 52 years (range 30-72 years). Nine patients had prior back surgery. There were 8 smokers. AGF was used in posterior (n = 15) or anterior intradiscal (n = 4) fusions. AGF was used with autograft and coraline hydroxyapatite in all posterior fusions, and autograft, coral, and intradiscal spacer (carbon fiber spinal fusion cages or Synthes femoral ring) in intradiscal fusions. Posterior stabilization was used in all cases. Eight cases were single-level fusions, 6 were two-level, and 1 was a three-level fusion. Autologous iliac crest bone graft was taken in 14 cases and local autograft used in 5 cases. Posteriorly, a total of 23 levels were fused; of these, nine were at L5-S1, eight at L4-L5, five at L3-L4, and one at L2-L3. No impending pseudoarthroses were noted on plain radiographic examination at last follow-up visit. Solid fusion was confirmed in 3 patients having routine hardware removal, and in 2 patients who had surgery at an adjacent level. There was one posterior wound infection, which was managed without sequelae. When used as an adjunct to autograft, AGF offers theoretical advantages that need to be examined in controlled studies. Further study is necessary to determine whether coralline hydroxyapatite used as a bone graft extender in lumbar spinal fusion may help to obviate the need for secondary site graft harvesting. PMID:10458274

  6. Pars Stress Fracture (Lumbar Spondylolysis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... his or her sport. Studies Show: 30% of adolescents involved in sports will have an episode of low back pain Pars stress fracture, also called lumbar spondylolysis, is one of the causes of low back pain in this age group ...

  7. A new pathological classification of lumbar disc protrusion and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin-long

    2015-02-01

    Lumbar disc protrusion is common. Its clinical manifestations and treatments are closely related to the pathological changes; however, the pathological classification of lumbar disc protrusion is controversial. This article introduces a new pathological classification comprising four types of lumbar disc protrusion according to intraoperative findings. The damage-herniation type is probably caused by injury and is characterized by soft herniation, the capsule can easily be cut and the broken disc tissue blocks overflow or is easily removed. The broken disc substances should be completely removed; satisfactory results can be achieved by minimally invasive endoscopic surgery. The degeneration-protrusion type is characterized by hard and tough protrusions and the pathological process by degeneration and proliferative reaction. The nerve should be decompressed and relaxed with minimally invasive removal of the posterior wall; the bulged or protruded disc often need not be excised. The posterior vertebral osteochondrosis with disc protrusion type is characterized by deformity of the posterior vertebral body, osteochondral nodules and intervertebral disc protrusion. The herniated and fragmented disc tissue should be removed with partially protruding osteochondral nodules. Intervertebral disc cyst is of uncertain pathogenesis and is characterized by a cyst that communicates with the disc. Resection of the cyst under microscopic or endoscopic control can achieve good results; and whether the affected disc needs to be simultaneously resected is controversial. The new pathological classification proposed here is will aid better understanding of pathological changes and pathogenesis of lumbar disc protrusion and provides a reference for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25708029

  8. Posterior polar cataracts: a predisposition to intraoperative posterior capsular rupture.

    PubMed

    Osher, R H; Yu, B C; Koch, D D

    1990-03-01

    We performed phacoemulsification or planned extracapsular cataract extraction on posterior polar cataracts in 31 eyes of 22 patients and experienced eight cases of posterior capsular rupture (26%). Capsular rupture occurred during removal of the posterior polar opacity or during cleaning of the posterior capsule after the opacity had been removed. We believe that excessive adherence of the opacity to the posterior capsule and unusual thinness of the capsule predisposed these eyes to posterior capsular rupture. PMID:2329471

  9. [Computerized tomography findings following successful lumbar intervertebral disk surgery].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, E; Reiniger, U; Ratzka, M

    1987-12-01

    Computed tomography findings were studied after successful lumbar disk surgery. All patients were asymptomatic after the operation thus presenting morphological changes that probably correspond to regular postoperative conditions. Small seromas in the area of surgery are well-known "normal" findings and have no pathological significance. Dorsal bulging at the level of the intervertebral disc operated upon has not yet been studied systematically. This protrusion that can even exceed the preoperative amount of bulging is due to swelling and folding of the posterior longitudinal ligament. In our patients it disappeared spontaneously within a few months and it should not be confused with real recurrent or residual disc herniation. PMID:3436123

  10. Intraspinal arachnoiditis and hydrocephalus after lumbar myelography using methylglucamine iocarmate.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, T S; Hein, O

    1978-01-01

    A 35 year old woman developed a severe meningeal reaction after lumbar myelography using the water-soluble contrast medium methylglucamine iocarmate. Three months after myelography the findings were a transverse spinal cord syndrome corresponding to the middle thoracic segments resulting from well developed leptomeningeal adhesions. This was combined with a noncommunicating hydrocephalus, probably the result of leptomeningeal fibrosis in the posterior fossa. After treatment with a ventriculoatrial shunt the patient is almost free of symptoms. A possible pathogenetic relationship between the contrast medium, the chronic leptomeningeal changes, and the symptoms of our patient is discussed on the basis of the literature. Images PMID:305466

  11. Surgical Management for Thoracic Spinal Tuberculosis Posterior Only versus Anterior Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Weiye; Xiong, Guangzhong; Wang, Bing; Dai, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A comparable retrospective study. Object To compare the clinical outcomes of surgical treatment by posterior only and anterior video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic spinal tuberculosis (TSTB). Method 145 patients with TSTB treated by two different surgical procedures in our institution from June 2001 to June 2014 were studied. All cases were retrospectively analyzed and divided into two groups according to the given treatments: 75 cases (32F/43M) in group A performed single-stage posterior debridement, transforaminal thoracic interbody fusion and instrumentation, and 70 cases (30F/40M) in group B underwent anterior video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Clinical and radiographic results in the two groups were analyzed and compared. Results Patients in group A and B were followed up for an average of 4.6±1.8, 4.4±1.2 years, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between groups in terms of the operation time, blood loss, bony fusion, neurological recovery and the correction angle of kyphotic deformity (P>0.05). Fewer pulmonary complications were observed in group A. Good clinical outcomes were achieved in both groups. Conclusions Both the anterior VATS and posterior approaches can effectively treat thoracic tuberculosis. Nevertheless, the posterior approach procedure obtained less morbidity and complications than the other. PMID:25781165

  12. Recurrent lumbar disc herniation: A prospective comparative study of three surgical management procedures

    PubMed Central

    El Shazly, Ayman A.; El Wardany, Mohammed A.; Morsi, Ahmad M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: The optimal surgical treatment of recurrent lumbar disc herniation is controversial. Aim: To compare prospectively the clinical outcomes of surgical treatment of recurrent lumbar disc herniation by three different methods; discectomy alone, discectomy with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), and diecectomy with posterolateral fusion (PLF), regardless of the postoperative radiological findings. Study Design: This is a prospective, randomized, comparative study. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective, randomized, comparative study on 45 patients with first time recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Patients were evaluated clinically by using the criteria of the Japanese Orthopedic Association's evaluation system for low back pain syndrome (JOA score). The patients were classified into three groups: Group A; patients who had revision discectomy alone, group B; patients who had revision discectomy with TLIF, and group C; patients who had revision discectomy with PLF. The mean follow-up period was 37 (±7.85 STD) months. Results: The mean overall recovery rate was 87.2% (±19.26 STD) and the satisfactory rate was 88.9%. Comparison between the three groups showed no significant difference with regard to the mean total postoperative JOA score, recovery rate, and satisfactory rate. However, the postoperative low back pain was significantly higher in group A than that of group B and C. Two patients in group A required further revision surgery. The incidences of dural tear and postoperative neurological deficit were higher in group A. The intraoperative blood loss and length of operation were significantly less in group A. The total cost of the procedure was significantly different between the three groups, being least in group A and highest in group B. There was no significant difference between the three groups with regard to the length of postoperative hospital stay. Conclusion: Revision discectomy is effective in patients with recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Fusion with revision discectomy improves the postoperative low back pain, decreases the intraoperative risk of dural tear or neural damage and decreases the postoperative incidence of mechanical instability or re-recurrence. TLIF and PLF have comparable results when used with revision discectomy, but PLF has significantly less total cost than TLIF. PMID:24403956

  13. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore; Tarantino, Umberto; Nano, Giovanni; Iundusi, Riccardo; Fiori, Roberto Da Ros, Valerio Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  14. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Genevay, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is most commonly due to degenerative changes in older individuals. LSS is being more commonly diagnosed and may relate to better access to advanced imaging and to an aging population. This review focuses on radicular symptoms related to degenerative central and lateral stenosis and updates knowledge of LSS pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. Since patients with anatomic LSS can range from asymptomatic to severely disabled, the clinical diagnosis focuses on symptoms and examination findings associated with LSS. Imaging findings are helpful for patients with persistent, bothersome symptoms in whom invasive treatments are being considered. There is limited information from high quality studies about the relative benefits and harms of commonly used treatments. Interpreting and comparing results of available research is limited by a lack of consensus about the definition of LSS. Nevertheless, evidence supports decompressive laminectomy for patients with persistent and bothersome symptoms. Recommendations favor a shared decision making approach due to important trade-offs between alternative therapies and differences among patients in their preferences and values. PMID:20227646

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Medical Tests & Exams > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine Print A A ...

  16. The cause of 2S Diapason screw breakage after internal lumbar fixation: studies of the mechanical and material properties of the implant.

    PubMed

    Kolasa, P; Grabarczyk, J; Depczyk, T

    2002-08-30

    In the years 1994-99, unstable fractures of the lumbar spine were surgically treated with interbody fixation in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Nicholas Copernicus Voivodeship Specialized Hospital in ?ód?, using stabilizers manufactured by various companies. Complications in the form of stabilizer breakage were observed in 1 case out of 22. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the reason why the Stryker 2S Diapason screws broke. Tests performed to measure the material and mechanical properties of the implant did not show any signs of material fatigue, nor were any material defects discovered. However, a scanning microscope investigation confirmed the hypothesis that the material had crumbled due to overload. This discovery led to the decision that screws would be mounted in the bodies of the vertebrae in a manner decreasing implant load. PMID:17679886

  17. Pedicle-Screw-Based Dynamic Systems and Degenerative Lumbar Diseases: Biomechanical and Clinical Experiences of Dynamic Fusion with Isobar TTL

    PubMed Central

    Barrey, Cédric; Perrin, Gilles; Champain, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic systems in the lumbar spine are believed to reduce main fusion drawbacks such as pseudarthrosis, bone rarefaction, and mechanical failure. Compared to fusion achieved with rigid constructs, biomechanical studies underlined some advantages of dynamic instrumentation including increased load sharing between the instrumentation and interbody bone graft and stresses reduction at bone-to-screw interface. These advantages may result in increased fusion rates, limitation of bone rarefaction, and reduction of mechanical complications with the ultimate objective to reduce reoperations rates. However published clinical evidence for dynamic systems remains limited. In addition to providing biomechanical evaluation of a pedicle-screw-based dynamic system, the present study offers a long-term (average 10.2 years) insight view of the clinical outcomes of 18 patients treated by fusion with dynamic systems for degenerative lumbar spine diseases. The findings outline significant and stable symptoms relief, absence of implant-related complications, no revision surgery, and few adjacent segment degenerative changes. In spite of sample limitations, this is the first long-term report of outcomes of dynamic fusion that opens an interesting perspective for clinical outcomes of dynamic systems that need to be explored at larger scale. PMID:25031874

  18. Spontaneous healing of retroperitoneal chylous leakage following anterior lumbar spinal surgery: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Su, I-Chang; Chen, Chang-Mu

    2007-12-01

    Cisterna chyli is prone to injury in any retroperitoneal surgery. However, retroperitoneal chylous leakage is a rare complication after anterior spinal surgery. To the best of our knowledge, only ten cases have been reported in the English literature. We present a case of a 49-year-old man who had lumbar metastasis and associated radiculopathy. He had transient retroperitoneal chylous leakage after anterior tumor decompression, interbody bony fusion, and instrumental fixation from L2 to L4. The leakage stopped spontaneously after we temporarily clamped the drain tube. Intraperitoneal ascites accumulation developed thereafter due to nutritional loss and impaired hepatic reserves. We gathered ten reported cases of chylous leak after anterior thoracolumbar or lumbar spinal surgery, and categorized all these cases into two groups, depending on the integrity of diaphragm. Six patients received anterior spinal surgery without diaphragm splitting. Postoperative chylous leak stopped after conservative treatment. Another five cases received diaphragm splitting in the interim of anterior spinal surgery. Chylous leakage stopped spontaneously in four patients. The remaining one had a chylothorax secondary to postop chyloretroperitoneum. It was resolved only after surgical intervention. In view of these cases, all the chylous leakage could be spontaneously closed without complications, except for one who had a secondary chylothorax and required thoracic duct ligation and chemopleurodesis. We conclude that intraoperative diaphragm splitting or incision does not increase the risk of secondary chylothorax if it was closed tightly at the end of the surgery and the chest tube drainage properly done. PMID:17273839

  19. Changes in Neuroforaminal Height with 2 Level Axial Presacral Lumbar Interbody Fusion at L4-S1

    PubMed Central

    Marawar, Satyajit; Jung, Jin; Sun, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective was to examine the changes in neuroforaminal height at L4-L5 and L5-S1 after insertion and graduated foraminal distraction using the 2 level transsacral implant in a cadaveric model. Methods Discectomy and transsacral instrumentation was performed in six fresh human cadavers at L4-S1. The neuroforaminal height was measured at L4-L5 and L5-S1 before and after insertion of the implant and then at each stage of manual distraction. Results Mean L4-5 neuroforaminal height increased from 18.2 ± 3.1mm to 20.3± 2.9mm (11%) on the left and from 18.8±2.8mm to 20.6± 2.3mm (12%) on the right (P<0.05). Mean L5-S1 neuroforaminal height increased from 15.7±3.0mm to 18.4 ±2.8mm (17%) on the left and from 15.6 ±2.1mm to 18.3 ±1.8mm (17%) on the right (P<0.05). When the neuroforaminal height was plotted against amount of rotation of the screw driver it was found that the neuroforaminal height at L5-S1 increased by 1mm on average for every complete revolution of the screw driver. At least 2 full rotations of the screw driver were achieved in all cadavers. Conclusions The transsacral screw construct distracted the disc space and neuroforaminal height in a cadaveric spine model without soft tissue envelope. During the initial process, manual control of disc space distraction predictably correlated with the increase in the neuroforaminal height to a maximum. However, further research is needed to look at variables affecting disc space pliability, implant subsidence, in vivo application, and clinical benefit of this procedure. PMID:25694937

  20. Measuring lumbar motion in industry, utilizing the lumbar motion monitor 

    E-print Network

    Bryan, Rex Wade

    1999-01-01

    measure and document the E3-dimensional trunk motions of high frequency MMH jobs in industry using the Lumbar Motion Monitor (LMM) from Chattanooga Group, loc. Five jobs were analyzed with five different workers in each job. The range of motion observed...

  1. The Effects on the Pain Index and Lumbar Flexibility of Obese Patients with Low Back Pain after PNF Scapular and PNF Pelvic Patterns.

    PubMed

    Park, KwangYong; Seo, KyoChul

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercises using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) scapular and pelvic patterns might decrease the pain index and increase the lumbar flexibility of obese patients with low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty obese patients with low back pain were randomly assigned to an experimetal group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). The exercise program of the experimental group consisted of scapular patterns (anterior depression - posterior elevation) and pelvic patterns (anterior elevation - posterior depression). The control group performed neutral back muscle strengthening exercises. Over the course of four weeks, the groups participated in PNF or performed strengthening exercises for 30 minutes, three times per week. Subjects were assessed a pre-test and post-test using measurements of pain and lumbar flexibility. [Results] The results show that lumbar flexion and lumbar extension significantly improved in the experimental group, had significant improvement and that the Oswestry Disability index (ODI) significantly decreased. However, there were no significant changes in the control group. The experimental group also showed significant differences in the pain index and lumbar flexibility from the control group. [Conclusion] This study showed that PNF can be used to improve pain index rating and lumbar flexibility. The findings indicate that the experimental group experienced greater improvement than the control group by participating in the PNF lumbar stabilization program. PMID:25364115

  2. Incidental Dural Tears During Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Retrospective Case Study of 84 Degenerative Lumbar Spine Patients

    PubMed Central

    Anekstein, Yoram; Mirovsky, Yigal

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective case study. Purpose To retrospectively review all incidental dural tears (DTs) that occurred at a single institution, classify them anatomically and evaluate the clinical significance of each subgroup. Overview of Literature Dural tears are considered the most commonly encountered complication during lumbar spine surgery. In contrast to the high frequency of DTs, reports on the characteristic location and mechanism are sparse. Methods We retrospectively retrieved all cases of degenerative lumbar spine surgery performed over a 9-year period and classified all identified DTs according to two independent planes. The coronal plane was divided into lower, middle and upper surgical fields, and the sagittal plane into posterior, lateral and ventral occurring tears. Demographic and clinical variables were retrieved and analyzed to search for significant associations. Results From 2003 to 2011, 1,235 cases of degenerative lumbar spine conditions were treated surgically at our institution. In 84 operations (6.8%), an incidental DT was either identified intraoperatively or suspected retrospectively. The most commonly involved location was the lower surgical field (n=39, 46.4%; p=0.002), followed equally by the middle and upper fields (n=16, 19%). In the sagittal plane, the most commonly involved locations were those in close proximity to the nerve root (n=35, 41.6%), followed by the dorsal aspect of the dural sac (n=24, 28.6%). None of the variables recorded was found to be associated with a particular location. Conclusions In our series, incidental DTs were found to occur most commonly in the lower surgical field. We hypothesize that local anatomic feature, such as the lordotic and broadening lumbar dura, may play a role in the observed DT tendency to occur in the lower surgical field. In light of the high frequency and potentially substantial resulting morbidity of incidental DTs, a better characterization of its location and mechanism may optimize both prevention and management. PMID:25346817

  3. Perioperative outcomes in minimally invasive lumbar spine surgery: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Belton, Patrick; Zarzour, Hekmat; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare minimally invasive (MIS) and open techniques for MIS lumbar laminectomy, direct lateral and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) surgeries with respect to length of surgery, estimated blood loss (EBL), neurologic complications, perioperative transfusion, postoperative pain, postoperative narcotic use, and length of stay (LOS). METHODS: A systematic review of previously published studies accessible through PubMed was performed. Only articles in English journals or published with English language translations were included. Level of evidence of the selected articles was assessed. Statistical data was calculated with analysis of variance with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. RESULTS: A total of 11 pertinent laminectomy studies, 20 direct lateral studies, and 27 TLIF studies were found. For laminectomy, MIS techniques resulted in a significantly longer length of surgery (177.5 min vs 129.0 min, P = 0.04), shorter LOS (4.3 d vs 5.3 d, P = 0.01) and less perioperative pain (visual analog scale: 16 ± 17 vs 34 ± 31, P = 0.04). There is evidence of decreased narcotic use for MIS patients (postoperative intravenous morphine use: 9.3 mg vs 42.8 mg), however this difference is of unknown significance. Direct lateral approaches have insufficient comparative data to establish relative perioperative outcomes. MIS TLIF had superior EBL (352 mL vs 580 mL, P < 0.0001) and LOS (7.7 d vs 10.4 d, P < 0.0001) and limited data to suggest lower perioperative pain. CONCLUSION: Based on perioperative outcomes data, MIS approach is superior to open approach for TLIF. For laminectomy, MIS and open approaches can be chosen based on surgeon preference. For lateral approaches, there is insufficient evidence to find non-inferior perioperative outcomes at this time. PMID:26716097

  4. Postoperative discitis following single-level lumbar discectomy: Our experience of 17 cases

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Saumyajit; Ghosh, Jay Deep; Malik, Farid H; Tikoo, Agnivesh

    2012-01-01

    Background: The established protocols of treatment of postoperative lumbar discitis have not been validated till date. We report a retrospective analysis of a series of patients with discitis following single level lumbar discectomy. We analyzed the outcome of conservative treatment of postoperative discitis with the objective to define when and what surgery was required when the conservative treatment failed. Materials and Methods: A total of 17 cases of postoperative discitis treated from 2002 to 2009 were followed up and evaluated clinically, radiologically and by laboratory investigations. All the patients were treated initially conservatively with rest and antibiotic therapy after diagnosis and those who did not respond to conservative treatment of at least 4 weeks were treated surgically. The cases were followed up with serial C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), X-ray, computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for at least 1 year. Results: The mean followup was 40.38 months (range 12-86 months). Four cases failed to respond to conservative therapy and were treated surgically. In three of these four cases, open debridement, transpedicular fixation and posterolateral fusion was performed, and in the fourth case percutaneous transpedicular fixation was done. In the former group, one case was diagnosed to be tubercular, in another case Staphylococcus aureus was cultured where as the third case culture was sterile. All operated patients showed evidence of interbody fusion at 1 year followup. Conclusions: Early detection and aggressive treatment are paramount in managing postoperative discitis and the majority do well with conservative treatment. Surgical management in the form of transpedicular fixation and debridement, when required, gives excellent results. PMID:22912518

  5. Lumbar discography: an update.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark W

    2004-01-01

    Discogenic pain most commonly affects the low back, buttocks, and hips and is thought to be a byproduct of internal disk degeneration. It is postulated that progressive annular breakdown and tearing results in biomechanical and/or biochemical stimulation of the pain fibers that reside in the outer one third of the annulus. Although multiple imaging modalities, most notably MRI, can show morphologic abnormalities of the spine, discography remains the only test that provides physiologic information regarding what role a given intervertebral disk plays in a patient's symptom complex. The controversy surrounding discography is here to stay until more definitive, well-designed studies are performed. In the meantime, there are certain things that can help the discographer maximize the accuracy of the test: 1. Always try to inject one "normal" disk as a "control level." 2. Be alert for factors that are associated with an increased false-positive rate (abnormal non-anatomic pain maps, a history of chronic pain of spinal or nonspinal origin, abnormal psychometric testing, and prior surgery at the injected disk level). In these cases, special attention should be directed to both the patient's verbal and nonverbal cues during disk injection. 3. Do not give any audible clues as to what level is being injected or when the injection is starting or finishing. In this regard, we find it very helpful to have one of our personnel talk with the patient during this portion of the procedure while closely observing the patient for any nonverbal cues regarding their pain response. This distraction is preferable to a silent room where the patient is intensely focused on what is going on with the injections. We also find that music playing during the procedure helps to relax and often distract the patient as well. 4. If the results are equivocal at a level (i.e., you are unable to determine whether or not the patient's pain response was truly concordant), go on to inject another disk level and then come back to reinject more contrast into the disk in question. As radiologists, we tend to focus on the technical aspects of a procedure and the anatomic/morphologic information it provides. However, it cannot be emphasized enough that when performing lumbar discography, the assessment of the patient's pain response during the injection is the most important component of the procedure, and requires not only technical skills, but an understanding of how best to avoid some of the pitfalls that can lead to inaccurate results. PMID:14976837

  6. Chylothorax following anterior thoraco-lumbar spine exposure. A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mora de Sambricio, A; Garrido Stratenwerth, E

    2015-01-01

    Pleural effusion is a possible complication of the thoraco-abdominal approach to the spine. It is more commonly a reactive effusion, but it also may be caused by hemothorax, empyema or, less commonly, a chylothorax. The case of a chylothorax is reported as a late onset complication of a double anterior and posterior instrumented fusion of the lumbar spine. Its management and clinical outcome, and a review of the literature is presented. PMID:24794096

  7. Activity of thoracic and lumbar epaxial extensors during postural responses in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, J. M.; Fung, J.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the role of trunk extensor muscles in the thoracic and lumbar regions during postural adjustments in the freely standing cat. The epaxial extensor muscles participate in the rapid postural responses evoked by horizontal translation of the support surface. The muscles segregate into two regional groups separated by a short transition zone, according to the spatial pattern of the electromyographic (EMG) responses. The upper thoracic muscles (T5-9) respond best to posteriorly directed translations, whereas the lumbar muscles (T13 to L7) respond best to anterior translations. The transition group muscles (T10-12) respond to almost all translations. Muscles group according to vertebral level rather than muscle species. The upper thoracic muscles change little in their response with changes in stance distance (fore-hindpaw separation) and may act to stabilize the intervertebral angles of the thoracic curvature. Activity in the lumbar muscles increases along with upward rotation of the pelvis (iliac crest) as stance distance decreases. Lumbar muscles appear to stabilize the pelvis with respect to the lumbar vertebrae (L7-sacral joint). The transition zone muscles display a change in spatial tuning with stance distance, responding to many directions of translation at short distances and focusing to respond best to contralateral translations at the long stance distance.

  8. Lumbar spine disc heights and curvature: upright posture vs. supine compression harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Shi-Uk; Hargens, Alan R.; Fredericson, Michael; Lang, Philipp K.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spinal lengthening in microgravity is thought to cause back pain in astronauts. A spinal compression harness can compress the spine to eliminate lengthening but the loading condition with harness is different than physiologic conditions. Our purpose was to compare the effect of spine compression with a harness in supine position on disk height and spinal curvature in the lumbar spine to that of upright position as measured using a vertically open magnetic resonance imaging system. METHODS: Fifteen healthy subjects volunteered. On day 1, each subject lay supine for an hour and a baseline scan of the lumbar spine was performed. After applying a load of fifty percent of body weight with the harness for thirty minutes, the lumbar spine was scanned again. On day 2, after a baseline scan, a follow up scan was performed after kneeling for thirty minutes within the gap between two vertically oriented magnetic coils. Anterior and posterior disk heights, posterior disk bulging, and spinal curvature were measured from the baseline and follow up scans. RESULTS: Anterior disk heights increased and posterior disk heights decreased compared with baseline scans both after spinal compression with harness and upright posture. The spinal curvature increased by both loading conditions of the spine. DISCUSSION: The spinal compression with specially designed harness has the same effect as the physiologic loading of the spine in the kneeling upright position. The harness shows some promise as a tool to increase the diagnostic capabilities of a conventional MR system.

  9. Symptomatic lumbar disc protrusion causing progressive myelopathy in a low-lying cord.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Shreya; Shetty, Rohit; Collins, Iona

    2012-06-01

    Low-lying cord is an uncommon entity, and cord compression due lumbar disc disease is rarely encountered. We discuss our experience with a case of lumbar cord compression secondary to a large disc protrusion, which caused myelopathy in a low-lying/tethered cord. A 77-year-old woman with known spina bifida occulta presented with 6-week history of severe low back pain and progressive paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a low-lying tethered cord and a large disc prolapse at L2/3 causing cord compression with associated syringomyelia. Medical comorbidities precluded her from anterior decompression, and therefore a posterior decompression was performed. She recovered full motor power in her lower limbs and could eventually walk unaided. She had a deep wound infection, which was successfully treated with debridement, negative pressure therapy (vacuum-assisted closure pump), and antibiotics. Six months after surgery, her Oswestry Disability Index improved from 55% preoperatively to 20%. Posterior spinal cord decompression for this condition has been successful in our case, and we believe that the lumbar lordosis may have helped indirectly decompress the spinal cord by posterior decompression alone. PMID:24353956

  10. Management of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon; Tomkins-Lane, Christy

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200?000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality. PMID:26727925

  11. Effect of Lumbar Stabilization and Dynamic Lumbar Strengthening Exercises in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hye Jin; Kim, Dae Ha; Kim, Ha Jeong; Cho, Young Ki; Lee, Kwang Hee; Kim, Jung Hoo; Choi, Yoo Jung

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises and lumbar dynamic strengthening exercises on the maximal isometric strength of the lumbar extensors, pain severity and functional disability in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Methods Patients suffering nonspecific LBP for more than 3 months were included prospectively and randomized into lumbar stabilization exercise group (n=11) or lumbar dynamic strengthening exercise group (n=10). Exercises were performed for 1 hour, twice weekly, for 8 weeks. The strength of the lumbar extensors was measured at various angles ranging from 0° to 72° at intervals of 12°, using a MedX. The visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (ODQ) were used to measure the severity of LBP and functional disability before and after the exercise. Results Compared with the baseline, lumbar extension strength at all angles improved significantly in both groups after 8 weeks. The improvements were significantly greater in the lumbar stabilization exercise group at 0° and 12° of lumbar flexion. VAS decreased significantly after treatment; however, the changes were not significantly different between the groups. ODQ scores improved significantly in the stabilization exercise group only. Conclusion Both lumbar stabilization and dynamic strengthening exercise strengthened the lumbar extensors and reduced LBP. However, the lumbar stabilization exercise was more effective in lumbar extensor strengthening and functional improvement in patients with nonspecific chronic LBP. PMID:23525973

  12. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury

    MedlinePLUS

    Cruciate ligament injury - posterior; PCL injury; Knee injury - posterior cruciate ligament (PCL); Hyperextended knee ... signs of PCL injury. This includes moving the knee joint in various ways. Your doctor may also ...

  13. The effect of anterior-posterior shear on the wear of Charité TDR

    PubMed Central

    Vicars, R; Prokopovich, P; Brown, T D; Tipper, JL; Ingham, E; Fisher, J; Hall, RM

    2011-01-01

    Study Design An in-vitro study of the wear rates of the Charité lumbar total disc replacement. Objective To investigate the effect of anterior-posterior shear on the in-vitro wear rates of the Charité lumbar total disc replacement. Summary of Background Data Current standards prescribe only 4 degree of freedom (DOF) inputs for evaluating the in-vitro wear of total disc replacements, despite the functional spinal unit incorporating 6DOF. Anterior-posterior shear has been highlighted as a significant load, particularly in the lumbar spine. A previous study investigated the effect of an anterior-posterior shear on the ProDisc-L, finding that wear rates were not significantly different from 4DOF wear tests. Methods 6 Charité lumbar discs were mounted in a 5 active DOF spine wear simulator and tested under 4DOF (ISO18192) conditions. 6 further Charité lumbar discs were tested under 5DOF conditions, consisting of 4DOF conditions plus an anterior-posterior shear displacement of +2/-1.5mm. The displacement was decreased and then increased by a factor of 2, to investigate the effect of the magnitude of displacement. µCT scans were taken of the discs before and after wear testing, and the height loss of the discs calculated. These were compared to the same measurements taken from explanted Charite discs, µCT scanned at another institution. Results 4DOF wear rates (12.2±1.0mg/MC) were not significantly different from 4DOF tests on the ProDisc-L. Wear rates were significantly increased (p<0.01) for ‘standard’ 5DOF conditions (22.3±2.0 mg/MC), decreased 5DOF (24.3±4.9 mg/MC) and increased 5DOF (29.1±7.6mg/MC). The height loss of the explants and in-vitro tested discs were not significantly different (p>0.05). Conclusion The addition of anterior-posterior shear to wear testing inputs of the Charité lumbar total disc replacement increases the wear rate significantly, which is in direct contrast to the previous 5DOF testing on the ProDisc. This study highlights the importance of clinically relevant testing regimens, and that test inputs may be different for dissimilar design philosophies. PMID:22037530

  14. The human lumbar dorsal rami.

    PubMed Central

    Bogduk, N; Wilson, A S; Tynan, W

    1982-01-01

    The L 1-4 dorsal rami tend to form three branches, medial, lateral, and intermediate, which are distributed, respectively, to multifidus, iliocostalis, and longissimus. The intertransversarii mediales are innervated by a branch of the dorsal ramus near the origin of the medial branch. The L 4 dorsal ramus regularly forms three branches while the L 1-3 levels the lateral and intermediate branches may, alternatively, arise from a short common stem. The L 5 dorsal ramus is much longer than the others and forms only a medial and an intermediate branch. Each lumbar medial branch innervates two adjacent zygapophysial joints and ramifies in multifidus, supplying only those fascicles which arise from the spinous process with the same segmental number as the nerve. The comparative anatomy of the lumbar dorsal rami is discussed and the applied anatomy with respect to 'rhizolysis', 'facet denervation' and diagnostic paraspinal electromyography is described. PMID:7076562

  15. Lumbar lordosis of extinct hominins.

    PubMed

    Been, Ella; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Kramer, Patricia A

    2012-01-01

    The lordotic curvature of the lumbar spine (lumbar lordosis) in humans is a critical component in the ability to achieve upright posture and bipedal gait. Only general estimates of the lordotic angle (LA) of extinct hominins are currently available, most of which are based on the wedging of the vertebral bodies. Recently, a new method for calculating the LA in skeletal material has become available. This method is based on the relationship between the lordotic curvature and the orientation of the inferior articular processes relative to vertebral bodies in the lumbar spines of living primates. Using this relationship, we developed new regression models in order to calculate the LAs in hominins. The new models are based on primate group-means and were used to calculate the LAs in the spines of eight extinct hominins. The results were also compared with the LAs of modern humans and modern nonhuman apes. The lordotic angles of australopithecines (41° ± 4), H. erectus (45°) and fossil H. sapiens (54° ± 14) are similar to those of modern humans (51° ± 11). This analysis confirms the assumption that human-like lordotic curvature was a morphological change that took place during the acquisition of erect posture and bipedalism as the habitual form of locomotion. Neandertals have smaller lordotic angles (LA = 29° ± 4) than modern humans, but higher angles than nonhuman apes (22° ± 3). This suggests possible subtle differences in Neandertal posture and locomotion from that of modern humans. PMID:22052243

  16. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  17. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  18. Posterior tibial tendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, Manuel; Maceira, Ernesto

    2015-03-01

    The posterior tibial tendon (PTT) helps the triceps surae to work more efficiently during ambulation. Disorders of the PTT include tenosynovitis, acute rupture, degenerative tears, dislocation, instability, enthesopathies, and chronic tendinopathy with dysfunction and flat foot deformity. Open surgery of the PTT has been the conventional approach to deal with these disorders. However, tendoscopy has become a useful technique to diagnose and treat PTT disorders. This article focuses on PTT tendoscopy and tries to provide an understanding of the pathomechanics of the tendon, indications for surgery, surgical technique, advantages, complications, and limitations of this procedure. PMID:25726479

  19. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  20. Posterior Fossa Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Essam A.; Taibah, Abdel Kader; Achilli, Vittorio; Aristegui, Miguel; Mazzoni, Antonio; Sanna, Mario

    1994-01-01

    Posterior fossa meningioma is the second most common tumor in the cerebellopontine angle. It has a higher rate of postoperative morbidity and mortality compared to acoustic neuroma. Forty posterior fossa meningioma patients managed in our centers were reviewed. Thirty-nine patients were managed surgically with 42 surgical procedures. The approaches used were the translabyrinthine approach in 18 patients (43%), the modified transcochlear in 11 cases (26%), the petro-occipital transsigmoid in 5 cases (12%), the suboccipital in 4 cases (10%), the petro-occipital trassigmoid transcervical in 2 cases (5%), the petro-occipital transsigmoid transtentorial in 1 case (2%), and a subtemporal transtentorial for another case (2%). Facial nerve anatomical integrity was preserved in 87% of procedures but was interrupted in 5 cases, with 4 of the latter subsequently repaired. Total tumor removal was accomplished in 38 cases. A second-stage total tumor removal is planned for the remaining case. There was only one case of perioperative death and no cases of radiological recurrence so far. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4p206-bFigure 5p207-bFigure 5 PMID:17171173

  1. Remote Cerebellar Hemorrhage after Revision Lumbar Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Justin M.; Calvert, Graham; Spiker, William R.; Brodke, Darrel S.; Lawrence, Brandon D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?To report a case of remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) without intraoperative dural tear after revision lumbar spine surgery. RCH is a rare postoperative complication following spine surgery. RCH has previously been reported only in cases with intraoperative dural tear or durotomy. Methods?Case report and literature review. Results?A 58-year-old woman underwent removal of L4–S1 posterior spinal instrumented fusion (PSIF) implants and L3–L4 decompressive laminectomy with PSIF. There was no intraoperative dural tear. After doing well initially, the patient developed new neurologic symptoms and was found to have RCH. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large dural defect. After repair of the dura, the patient had dramatic improvement of her neurologic symptoms. At 1-year follow-up, the patient continued to have no neurologic sequelae. Conclusion?This report demonstrates that RCH can occur without intraoperative dural tear. Although rare, any patient with new onset of declining neurologic symptoms following spine surgery should have a brain MRI and should have RCH on the differential diagnosis. PMID:26682108

  2. Remote Cerebellar Hemorrhage after Revision Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Haller, Justin M; Calvert, Graham; Spiker, William R; Brodke, Darrel S; Lawrence, Brandon D

    2015-12-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?To report a case of remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) without intraoperative dural tear after revision lumbar spine surgery. RCH is a rare postoperative complication following spine surgery. RCH has previously been reported only in cases with intraoperative dural tear or durotomy. Methods?Case report and literature review. Results?A 58-year-old woman underwent removal of L4-S1 posterior spinal instrumented fusion (PSIF) implants and L3-L4 decompressive laminectomy with PSIF. There was no intraoperative dural tear. After doing well initially, the patient developed new neurologic symptoms and was found to have RCH. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large dural defect. After repair of the dura, the patient had dramatic improvement of her neurologic symptoms. At 1-year follow-up, the patient continued to have no neurologic sequelae. Conclusion?This report demonstrates that RCH can occur without intraoperative dural tear. Although rare, any patient with new onset of declining neurologic symptoms following spine surgery should have a brain MRI and should have RCH on the differential diagnosis. PMID:26682108

  3. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  4. Estimation of stature from radiologic anthropometry of the lumbar vertebral dimensions in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kui; Chang, Yun-Feng; Fan, Fei; Deng, Zhen-Hua

    2015-11-01

    The resent study was to assess the relationship between the radiologic anthropometry of the lumbar vertebral dimensions and stature in Chinese and to develop regression formulae to estimate stature from these dimensions. A total of 412 normal, healthy volunteers, comprising 206 males and 206 females, were recruited. The linear regression analysis were performed to assess the correlation between the stature and lengths of various segments of the lumbar vertebral column. Among the regression equations created for single variable, the predictive value was greatest for the reconstruction of stature from the lumbar segment in both sexes and subgroup analysis. When individual vertebral body was used, the heights of posterior vertebral body of L3 gave the most accurate results for male group, the heights of central vertebral body of L1 provided the most accurate results for female group and female group with age above 45years, the heights of central vertebral body of L3 gave the most accurate results for the groups with age from 20-45years for both sexes and the male group with age above 45years. The heights of anterior vertebral body of L5 gave the less accurate results except for the heights of anterior vertebral body of L4 provided the less accurate result for the male group with age above 45years. As expected, multiple regression equations were more successful than equations derived from a single variable. The research observations suggest lumbar vertebral dimensions to be useful in stature estimation among Chinese population. PMID:26593994

  5. Investigation of biomechanical behavior of lumbar vertebral segments with dynamic stabilization device using finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deoghare, Ashish B.; Kashyap, Siddharth; Padole, Pramod M.

    2013-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease is a major source of lower back pain and significantly alters the biomechanics of the lumbar spine. Dynamic stabilization device is a remedial technique which uses flexible materials to stabilize the affected lumbar region while preserving the natural anatomy of the spine. The main objective of this research work is to investigate the stiffness variation of dynamic stabilization device under various loading conditions under compression, axial rotation and flexion. Three dimensional model of the two segment lumbar spine is developed using computed tomography (CT) scan images. The lumbar structure developed is analyzed in ANSYS workbench. Two types of dynamic stabilization are considered: one with stabilizing device as pedicle instrumentation and second with stabilization device inserted around the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis suggests that proper positioning of the dynamic stabilization device is of paramount significance prior to the surgery. Inserting the device in the posterior region indicates the adverse effects as it shows increase in the deformation of the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis executed by positioning stabilizing device around the inter-vertebral disc yields better result for various stiffness values under compression and other loadings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Does Vertebral Endplate Morphology Influence Outcomes in Lumbar Disc Arthroplasty? Part I: An Initial Assessment of a Novel Classification System of Lumbar Endplate Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Oetgen, Matthew E.; la Torre, Jorge J. Jaramillo-de; Bertagnoli, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Background The influence of lumbar endplate morphology on the clinical and radiographic outcomes of lumbar disc arthroplasty has not been evaluated to the best of our knowledge. Study Design and Objective In this observational study of 80 patients, the objective was to formulate a reproducible and valid lumbar endplate classification system to be used in evaluating lumbar total disc replacement patients. Methods A novel vertebral endplate morphology classification system was formulated after review of data related to 80 patients enrolled in a prospective, randomized clinical trial in conjunction with an application for a US Food and Drug Administration investigational device exemption. Intraobserver and interobserver analyses of the classification system were performed on the same 80 patients utilizing the classification system. Results The initial review of the radiographs revealed 5 types of endplates: Type I (n = 82) flat endplates; Type II (n = 26) posterior lip; Type III (n = 5) central concavity; Type IV (n = 4) anterior sloping endplate; and Type V (n = 2) combination of Types I—IV. The intraobserver kappa was 0.66 and the interobserver kappa was 0.51. These kappa values indicate “substantial” to “moderate” reproducibility, respectively. Conclusions In this study, we propose a lumbar endplate classification system to be used in the preoperative assessment of patients undergoing lumbar disc arthroplasty. The classification can function as a basis for comparison and discussion among arthroplasty clinicians, and serve as a possible exclusionary screening tool for disc arthroplasty. Special consideration should be given to Type II endplates to optimize proper positioning and functioning of a total disc replacement (TDR) implant. Further outcome studies are warranted to assess the clinical significance of this classification system. The key points of our study are: (1) We present a novel lumbar vertebral endplate classification system; (2) Five types of endplates were identified and classified; (3) Intraobserver and interobserver reliability were classified as substantial and moderate, respectively; and (4) The classification system used may assist in the preoperative evaluation of patients for total disc replacement. Level of Evidence A systematic review of cohort studies (level 2a). PMID:25802597

  7. The Great Imitator: Ocular Syphilis Presenting as Posterior Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Alan; Ziaee, Saba M.; Hosseini, Hamid; Voleti, Vinod; Schwartz, Steven D.; Kim, Nam U.; Ge, Phillip S.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 34 Final Diagnosis: Ocular syphilis Symptoms: Painful unilateral vision loss Medication: Benzylpenicillin Clinical Procedure: Lumbar puncture Specialty: Infectious Diseases • Ophthalmology Objective: Rare disease Background: Syphilis is often known as the “Great Imitator”. The differential diagnosis of posterior uveitis is broad with ocular syphilis being particularly challenging to diagnose as it presents similarly to other ocular conditions such as acute retinal necrosis. Case Report: A 34-year-old woman with multiple sexual partners over the past few years presented with painful and progressively worsening unilateral vision loss for 2 weeks. Several months prior, she had reported non-specific symptoms of headache and diffuse skin rash. Despite treatment with oral acyclovir for 3 weeks, her vision progressively declined, and she was referred to the university ophthalmology clinic for further evaluation. On examination, there was concern for acute retinal necrosis and she was empirically treated with parenteral acyclovir while awaiting further infectious disease study results. Workup ultimately revealed ocular syphilis, and neurosyphilis was additionally confirmed with cerebrospinal fluid studies. Treatment with intravenous penicillin was promptly initiated with complete visual recovery. Conclusions: Ocular syphilis varies widely in presentation and should be considered in all patients with posterior uveitis, especially with a history of headache and skin rashes. However, given that acute retinal necrosis is a more common cause of posterior uveitis and can rapidly result in permanent vision loss, it should be empirically treated whenever it is suspected while simultaneous workup is conducted to evaluate for alternative diagnoses. PMID:26151369

  8. Prevalence and Distribution of Thoracic and Lumbar Compressive Lesions in Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kodera, Ryuzo; Yoshiiwa, Toyomi; Kawano, Masanori; Kaku, Nobuhiro; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cross-sectional study. Purpose This study analyzed the prevalence and distribution of horacic and lumbar compressive lesions in cervical spondylotic myelopathy as well as their relationships with cervical developmental spinal canal stenosis (DCS) by using whole-spine postmyelographic computed tomography. Overview of Literature There are few studies on missed compressive lesions of the spinal cord or cauda equina at the thoracolumbar level in cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Furthermore, the relationships between DCS, and the prevalence and distribution of thoracic and lumbar compressive lesions are unknown. Methods Eighty patients with symptomatic cervical spondylotic myelopathy were evaluated. Preoperative image data were obtained. Patients were classified as DCS or non-DCS (n=40 each) if their spinal canal longitudinal diameter was <12 mm at any level or ?12 mm at all levels, respectively. Compressive lesions in the anterior and anteroposterior parts, ligamentum flavum ossification, posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, and spinal cord tumors at the thoracolumbar levels were analyzed. Results Compressive lesions in the anterior and anteroposterior parts were observed in 13 (16.3%) and 45 (56.3%) patients, respectively. Ligamentum flavum and posterior longitudinal ligament ossification were observed in 19 (23.8%) and 3 (3.8%) patients, respectively. No spinal cord tumors were observed. Thoracic and lumbar compressive lesions of various causes tended to be more common in DCS patients than non-DCS patients, although the difference was statistically insignificant. Conclusions Surveying compressive lesions and considering the thoracic and lumbar level in cervical spondylotic myelopathy in DCS patients are important for preventing unexpected neurological deterioration and predicting accurate neurological condition after cervical surgery. PMID:25901233

  9. ISASS Policy Statement – Lumbar Artificial Disc

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The primary goal of this Policy Statement is to educate patients, physicians, medical providers, reviewers, adjustors, case managers, insurers, and all others involved or affected by insurance coverage decisions regarding lumbar disc replacement surgery. Procedures This Policy Statement was developed by a panel of physicians selected by the Board of Directors of ISASS for their expertise and experience with lumbar TDR. The panel's recommendation was entirely based on the best evidence-based scientific research available regarding the safety and effectiveness of lumbar TDR. PMID:25785243

  10. The importance of the anterior longitudinal ligament in lumbar disc arthroplasty: 36-Month follow-up experience in extreme lateral total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Luis; Oliveira, Leonardo; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Pimenta, Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Background Current total disc replacement (TDR) for lumbar spine requires an anterior approach for implantation but presents inherent limitations, including risks to the abdominal structures, as well as resection of the anterior longitudinal ligament. By approaching the spine laterally, it is possible to preserve the stabilizing ligaments, which are a natural restraint to excessive rotations and translations, and thereby help to minimize facet stresses. This less invasive approach also offers a biomechanical advantage of placement of the device over the ring apophysis bilaterally; importantly, it also offers a greater opportunity for safer revision surgery, if necessary, by avoiding scarring of the anterior vasculature. We present the clinical and radiologic results of a lateral TDR device from a prospective single-center study. Methods A new metal-on-metal TDR device designed for implantation through a true lateral, retroperitoneal, transpsoatic approach (extreme lateral interbody fusion) was implanted in 36 patients with discography-confirmed 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease. Clinical (pain and function) and radiographic (range of motion) outcome assessments were prospectively collected preoperatively, postoperatively, and serially up to a minimum of 36 months’ follow-up. Results Between December 2005 and December 2006, 36 surgeries were performed in 16 men and 20 women (mean age, 42.6 years). These included 15 single-level TDR procedures at L3-4 or L4-5, 3 2-level TDR procedures spanning L3-4 and L4-5, and 18 hybrid procedures (anterior lumbar interbody fusion) at L5-S1 and TDR at L4-5 (17) or L3-4 (1). Operative time averaged 130 minutes, with mean blood loss of 60 mL and no intraoperative complications. Postoperative X-rays showed good device placement, with restoration of disc height, foraminal volume, and sagittal balance. All patients were up and walking within 12 hours of surgery, and all but 9 were discharged the next day (7 of those 9 were hybrid TDR–anterior lumbar interbody fusion cases). Postoperatively, 5 of 36 patients (13.8%) had psoas weakness and 3 of 36 (8.3%) had anterior thigh numbness, with both symptoms resolving within 2 weeks. Of the 36 patients, 4 (11%) had postoperative facet joint pain, all in hybrid cases. Visual analog scale pain scores and Oswestry Disability Index scores improved by 74.5% and 69.2%, respectively, from preoperatively to 3-year follow-up. Range of motion at 3 years postoperatively averaged 8.1°. Signals of heterotopic ossification were present in 5 patients (13.9%), and 2 patients (5.5%) were considered to have fusion after 36 months. Conclusions The clinical and radiographic results of a laterally placed TDR have shown maintenance of pain relief and functional improvement over a long-term follow-up period. The benefits of the lateral access—minimal morbidity, avoidance of mobilization of the great vessels, preservation of the anterior longitudinal ligament, biomechanically stable orientation, and broader revision options—promote a new option for motion-preservation procedures. PMID:25694866

  11. Interspinous posterior devices: What is the real surgical indication?

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Interspinous posterior device (IPD) is a term used to identify a relatively recent group of implants used to treat lumbar spinal degenerative disease. This kind of device is classified as part of the group of the dynamic stabilization systems of the spine. The concept of dynamic stabilization has been replaced by that of dynamic neutralization of hypermobility, with the intention of clarifying that the primary aim of this kind of system is not the preservation of the movement, but the dynamic neutralization of the segmental hypermobility which is at the root of the pathological condition. The indications for the implantation of an IPD are spinal stenosis and neurogenic claudication, assuming that its function is the enlargement of the neural foramen and the decompression of the roots forming the cauda equina in the central part of the vertebral canal. In the last 10 years, use of these implants has been very common but to date, no long-term clinical follow-up regarding clinical and radiological aspects are available. The high rate of reoperation, recurrence of symptoms and progression of degenerative changes is evident in the literature. If these devices are effectively a miracle cure for lumbar spinal stenosis, why do the utilization and implantation of IPD remain extremely controversial and should they be investigated further? Excluding the problems related to the high cost of the device, the main problem remains the pathological substrate on which the device is explicit in its action: the degenerative pathology of the spine. PMID:25232541

  12. Metabolic syndrome and lumbar spine fusion surgery: epidemiology and perioperative outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Memtsoudis, Stavros G.; Kirksey, Meghan; Ma, Yan; Chiu, Ya Lin; Mazumdar, Madhu; Pumberger, Matthias; Girardi, Federico P.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Analysis of the National Inpatient Sample database from 2000 to 2008. Objective To identify if metabolic syndrome is an independent risk factor for increased major perioperative complications, cost, length of stay and non-routine discharge. Summary of Background Data Metabolic syndrome is a combination of medical disorders that has been shown to increase the health risk of the general population. No study has analyzed its impact in the perioperative spine surgery setting. Methods We obtained the National Inpatient Sample from the Hospital Cost and Utilization Project for each year between 2000 and 2008. All patients undergoing primary posterior lumbar spine fusion were identified and separated into groups with and without metabolic syndrome. Patient demographics and health care system related parameters were compared. The outcomes of major complications, non-routine discharge, length of hospital stay and hospitalization charges were assessed for both groups. Regression analysis was performed to identify if the presence of metabolic syndrome was an independent risk factor for each outcome. Results An estimated 1,152,747 primary posterior lumbar spine fusion were performed between 2000 and 2008 in the US. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome as well as the comorbidities of the patients increased significantly over time. Patients with metabolic syndrome had significantly longer length of stay, higher hospital charges, higher rates of non-routine discharges and increased rates of major life-threatening complications compared to patients without metabolic syndrome. Conclusion Patients with metabolic syndrome undergoing primary posterior lumbar spinal fusion represent an increasing financial burden on the health care system. Clinicians should recognize that metabolic syndrome represents a risk factor for increased perioperative morbidity. PMID:22024892

  13. Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    MedlinePLUS

    .org Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Page ( 1 ) Spinal fractures can vary widely in severity. While some fractures are very serious injuries that require emergency treatment, other fractures can ...

  14. Lumbar disc injury in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Robert G

    2002-01-01

    The lumbar spine is a highly vulnerable area for injury in a number of different sports. And while the incidence is significant and the time lost may be significant, probably the most important problems are related to the fear of spinal injuries and the need for a therapeutic plan. Lumbar pain is significant in many sports, but an organized diagnostic and therapeutic plan can prevent permanent injury, allowing full function and maximum performance. PMID:11877868

  15. Epidural cerebrospinal fluid collection after lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Paul L; Zonfrillo, Mark R

    2009-07-01

    Lumbar puncture is a common procedure in the emergency department. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak through a dural tear can cause transient side effects including headache and backache, although more severe symptoms may occur. These CSF collections can be managed nonoperatively without any neurologic sequelae. We report a patient with a symptomatic epidural CSF collection after diagnostic lumbar puncture, followed by a brief review of the literature including discussion of techniques that can reduce CSF leak. PMID:19606006

  16. Catheter-Based Transepidural Approach to Cervical and Thoracic Posterior and Perineural Epidural Spaces: A Cadaveric Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Khan, Asif A.; Sohail, Amna; Saed, Aveen; Jadhav, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Approaching the cervical and high thoracic level epidural space through transepidural route from lumbar region represents a method to lower the occurrence of complications associated with direct approach. The authors performed a cadaveric pilot project to determine the feasibility of various catheter-based manipulation and cephalad advancement using the transepidural route. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Two cadavers were used to determine the following: 1. Ability to place a guide sheath over a guidewire using a percutaneous approach within the posterior lumbar epidural space; 2. The highest vertebral level catheter can be advanced within the posterior epidural space; 3. Ability to cross midline within the posterior epidural space; and 4. Ability to catheterize the perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. RESULTS We were able to advance the catheters up to the level of cervical vertebral level of C2 within the posterior epidural space under fluoroscopic guidance from a sheath inserted via oblique parasagittal approach at the lumbar L4–L5 intervertebral space. We were able to cross midline within the posterior epidural space and catheterize multiple perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical vertebral level of C2, C3, and C4 on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. We also catheterized multiple epidural sheaths that surround the nerve roots exiting at the thoracic vertebral level on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. CONCLUSIONS We were able to advance a catheter or microcatheter up to the cervical vertebral level within the posterior epidural space and catheterize the perineural epidural sheath of the nerve root exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. Such observations support further exploration of percutaneous catheter based transepidural approach to cervical and thoracic dorsal epidural spaces for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26060530

  17. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) Text Size ... the arch, and an inward rolling of the ankle. As the condition progresses, the symptoms will change. ...

  18. Termination zones of functionally characterized spinothalamic tract neurons within the primate posterior thalamus.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Steve; Zhang, Xijing; Khasabov, Sergey G; Simone, Donald A; Giesler, Glenn J

    2008-10-01

    The primate posterior thalamus has been proposed to contribute to pain sensation, but its precise role is unclear. This is in part because spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons that project to the posterior thalamus have received little attention. In this study, antidromic mapping was used to identify individual STT neurons with axons that projected specifically to the posterior thalamus in Macaca fascicularis. Each axon was located by antidromic activation at low stimulus amplitudes (<30 microA) and was then surrounded distally by a grid of stimulating points in which 500-microA stimuli were unable to activate the axon antidromically, thereby indicating the termination zone. Several nuclei within the posterior thalamus were targets of STT neurons: the posterior nucleus, suprageniculate nucleus, magnocellular part of the medial geniculate nucleus, and limitans nucleus. STT neurons projecting to the ventral posterior inferior nucleus were also studied. Twenty-five posterior thalamus-projecting STT neurons recorded in lumbar spinal cord were characterized by their responses to mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli. Sixteen of 25 neurons were recorded in the marginal zone and the balance was located within the deep dorsal horn. Thirteen neurons were classified as wide dynamic range and 12 as high threshold. One-third of STT neurons projecting to posterior thalamus responded to noxious heat (50 degrees C). Two-thirds of those tested responded to cooling. Seventy-one percent responded to an intradermal injection of capsaicin. These data indicate that the primate STT transmits noxious and innocuous mechanical, thermal, and chemical information to multiple posterior thalamic nuclei. PMID:18701750

  19. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  20. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-Yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  1. Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging of the posterior paraspinal muscles.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Maria; Hides, Julie; Elliott, James; Kiesel, Kyle; Hodges, Paul

    2007-10-01

    Interest in rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) of the posterior paraspinal muscles is growing, along with the body of literature to support integration of this technique into routine physical therapy practice. This clinical commentary reviews how RUSI can be used as an evaluative and treatment tool and proposes guidelines for its use for the posterior muscles of the lumbar and cervical regions. Both quantitative and qualitative applications are described, as well as measurement reliability and validity. Measurement of morphological characteristics of the muscles (morphometry) in healthy populations and people with spinal pathology are described. Preliminary normal reference data exist for measurements of cross-sectional area (CSA), linear dimensions (muscle depth/thickness and width), and shape ratios. Compared to individuals without low back pain, changes in muscles' size at rest and during the contracted state have been observed using RUSI in people with spinal pathology. Visual observation of the image during contraction indicates that RUSI may be a valuable biofeedback tool. Further investigation of many of these observations is required using controlled studies to provide conclusive evidence that RUSI enhances clinical practice. PMID:17970405

  2. 49 CFR 572.115 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Side Impact Hybrid Dummy 50th Percentile Male § 572.115 Lumbar spine and pelvis. The specifications and test procedure for the lumbar...

  3. Grynfeltt Hernia: A Deceptive Lumbar Mass with a Lipoma-Like Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Zadeh, Jonathan R.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Patel, Chetan; Kozol, Robert; Lopez-Viego, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    The Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia is a rare posterior abdominal wall defect that allows for the herniation of retro- and intraperitoneal structures through the upper lumbar triangle. While this hernia may initially present as a small asymptomatic bulge, the defect typically enlarges over time and can become symptomatic with potentially serious complications. In order to avoid that outcome, it is advisable to electively repair Grynfeltt hernias in patients without significant contraindications to surgery. Due to the limited number of lumbar hernioplasties performed, there has not been a large study that definitively identifies the best repair technique. It is generally accepted that abdominal hernias such as these should be repaired by tension-free methods. Both laparoscopic and open techniques are described in modern literature with unique advantages and complications for each. We present the case of an unexpected Grynfeltt hernia diagnosed following an attempted lipoma resection. We chose to perform an open repair involving a combination of fascial approximation and dual-layer polypropylene mesh placement. The patient's recovery was uneventful and there has been no evidence of recurrence at over six months. Our goal herein is to increase awareness of upper lumbar hernias and to discuss approaches to their surgical management. PMID:26697256

  4. Evaluation of Degenerative Lumbar Scoliosis After Short Segment Decompression and Fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Naiguo; Wang, Dachuan; Wang, Feng; Tan, Bingyi; Yuan, Zenong

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate short segment decompression of degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS) and the efficiency of fusion treatment.After DLS surgery, the patients were retrospectively reviewed using the VAS (visual analog scale) and ODI (Oswestry Disability Index) to assess clinical outcomes. All patients underwent posterior lumbar decompressive laminectomy, pedicle screw internal fixation, and posterolateral bone graft fusion surgery. Radiographic measurements included the scoliotic Cobb angle, the fused Cobb angle, the anterior intervertebral angle (AIA), the sagittal intervertebral angle (SIA), and lumbar lordosis angle. The relationships between these parameters were examined by bivariate Pearson analysis and linear regression analysis.Preoperatively, the Cobb angle at the scoliotic segment was 15.4°, which decreased to 10.2° immediately following surgery (P?

  5. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  6. Economic impact of minimally invasive lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Christoph P; Hofer, Anna S; Wang, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    Cost effectiveness has been demonstrated for traditional lumbar discectomy, lumbar laminectomy as well as for instrumented and noninstrumented arthrodesis. While emerging evidence suggests that minimally invasive spine surgery reduces morbidity, duration of hospitalization, and accelerates return to activites of daily living, data regarding cost effectiveness of these novel techniques is limited. The current study analyzes all available data on minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, decompression, short-segment fusion and deformity surgery. In general, minimally invasive spine procedures appear to hold promise in quicker patient recovery times and earlier return to work. Thus, minimally invasive lumbar spine surgery appears to have the potential to be a cost-effective intervention. Moreover, novel less invasive procedures are less destabilizing and may therefore be utilized in certain indications that traditionally required arthrodesis procedures. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing the economic impact of minimally invasive spine surgery. Future studies are necessary to confirm the durability and further define indications for minimally invasive lumbar spine procedures. PMID:25793159

  7. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy - early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Takeda, Masaaki; Itoh, Yasunobu; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We report our early clinical experience with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in the lumbar spine. We introduced PELD to our clinical practice in June 2009. A total of 311 patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease were treated in our hospital up to August 2011. Thirty-seven patients with lumbar HNP were treated by PELD. PELD was carried out under local anesthesia, and the endoscope was continuously irrigated with saline. Twenty-eight patients were treated through the transforaminal approach, 5 were treated through the interlaminar approach, and 4 were treated through the extraforaminal approach. Surgery was discontinued due to uncontrollable intraoperative pain or anatomical inaccessibility in one case of the interlaminar approach and 2 cases of the extraforaminal approach. In the other 34 patients, the elapsed time of surgery was 34 to 103 minutes (mean 62.4 minutes). Extracorporeal blood loss was insignificant. Immediate symptom relief was achieved in all patients, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed sufficient removal of the HNP. The length of the postoperative hospital stay was 1 or 2 days in all patients. The surgical method of PELD is completely different from percutaneous nucleotomy, and the aim is to directly remove the HNP with minimum damage to the musculoskeletal structure. Although this study is based on our early clinical outcomes, PELD seemed to be a promising minimally invasive surgery for HNP in the lumbar spine. PMID:23006872

  8. Posterior polar cataract: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kalantan, Hatem

    2011-01-01

    Posterior polar cataract is a rare form of congenital cataract. It is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant disease, yet it can be sporadic. Five genes have been attributed to the formation of this disease. It is highly associated with complications during surgery, such as posterior capsule rupture and nucleus drop. The reason for this high complication rate is the strong adherence of the opacity to the weak posterior capsule. Different surgical strategies were described for the handling of this challenging entity, most of which emphasized the need for gentle maneuvering in dealing with these cases. It has a unique clinical appearance that should not be missed in order to anticipate, avoid, and minimize the impact of the complications associated with it. PMID:23960967

  9. Posterior polar cataract: A review.

    PubMed

    Kalantan, Hatem

    2012-01-01

    Posterior polar cataract is a rare form of congenital cataract. It is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant disease, yet it can be sporadic. Five genes have been attributed to the formation of this disease. It is highly associated with complications during surgery, such as posterior capsule rupture and nucleus drop. The reason for this high complication rate is the strong adherence of the opacity to the weak posterior capsule. Different surgical strategies were described for the handling of this challenging entity, most of which emphasized the need for gentle maneuvering in dealing with these cases. It has a unique clinical appearance that should not be missed in order to anticipate, avoid, and minimize the impact of the complications associated with it. PMID:23960967

  10. Activations of Deep Lumbar Stabilizing Muscles by Transcutaneous Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation of Lumbar Paraspinal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seung Ok; Ahn, Sang Ho; Jones, Rodney; Cho, Hee Kyung; Jung, Gil Su; Cho, Yun Woo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate changes in lumbar multifidus (LM) and deep lumbar stabilizing abdominal muscles (transverse abdominis [TrA] and obliquus internus [OI]) during transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of lumbar paraspinal L4-L5 regions using real-time ultrasound imaging (RUSI). Methods Lumbar paraspinal regions of 20 healthy physically active male volunteers were stimulated at 20, 50, and 80 Hz. Ultrasound images of the LM, TrA, OI, and obliquus externus (OE) were captured during stimulation at each frequency. Results The thicknesses of superficial LM and deep LM as measured by RUSI were greater during NMES than at rest for all three frequencies (p<0.05). The thicknesses in TrA, OI, and OE were also significantly greater during NMES of lumbar paraspinal regions than at rest (p<0.05). Conclusion The studied transcutaneous NMES of the lumbar paraspinal region significantly activated deep spinal stabilizing muscle (LM) and the abdominal lumbar stabilizing muscles TrA and OI as evidenced by RUSI. The findings of this study suggested that transcutaneous NMES might be useful for improving spinal stability and strength in patients having difficulty initiating contraction of these muscles. PMID:25229029

  11. A study on difference and importance of sacral slope and pelvic sacral angle that affect lumbar curvature.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seyoung; Lee, Minsun; Kwon, Byongan

    2014-01-01

    Individual pelvic sacral angle was measured, compared and analyzed for the 6 male and female adults who were diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis, foraminal stenosis and mild spondylolisthesis in accordance with spinal parameters, pelvic parameters and occlusion state of sacroiliac joint presented by the author of this thesis based on the fact that the degree of lumbar excessive lordosis that was one of the causes for lumbar pain was determined by sacral slope. The measured values were compared with the standard values of the average normal range from 20 s to 40 s of normal Koreans stated in the study on the change in lumbar lordosis angle, lumbosacral angle and sacral slope in accordance with the age by Oh et al. [5] and sacral slope and pelvic sacral slope of each individual of the subjects for measurement were compared. Comparing the difference between the two tilt angles possessed by an individual is a comparison to determine how much the sacroiliac joint connecting pelvis and sacral vertebrae compensated and corrected the sacral vertebrae slope by pelvic tilt under the condition of synarthrodial joint.Under the condition that the location conforming to the line in which the sagittal line of gravity connects with pelvic ASIS and pubic pubic tuberele is the neutral location of pelvic tilt, sacral slope being greater than pelvic sacral slope means pelvic anterior tilting, whereas sacral slope being smaller than pelvic sacral slope means pelvic posterior tilting. On that account, male B, female A and female C had a pelvic posterior tilting of 16 degrees, 1 degree and 5 degrees respectively, whereas male A, male C and female B had a pelvic anterior tilting of 3 degrees, 9 degrees and 4 degrees respectively. In addition, the 6 patients the values of lumbar lordosis angle, lumbosacral angle and sacral slope that were almost twice as much as the normal standard values of Koreans. It is believed that this is because the pelvic sacral slope maintaining an angle that is slightly greater than the normal range by being located in the lowest end of spine considering that the compensation for pelvic tilt, in other words, pelvic limb is not much causes an excess of lumbar lordosis angle. The meaning of this study based on these results is to prove that PSA is one of the important factors that fundamentally determine lumbar curvature. And this is because it is definitely required to have a study on the guideline for appropriate posture and life habit to the maintenance and management of ideal PSA before the end of growth phase and also the exercise therapy and adjustment for the control of PSA. PMID:24704656

  12. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY...-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and...

  13. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. 572.9 Section... Percentile Male § 572.9 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist... minutes after the release. (d) When the abdomen is subjected to continuously applied force in...

  14. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. 572.9 Section... Percentile Male § 572.9 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist... minutes after the release. (d) When the abdomen is subjected to continuously applied force in...

  15. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY...-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and...

  16. 49 CFR 572.115 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.115 Section 572.115... 50th Percentile Male § 572.115 Lumbar spine and pelvis. The specifications and test procedure for the lumbar spine and pelvis are identical to those for the SID dummy as set forth in § 572.42 except that...

  17. 49 CFR 572.115 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.115 Section 572.115... 50th Percentile Male § 572.115 Lumbar spine and pelvis. The specifications and test procedure for the lumbar spine and pelvis are identical to those for the SID dummy as set forth in § 572.42 except that...

  18. 49 CFR 572.115 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.115 Section 572.115... 50th Percentile Male § 572.115 Lumbar spine and pelvis. The specifications and test procedure for the lumbar spine and pelvis are identical to those for the SID dummy as set forth in § 572.42 except that...

  19. 49 CFR 572.115 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.115 Section 572.115... 50th Percentile Male § 572.115 Lumbar spine and pelvis. The specifications and test procedure for the lumbar spine and pelvis are identical to those for the SID dummy as set forth in § 572.42 except that...

  20. Children's Understanding of Posterior Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girotto, Vittorio; Gonzalez, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Do young children have a basic intuition of posterior probability? Do they update their decisions and judgments in the light of new evidence? We hypothesized that they can do so extensionally, by considering and counting the various ways in which an event may or may not occur. The results reported in this paper showed that from the age of five,…

  1. Postoperative Epidural Hematomas in the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Kurd, Mark F; Kepler, Christopher K; Arnold, Paul M; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative epidural hematomas are rare complications following lumbar spine surgery, but if they are not quickly identified and treated they can lead to permanent neurological deficits. Epidural hematomas occur in approximately 0.10%-0.24% of all spine surgeries, and despite the fact that multiple large studies have been performed attempting to identify risk factors for this complication, there is still significant debate about the effect of subfascial drains, postoperative anticoagulation, and antiplatelet medication on the incidence of postoperative hematoma. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of patients who develop a postoperative lumbar epidural hematoma. PMID:26484502

  2. Lumbar vertebral pedicles: radiologic anatomy and pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.P.; Kumar, R.; Kinkhabwala, M.; Wengrover, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    With the advancement of high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scanning the spine has added new knowledge to the various conditions affecting the pedicles. We wish to review the entire spectrum of pedicular lesions: the embryology, normal anatomy, normal variants, pitfalls, congenital anomalies, and pathological conditions are discussed. Different imaging modalities involving CT, isotope bone scanning, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are used to complement plain films of the lumbar spine. This subject review is an excellent source for future reference to lumbar pedicular lesions. 27 references.

  3. Augmentation Improves Human Cadaveric Vertebral Body Compression Mechanics For Lumbar Total Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Jonathon H.; Auerbach, Joshua D.; Maurer, Philip M.; Erbe, Erik M.; Entrekin, Dean; Balderston, Richard A.; Bertagnoli, Rudolf; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Cadaveric biomechanical study. Objectives Quantify the effects of vertebral body augmentation on biomechanics under axial compression by a total disc replacement (TDR) implant. Summary of Background Data TDR is a surgical alternative to lumbar spinal fusion to treat degenerative disc disease. Osteoporosis in the adjacent vertebrae to the interposed TDR may lead to implant subsidence or vertebral body fracture. Vertebral augmentation is used to treat osteoporotic compression fracture. The study sought to evaluate whether vertebral augmentation improves biomechanics under TDR axial loading. Methods Forty-five L1-L5 lumbar vertebral body segments with intact posterior elements were used. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans were performed to determine bone density, block randomizing specimens by bone density into augmentation and control groups. A semi-constrained keeled lumbar disc replacement device was implanted providing 50% endplate coverage. Vertebral augmentation of 17.6 ± 0.9% vertebral volume fill with Cortoss was performed on augmentation group. All segments underwent axial compression at a rate of 0.2 mm/s to 6mm. Results The load-displacement response for all specimens was non-linear. Subfailure mechanical properties with augmentation were significantly different from control; in all cases the augmented group was 2× higher than control. At failure, the maximum load and stiffness with augmentation was not significantly different from control. The maximum apparent stress and modulus with augmentation were 2× and 1.3× greater than control, respectively. The subfailure stress and apparent modulus with augmentation was moderately correlated with bone density while the control subfailure properties were not. The augmented maximum stress was not correlated with bone density, while the control was weakly correlated. The maximum apparent modulus was moderately correlated with bone density for both the augmented and control groups. Conclusion Augmentation improved the mechanical properties of the lumbar vertebral body for compression by a TDR implant. PMID:20375770

  4. How frequent is chronic lumbar arachnoiditis following intrathecal Myodil?

    PubMed

    Hughes, D G; Isherwood, I

    1992-09-01

    Chronic lumbar arachnoiditis has numerous causes, including the introduction of contrast media into the lumbar subarachnoid space. The oily contrast medium Myodil (iophendylate) is often cited but the true incidence of symptomatic lumbar arachnoiditis due solely to the presence of Myodil is unknown. A retrospective review of 98 patients in whom Myodil was introduced by ventriculography or cisternography, i.e. remote from the lumbar spine, revealed no cases of chronic lumbar arachnoiditis. All patients were monitored closely for periods ranging from 1 to 28 years. We conclude that, in these circumstances, it is rare for Myodil to produce symptomatic arachnoiditis. PMID:1393409

  5. An optimization study of the screw orientation on the interfacial strength of the anterior lumbar plate system using neurogenetic algorithms and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chian-Her; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Huy, Dinh Cong

    2014-11-01

    Anterior lumbar plate (ALP) systems have been widely used as an effective interbody fusion device for treating spinal cord compression. However, clinical complications, such as implant loosening and breakage, still occur. Past studies have investigated the effects of the screw orientation on the interfacial strength, but these studies were inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to identify an ALP system with excellent interfacial strength by varying the screw orientation. Three-dimensional finite element models of L4-L5 segments with an ALP system were first constructed. A neurogenetic algorithm, which combines artificial neural networks and genetic algorithms, was subsequently developed to discover the optimum plate design. Finally, biomechanical tests were conducted to validate the results of the finite element models and the engineering algorithm. The results indicated that the interfacial strength of the optimum plate design obtained using the neurogenetic algorithm was excellent compared with the other designs and that all of the locking screws should be inserted divergently. Both the numerical and experimental outcomes can provide clinical suggestions to surgeons and help them to understand the interfacial strength of ALP systems in terms of the screw orientation. PMID:25162521

  6. Intravitreal bevacizumab for posterior capsule neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohaimeed, Mansour; Al-Gehedan, Saeed; Dhibi, Hassan Al

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of rapid regression of extensive posterior capsule neovascularization in a 67-year-old diabetic male patient, who developed posterior capsule opacity with neovascularization one year post cataract surgery, after a single injection of intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin) followed by neodymium:YAG capsulotomy. Rapid regression of the posterior capsule neovascularization, and visual improvement was observed 9 days after the intervention. Posterior capsulotomy was performed successfully without bleeding. Prior to posterior capsulotomy, intravitreal bevacizumab can result in rapid and dramatic regression of posterior capsule neovascularization. PMID:23960877

  7. Intravitreal bevacizumab for posterior capsule neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Al-Mohaimeed, Mansour; Al-Gehedan, Saeed; Dhibi, Hassan Al

    2010-04-01

    We report a case of rapid regression of extensive posterior capsule neovascularization in a 67-year-old diabetic male patient, who developed posterior capsule opacity with neovascularization one year post cataract surgery, after a single injection of intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin) followed by neodymium:YAG capsulotomy. Rapid regression of the posterior capsule neovascularization, and visual improvement was observed 9 days after the intervention. Posterior capsulotomy was performed successfully without bleeding. Prior to posterior capsulotomy, intravitreal bevacizumab can result in rapid and dramatic regression of posterior capsule neovascularization. PMID:23960877

  8. Iatrogenic Lumbar Vertebral Fracture during Osteosynthesis for a Trochanteric Fracture of the Femur in Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Takeshi; Murakami, Hideki; Maruhashi, Yoshinobu; Segawa, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Daiki; Shimizu, Shusuke; Morita, Yasuhiko; Nakamura, Takuya

    2015-10-01

    Vertebral fractures occur with only slight trauma in patients with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). However, a lumbar vertebra fracture, due to an intraoperative body position has not been previously reported. An 87-year-old woman with kyphosis sustained a left trochanteric fracture of her femur. The patient was placed in a supine position during the operation. Postoperatively, the patient experienced severe right thigh pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an L4 vertebral fracture. Computed tomography revealed ankylosis from the upper thoracic spine to the sacrum. While in a supine position under general anesthesia, the contact of the patient's lower back with operating table likely created a fulcrum at her lumbosacral spine acting as a long lever arm, bearing the mass of her upper body. We performed L1-S2 posterior stabilization. DISH patients with kyphosis placed in a supine position have an increased risk for lumbar vertebral fracture. PMID:26435803

  9. Lumbar spinal atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Aditi; Tekautz, Tanya; Recinos, Violette; Murphy, Erin; Prayson, Richard A; Ruggieri, Paul; Wolff, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    We describe a pediatric patient with an atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) exclusively of the lumbar spine, with a different presentation from the two previously reported pediatric lumbar AT/RT. AT/RT are rare pediatric tumors of the central nervous system, with a dismal prognosis. Although there is sufficient literature on brain AT/RT, spinal AT/RT continues to be a rare entity, with a lumbar location even less frequently reported. A 30-month-old African American boy with multiple comorbidities presented with the inability to ambulate, encopresis and urinary dribbling. The MRI showed an intradural extramedullary mass extending downwards from the L3-4 level. He underwent an L3-S2 laminoplasty. The surgically resected mass was marked by sheets of cells with large nuclei and prominent nucleoli. The tumor cells stained with antibodies to synaptophysin and CAM5.2, and showed no immunoreactivity to INI-1 antibody. He was diagnosed with a World Health Organization Grade IV AT/RT. There was no mutation detected in the SMARCB1 gene on a comprehensive analysis of his blood. The boy is currently being treated according to the Medical University of Vienna AT/RT protocol, with no evidence of tumor recurrence 8months after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the only report of a lumbar AT/RT in an African American child. PMID:26234633

  10. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 6.05 ±0.1 m/s measured at...with its decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Lumbar Spine Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

  11. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 6.05 ±0.1 m/s measured at...with its decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Lumbar Spine Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

  12. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 6.05 ±0.1 m/s measured at...with its decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Lumbar Spine Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

  13. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 6.05 ±0.1 m/s measured at...with its decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Lumbar Spine Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

  14. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...it to fall freely to achieve an impact velocity of 6.05 ±0.1 m/s measured at...with its decelerating mechanism. The velocity-time history of the pendulum falls...ES-2re Lumbar Spine Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

  15. Lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Lotte, Romain; Popoff, M R; Degand, Nicolas; Lotte, Laurene; Bouvet, Philippe; Baudin, Guillaume; Cua, Eric; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Ruimy, Raymond

    2014-10-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens in an elderly patient that was treated with a combination of ?-lactams and clindamycin. Molecular analysis performed on the strain revealed an unusual toxin gene pattern. PMID:25056327

  16. Posterior capsule opacification: experimental analyses.

    PubMed

    Odrich, M G; Hall, S J; Worgul, B V; Trokel, S L; Rini, F J

    1985-01-01

    The lenses of New Zealand White and Flemish Giant rabbits were removed using five techniques representative of the different clinical approaches to extracapsular cataract extraction currently employed. Posterior capsule opacification developed in all experimental animals within 6 weeks of the operation. None of the techniques reduced the incidence of the capsular opacification. Histological analyses including immunofluorescent and tritiated thymidine labelling were used to determine the nature of the cellular constitutents of the secondary membrane. The evidence indicates that the opacity is due not only to lens cells remaining after the operation but also consists of cells of nonlenticular origin. The data strongly implicate the anterior uvea as the source of those cells. Furthermore, the findings suggest that posterior capsule opacification is the product of a migration and a proliferation of both cell populations. PMID:3885127

  17. Distortions of posterior visual space.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Flip; Voshell, Martin G

    2009-01-01

    The study of spatial vision is a long and well traveled road (which, of course, converges to a vanishing point at the horizon). Its various distortions have been widely investigated empirically, and most concentrate, pragmatically, on the space anterior to the observer. The visual world behind the observer has received relatively less attention and it is this perspective the current experiments address. Our results show systematic perceptual distortions in the posterior visual world when viewed statically. Under static viewing conditions, observer's perceptual representation was consistently 'spread' in a hyperbolic fashion. Directions to distant, peripheral locations were consistently overestimated by about 11 degrees from the ground truth and this variability increased as the target was moved toward the center of the observer's back. The perceptual representation of posterior visual space is, no doubt, secondary to the more immediate needs of the anterior visual world. Still, it is important in some domains including certain sports, such as rowing, and in vehicular navigation. PMID:19764306

  18. Inflammatory Changes of the Lumbar Spine in Children and Adolescents With Enthesitis-Related Arthritis: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Vendhan, Kanimozhi; Sen, Debajit; Fisher, Corinne; Ioannou, Yiannis; Hall-Craggs, Margaret A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe and profile abnormalities of the lumbar spine in a cohort of patients with enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) as compared to a control group of adolescents with mechanical back pain. Methods We performed a retrospective review of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lumbar spine scans of 79 patients (58 cases, 21 controls). The study was covered by institutional review board approval and informed consent was obtained for review of all clinical investigations. Images were reviewed by an expert MRI reader who was blinded to clinical details. The presence or absence of morphologic features of enthesitis, apophyseal joint synovitis, and inflammation of posterior elements was assessed at each lumbar vertebral level. The apophyseal joint inflammation was graded from 0 to 3 using a grading system that was adapted from one used in adults with inflammatory facet osteoarthropathy. STATA software was used for data analysis. Results One or more abnormalities of the lumbar spine were found in 39 (67%) of 58 cases and sacroiliitis was present in 45 (78%) of the cases. Apophyseal joint synovitis was seen in 22 (38%) cases and in 1 (5%) control patient. This difference was highly significant (P = 0.004). Inflammatory changes in the interspinous ligaments were seen in a higher percentage of cases than controls and this observation was of statistical significance (P = 0.04). Conclusion Statistically significant inflammation of the lumbar apophyseal joints and interspinous ligaments was seen in our cohort of ERA patients, most of whom have concurrent sacroiliitis. This could be contributing to back pain in these patients. PMID:24127385

  19. Fatigue evaluation of lumbar muscles during repeated dynamic trunk exercise.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Minamitani, H; Ju, K; Wakano, K; Onishi, S; Yamazaki, H

    1996-06-01

    Muscle fatigue in the lumbar muscles for five normal subjects was investigated during repeated dynamic trunk exercise using a lumbar extension machine which is designed to isolated lumbar extension functions. The electromyogram (EMG) signal from erector spinae muscles at lumbar 1 (L1), lumbar 3 (L3) and lumbar 5 (L5) spinal level was detected by bipolar Ag-AgCl surface electrodes. Subjects were required to perform one set of variable resistance lumbar extensions through a 72 degrees range of motion (ROM) with a weight load (50% maximal voluntary contraction) that allowed 13 repetitions of fatigue contraction. Median frequency (MF) of EMG power spectrum was analyzed to compare the difference of fatigability between each lumbar muscle. The experimental results indicated: 1) each lumbar muscle has characteristic MF, especially at the beginning of the trunk exercise (i.e., L1 = 86 Hz, L3 = 96 Hz and L5 = 106 Hz); 2) Significant differences (P < 0.001) in MF between the beginning and the end of trunk exercise for all lumbar muscle sites; 3) Significant differences in the decreasing ratios of MF between L1, L3 and L5. Based on the theory that the decreasing ratio of MF is proportional to fatigability, L5 was more fatiguable than L1 and L3. PMID:8803496

  20. Comparative In-Hospital Morbidity and Mortality after Revision versus Primary Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Passias, Peter; Gaber-Baylis, Licia K.; Girardi, Federico P.; Memtsoudis, Stavros G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Context Despite increasing utilization of surgical spine fusions, a paucity of literature addressing perioperative complications after revision (RPSF) versus primary posterior spine fusions (PPSF) of the thoracic and lumbar spine exists. Purpose To examine demographics of patients undergoing PPSF and RPSF of the thoracic and lumbar spine, assess the incidence of perioperative morbidity and mortality, and determine independent risk factors for in-hospital death. Study Design/Setting Analysis of nationally representative data collected for the National Inpatient Sample (NIS). Patient Sample All discharges included in the NIS with a procedure code for posterior thoracic and lumbar spine fusion from 1998 to 2006. Outcome Measures In-hospital mortality and morbidity. Methods Data collected for each year between 1998 and 2006 for the National Inpatient Sample were analyzed. Discharges with a procedure code for thoracic and lumbar spine fusion were included in the sample. The prevalence of patient as well as health care system related demographics were evaluated by procedure type (primary vs. revision). Frequencies of procedure-related complications and in-hospital mortality were analyzed. Independent predictors for in-hospital mortality were determined. Results We identified 222,549 PPSF and 12,474 RPSF discharges between 1998 and 2006. Patients undergoing PPSF were significantly younger (51.23 (CI= [51.16, 51.31]) years) and had lower average comorbidity indices (0.40 (CI= [0.39, 0.41]) than those undergoing RPSF (52.69 (CI= [52.43, 52.97]) years and 0.44 (CI=[0.43, 0.45]), P<0.0001). The incidence of procedure related complications was 16.02% among RPSF compared to 13.44% in PPSF patients (P<0.0001). In- hospital mortality rates after PPSF were approximately twice those of RPSF (0.28% vs. 0.15%, P=0.006). Adjusted risk factors for increased in-hospital mortality included PPSF compared to RPSF, male gender, and increasing age. A number of comorbidities, complications, and specific surgical indications increased the risk for perioperative death. Conclusion Despite being performed in generally younger and healthier patients, and having lower perioperative morbidity, PPSF procedures are associated with increased mortality compared with RPSF procedures. The findings of this study can be used for risk stratification, accurate patient consultation, and hypothesis formation for future research. PMID:20869002

  1. CO2 laser posterior transverse cordotomy for isolated type IV posterior glottic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Gaboriau, H; Laccourreye, O; Laccourreye, H; Brasnu, D

    1995-01-01

    One case of isolated type IV posterior glottic stenosis successfully treated with CO2 laser posterior transverse cordotomy is presented. This report emphasized the value of the CO2 laser posterior transverse cordotomy in this situation. A review of the various therapeutic options advocated in the medical literature to treat isolated posterior glottic stenosis is also presented. PMID:7503381

  2. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercise on functional disability and lumbar lordosis angle in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Igsoo; Jeon, Chunbae; Lee, Sangyong; Lee, Daehee; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the functional disability and lumbar lordosis angles in patients with chronic low back pain. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 patients with chronic low back pain divided into a lumbar stabilization exercise group (n = 15) and a conservative treatment group (n = 15). [Methods] The lumbar stabilization exercise and conservative treatment groups performed an exercise program and conservative physical treatment, respectively. Both programs were performed 3 times a week for 6 weeks. The degree of functional disability was assessed by the Oswestry disability index, and lumbar lordosis angles were measured by plain radiography. [Results] The Oswestry disability index decreased significantly in the both groups; however, it was significantly lower in the lumbar stabilization exercise group. The lumbar lordosis angle increased significantly in the lumbar stabilization exercise group after treatment and was also significantly greater than that in the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] Lumbar stabilization exercise is more effective than conservative treatment for improving functional disability and lumbar lordosis angles. PMID:26180363

  3. [Osteoid osteoma of the posterior edge of the acetabular bone of the hip simulating a lumbo-radicular syndrome: a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Macario-Gioia, B; Sobrino, G

    1985-01-01

    The authors describe a clinic case regarding a 23 year-old man affected by an osteoid osteoma of the hip's posterior edge of the cotyloid cavity. The illness had been treated for two years as a lumbar disc syndrome. As any objective clinic sign missed at the hip's level and given the rarity of the location, only surgical removal was able to cure the patient. PMID:2952039

  4. Lumbar Cryptococcal Osteomyelitis Mimicking Metastatic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hyun Seok; Ha, Jung-Ki; Hwang, Chang Ju; Lee, Dong-Ho; Lee, Choon Sung

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus is an encapsulated, yeast-like fungus that rarely causes infection in immunocompetent patients. We present the case report of a 66-year-old female patient with a history of rectal cancer with an isolated lumbar vertebral cryptococcosis proven by biopsy performed during operation. The patient was not an immunocompromised host and did not have any other risk factors except the history of cured rectal cancer. The presumptive diagnosis based on imaging studies was metastatic spine cancer, so operation was performed. However, cryptococcal osteomyelitis was diagnosed in the pathologic examination. This case report emphasizes that we should be aware that lumbar cryptococcosis can be a rare cause of mimicking lesions with metastatic cancer. PMID:26435802

  5. [Repeated operations for recurrent lumbar disc herniations].

    PubMed

    Kloc, W; Imieli?ski, B L; Wasilewski, W; Jende, P; Puzyrewski, R

    1999-01-01

    A study of 73 patients who underwent reoperation for persistent or new complaints following initial lumbar discectomy is presented. 32 patients showed true recurrence of disc herniation (6 on the contralateral side) and 41 at a different level. 14 patients needed 3rd operation. Final results were evaluated using the Functional Economic Rating Scale elaborated by Prolo. Mean score for group operated on twice was 8.1 according to Prolo and 7.1 for group operated on 3 times. PMID:10791038

  6. Linear Lumbar Localized Lysis of Elastic Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Tschen, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The absence or loss of elastic fibers in the skin is referred to as dermal elastolysis. Purpose: This paper describes a woman with a distinctive clinical presentation of mid-dermal elastolysis characterized morphologically by multiple horizontal raised bands on the lower back. Methods: A 20-year-old Filipino woman presented with multiple asymptomatic, flesh-colored, raised, firm, linear, cord-like bands on the lumbar area of her back. There were neither similar lesions elsewhere nor a family member with this condition. Results: Microscopic examination of the raised band showed nearly complete absence of elastic fibers in the mid dermis. In contrast, a biopsy of symmetrically located normal-appearing skin showed a uniform distribution of elastic fibers throughout the dermis. Linear lumbar localized elastolysis is a descriptive designation that accurately reflects a correlation of the clinical and pathological changes of this condition. Conclusion: The clinical differential of raised horizontal cord-like bands on the lower back (without a family history of an inherited elastic fiber disorder, a prior history of trauma, or a significant change in weight or exercise habit) includes linear focal elastosis and linear lumbar localized elastolysis. Microscopic evaluation of a Verhoeff-van Gieson stained lesion specimen (which may be accompanied by a biopsy of normal-appearing skin for comparison) will readily differentiate these conditions. The former is usually characterized by increased elastic fibers, whereas the latter, as in this patient, shows a paucity or absence of elastic fibers in the mid dermis. PMID:23882313

  7. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years’ follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  8. The Effects of Stretching with Lumbar Traction on VAS and Oswestry Scales of Patients with Lumbar 4–5 Herniated Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hae-sun; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of stretching with lumbar traction on VAS and Oswestry scale scores of lumbar 4–5 herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) patients. [Subjects] We recruited 20 lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients. [Methods] We performed stretching with lumbar traction for lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients during 4 weeks. The VAS and Oswestry scales were measured before and 4 weeks after the intervention. [Results] The results showed a significant decrease in VAS scale scores for stretching with lumbar traction in lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients, from 18±1.29 to 2.1±1.35. The Oswestry scale scores also decreased significantly, from 20.35±2.01 to 3.5±2.84, after stretching with lumbar traction. [Conclusion] Thus, we suggest stretching with lumbar traction for lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients. PMID:25140094

  9. The Effects of Stretching with Lumbar Traction on VAS and Oswestry Scales of Patients with Lumbar 4-5 Herniated Intervertebral Disc.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hae-Sun; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of stretching with lumbar traction on VAS and Oswestry scale scores of lumbar 4-5 herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) patients. [Subjects] We recruited 20 lumbar 4-5 HIVD patients. [Methods] We performed stretching with lumbar traction for lumbar 4-5 HIVD patients during 4 weeks. The VAS and Oswestry scales were measured before and 4 weeks after the intervention. [Results] The results showed a significant decrease in VAS scale scores for stretching with lumbar traction in lumbar 4-5 HIVD patients, from 18±1.29 to 2.1±1.35. The Oswestry scale scores also decreased significantly, from 20.35±2.01 to 3.5±2.84, after stretching with lumbar traction. [Conclusion] Thus, we suggest stretching with lumbar traction for lumbar 4-5 HIVD patients. PMID:25140094

  10. Posterior muscle chain activity during various extension exercises: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Back extension exercises are often used in the rehabilitation of low back pain. However, at present it is not clear how the posterior muscles are recruited during different types of extension exercises. Therefore, the present study will evaluate the myoelectric activity of thoracic, lumbar and hip extensor muscles during different extension exercises in healthy persons. Based on these physiological observations we will make recommendations regarding the use of extensions exercises in clinical practice. Methods Fourteen healthy subjects performed four standardized extension exercises (dynamic trunk extension, dynamic-static trunk extension, dynamic leg extension, dynamic-static leg extension) in randomized order at an intensity of 60% of 1-RM (one repetition maximum). Surface EMG signals of Latissimus dorsi (LD), Longissimus thoracis pars thoracic (LTT) and lumborum (LTL), Iliocostalis lumborum pars thoracic (ILT) and lumborum (ILL), lumbar Multifidus (LM) and Gluteus Maximus (GM) were measured during the various exercises. Subsequently, EMG root mean square values were calculated and compared between trunk and leg extension exercises, as well as between a dynamic and dynamic-static performance using mixed model analysis. During the dynamic exercises a 2 second concentric contraction was followed by a 2 second eccentric contraction, whereas in the dynamic-static performance, a 5 second isometric interval was added in between the concentric and eccentric contraction phase. Results In general, the muscles of the posterior chain were recruited on a higher level during trunk extension (mean ± SD, 56.6 ± 30.8%MVC) compared to leg extension (47.4 ± 30.3%MVC) (p ? 0.001). No significant differences were found in mean muscle activity between dynamic and dynamic-static performances (p = 0.053). The thoracic muscles (LTT and ILT) were recruited more during trunk extension (64.9 ± 27.1%MVC) than during leg extension (54.2 ± 22.1%MVC) (p = 0.045) without significant differences in activity between both muscles (p = 0.138). There was no significant differences in thoracic muscle usage between the dynamic or dynamic-static performance of the extension exercises (p = 0.574). Lumbar muscle activity (LTT, ILL, LM) was higher during trunk extension (70.6?±?22.2%MVC) compared to leg extension (61.7?±?27.0%MVC) (p?=?0.047). No differences in myoelectric activity between the lumbar muscles could be demonstrated during the extension exercises (p?=?0.574). During each exercise the LD (19.2?±?13.9%MVC) and GM (28.2?±?14.6%MVC) were recruited significantly less than the thoracic and lumbar muscles. Conclusion The recruitment of the posterior muscle chain during different types of extension exercises was influenced by the moving body part, but not by the type of contraction. All muscle groups were activated at a higher degree during trunk extension compared to leg extension. Based on the recruitment level of the different muscles, all exercises can be used to improve the endurance capacity of thoracic muscles, however for improvement of lumbar muscle endurance leg extension exercises seem to be more appropriate. To train the endurance capacity of the LD and GM extension exercises are not appropriate. PMID:23834759

  11. Comparison of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy and Open Lumbar Surgery for Adjacent Segment Degeneration and Recurrent Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-Chieh; Lee, Chih-Hsun; Wei, Li; Lui, Tai-Ngar; Lin, Tien-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The goal of the present study was to examine the clinical results of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and open lumbar surgery for patients with adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) and recurrence of disc herniation. Methods. From December 2011 to November 2013, we collected forty-three patients who underwent repeated lumbar surgery. These patients, either received PELD (18 patients) or repeated open lumbar surgery (25 patients), due to ASD or recurrence of disc herniation at L3-4, L4-5, or L5-S1 level, were assigned to different groups according to the surgical approaches. Clinical data were assessed and compared. Results. Mean blood loss was significantly less in the PELD group as compared to the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Hospital stay and mean operating time were shorter significantly in the PELD group as compared to the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Immediate postoperative pain improvement in VAS was 3.5 in the PELD group and ?0.56 in the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. For ASD and recurrent lumbar disc herniation, PELD had more advantages over open lumbar surgery in terms of reduced blood loss, shorter hospital stay, operating time, fewer complications, and less postoperative discomfort. PMID:25861474

  12. The implications of constraint in lumbar total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Russel C; Girardi, Federico P; Cammisa, Frank P; Wright, Timothy M

    2003-08-01

    Lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) is an evolving technique that has the potential to replace arthrodesis as the gold standard surgical treatment of degenerative disc disease. The interaction between host anatomy and physiology and the biomechanical properties of TDR implants will determine the quality of long-term clinical results. However, there is scant literature addressing this subject. The purpose of this article is to discuss the implications of biomechanical constraint in TDR. Based upon available data for normal motion segments and the design of two TDRs currently in clinical trials, unconstrained designs appear to have a kinematic advantage. They are more likely to provide a physiologic mobile instantaneous axis of rotation (IAR), which may explain why they display greater range of motion in vivo. Their lack of constraint may prevent excessive facet joint or capsuloligamentous loads in the extremes of flexion and extension. Furthermore, since the IAR is mobile, they may be less sensitive to small errors in implant placement. On the other hand, constrained devices appear to have an advantage in protection of the posterior elements from shear loading. Spinal shear loads of considerable magnitude occur during activities of daily living. Whether the transference of stresses to the implant and implant-bone interface is clinically significant is unknown. Although this article focuses on two specific TDR designs, future designs will need to account for the same kinematic and loading concerns regarding constraint. We hope this discussion will assist clinicians and researchers in the design, selection, and clinical comparison of present and future TDR implants. PMID:12902958

  13. Surgical Outcome of Reduction and Instrumented Fusion in Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Hassankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Shiravani, Reza; Mirkazemi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (LDS) is a degenerative slippage of the lumbar vertebrae. We aimed to evaluate the surgical outcome of degenerative spondylolisthesis with neural decompression, pedicular screw fixation, reduction, and posterolateral fusion. Methods: This before-after study was carried out on 45 patients (37 female and 8 male) with LDS operated from August 2008 to January 2011. The patients’ pain and disability were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) questionnaire. In surgery, we applied distraction force to facilitate slip reduction. All the intra- and postoperative complications were recorded. The paired t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean age of patients and mean follow-up period were 58.3±3.5 years and 31.2±4.8 months, respectively. The mean slip correction rate was 52.2% with a mean correction loss of 4.8%. Preoperative VAS and ODI improved from 8.8 and 71.6 to postoperative 2.1 and 28.7, respectively. Clinical improvement was more prominent in more reduced patients, but Pearson coefficient could not find a significant correlation. Conclusion: Although spinal decompression with fusion and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment of the patients with LDS result in satisfactory outcome, vertebral reduction cannot significantly enhance the clinical improvement. PMID:26722140

  14. Remote Hemorrhage in the Cerebellum and Temporal Lobe after Lumbar Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shotaro; Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Inoue, Gen; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao; Okawa, Akihiko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar hemorrhage remote from the site of surgery can complicate neurosurgical procedures. However, this complication after lumbar surgery is rare. Furthermore, hemorrhage in both the cerebellum and the temporal lobe after spine surgery is rarer still. Herein we present a case of remote hemorrhage in both the cerebellum and the temporal lobe after lumbar spine surgery. A 79-year-old woman with a Schwannoma at the L4 level presented with low back and bilateral leg pain refractory to conservative management. Surgery was undertaken to remove the Schwannoma and to perform posterior fusion. During the surgery, the dura mater was removed in order to excise the Schwannoma. Reconstruction of the dura mater was performed; postoperatively the patient had a cerebrospinal fluid leak. Five days after surgery, clouding of consciousness started gradually, and hemorrhage in the cerebellum and the temporal lobe was revealed by computed tomography. Emergent evacuation of the hemorrhage was performed and the patient recovered consciousness after the surgery. Leakage of cerebrospinal fluid may have induced this hemorrhage. While rare, intracranial hemorrhage after spine surgery can occur, sometimes requiring emergent intervention. PMID:26339517

  15. Motion-preserving technologies for degenerative lumbar spine: The past, present, and future horizons

    PubMed Central

    Serhan, Hassan; Mhatre, Devdatt; Defossez, Henri; Bono, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few decades, remarkable advancements in the understanding of the origin of low-back pain and lumbar spinal disorders have been achieved. Spinal fusion is generally considered the “gold standard” in the treatment of low-back pain; however, fusion is also associated with accelerated degeneration of adjacent levels. Spinal arthroplasty and dynamic stabilization technologies, as well as the continuous improvement in diagnosis and surgical interventions, have opened a new era of treatment options. Recent advancements in nonfusion technologies such as motion-preservation devices and posterior dynamic stabilization may change the gold standard. These devices are designed with the intent to provide stabilization and eliminate pain while preserving motion of the functional spinal unit. The adaption of nonfusion technologies by the surgical community and payers for the treatment of degenerative spinal conditions will depend on the long-term clinical outcome of controlled randomized clinical studies. Although the development of nonfusion technology has just started and the adoption is very slow, it may be considered a viable option for motion preservation in coming years. This review article provides technical and surgical views from the past and from the present, as well as a glance at the future endeavors and challenges in instrumentation development for lumbar spinal disorders. © 2011 SAS - The International Society for the Advancement of Spine Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. PMID:25802672

  16. A Minimally Invasive Endoscopic Surgery for Infectious Spondylodiscitis of the Thoracic and Upper Lumbar Spine in Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chuan; Huang, Teng-Le; Chen, Yen-Jen; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Lin, Wei-Ching; Hung, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Chen, Hsien-Te

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the safety and effectiveness of computed tomography- (CT-) assisted endoscopic surgery in the treatment of infectious spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and upper lumbar spine in immunocompromised patients. From October 2006 to March 2014, a total of 41 patients with infectious spondylodiscitis underwent percutaneous endoscopic surgery under local anesthesia, and 13 lesions from 13 patients on the thoracic or upper lumbar spine were selected for evaluation. A CT-guided catheter was placed before percutaneous endoscopic surgery as a guide to avoid injury to visceral organs, major vessels, and the spinal cord. All 13 patients had quick pain relief after endoscopic surgery without complications. The bacterial culture rate was 77%. Inflammatory parameters returned to normal after adequate antibiotic treatment. Postoperative radiographs showed no significant kyphotic deformity when compared with preoperative films. As of the last follow-up visit, no recurrent infections were noted. Traditional transthoracic or diaphragmatic surgery with or without posterior instrumentation is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, especially in elderly patients, patients with multiple comorbidities, or immunocompromised patients. Percutaneous endoscopic surgery assisted by a CT-guided catheter provides a safe and effective alternative treatment for infectious spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and upper lumbar spine. PMID:26273644

  17. A Minimally Invasive Endoscopic Surgery for Infectious Spondylodiscitis of the Thoracic and Upper Lumbar Spine in Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Chuan; Huang, Teng-Le; Chen, Yen-Jen; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Lin, Wei-Ching; Hung, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Chen, Hsien-Te

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the safety and effectiveness of computed tomography- (CT-) assisted endoscopic surgery in the treatment of infectious spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and upper lumbar spine in immunocompromised patients. From October 2006 to March 2014, a total of 41 patients with infectious spondylodiscitis underwent percutaneous endoscopic surgery under local anesthesia, and 13 lesions from 13 patients on the thoracic or upper lumbar spine were selected for evaluation. A CT-guided catheter was placed before percutaneous endoscopic surgery as a guide to avoid injury to visceral organs, major vessels, and the spinal cord. All 13 patients had quick pain relief after endoscopic surgery without complications. The bacterial culture rate was 77%. Inflammatory parameters returned to normal after adequate antibiotic treatment. Postoperative radiographs showed no significant kyphotic deformity when compared with preoperative films. As of the last follow-up visit, no recurrent infections were noted. Traditional transthoracic or diaphragmatic surgery with or without posterior instrumentation is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, especially in elderly patients, patients with multiple comorbidities, or immunocompromised patients. Percutaneous endoscopic surgery assisted by a CT-guided catheter provides a safe and effective alternative treatment for infectious spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and upper lumbar spine. PMID:26273644

  18. 49 CFR 572.43 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.43 Section 572.43 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY... Percentile Male § 572.43 Lumbar spine and pelvis. (a) When the pelvis of a fully assembled dummy...

  19. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lumbar spine flexure. 572.85 Section 572.85... Lumbar spine flexure. (a) When subjected to continuously applied force in accordance with paragraph...

  20. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine flexure. 572.85 Section 572.85... Lumbar spine flexure. (a) When subjected to continuously applied force in accordance with paragraph...

  1. 49 CFR 572.43 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.43 Section 572.43 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY... Percentile Male § 572.43 Lumbar spine and pelvis. (a) When the pelvis of a fully assembled dummy...

  2. 49 CFR 572.43 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.43 Section 572.43 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY... Percentile Male § 572.43 Lumbar spine and pelvis. (a) When the pelvis of a fully assembled dummy...

  3. 49 CFR 572.43 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.43 Section 572.43 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY... Percentile Male § 572.43 Lumbar spine and pelvis. (a) When the pelvis of a fully assembled dummy...

  4. The Robotic Lumbar Spine (RLS): Dynamics and Feedback Linearization Control

    E-print Network

    Williams II, Robert L.

    The Robotic Lumbar Spine (RLS): Dynamics and Feedback Linearization Control Ernur Karadogan. Karadogan and R.L. Williams II, 2013, "The Robotic Lumbar Spine (RLS): Dynamics and Feedback Linearization Spine (RLS): Dynamics and Feedback Linearization Control Ernur Karadogan 1 and Robert L. Williams II 2 1

  5. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lumbar spine flexure. 572.85 Section 572.85... Lumbar spine flexure. (a) When subjected to continuously applied force in accordance with paragraph...

  6. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lumbar spine flexure. 572.85 Section 572.85... Lumbar spine flexure. (a) When subjected to continuously applied force in accordance with paragraph...

  7. 49 CFR 572.43 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.43 Section 572.43 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY... Percentile Male § 572.43 Lumbar spine and pelvis. (a) When the pelvis of a fully assembled dummy...

  8. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rotate from its initial position in accordance with Figure No. 18 of § 572.21 (49 CFR part 572) by 40... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine flexure. 572.85 Section 572.85... Lumbar spine flexure. (a) When subjected to continuously applied force in accordance with paragraph...

  9. The Robotic Lumbar Spine: Dynamics and Feedback Linearization Control

    PubMed Central

    Karadogan, Ernur; Williams, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The robotic lumbar spine (RLS) is a 15 degree-of-freedom, fully cable-actuated robotic lumbar spine which can mimic in vivo human lumbar spine movements to provide better hands-on training for medical students. The design incorporates five active lumbar vertebrae and the sacrum, with dimensions of an average adult human spine. It is actuated by 20 cables connected to electric motors. Every vertebra is connected to the neighboring vertebrae by spherical joints. Medical schools can benefit from a tool, system, or method that will help instructors train students and assess their tactile proficiency throughout their education. The robotic lumbar spine has the potential to satisfy these needs in palpatory diagnosis. Medical students will be given the opportunity to examine their own patient that can be programmed with many dysfunctions related to the lumbar spine before they start their professional lives as doctors. The robotic lumbar spine can be used to teach and test medical students in their capacity to be able to recognize normal and abnormal movement patterns of the human lumbar spine under flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. This paper presents the dynamics and nonlinear control of the RLS. A new approach to solve for positive and nonzero cable tensions that are also continuous in time is introduced. PMID:24151527

  10. A Review of Lesions of the Posterior Fourchette, Posterior Vestibule (Fossa Navicularis), and Hymen.

    PubMed

    Heller, Debra S

    2015-07-01

    Lesions specific to the posterior fourchette, posterior vestibule (fossa navicularis), and hymen are reviewed. Knowledge of these regional lesions will be helpful if such a patient is encountered. PMID:25943866

  11. Stochastic predictors from the DXA scans of human lumbar vertebrae are correlated with the microarchitecture parameters of trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xuanliang Neil; Pinninti, Rajeshwar; Tvinnereim, Amy; Lowe, Timothy; Di Paolo, David; Shirvaikar, Mukul

    2015-09-18

    The purpose of this study was to provide a novel stochastic assessment of inhomogeneous distribution of bone mineral density (BMD) from the Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) scans of human lumbar vertebrae and identify the stochastic predictors that were correlated with the microarchitecture parameters of trabecular bone. Eighteen human lumbar vertebrae with intact posterior elements from 5 cadaveric spines were scanned in the posterior-anterior projection using a Hologic densitometer. The BMD map of human vertebrae was obtained from the raw data of DXA scans by directly operating on the transmission measurements of low- and high-energy X-ray beams. Stochastic predictors were calculated by fitting theoretical models onto the experimental variogram of the BMD map, rather than grayscale images, from DXA scans. In addition, microarchitecture parameters of trabecular bone were measured from the 3D images of human vertebrae acquired using a Micro-CT scanner. Significant correlations were observed between stochastic predictors and microarchitecture parameters. The sill variance, representing the standard deviation of the BMD map to some extent, had significantly positive correlations with bone volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular number and connectivity density. The sill variance was also negatively associated with bone surface to volume ratio and trabecular separation. This study demonstrates that the stochastic assessment of the inhomogeneous distribution of BMD from DXA scans of human lumbar vertebrae can reveal microarchitecture information of trabecular bone. However, future studies are needed to examine the potential of stochastic predictors from routine clinical DXA scans in providing bone fragility information complementary to BMD. PMID:26300404

  12. Two-level traumatic lateral lumbar fracture and dislocation in a heavy equipment operator: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Yaoki; Kajino, Tomomichi

    2013-01-01

    Objective Lumbar fracture-dislocations are rare and invariably due to high-energy trauma. The purpose of this study is to report the surgical management of a man with lateral lumbar dislocations in 2 noncontiguous lesions. Clinical features A 49-year-old Asian man was crushed by a bulldozer. The patient was transported to a major medical center where he was found to be conscious, and the primary spinal injuries were fracture-dislocation of L1-L2 and L4-L5. His preoperative neurologic status showed a partial paraparesis to all motor groups of the lower extremities bilaterally. His radiological and operative findings showed a rupture of the thoracolumbar fascia and latissimus dorsi muscle, left L1-L2 dislocated facet, right L4-5 facet fracture, and dural tear. Intervention and outcome The patient underwent a posterior reduction, decompression, instrumentation, and fusion surgery from T12 to S1 with autologous bone graft and pedicle screw instrumentation. Postoperatively, his neurologic status improved, allowing him to be ambulatory using a Lofstrand crutch with improved lumbosacral alignment being well maintained. Two weeks postoperatively, the patient regained voluntary bowel and bladder function. At the 1-year follow-up evaluation, his motor power was full in the left leg; however, sensation to pin prick remained lost on the right L5 and S1 distributions. He continued to ambulate using a Lofstrand crutch. Conclusion Lateral lumbar fracture-dislocation at 2 noncontiguous levels is an unusual injury that results from high-energy trauma. Prompt recognition of the injuries, reduction of the fracture-dislocations, and posterior stabilization are recommended for neural decompression, spinal alignment, and long-term stabilization. PMID:24396320

  13. Bacterial meningitis associated with lumbar drains: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Coplin, W.; Avellino, A.; Kim, D; Winn, H; Grady, M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The infective potential of lumbar drainage is an important topic deserving particular study. The aetiology, incidence, and clinical findings associated with bacterial meningitis are described in patients having continuous lumbar CSF drainage to treat communicating hydrocephalus after subarachnoid haemorrhage or CSF leaks after traumatic dural rents.?METHODS—Retrospective review of the records of patients with a positive CSF bacterial culture who underwent lumbar drain placement over a 39 month period.?RESULTS—Thirteen cases of bacterial meningitis occurred subsequent to the use of 312 lumbar drain kits (4.2%). All meningitic patients had CSF pleocytosis, but not all had peripheral leukocytosis. Fever, peripheral leukocytosis, and CSF pleocytosis did not help to differentiate the presence of bacterial meningitis from other infections. Eight patients had prior CSF drainage procedures, including ventriculostomy (n=5) or lumbar drain (n=5) placements; two patients received both procedures. Six of 13 patients developed their CSF infection within 24 hours of lumbar drain insertion. Six of 13 patients developed meningitis while receiving antibiotics for other reasons.?CONCLUSIONS—External lumbar drainage seems to carry a low risk of infectious meningitis and offers a safe alternative to ventriculostomy or serial lumbar punctures. Antibiotics do not seem to protect completely against developing the infection. The infection happens most often with skin organisms. The meningitis often appears within 24 hours after lumbar drain placement. Daily CSF samples should include bacterial cultures but cell counts may not offer any additional useful information in diagnosing the complication. Lumbar drain insertion and management need not be confined to the intensive care unit.?? PMID:10486393

  14. Establishment of a new animal model for ischemic lumbar vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Changlong; Tan, Guosheng; Zhuang, Wenquan; Yang, Jianyong

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration and ischemia of lumbar intervertebral disc has become a more and more important issue for elder people. However the mechanism for this is still known, largely due to a lack of a suitable animal model. In this study, we constructed a new animal model for the study of ischemic lumbar vertebrae. 42 New Zealand white rabbits were chosen for the study. For each rabbit, two vertebrae were used. L5 was set as the experimental group and L4 was set as the control group. Percutaneous lumbar puncture needles were applied in vertebrae adjacent to endplate for L5 and L4. For L4 1 ml saline was injected and for L5 1 ml pingyangmycin (2 mg/mL) was used. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 weeks; 2 and 3 months after surgery, 6 rabbits at each time point were randomly chosen and underwent MRI, pathological test. The results in L5 and L4 were compared. Another 6 rabbits were used for DSA (Digital Subtraction Angiography) and vascular cast to study the length and diameters of the branches of lumbar artery. It was identified that since the third week, slightly hyperintense signal on T2-weighted image (T2WI) and fat-suppression T2-weighted image (FS T2WI) were detected. Lumbar vertebrae damage could be identified since the fourth week. Results of MRI and the size of pathological area were positively related (r=0.965, P<0.05). DSA and vascular cast could both clearly show the third level branches of lumbar artery. Our study suggested that injection of pingyangmycin via percutaneous lumbar needle could successfully induce ischemia in lumbar endplate. This method had little trauma, required a simple operation process and is highly repetitive. Besides, by vascular cast, the most important source of blood supply is the media branch of the lumbar artery. This branch could be a new therapy pathway for the degeneration of lumbar vertebrae. PMID:26379856

  15. Posterior approach to kidney dissection: An old surgical approach for integrated medical curricula.

    PubMed

    Daly, Frank J; Bolender, David L; Jain, Deepali; Uyeda, Sheryl; Hoagland, Todd M

    2015-11-12

    Integrated medical curricular changes are altering the historical regional anatomy approach to abdominal dissection. The renal system is linked physiologically and biochemically to the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; yet, anatomists often approach the urinary system as part of the abdomen and pelvic regions. As part of an integrated curriculum, the renal system must be covered relatively quickly after the thorax in the cadaver laboratory, often without the opportunity to fully appreciate the rest of the abdominal contents. This article provides dissection instructions that follow one of the historical surgical approaches for nephrectomy, including preservation of the posterior abdominal wall neurovasclature. Dissection procedures were developed for first-year medical students, intending this posterior approach to the kidneys to be their first introduction to the renal system. It has been successfully implemented with the first-year medical students at the University of New England, College of Osteopathic Medicine. Utilizing this posterior approach to the kidney enabled the study of the anatomy of the kidneys, suprarenal glands, and renal vessels, as well as the muscles of the lumbar spine, while maintaining the integrity of the anterior abdominal wall and peritoneal cavity for future gastrointestinal and reproductive system-based dissections. Anat Sci Educ 8: 555-563. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:25688744

  16. Management of traumatic double-level spondyloptosis of the thoracic spine with posterior spondylectomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Rahimizadeh, Abolfazl; Rahimizadeh, Ava

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic spondyloptosis of the thoracic spine is an uncommon injury. In most cases, spondyloptosis is confined to one vertebral body, whereas double-level spondyloptosis is extremely rare. Most patients who sustain traumatic spondyloptosis immediately become paraplegic, but in some cases neurological function is preserved. If this occurs, it is due to detachment of the pedicles from the corresponding vertebral body, resulting in spontaneous decompression of neural elements. Herein, the authors describe a case of undetected traumatic double-level spondyloptosis in the upper thoracic region in an adult male patient who was neurologically intact for 2 days but later became paraplegic. Initially, management of this pathology seemed a very challenging scenario. However, with review of the reconstructed CT images and reproduction of the injury on a plastic model, a posterior-only approach was chosen as an alternative operative solution for this catastrophic injury. Via this single-stage posterior approach, long-segment pedicle screw/rod instrumentation resulted in successful reduction, restoration of alignment, and stabilization after 1-level posterior spondylectomy. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first example reported in the literature of double-level spondyloptosis of the thoracic and the lumbar spine. This report describes the rationale, mechanism, and technical details afforded for reduction and stabilization of this rare injury. PMID:26296192

  17. Secondary closure of posterior continuous circular capsulorhexis.

    PubMed

    Tassignon, M J; De Groot, V; Smets, R M; Tawab, B; Vervecken, F

    1996-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that removing the center of the posterior capsule would reduce the risk for posterior opacification (PCO). We considered the prevalence of post-operative complications after PCCC like retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema, as found after Nd-YAG laser capsulotomy. PMID:9009367

  18. RESEARCH ARTICLE Posterior Probability Matching and Human

    E-print Network

    Murray, Richard

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Posterior Probability Matching and Human Perceptual Decision Making Richard F making that was first developed in mod- els of cognition. Posterior probability matching, a variant probability matching behaviour, and our meth- ods provide new tools for testing for such a strategy. Author

  19. 49 CFR 572.75 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and...) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 6-Year-Old Child § 572.75 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure. (a) Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly. The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist...

  20. 49 CFR 572.75 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and...) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 6-Year-Old Child § 572.75 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure. (a) Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly. The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist...

  1. [Lumbar spondylodiscitis caused by Salmonella enteritidis].

    PubMed

    Schüler, A; Schaumann, D; Manns, M P; Koch, K M

    1994-10-14

    A 19-year-old boy developed paravertebral muscular pain in the lumbar region after an episode of extremely arduous sporting activity, with fever followed by meningism. The cerebrospinal fluid showed a reactive pleocytosis. Initially, no acute inflammatory changes were present on serum and blood analysis, although the erythrocyte sedimentation rate was moderately increased to 25/60 mm. Pyrexia of up to 38.5 degrees C developed 6 days after admission. Because Borrelia IgM and IgG titres were positive, the diagnosis was at first thought to be atypical borreliosis and the patient was treated with antibiotics. However, after a further episode of fever. Salmonella antibody titres, which had initially been normal, rose to 1: 3200 (Salmonella typhi O and H antigens) and 1: 12800 (Salmonella enteritidis, H antigen). At this stage, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate rose to 86/120 mm and the C-reactive protein to 77 mg/dl. The white cell count remained normal throughout. Blood cultures grew Salmonella enteritidis. Abnormalities on bone scintigraphy were confirmed by CT and MRI scans, showing spondylodiscitis of lumbar vertebrae 1 and 2 with limited osteolysis. The lesion resolved completely on 6 week's treatment with ciprofloxacin (200 mg twice a day intravenously) and conservative supportive treatment. Spondylodiscitis is an uncommon complication of salmonellosis and may occur long after the diarrhoea. Cross reactions with Borrelia flagellin antigens may lead to the wrong diagnosis being made. PMID:7924947

  2. Posterior capsule staining and posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis in congenital cataract.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Taketoshi; Yamamoto, Narumichi

    2002-11-01

    We report 2 cases of indocyanine green (ICG) staining used for posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (PCCC) in congenital cataract combined with anterior vitrectomy. In the first case, because of corneal opacity, the visibility of the posterior capsule was poor without staining. After the extraction of the cataract, a PCCC was performed after ICG staining of the posterior capsule. In the second case, after cataract removal, ICG staining was used to better visualize the posterior capsule. In both cases, the PCCC was successfully completed because of better visualization of the stained posterior capsule flap against the transparent anterior hyaloid face of the vitreous. Clear visual axes have been maintained. PMID:12457683

  3. Adverse Event Recording and Reporting in Clinical Trials Comparing Lumbar Disk Replacement with Lumbar Fusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Jayme; Rastegar, Farbod; Contag, Alec G; Norvell, Daniel C; Anderson, Paul A; Hart, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Study Design?Systematic review. Objectives?(1) To compare the quality of adverse event (AE) methodology and reporting among randomized trials comparing lumbar fusion with lumbar total disk replacement (TDR) using established AE reporting systems; (2) to compare the AEs and reoperations of lumbar spinal fusion with those from lumbar TDR; (3) to make recommendations on how to report AEs in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) so that surgeons and patients have more-detailed and comprehensive information when making treatment decisions. Methods?A systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane collaboration database, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse through May 2015 was conducted. Randomized controlled trials with at least 2 years of follow-up comparing lumbar artificial disk replacement with lumbar fusion were included. Patients were required to have axial or mechanical low back pain of ?3 months' duration due to degenerative joint disease defined as degenerative disk disease, facet joint disease, or spondylosis. Outcomes included the quality of AE acquisition methodology and results reporting, and AEs were defined as those secondary to the procedure and reoperations. Individual and pooled relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals comparing lumbar TDR with fusion were calculated. Results?RCTs demonstrated a generally poor description of methods for assessing AEs. There was a consistent lack of clear definition or grading for these events. Furthermore, there was a high degree of variation in reporting of surgery-related AEs. Most studies lacked adequate reporting of the timing of AEs, and there were no clear distinctions between acute or chronic AEs. Meta-analysis of the pooled data demonstrated a twofold increased risk of AEs in patients having lumbar fusion compared with patients having lumbar TDR at 2-year follow-up, and this relative risk was maintained at 5 years. Furthermore, the pooled data demonstrated a 1.7 times greater relative risk of reoperation in the fusion group compared with lumbar TDR, although this risk decreased to 1.1 at 5-year follow-up. However, given the lack of quality and consistency in the methods of recording and reporting of AEs, we are unable to make a clear recommendation of one treatment over the other. Conclusions?Based on the currently available literature, lumbar TDR appears to be comparable in safety to lumbar fusion. However, due to lack of consistency in reporting of AEs, it is difficult to make conclusions regarding the true safety profile of lumbar TDR. Standardization in AE reporting will significantly improve the reliability of the current literature. PMID:26682099

  4. Adverse Event Recording and Reporting in Clinical Trials Comparing Lumbar Disk Replacement with Lumbar Fusion: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hiratzka, Jayme; Rastegar, Farbod; Contag, Alec G.; Norvell, Daniel C.; Anderson, Paul A.; Hart, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Systematic review. Objectives?(1) To compare the quality of adverse event (AE) methodology and reporting among randomized trials comparing lumbar fusion with lumbar total disk replacement (TDR) using established AE reporting systems; (2) to compare the AEs and reoperations of lumbar spinal fusion with those from lumbar TDR; (3) to make recommendations on how to report AEs in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) so that surgeons and patients have more-detailed and comprehensive information when making treatment decisions. Methods?A systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane collaboration database, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse through May 2015 was conducted. Randomized controlled trials with at least 2 years of follow-up comparing lumbar artificial disk replacement with lumbar fusion were included. Patients were required to have axial or mechanical low back pain of ?3 months' duration due to degenerative joint disease defined as degenerative disk disease, facet joint disease, or spondylosis. Outcomes included the quality of AE acquisition methodology and results reporting, and AEs were defined as those secondary to the procedure and reoperations. Individual and pooled relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals comparing lumbar TDR with fusion were calculated. Results?RCTs demonstrated a generally poor description of methods for assessing AEs. There was a consistent lack of clear definition or grading for these events. Furthermore, there was a high degree of variation in reporting of surgery-related AEs. Most studies lacked adequate reporting of the timing of AEs, and there were no clear distinctions between acute or chronic AEs. Meta-analysis of the pooled data demonstrated a twofold increased risk of AEs in patients having lumbar fusion compared with patients having lumbar TDR at 2-year follow-up, and this relative risk was maintained at 5 years. Furthermore, the pooled data demonstrated a 1.7 times greater relative risk of reoperation in the fusion group compared with lumbar TDR, although this risk decreased to 1.1 at 5-year follow-up. However, given the lack of quality and consistency in the methods of recording and reporting of AEs, we are unable to make a clear recommendation of one treatment over the other. Conclusions?Based on the currently available literature, lumbar TDR appears to be comparable in safety to lumbar fusion. However, due to lack of consistency in reporting of AEs, it is difficult to make conclusions regarding the true safety profile of lumbar TDR. Standardization in AE reporting will significantly improve the reliability of the current literature. PMID:26682099

  5. Radiographic assessment of posterior malleolar ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Olga; Fleming, Justin J; Meyr, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The anatomy of the posterior tibial malleolus plays an important role in the structure and function of the ankle mortise. With specific respect to ankle fractures, the presence, size, and displacement of posterior malleolar fractures (Volkmann's fracture) helps determine which will be amendable to operative fixation. The objective of the present study was to increase the body of knowledge with respect to the ability of foot and ankle reconstructive surgeons to assess posterior malleolar ankle fractures using plain film radiography. Three different variables were investigated on Sawbones(®) models: (1) differing size of posterior malleolar fractures (10%, 25%, and 50% of the tibial plafond), (2) differing displacement of posterior malleolar fractures (0 and 5 mm of proximal displacement), and (3) 2 different radiographic projections (standard lateral and externally rotated lateral projections). Accurate identification of the posterior malleolar fracture occurred on 86.67% (26 of 30) of standard lateral radiographs and 100% (30 of 30) of externally rotated lateral radiographs. Furthermore, the surgeons described the fracture with greater precision and had greater interclass correlation coefficient values with respect to measurement of sagittal plane displacement (0.977 versus 0.939) and percentage of involvement of the tibial plafond (0.972 versus 0.775) with an externally rotated lateral projection compared with a standard lateral projection. Our results provide evidence that an externally rotated lateral radiographic projection can provide surgeons with some additional information with respect to the presence, size, and displacement of posterior malleolar ankle fractures. PMID:25262838

  6. Congenital basis of posterior fossa anomalies.

    PubMed

    Cotes, Claudia; Bonfante, Eliana; Lazor, Jillian; Jadhav, Siddharth; Caldas, Maria; Swischuk, Leonard; Riascos, Roy

    2015-06-01

    The classification of posterior fossa congenital anomalies has been a controversial topic. Advances in genetics and imaging have allowed a better understanding of the embryologic development of these abnormalities. A new classification schema correlates the embryologic, morphologic, and genetic bases of these anomalies in order to better distinguish and describe them. Although they provide a better understanding of the clinical aspects and genetics of these disorders, it is crucial for the radiologist to be able to diagnose the congenital posterior fossa anomalies based on their morphology, since neuroimaging is usually the initial step when these disorders are suspected. We divide the most common posterior fossa congenital anomalies into two groups: 1) hindbrain malformations, including diseases with cerebellar or vermian agenesis, aplasia or hypoplasia and cystic posterior fossa anomalies; and 2) cranial vault malformations. In addition, we will review the embryologic development of the posterior fossa and, from the perspective of embryonic development, will describe the imaging appearance of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. Knowledge of the developmental bases of these malformations facilitates detection of the morphological changes identified on imaging, allowing accurate differentiation and diagnosis of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. PMID:26246090

  7. Retrolisthesis and lumbar disc herniation: a postoperative assessment of patient function

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kevin K.; Shen, Michael S.; Zhao, Wenyan; Lurie, Jon D.; Razi, Afshin E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT The presence of retrolisthesis has been associated with the degenerative changes of the lumbar spine. However, retrolisthesis in patients with L5–S1 disc herniation has not been shown to have a significant relationship with worse baseline pain or function. Whether it can affect the outcomes after discectomy, is yet to be established. PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between retrolisthesis (alone or in combination with other degenerative conditions) and postoperative low back pain, physical function, and quality of life. This study was intended to be a follow-up to a previous investigation that looked at the preoperative assessment of patient function in those with retrolisthesis and lumbar disc herniation. STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional study. PATIENT SAMPLE Patients enrolled in SPORT (Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial) who had undergone L5–S1 discectomy and had a complete magnetic resonance imaging scan available for review (n=125). Individuals with anterolisthesis were excluded. OUTCOME MEASURES Time-weighted averages over 4 years for the Short Form (SF)-36 bodily pain scale, SF-36 physical function scale, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Sciatica Bothersomeness Index (SBI). METHODS Retrolisthesis was defined as a posterior subluxation of 8% or more. Disc degeneration was defined as any loss of disc signal on T2 imaging. Modic changes were graded 1 to 3 and collectively classified as vertebral end plate degenerative changes. The presence of facet arthropathy and ligamentum flavum hypertrophy was classified jointly as posterior degenerative changes. Longitudinal regression models were used to compare the time-weighted outcomes over 4 years. RESULTS Patients with retrolisthesis did significantly worse with regard to bodily pain and physical function over 4 years. However, there were no significant differences in terms of ODI or SBI. Similarly, retrolisthesis was not a significant factor in the operative time, blood loss, lengths of stay, complications, rate of additional spine surgeries, or recurrent disc herniations. Disc degeneration, modic changes, and posterior degenerative changes did not affect the outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Although retrolisthesis in patients with L5–S1 disc herniation did not affect the baseline pain or function, postoperative outcomes appeared to be somewhat worse. It is possible that the contribution of pain or dysfunction related to retrolisthesis became more evident after removal of the disc herniation. PMID:23201024

  8. Cervical branching of lumbar vestibulospinal axons

    PubMed Central

    Abzug, C.; Maeda, M.; Peterson, B. W.; Wilson, V. J.; Bean, C. P.

    1974-01-01

    1. We have investigated the possibility that individual lateral vestibulospinal tract (LVST) axons branch so as to innervate more than one spinal cord level. 2. LVST cells in Deiters' nucleus were activated antidromically by means of electrical stimulation applied through fine metal electrodes inserted into the spinal cord. Both by directly measuring the spread of effect of stimulus current, and from theoretical considerations (Appendix), we determined that in most cases an estimate of spread of effect of stimulus current was 10 ?m/?A. From the magnitude of the threshold stimulus and from the location of the stimulus point we could often exclude the possibility that the stimulus was spreading to the LVST instead of activating local branches. 3. Movable stimulating electrodes, or multi-electrode arrays placed in fixed position, were used to activate 115 LVST neurones antidromically by stimulation of local branches in the lower cervical or upper thoracic cord. Of these cells, 50% were also fired antidromically by stimulation of the LVST at levels ranging from L1 to L4 (Lc cells). The remaining cells were not activated by the lumbar stimulus (C cells). An additional group of cells was only fired by the lumbar tract stimulus (L cells). 4. The distribution of locations of Lc cells within Deiters' nucleus more closely resembles that of L cells than that of C cells. In addition the median conduction velocity of Lc cells is similar to that of L cells, but higher than that of C cells. 5. Much of the information reaching the lower cervical level from neurones of the LVST is information that is also simultaneously being passed downward to the lumbar region. Such integration makes it possible for a single neurone to be used to co-ordinate widespread motor activity. 6. A theory is presented in a separate section (Appendix) to account for the spread of effect of stimulus current upon a myelinated axon submerged in an isotropic medium. The threshold for stimulation of a node by a nearby monopolar electrode is predicted to be proportional to the electrode-node spacing. The constant of proportionality is given in a closed form that depends on the electrical properties of both the neurone and the surrounding medium. The predictions of the theory are shown to be in good accord with the experimental results. PMID:4449072

  9. Traumatic lumbar artery rupture after lumbar spinal fracture dislocation causing hypovolemic shock: An endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Eun, Jong-Pil; Oh, Young-Min

    2015-10-01

    Recently, we observed a case of lumbar artery injury after trauma, which was treated by endovascular embolization. A 67-year-old woman who was injured in a traffic accident was brought to the emergency room. She was conscious and her hemodynamic condition was stable, but she had paraplegia below L1 dermatome. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of abdomen and pelvis revealed fracture dislocation of L3/4 along with retroperitoneal hematomas. However, there was no evidence of traumatic injury in both thoracic and abdominal cavity. At that time, her blood pressure suddenly decreased to 60/40 mmHg and her mental status deteriorated. Also, her hemoglobin level was 5.4 g/dl. While her hemodynamic condition stabilized with massive fluid resuscitation including blood transfusion, an angiography was immediately performed to look for and embolize site of retroperitoneal hemorrhage. On the angiographic images, there was an active extravasation from ruptured left 3rd lumbar artery, and we performed complete embolization with GELFOAM and coil. Lumbar artery injury after trauma is rare and endovascular treatment is useful in case of hemodynamic instability. PMID:25958959

  10. Retrolisthesis and Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Pre-operative Assessment of Patient Function

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Michael; Razi, Afshin; Lurie, Jon D.; Hanscom, Brett; Weinstein, Jim

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Retrolisthesis is relatively rare but when present has been associated with increased back pain and impaired back function. Neither the prevalence of this condition in individuals with lumbar disc herniations nor its possible relation to pre-operative back pain and dysfunction has been well studied. PURPOSE The purposes of this study were as follows: 1) to determine the prevalence of retrolisthesis (alone or in combination with other degenerative conditions) in individuals with confirmed L5 – S1 disc herniation who later underwent lumbar discectomy; 2) to determine if there is any association between retrolisthesis and degenerative changes within the same vertebral motion segment; and 3) to determine the relation between retrolisthesis (alone or in combination with other degenerative conditions) and pre-operative low back pain, physical function, and quality of life. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING Cross-sectional study. PATIENT SAMPLE A total of 125 individuals were identified for incorporation into this study. All patients had confirmed L5-S1 disc herniation on MRI and later underwent L5-S1 discectomy. All patients were enrolled in the SPORT (Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial) study; data was obtained from the multi-institutional database comprised of SPORT patients from across the United States. OUTCOME MEASURES Retrolisthesis, Degenerative change on MRI, Modic Changes. METHODS MRI scans of the lumbar spine were assessed at spinal level L5–S1 for all 125 patients. Retrolisthesis was defined as posterior subluxation of 8% or more. Disc degeneration was defined as any loss of disc signal on T2 imaging. Modic changes were graded 1 – 3 and collectively classified as vertebral endplate degenerative changes. The presence of facet arthropathy and ligamentum flavum hypertrophy were classified jointly as posterior degenerative changes. RESULTS The overall incidence of retrolisthesis at L5-S1 in our study was 23.2%. Retrolisthesis combined with posterior degenerative changes, degenerative disc disease, or vertebral endplate changes had incidences of 4.8%, 16%, and 4.8% respectively. The prevalence of retrolisthesis did not vary by sex, age, race, smoking status, or education level when compared to individuals with normal sagittal alignment. However, individuals with retrolisthesis were more likely to be receiving worker compensation than those without retrolisthesis. Increased age was found to be associated with individuals having vertebral endplate degenerative changes (both alone and in conjunction with retrolisthesis) and degenerative disc disease. Individuals who had retrolisthesis with concomitant vertebral endplate degenerative changes were more often smokers and had no insurance. The presence of retrolisthesis was not associated with an increased incidence of having degenerative disc disease, posterior degenerative changes, or vertebral endplate changes. No statistical significance was found between the presence of retrolisthesis on the degree of patient pre-operative low back pain and physical function. Patients with degenerative disc disease were found to have increased leg pain compared to those patients without degenerative disc changes. CONCLUSIONS We found no significant relationship between retrolisthesis in patients with L5-S1 disc herniation and worse baseline pain or function. It is possible that the contribution of pain or dysfunction related to retrolisthesis was far overshadowed by the presence of symptoms due to the concomitant disc herniation. It remains to be seen whether retrolisthesis will affect outcome following discectomy in these patients. PMID:17630138

  11. A Posterior Approach for Microphone Array Based Speech Recognition 

    E-print Network

    Wang, Dong; Himawan, Ivan; Frankel, Joe; King, Simon

    2008-01-01

    posterior-based approach for array-based speech recognition. The main idea is, instead of enhancing speech signals, we try to enhance the posterior probabilities that frames belonging to recognition units, e.g., phones. These enhanced posteriors...

  12. Congenital Hairy Polyp of Posterior Tonsillar Pillar

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Shahid; Talat, Nabila; Saleem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Congenital hairy polyps are exceedingly rare congenital anomalies. We report a case of congenital hairy polyp arising from posterior tonsillar pillar which was excised with bipolar cautry. PMID:26023478

  13. Meibomian Gland Dysfunction and Treatment (Posterior Blepharitis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Meibomian Gland Dysfunction and Treatment What are Meibomian (Oil) Glands? Meibomian glands are glands that are arranged ... lashes. The force of an eyelid blink causes oil to be excreted onto the posterior lid margin. ...

  14. Confidence measures from local posterior probability estimates 

    E-print Network

    Williams, Gethin; Renals, Steve

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a set of related confidence measures for large vocabulary continuous speech recognition (LVCSR) based on local phone posterior probability estimates output by an acceptor HMM acoustic model. In ...

  15. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  16. An unusual cause of posterior mediastinal cyst

    PubMed Central

    Dhooria, Sahajal; Muthu, Valliappan; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the mediastinum may be congenital or acquired. The differential diagnosis depends on their location in the mediastinum. Cysts in the posterior mediastinum are generally developmental cysts and are neurogenic or of foregut origin. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy, who presented with dry cough and progressively increasing breathlessness, and was found to have a cystic lesion in the posterior mediastinum. Fine needle aspiration from the cyst helped make a diagnosis of tuberculosis.

  17. Posterior Shoulder Instability in Overhead Athletes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Edward S; Greco, Nicholas J; McClincy, Michael P; Bradley, James P

    2016-01-01

    Posterior shoulder instability in overhead athletes presents a unique and difficult challenge. Often, this group has an inherent capsular laxity and/or humeral retroversion to accommodate the range of motion necessary to throw. This adaptation makes the diagnosis of posterior capsulolabral pathology challenging, as the examiner must differentiate between adaptive capsular laxity and pathologic instability. Further complicating matters, the intraoperative surgeon must find the delicate balance of achieving stability while still allowing the necessary range of motion. PMID:26614932

  18. PREDICTING HEALTH CARE NEEDS FOLLOWING LUMBAR SPINE SURGERY

    E-print Network

    Kanaan, Saddam

    2013-08-31

    Low back pain is one of the most common health problems globally, having significant impact on individuals, community, and health care system. Lumbar Spine Surgery (LSS) is usually considered a treatment of low back pain ...

  19. Does myodil introduced for ventriculography lead to symptomatic lumbar arachnoiditis?

    PubMed

    Hill, C A; Hunter, J V; Moseley, I F; Kendall, B E

    1992-12-01

    Although there is a substantial body of evidence implicating Myodil or Pantopaque as a cause of lumbar arachnoiditis, assessment of the clinically based evidence is complicated by the additional potentially causative factors present in a high proportion of cases. These include pre-existing spinal pathology, traumatic lumbar puncture and surgery. The aim of this retrospective study was to attempt to ascertain whether Myodil introduced via ventricular catheter was associated with subsequent development of symptomatic lumbar arachnoiditis. In 222 patients in whom clinical records were reviewed there was no excess of back pain following ventriculography compared to the general population. Myodil ventriculography does not appear to be a major cause of symptomatic lumbar arachnoiditis. Several unavoidable problems with the methodology of this study are discussed. PMID:1286419

  20. Sense in the lumbar spine Is diminished with flexion

    E-print Network

    Gade, Venkata; Wilson, Sara E.

    2007-01-01

    Proprioception plays an important role in appropriate sensation of spine position, movement and stability. Previous research has demonstrated that position sense error in the lumbar spine is increased in flexed postures. This study investigated...

  1. Single-stage Anterior and Posterior Fusion Surgery for Correction of Cervical Kyphotic Deformity Using Intervertebral Cages and Cervical Lateral Mass Screws: Postoperative Changes in Total Spine Sagittal Alignment in Three Cases with a Minimum Follow-up of Five Years

    PubMed Central

    OGIHARA, Satoshi; KUNOGI, Junichi

    The surgical treatment of cervical kyphotic deformity remains challenging. As a surgical method that is safer and avoids major complications, the authors present a procedure of single-stage anterior and posterior fusion to correct cervical kyphosis using anterior interbody fusion cages without plating, as illustrated by three consecutive cases. Case 1 was a 78-year-old woman who presented with a dropped head caused by degeneration of her cervical spine. Case 2 was a 54-year-old woman with athetoid cerebral palsy. She presented with cervical myelopathy and cervical kyphosis. Case 3 was a 71-year-old woman with cervical kyphotic deformity following a laminectomy. All three patients underwent anterior release and interbody fusion with cages and posterior fusion with cervical lateral mass screw (LMS) fixation. Postoperative radiographs showed that correction of kyphosis was 39° in case 1, 43° in case 2, and 39° in case 3. In all three cases, improvement of symptoms was established without major perioperative complications, solid fusion was achieved, and no loss of correction was observed at a minimum follow-up of 61 months. We also report that preoperative total spine sagittal malalignment was improved after corrective surgery for cervical kyphosis and was maintained at the latest follow-up in all three cases. The combination of anterior fusion cages and LMS is considered a safe and effective procedure in cases of severe cervical kyphotic deformity. Preoperative total spine sagittal malalignment improved, accompanied by correction of cervical kyphosis, and was maintained at last follow-up in all three cases. PMID:26119893

  2. Posterior Wnts Have Distinct Roles in Specification and Patterning of the Planarian Posterior Region.

    PubMed

    Sureda-Gómez, Miquel; Pascual-Carreras, Eudald; Adell, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The wnt signaling pathway is an intercellular communication mechanism essential in cell-fate specification, tissue patterning and regional-identity specification. A ?catenin-dependent signal specifies the AP (Anteroposterior) axis of planarians, both during regeneration of new tissues and during normal homeostasis. Accordingly, four wnts (posterior wnts) are expressed in a nested manner in central and posterior regions of planarians. We have analyzed the specific role of each posterior wnt and the possible cooperation between them in specifying and patterning planarian central and posterior regions. We show that each posterior wnt exerts a distinct role during re-specification and maintenance of the central and posterior planarian regions, and that the integration of the different wnt signals (?catenin dependent and independent) underlies the patterning of the AP axis from the central region to the tip of the tail. Based on these findings and data from the literature, we propose a model for patterning the planarian AP axis. PMID:26556349

  3. Posterior Wnts Have Distinct Roles in Specification and Patterning of the Planarian Posterior Region

    PubMed Central

    Sureda-Gómez, Miquel; Pascual-Carreras, Eudald; Adell, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The wnt signaling pathway is an intercellular communication mechanism essential in cell-fate specification, tissue patterning and regional-identity specification. A ?catenin-dependent signal specifies the AP (Anteroposterior) axis of planarians, both during regeneration of new tissues and during normal homeostasis. Accordingly, four wnts (posterior wnts) are expressed in a nested manner in central and posterior regions of planarians. We have analyzed the specific role of each posterior wnt and the possible cooperation between them in specifying and patterning planarian central and posterior regions. We show that each posterior wnt exerts a distinct role during re-specification and maintenance of the central and posterior planarian regions, and that the integration of the different wnt signals (?catenin dependent and independent) underlies the patterning of the AP axis from the central region to the tip of the tail. Based on these findings and data from the literature, we propose a model for patterning the planarian AP axis. PMID:26556349

  4. Laparoscopic Repair of Left Lumbar Hernia After Laparoscopic Left Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Milone, Luca; Gumbs, Andrew; Turner, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Lumbar hernias, rarely seen in clinical practice, can be acquired after open or laparoscopic flank surgery. We describe a successful laparoscopic preperitoneal mesh repair of multiple trocar-site hernias after extraperitoneal nephrectomy. All the key steps including creating a peritoneal flap, reducing the hernia contents, and fixation of the mesh are described. A review of the literature on this infrequent operation is presented. Laparoscopic repair of lumbar hernias has all the advantages of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. PMID:21333197

  5. Comparison of trunk and hip muscle activity during different degrees of lumbar and hip extension.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Min; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the activity of trunk and hip muscles during different degrees of lumbar and hip extension. [Subjects] The study enrolled 18 participants. [Methods] Two exercises (hip and lumbar extension) and two ranges (180° and <180°) were studied. [Results] Differences in degree of extension affected the percentage maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the lumbar erector spinae and biceps femoris muscles, with significantly higher average values at >180° than at 180° lumbar extension. No significant differences were found in gluteus maximus activity according to exercise type or range. [Conclusion] Hip extension may be more effective and safer for lumbar rehabilitation than lumbar extension. PMID:26504276

  6. Intraoperative Computed Tomography Navigation for Transpedicular Screw Fixation to Treat Unstable Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chu-Hsiang; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transpedicular screw (TPS) fixation in unstable thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine fractures remains technically difficult because of destroyed anatomical landmarks, unstable gross segments, and discrepancies in anatomic orientation using conventional anatomic landmarks, fluoroscopic guidance, or computed tomography (CT)-based navigation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and accuracy of TPS placement under intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) navigation in managing unstable TL spine fractures. From 2010 to 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the Spine Operation Registry records of patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion to treat unstable TL spine fractures via the iCT navigation system. An unstable spine fracture was identified as AO/Magerl classification type B or type C. In all, 316 screws in 37 patients with unstable TL spine fractures were evaluated and involved 7 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar junctional, and 7 lumbar fractures. The accuracy of TPS positioning in the pedicle without breach was 98% (310/316). The average number of iCT scans per patient was 2.1 (range 2–3). The average total radiation dose to patients was 15.8?mSv; the dose per single level exposure was 2.7?mSv. The TPS intraoperative revision rate was 0.6% (2/316) and no neurovascular sequela was observed. TPS fixation using the iCT navigation system obtained a 98% accuracy in stabilizing unstable TL spine fractures. A malplaced TPS could be revised during real-time confirmation of the TPS position, and no secondary operation was required to revise malplaced screws. The iCT navigation system provides accurate and safe management of unstable TL spine fractures. In addition, operating room personnel, including surgeons and nurses, did not need to wear heavy lead aprons as they were not exposed to radiation. PMID:25997042

  7. Percutaneous Decompression of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with a New Interspinous Device

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore; Fiori, Roberto; Bartolucci, Dario Alberto Volpi, Tommaso; Calabria, Eros; Novegno, Federica; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2012-04-15

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of the implantation of a new interspinous device (Falena) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. The clinical outcomes and imaging results were assessed by orthostatic MR during an up to 6-month follow-up period. Methods: Between October 2008 and February 2010, the Falena was implanted at a single level in 26 patients (17 men; mean age, 69 (range, 54-82) years) who were affected by degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. All of the patients were clinically evaluated before the procedure and at 1 and 3 months. Furthermore, 20 patients have completed a 6-month follow-up. Pain was assessed before and after the intervention using the Visual Analogue Scale score and the Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire. Orthostatic MR imaging was performed before the implantation and at 3 months to assess the correlation with the clinical outcome. Results: The mean ODI score decreased from 48.9 before the device implantation to 31.2 at 1 month (p < 0.0001). The mean VAS score decreased from 7.6 before to 3.9 (p < 0.0001) at 1 month and 3.6 at 3 months after the procedure (p = 0.0115). These values were stable at 6 months evaluation. No postimplantation major complications were recorded. MRI evaluation documented in most cases an increased size of the spinal canal area. Similarly a bilateral foraminal area improvement was found. The variation of the intervertebral space height measured on the posterior wall was not significant. Conclusions: In our preliminary experience with the Falena in a small cohort of patients, we obtained clinical and imaging results aligned to those reported with similar interspinous devices.

  8. A new technique of bone cement augmentation via the disc space for percutaneous pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Kyu; Park, Choon Keun; Lee, Dong Chan; Lee, Dong Geun

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT In elderly patients with severe osteoporosis, instrumented lumbar interbody fusion may result in fixation failure or nonunion because of decreased pedicle screw pullout strength or increased interbody graft subsidence risk. Thus, given its many advantages, percutaneous pedicle screw fixation with cement augmentation can be an effective method to use in elderly patients. The authors report on an easy, safe, and economical technique for bone cement augmentation using a bone biopsy needle inserted into the disc space in 2 osteoporotic patients who were treated with posterior interbody fusion and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. METHODS Two elderly patients who complained of back pain and intermittent neurological claudication underwent posterior interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. After routinely assembling rods on the screws, a bone biopsy needle was inserted into the disc space via the operative field; the needle was then placed around the tips of the screws using fluoroscopic radiography for guidance. Bone cement was injected through the bone biopsy needle, also under fluoroscopic radiography guidance. RESULTS Both patients' symptoms improved after the operation, and there was no evidence of cage subsidence or screw loosening at the 4-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The indirect technique of bone cement augmentation via the disc space for percutaneous screw fixation could be an easy, safe, and economical method. PMID:26360145

  9. Routine use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in posterior fusions of the pediatric spine and incidence of cancer.

    PubMed

    Sayama, Christina; Willsey, Matthew; Chintagumpala, Murali; Brayton, Alison; Briceño, Valentina; Ryan, Sheila L; Luerssen, Thomas G; Hwang, Steven W; Jea, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to determine the safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) use in posterior instrumented fusions in the pediatric population, focusing on cancer risk. In a previous study, the authors reported the short-term (mean follow-up of 11 months) safety and efficacy of rhBMP-2 in the pediatric age group. The present study reports their results with a minimum of 24 months' follow-up. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed 57 consecutive cases involving pediatric patients who underwent posterior occiptocervical, cervical, thoracic, lumbar, or lumbosacral spine fusion from October 1, 2007, to June 30, 2011, at Texas Children's Hospital. Seven cases were excluded from further analysis because of loss to follow-up. Three patients died during the follow-up period and were placed in a separate cohort. RESULTS The patients' average age at the time of surgery was 11 years, 4 months (range 9 months to 20 years). The mean duration of follow-up was 48.4 months (range 24-70 months). Cancer status was determined at the most recent encounter with the patient and/or caretaker(s) in person, or in telephone follow-up. Twenty-four or more months after administration of rhBMP-2, there were no cases of new malignancy, degeneration, or metastasis of existing tumors. The cause of death of the patients who died during the study period was not related to BMP or to the development, degeneration, or metastasis of cancer. CONCLUSIONS Despite the large number of adult studies reporting increased cancer risk associated with BMP use, the authors' outcomes with rhBMP-2 in the pediatric population suggest that it is a safe adjunct to posterior spine fusions of the occipitocervical, cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and lumbosacral spine. There were no new cases of cancer, or degeneration or metastasis of existing malignancies in this series. PMID:25860984

  10. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Removal Contributes to Abnormal Knee Motion during Posterior Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty

    E-print Network

    Delp, Scott

    the prosthesis. Passively flexing and extending the knee, we calculated anterior femoral translationPosterior Cruciate Ligament Removal Contributes to Abnormal Knee Motion during Posterior Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty Melinda J. Cromie,1,2 Robert A. Siston,1,2,3,4 Nicholas J. Giori,2,5 Scott L

  11. A new PMHS model for lumbar spine injuries during vertical acceleration.

    PubMed

    Stemper, Brian D; Storvik, Steven G; Yoganandan, Narayan; Baisden, Jamie L; Fijalkowski, Ronald J; Pintar, Frank A; Shender, Barry S; Paskoff, Glenn R

    2011-08-01

    Ejection from military aircraft exerts substantial loads on the lumbar spine. Fractures remain common, although the overall survivability of the event has considerably increased over recent decades. The present study was performed to develop and validate a biomechanically accurate experimental model for the high vertical acceleration loading to the lumbar spine that occurs during the catapult phase of aircraft ejection. The model consisted of a vertical drop tower with two horizontal platforms attached to a monorail using low friction linear bearings. A total of four human cadaveric spine specimens (T12-L5) were tested. Each lumbar column was attached to the lower platform through a load cell. Weights were added to the upper platform to match the thorax, head-neck, and upper extremity mass of a 50th percentile male. Both platforms were raised to the drop height and released in unison. Deceleration characteristics of the lower platform were modulated by foam at the bottom of the drop tower. The upper platform applied compressive inertial loads to the top of the specimen during deceleration. All specimens demonstrated complex bending during ejection simulations, with the pattern dependent upon the anterior-posterior location of load application. The model demonstrated adequate inter-specimen kinematic repeatability on a spinal level-by-level basis under different subfailure loading scenarios. One specimen was then exposed to additional tests of increasing acceleration to induce identifiable injury and validate the model as an injury-producing system. Multiple noncontiguous vertebral fractures were obtained at an acceleration of 21 g with 488 g/s rate of onset. This clinically relevant trauma consisted of burst fracture at L1 and wedge fracture at L4. Compression of the vertebral body approached 60% during the failure test, with -6,106 N axial force and 168 Nm flexion moment. Future applications of this model include developing a better understanding of the vertebral injury mechanism during pilot ejection and developing tolerance limits for injuries sustained under a variety of different vertical acceleration scenarios. PMID:21950895

  12. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by the Right Lumbar Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Yamashiro, Masashi; Okuda, Miho; Yoshie, Yuichi; Sugimori, Natsuki; Igarashi, Saya; Nakashima, Yoshiko; Matsui, Osamu

    2010-02-15

    This study evaluated the clinical features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) supplied by the right lumbar artery. Eleven patients with HCC supplied by the right lumbar artery were treated with chemoembolization. The patients' medical records were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent 6.7 {+-} 3.7 (mean {+-} SD) chemoembolization sessions, and the hepatic arterial branches were noted as being attenuated. The right inferior phrenic artery (IPA) was also embolized in 10 patients. The interval between initial chemoembolization and chemoembolization of the lumbar artery supply was 53.2 {+-} 26.9 months. Mean tumor diameter was 3.1 {+-} 2.4 cm and was located at the surface of S7 and S6. The feeding-branch arose proximal to the bifurcation of the dorsal ramus and muscular branches (n = 8) or from the muscular branches (n = 3) of the right first (n = 10) or second lumbar artery (n = 1). The anterior spinal artery originated from the tumor-feeding lumbar artery in one patient. All feeders were selected, and embolization was performed after injection of iodized oil and anticancer drugs (n = 10) or gelatin sponge alone in a patient with anterior spinal artery branching (n = 1). Eight patients died from tumor progression 10.1 {+-} 4.6 months later, and two patients survived 2 and 26 months, respectively. The remaining patient died of bone metastases after 32 months despite liver transplantation 10 months after chemoembolization. The right lumbar artery supplies HCC located in the bare area of the liver, especially in patients who undergo repeated chemoembolization, including chemoembolization by way of the right IPA. Chemoembolization by way of the right lumbar artery may be safe when the feeder is well selected.

  13. Incidence of posterior capsule opacification in eyes with and without posterior chamber intraocular lenses.

    PubMed

    Nishi, O

    1986-09-01

    The incidence of posterior capsule opacification after extracapsular cataract extraction was significantly lower in eyes implanted with posterior chamber intraocular lenses than in nonimplanted eyes. The number of loops fixated in the bag was significantly smaller in the eyes that became opacified than in those that did not. These findings suggest that the posterior chamber lens suppresses the two processes that lead to opacification: the development of a ring-shaped opacity at the site of contact between the anterior capsule rim and the posterior capsule and the migration of lens epithelial cells toward the center of the capsule. These suppressive effects were greater when the posterior chamber lens was fixated in the bag. PMID:3772787

  14. Posterior predictive checking of multiple imputation models.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cattram D; Lee, Katherine J; Carlin, John B

    2015-07-01

    Multiple imputation is gaining popularity as a strategy for handling missing data, but there is a scarcity of tools for checking imputation models, a critical step in model fitting. Posterior predictive checking (PPC) has been recommended as an imputation diagnostic. PPC involves simulating "replicated" data from the posterior predictive distribution of the model under scrutiny. Model fit is assessed by examining whether the analysis from the observed data appears typical of results obtained from the replicates produced by the model. A proposed diagnostic measure is the posterior predictive "p-value", an extreme value of which (i.e., a value close to 0 or 1) suggests a misfit between the model and the data. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the posterior predictive p-value as an imputation diagnostic. Using simulation methods, we deliberately misspecified imputation models to determine whether posterior predictive p-values were effective in identifying these problems. When estimating the regression parameter of interest, we found that more extreme p-values were associated with poorer imputation model performance, although the results highlighted that traditional thresholds for classical p-values do not apply in this context. A shortcoming of the PPC method was its reduced ability to detect misspecified models with increasing amounts of missing data. Despite the limitations of posterior predictive p-values, they appear to have a valuable place in the imputer's toolkit. In addition to automated checking using p-values, we recommend imputers perform graphical checks and examine other summaries of the test quantity distribution. PMID:25939490

  15. Posterior ankle impingement in dancers and athletes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Andrew J; Calder, James D F; Lloyd Williams, R

    2013-06-01

    The diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement requires an accurate history and specific examination. Computed tomography is a useful investigation to diagnose bony impingement, especially where plain radiography and/or magnetic resonance imaging are sometimes inconclusive. Accurate ultrasound-guided steroid/anesthetic injections are useful interventions to locate the symptomatic lesions and reduce symptoms and occasionally prove curative. If surgical debridement or excision is deemed necessary, arthroscopic surgery via a posterior approach is recommended to excise impingement lesions with a quicker return to sport expected and minimal complications. Open surgical excision, however, remains a viable treatment option. PMID:23707179

  16. Large posterior abdominal masses: computed tomographic localization

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, I.A.; Auh, Y.H.; Rubenstein, W.A.; Whalen, J.P.; Kazam, E.

    1983-10-01

    Large posterior abdominal masses, particularly those in the right upper abdomen, may be difficult to localize correctly into the peritoneal or retroperitoneal compartments. The following signs were found to be reliable CT indicators of retroperitoneal location: obliteration of the perinephric fat outlining the psoas muscle; lateral displacement of the fat outlining the posterior right lobe of the liver; rotation of the intrahepatic portal veins to the left; anterior displacement of the inferior vena cava and renal veins; and anterior displacement of the ascending colon, descending duodenum, or pancreatic head.

  17. Imaging the posterior mediastinum: a multimodality approach

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Mariaelena; Heidinger, Benedikt H.; Franquet, Elisa; Eisenberg, Ronald L.; Bankier, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    The posterior mediastinum contains several structures that can produce a wide variety of pathologic conditions. Descending thoracic aorta, esophagus, azygos and hemiazygos veins, thoracic duct, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, and nerves are all located in this anatomical region and can produce diverse abnormalities. Although chest radiography may detect many of these pathologic conditions, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are the imaging modalities of choice for further defining the relationship of posterior mediastinal lesions to neighboring structures and showing specific imaging features that narrow the differential diagnosis. This review emphasizes modality-related answers to morphologic questions, which provide precise diagnostic information. PMID:25993732

  18. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy for a huge herniated disc causing acute cauda equina syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jha, Subash C; Tonogai, Ichiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Higashino, Kosaku; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Hamada, Daisuke; Goto, Tomohiro; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Goda, Yuichiro; Abe, Mitsunobu; Mineta, Kazuaki; Kimura, Tetsuya; Nitta, Akihiro; Hama, Shingo; Higuchi, Tadahiro; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Microsurgery for lumbar disc herniation that requires surgical intervention has been well described. The methods vary from traditional open discectomy to minimally invasive techniques. All need adequate preanesthetic preparation of patients as general anesthesia is required for the procedure, and nerve monitoring is necessary to prevent iatrogenic nerve injury. Conventional surgical techniques sometimes require the removal of the corresponding lamina to assess the nerve root and herniated disc, and this may increase the risk for posterior instability of the vertebral body. Should this occur, fusion surgery may be needed, further increasing morbidity and cost. We present here a case of lumbar herniated disc fragments causing acute cauda equina syndrome that were endoscopically resected through a transforaminal approach in an awake patient under local anesthesia. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy under local anesthesia proved to be a better alternative to open back surgery as it made immediate intervention possible, was associated with fewer perioperative complications and morbidity, minimized soft tissue damage, and allowed early rehabilitation with a better outcome and greater patient satisfaction. In addition to these advantages, percutaneous endoscopic discectomy protects other approaches that may be needed in subsequent surgeries, whether open or minimally invasive. PMID:25817294

  19. Transpedicular vertebral body augmentation reinforced with pedicle screw fixation in fresh traumatic A2 and A3 lumbar fractures: comparison between two devices and two bone cements.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Vardakastanis, Konstantinos; Repantis, Thomas; Vitsas, Vasilios

    2014-07-01

    This retrospective study compares efficacy and safety of balloon kyphoplasty (BK) with calcium phosphate (Group A) versus KIVA implant with PMMA (Group B) reinforced with three vertebrae pedicle screw constructs for A2 and A3 single fresh non-osteoporotic lumbar (L1-L4) fractures in 38 consecutive age- and diagnosis-matched patient populations. Extracanal leakage of both low-viscosity PMMA and calcium phosphate (CP) as well as the following roentgenographic parameters: segmental kyphosis (SKA), anterior (AVBHr) and posterior (PVBHr) vertebral body height ratio, spinal canal encroachment (SCE) clearance, and functional outcome measures: VAS and SF-36, were recorded and compared between the two groups. All patients in both groups were followed for a minimum 26 (Group A) and 25 (Group B) months. Extracanal CP and PMMA leakage was observed in four (18 %) and three (15 %) vertebrae/patients of group A and B, respectively. Hybrid fixation improved AVBHr, SKA, SCE, but PVBHr only in group B. VAS and SF-36 improved postoperatively in the patients of both groups. Short-segment construct with the novel KIVA implant restored better than BK-fractured lumbar vertebral body, but this had no impact in functional outcome. Since there was no leakage difference between PMMA and calcium phosphate and no short-term adverse related to PMMA use were observed, we advice the use of PMMA in fresh traumatic lumbar fractures. PMID:23982115

  20. Lumbar Stenosis: A Recent Update by Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lee, Seung Jin

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc results in initial relative instability, hypermobility, and hypertrophy of the facet joints, particularly at the superior articular process. This finally leads to a reduction of the spinal canal dimensions and compression of the neural elements, which can result in neurogenic intermittent claudication caused by venous congestion and arterial hypertension around nerve roots. Most patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis had neurogenic intermittent claudication with the risk of a fall. However, although the physical findings and clinical symptoms in lumbar stenosis are not acute, the radiographic findings are comparatively severe. Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and good method for evaluation of lumbar stenosis. Though there are very few studies pertaining to the natural progression of lumbar spinal stenosis, symptoms of spinal stenosis usually respond favorably to non-operative management. In patients who fail to respond to non-operative management, surgical treatments such as decompression or decompression with spinal fusion are required. Restoration of a normal pelvic tilt after lumbar fusion correlates to a good clinical outcome. PMID:26435805

  1. Lumbar Stenosis: A Recent Update by Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lee, Seung Jin; Park, Moon Soo

    2015-10-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc results in initial relative instability, hypermobility, and hypertrophy of the facet joints, particularly at the superior articular process. This finally leads to a reduction of the spinal canal dimensions and compression of the neural elements, which can result in neurogenic intermittent claudication caused by venous congestion and arterial hypertension around nerve roots. Most patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis had neurogenic intermittent claudication with the risk of a fall. However, although the physical findings and clinical symptoms in lumbar stenosis are not acute, the radiographic findings are comparatively severe. Magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive and good method for evaluation of lumbar stenosis. Though there are very few studies pertaining to the natural progression of lumbar spinal stenosis, symptoms of spinal stenosis usually respond favorably to non-operative management. In patients who fail to respond to non-operative management, surgical treatments such as decompression or decompression with spinal fusion are required. Restoration of a normal pelvic tilt after lumbar fusion correlates to a good clinical outcome. PMID:26435805

  2. Embolization of Isolated Lumbar Artery Injuries in Trauma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sofocleous, Constantinos T. Hinrichs, Clay R.; Hubbi, Basil; Doddakashi, Satish; Bahramipour, Philip; Schubert, Johanna

    2005-12-15

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the angiographic findings and results of embolotherapy in the management of lumbar artery trauma. Methods. All patients with lumbar artery injury who underwent angiography and percutaneous embolization in a state trauma center within a 10-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Radiological information and procedural reports were reviewed to assess immediate angiographic findings and embolization results. Long-term clinical outcome was obtained by communication with the trauma physicians as well as with chart review. Results. In a 10-year period, 255 trauma patients underwent abdominal aortography. Eleven of these patients (three women and eight men) suffered a lumbar artery injury. Angiography demonstrated active extravasation (in nine) and/or pseudoaneurysm (in four). Successful selective embolization of abnormal vessel(s) was performed in all patients. Coils were used in six patients, particles in one and gelfoam in five patients. Complications included one retroperitoneal abscess, which was treated successfully. One patient returned for embolization of an adjacent lumbar artery due to late pseudoaneurysm formation. Conclusions. In hemodynamically stable patients, selective embolization is a safe and effective method for immediate control of active extravasation, as well as to prevent future hemorrhage from an injured lumbar artery.

  3. Posterior instability caused by batter's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kang, Richard W; Mahony, Gregory T; Harris, Thomas C; Dines, Joshua S

    2013-10-01

    In summary, batter’s shoulder is a rare and only recently recognized entity. This condition is posterior shoulder instability caused by a missed attempt at hitting a pitch, especially with an outside pitch. The lack of counterforce from hitting a ball produces increased forces imparted on the posterior capsulolabral complex of the lead shoulder during batting. If the player fails conservative management, she or he can undergo an arthroscopic posterior labral repair instead of debridement. After treatment, the player can expect to return to play after approximately 6 to 7 months. Initial results from a small, retrospective series demonstrate greater than 90% excellent results. These findings are similar to current literature for arthroscopic treatment of posterior instability, which reports success rates that range from 75% to 91%. Longer-term follow-up will be needed to determine the natural history and prognosis or batter’s shoulder. Based on initial results, the authors predict good to excellent results for most players with batter’s shoulder who undergo proper treatment. Additionally, with the exception of switch hitters, the nonthrowing arm is affected. This can also improve the athlete’s return to play. PMID:24079435

  4. BAER suppression during posterior fossa dural opening

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Christopher B.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Jiang, Yi Dan; Yao, Tom; Zhang, Yi Ping; Sun, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative monitoring with brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) provides an early warning signal of potential neurological injury and may avert tissue damage to the auditory pathway or brainstem. Unexplained loss of the BAER signal in the operating room may present a dilemma to the neurosurgeon. Methods: This paper documents two patients who displayed a unique mechanism of suppression of the BAER apparent within minutes following dural opening for resection of a posterior fossa meningioma. Results: In two patients with anterior cerebellopontine angle and clival meningiomas, there was a significant deterioration of the BAER soon after durotomy but prior to cerebellar retraction and tumor removal. Intracranial structures in the posterior fossa lying between the tumor and dural opening were shifted posteriorly after durotomy. Conclusion: We hypothesized that the cochlear nerve and vessels entering the acoustic meatus were compressed or stretched when subjected to tissue shift. This movement caused cochlear nerve dysfunction that resulted in BAER suppression. BAER was partially restored after the tumor was decompressed, dura repaired, and bone replaced. BAER was not suppressed following durotomy for removal of a meningioma lying posterior to the cochlear complex. Insight into the mechanisms of durotomy-induced BAER inhibition would allay the neurosurgeon's anxiety during the operation. PMID:25883849

  5. Posterior Probabilities for a Consensus Ordering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fligner, Michael A.; Verducci, Joseph S.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of consensus ordering is defined, and formulas for exact and approximate posterior probabilities for consensus ordering are developed under the assumption of a generalized Mallows' model with a diffuse conjugate prior. These methods are applied to a data set concerning 98 college students. (SLD)

  6. [Posterior capsule opacification after extracapsular extraction with a posterior chamber implant].

    PubMed

    Teodoru, A

    1996-01-01

    The opacity of posterior capsule after the extracapsular extraction of the crystalline with implant of an artificial crystalline in the posterior chamber is a post-operatory complication which is meeting in 5.33% operated eyes with a subjective consequence which is a visual acuity diminuation with the appearance of some bright bands in the visual field of the operated eyes especially in the night. The principal reasons was founded to be the patient age and the disposal of pseudophakia in the ciliary sulcus what is permitting the contact of the anterior chamber's remains with the posterior capsule which is the place of beginning to the epithelium proliferation. PMID:8962855

  7. Low back pain and lumbar angles in Turkish coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Sarikaya, S.; Ozdolap, S.; Gumustas, S.; Koc, U.

    2007-02-15

    This study was designed to assess the incidence of low back pain among Turkish coal miners and to investigate the relationship between angles of the lumbar spine and low back pain in coal miners. Fifty underground workers (Group I) and 38 age-matched surface workers (Group II) were included in the study. All the subjects were asked about low back pain in the past 5 years. The prevalence of low back pain was higher in Group I than in Group II (78.0%, 32.4%, respectively, P {lt} 0.001). The results of the study showed that low back pain occurred in 78.0% of Turkish coal miners. Although the nature of the occupation may have influenced coal miners' lumbar spinal curvature, lumbar angles are not a determinant for low back pain in this population. Further extensive studies involving ergonomic measurements are needed to validate our results for Turkish coal mining industry.

  8. Sex determination by discriminant function analysis of lumbar vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Ostrofsky, Kelly R; Churchill, Steven E

    2015-01-01

    Sex determination is critical for developing the biological profile of unidentified skeletal remains. When more commonly used elements (os coxa, cranium) for sexing are not available, methods utilizing other skeletal elements are needed. This study aims to assess the degree of sexual dimorphism of the lumbar vertebrae and develop discriminant functions for sex determination from them, using a sample of South African blacks from the Raymond A. Dart Collection (47 males, 51 females). Eleven variables at each lumbar level were subjected to univariate and multivariate discriminant function analyses. Univariate equations produced classification rates ranging from 57.7% to 83.5%, with the highest accuracies associated with dimensions of the vertebral body. Multivariate stepwise analysis generated classification rates ranging from 75.9% to 88.7%. These results are comparable to other methods for sexing the skeleton and indicate that measures of the lumbar vertebrae can be used as an effective tool for sex determination. PMID:25382679

  9. Lumbar spinal fusion using the Diapason system.

    PubMed

    Musha, Y; Okajima, Y; Motegi, M

    1995-01-01

    Lumbar spinal fusion with the Diapason system was performed on 58 patients at Toho University Ohmori Hospital from November 1991 to November 1994. The first 44 consecutive patients were followed for more than 1 year, including 34 cases with degenerative diseases. Those 34 cases consisted of 22 men and 12 women, ages 19-78 years (average 47.4), with 49 vertebral levels; these patients were followed for an average of 26.3 months. The clinical improvement and rate of bony union after 1 year of surgery were examined and the intervertebral angulatory motion degree of fused vertebrae was measured using a radiographic functional photo image during 1 year. We also performed an experimental study to evaluate the rigidity of this system. There were no severe complications. Although there was no instrument breakage or screw migration, two cases of rod migration were observed in L5-S1 arthrodesis. A mean improvement rate of 84.3% in the Japanese Orthopaedics Association (JOA) score was revealed. Thirty-three of 34 (97.1%) patients demonstrated successful arthrodesis after their initial procedure. In 10 segments (20.4%) 3-5 degrees of angulatory mobility were still retained, and no angulatory motion was observed in 27 segments (55.1%) 3 months after the surgery; however, no angulatory motion was observed in 44 segments (89.8%) 1 year after the surgery. In our biomechanical study, we observed that the anterior intervertebral space became narrow and mobile with loading, but when the loading was removed, the space reverted to the initial site. This movement was thought to be due to a certain elasticity in the rod and screw, and not loosening at the connection level. This system was evaluated based on the results of both clinical and biomechanical study. Notwithstanding the fact that this method has been evaluated as semirigid fusion, it does provide satisfactory bony union in posterolateral fusion, with excellent clinical results. PMID:7787346

  10. Genetic Association Studies in Lumbar Disc Degeneration: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Eskola, Pasi J.; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjaer, Per; Solovieva, Svetlana; Männikkö, Minna; Tommerup, Niels; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.; Chan, Danny

    2012-01-01

    Objective Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Science, The Genetic Association Database and The Human Genome Epidemiology Network for information published between 1990–2011 addressing genes and lumbar disc degeneration. Two investigators independently identified studies to determine inclusion, after which they performed data extraction and analysis. The level of cumulative genetic association evidence was analyzed according to The HuGENet Working Group guidelines. Results Fifty-two studies were included for review. Forty-eight studies reported at least one positive association between a genetic marker and lumbar disc degeneration. The phenotype definition of lumbar disc degeneration was highly variable between the studies and replications were inconsistent. Most of the associations presented with a weak level of evidence. The level of evidence was moderate for ASPN (D-repeat), COL11A1 (rs1676486), GDF5 (rs143383), SKT (rs16924573), THBS2 (rs9406328) and MMP9 (rs17576). Conclusions Based on this first extensive systematic review on the topic, the credibility of reported genetic associations is mostly weak. Clear definition of lumbar disc degeneration phenotypes and large population-based cohorts are needed. An international consortium is needed to standardize genetic association studies in relation to disc degeneration. PMID:23185509

  11. Lumbopelvic parameters and the extent of lumbar fusion

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Yoganandan, Narayan; Maiman, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Following lumbar fusion, sacroiliac (SI) joint pain has been regarded as a form of adjacent segment disease. Prior studies suggest increased stress to the SI joint and pelvis with lumbar fusion. Limited studies have evaluated the relationship between the extent of lumbar fusion and its potential influence on lumbopelvic parameters, which may provide the insights to persistent back pain. Methods: Three hundred fifty-five patients underwent lumbar fusions at our institution between fall 2010 and winter 2012; 80 patients met criteria for the study. Inclusion criteria included appropriate imaging available (preoperative and postoperative lateral films), follow-up >1-year, fusion where the rostral extent was up to L1 and the caudal extent was at most S1. Exclusion criteria included prior lumbar fusion, history of SI joint syndrome, follow-up <1-year, fusion involving thoracic levels, and inadequate films (inability to visualize appropriate anatomy). The patients were divided into groups based on the extent of fusion. The patients were evaluated based on age, sex, diagnosis, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, and sacral slope. The preoperative values were compared among the groups, the postoperative values were compared among the groups, and the pre- and post-operative values were compared within each group. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between pre- and post-operative lumbopelvic parameters within each fusion group. Conclusion: The results imply that the extent of instrumentation, including the involvement of the sacrum, may not alter lumbopelvic parameters. This appears to argue against the idea that longer fusion constructs induce more stress on the pelvis and SI joint. PMID:26543673

  12. Treatment of lumbar disc herniation: Evidence-based practice

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Weiner, Bradley K

    2010-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the best treatment for lumbar disc herniations? Results: For patients failing six weeks of conservative care, the current literature supports surgical intervention or prolonged conservative management as appropriate treatment options for lumbar radiculopathy in the setting of disc herniation. Surgical intervention may result in more rapid relief of symptoms and restoration of function. Implementation: While surgery appears to provide more rapid relief, many patients will gradually get better with continued nonoperative management; thus, patient education and active participation in decision-making is vital. PMID:20689695

  13. The “Reverse” Latissimus Dorsi Flap for Large Lower Lumbar Defect

    PubMed Central

    Kotti, Bouraoui; Jaidane, Olfa; Ben Hassouna, Jamel; Rahal, Khaled

    2012-01-01

    The latissimus dorsi (LD) flap is one of the most common flaps used in plastic surgery based on its dominant thoracodorsal pedicle as well as free tissue transfer. The “distally based” or “reverse” fashion design has been used to repair myelomeningoceles, congenital diaphragmatic agenesis, or thoracolumbar defects. We present a case of a large lumbar defect after cancer resection covered by a combined tegument solution starring the “reverse” LD flap in its muscular version with a cutaneous gluteal flap. This flap is a safe and reliable way to cover large distal lumbar defect. PMID:23082273

  14. Recent advances in lumbar mechanics with relevance to clinicians

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Stuart M

    1989-01-01

    Perhaps the singular, most important impediment to universal recognition of chiropractic as a legitimate and mature health care alternative is the absence of a developed mechanical knowledge of chiropractic techniques. The purpose of this review paper was to describe, and to some extent critique, some recent research pertaining to mechanics of the lumbar spine and to illustrate the relevance to clinical chiropractic. Specific contentious issues addressed include discussion of the mechanical relationship of intra-abdominal pressure, the lumbodorsal fascia, muscle-ligament interplay and the abdominal musculature with the lumbar spine. Directions or future research are proposed given the pressing need to provide a rationale for, and explanation of, specific chiropractic treatment.

  15. Limited Unilateral Decompression and Pedicle Screw Fixation with Fusion for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with Unilateral Radiculopathy: A Retrospective Analysis of 25 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Miao, Hai-xiong; Wang, Yong; Chen, An-fu; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lumbar spinal stenosis is conventionally treated with surgical decompression. However, bilateral decompression and laminectomy is more invasive and may not be necessary for lumbar stenosis patients with unilateral radiculopathy. We aimed to report the outcomes of unilateral laminectomy and bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. Methods Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis with unilateral lower extremity radiculopathy who received limited unilateral decompression and bilateral pedicle screw fixation were included and evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS) pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores preoperatively and at follow-up visits. Ligamentum flavum thickness of the involved segments was measured on axial magnetic resonance images. Results Twenty-five patients were included. The mean preoperative VAS score was 6.6±1.6 and 4.6±3.1 for leg and back pain, respectively. Ligamentum flavum thickness was comparable between the symptomatic and asymptomatic side (p=0.554). The mean follow-up duration was 29.2 months. The pain in the symptomatic side lower extremity (VAS score, 1.32±1.2) and the back (VAS score, 1.75±1.73) significantly improved (p=0.000 vs. baseline for both). The ODI improved significantly postoperatively (6.60±6.5; p=0.000 vs. baseline). Significant improvement in VAS pain and ODI scores were observed in patients receiving single or multi-segment decompression fusion with fixation (p<0.01). Conclusion Limited laminectomy and unilateral spinal decompression followed by bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion achieves satisfactory outcomes in patients with spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. This procedure is less damaging to structures that are important for maintaining posterior stability of the spine. PMID:26279816

  16. Posterior cruciate-retaining versus posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bercik, Michael J; Joshi, Ashish; Parvizi, Javad

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare outcomes of posterior cruciate-retaining and posterior stabilized prostheses. A computerized literature search was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials comparing the clinical outcomes of cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized designs. The table of contents of four major Orthopaedic journals and the references section of two arthroplasty text books were reviewed to identify other relevant studies. Ultimately, 1114 patients (1265 knees) were compared. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in flexion and range of motion in favor of posterior-stabilized knees, but no difference in complication rates. The clinical importance of this remains unknown. The decision to use one design versus the other should rest with the surgeon's preference and comfort with a particular design. PMID:23433255

  17. Hypertensive posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome causing posterior fossa edema and hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Grossbach, Andrew J; Abel, Taylor J; Hodis, Brendan; Wassef, Shafik N; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2014-02-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a well characterized entity resulting from the inability of cerebral autoregulation to adequately protect the brain from uncontrolled hypertension. It primarily affects the occipital lobes, but can also involve the structures in the posterior fossa including the brainstem and cerebellum. Treatment usually consists of strict blood pressure control, but more aggressive management may be indicated with acutely worsening neurological status. We present a patient with hypertensive encephalopathy that resulted in hydrocephalus and brainstem compression necessitating surgical decompression requiring ventriculostomy and suboccipital craniectomy. In rare cases, PRES can present with severe brainstem compression requiring emergent posterior fossa decompression. When brainstem signs are present on exam, emergent posterior fossa decompression may be safer than ventriculostomy alone. PMID:24126039

  18. An Unusual Cause of Posterior Elbow Impingement: Detachment of a Hypertrophied Posterior Fat Pad

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Daisuke; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Sugiura, Kosuke; Higuchi, Tadahiro; Suzue, Naoto; Goto, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Wada, Keizo; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 47-year-old woman who developed posterior impingement of the elbow due to detachment of a hypertrophied posterior fat pad. She reported acute left elbow pain after leaning back onto a hard object with her hand and subsequently experienced a “catching” sensation. Comparison with the magnetic resonance images of a normal elbow revealed a hypertrophied posterior fat pad interposed between the olecranon and olecranon fossa in both elbows, with the fat pad in the left elbow located more inferiorly than that in the right elbow. Elbow arthroscopy showed the olecranon fossa covered by the fat pad, a portion of which was detached from the rest of the pad. Debridement of the detached portion was performed until no impingement was evident. Postoperatively, full extension of the elbow did not elicit pain. Clinicians should include this pathology among the differential diagnoses for posterior elbow pain. PMID:26613057

  19. Lumbar periradicular abscess mimicking a fragmented lumbar disc herniation : an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Bakar, Bulent; Tekkok, Ismail Hakki

    2008-12-01

    We herein describe the case of a focal spontaneous spinal epidural abscess who was initially diagnosed to have a free fragment of a lumbar disc. A 71-year-old woman presented with history of low back and right leg pain. Magnetic resonance imaging suggested a peripherally enhancing free fragment extending down from S1 nerve root axilla. Preoperative laboratory investigation showed elevation of c-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) levels. She was taken for surgery and a fluctuating mass at the axilla of S1 nerve was found. When the mass was probed with a dissector, a dark yellow, thick pus drained out. Pus cultures were negative. Patients who present with extreme low back plus leg pain and increased leucocyte count, ESR and CRP levels should raise the suspicion of an infection of a vertebral body or spinal epidural space. PMID:19137084

  20. A Cadaveric Study of Bilateral Configuration of Posterior Bifurcation of Posterior Communicating Artery in Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Anubha; Mandal, Shyamash

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Various studies have been done regarding variations of circle of Willis, but few literatures are available about the detail configurations on Indian population. Posterior communicating artery is the main collateral channel between the vertebrobasilar and carotid system. It may act as a main source of blood flow via posterior cerebral artery if fetal configuration is present. Aim of the study is to see the bilateral configurations to compare the blood supply of both cerebral hemispheres via posterior cerebral artery in human cadavers. Materials and Methods: Fifty six formalin fixed brains were used for study. The specimens were classified into 3 types and 21 subtypes according to the configuration of the vessel of both hemispheres. As hemodynamic balance is dependent on the calibre of the vessel, the diameter of the arteries were also taken into consideration. Pearson’s correlation had been done. Result: In present study type I is 57.2%, type II is 37.5% and type III is 5.4%. Incidence of unilateral fetal type posterior cerebral artery is in high percentage (33.9%). Greatest diameter of posterior communicating artery is 3.8mm on right and 3.6mm on left side. Significant correlations also have been found between arterial segments of different types. Conclusion: It is expected that the study will help to enrich the knowledge about the arterial predominance of origin of posterior cerebral artery of both cerebral hemispheres in normal or variant cases and its effect on perfusion images. PMID:25954608

  1. Posterior Pole Sparing Laser Photocoagulation Combined with Intravitreal Bevacizumab Injection in Posterior Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Rebecca; Kim, Yu Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To report the results of the posterior pole sparing laser photocoagulation combined with intravitreal bevacizumab injection (IVB) in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Methods. A retrospective chart review of premature babies with ROP, all of whom received laser photocoagulation with IVB. Eleven eyes of 6 infants with advanced zone I ROP underwent laser ablation sparing posterior pole with concurrent IVB. The results were compared with those of full-laser treatment combined with IVB to 8 eyes of 5 infants with advanced ROP without involvement of the posterior pole. Results. The posterior pole sparing laser with IVB was performed with zone I, stage 3+ ROP at the mean postmenstrual age of 36 weeks and 5 days. The plus sign decreased significantly at postoperative day 1, the neovascular proliferation regressed by postoperative week 1, and the normal vascularization started at postoperative day 32 on the average. Two months after treatment, vascularization of the spared avascular area was completed. There was no macular dragging, tractional retinal detachment, foveal destruction by laser scars, or any other adverse event. No significant anatomical differences were identified from those of full-laser ablation combined with IVB. Conclusions. Posterior pole sparing laser with IVB can give favorable results without destruction of posterior pole retina. PMID:25614828

  2. Comparison of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy and Open Lumbar Microdiscectomy for Recurrent Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Yeob; Shim, Chan Shik; Ahn, Yong; Choi, Young-Geun; Kim, Ho Jin

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and radiological outcomes of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and open lumbar microdiscectomy (OLM) for recurrent disc herniation. Methods Fifty-four patients, who underwent surgery, either PELD (25 patients) or repeated OLM (29 patients), due to recurrent disc herniation at L4-5 level, were divided into two groups according to the surgical methods. Excluded were patients with sequestrated disc, calcified disc, severe neurological deficit, or instability. Clinical outcomes were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiological variables were assessed using plain radiography and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Results Mean operating time and hospital stay were significantly shorter in PELD group (45.8 minutes and 0.9 day, respectively) than OLM group (73.8 minutes and 3.8 days, respectively) (p < 0.001). Complications occurred in 4% in PELD group and 10.3% in OLM group in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 34.2 months, the mean improvements of back pain, leg pain, and functional improvement were 4.0, 5.5, and 40.9% for PELD group and 2.3, 5.1, and 45.0% for OLM group, respectively. Second recurrence occurred in 4% after PELD and 10.3% after OLM. Disc height did not change after PELD, but significantly decreased after OLM (p = 0.0001). Neither sagittal rotation angle nor volume of multifidus muscle changed significantly in both groups. Conclusion Both PELD and repeated OLM showed favorable outcomes for recurrent disc herniation, but PELD had advantages in terms of shorter operating time, hospital stay, and disc height preservation. PMID:20062565

  3. Intradural solitary fibrous tumor of the lumbar spine: a distinctive case report.

    PubMed

    Basaran, Recep; Kaksi, Mustafa; Onoz, Mustafa; Balkuv, Ece; Sav, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Solitary fibrous tumors are ubiquitous mesenchymal neoplasms of putative fibroblastic origin. They were originally described in the pleura but subsequently have been reported in many extraserosal sites. Solitary fibrous tumors may also occur in the meninges, central nervous system parenchyma, and spinal cord. Case. A 67-year-old male patient with progressive lower extremity weakness, urinary urgency, and sexual dysfunction has been admitted to our hospital. On his lumbar MRI, we detected an intradural lesion posterior to the L3 vertebral corpus. We resected the lesion by L3 total laminectomy. Immunohistological findings revealed strong and diffuse immunopositivity with vimentin, CD34, and bcl-2. Ki-67 proliferation index was 5-8%. We did not detect any recurrence 12 months after his operation. Conclusion. SFT is mostly seen in young and middle-aged patients and should be considered among differential diagnosis in cases suffering from pain, hypoesthesia, and urinary dysfunction. Gross total resection should be primary treatment. Tumors that have high Ki-67 labeling should be followed up for potential recurrences. PMID:25648160

  4. Chiropractic management of a patient with lumbar spine pain due to synovial cyst: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Cox, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to report the findings resulting from chiropractic care using flexion distraction spinal manipulation for a patient with low back and radicular pain due to spinal stenosis caused by a synovial cyst. Case Report A 75-year-old man presented with low back pain radiating to the right anterior thigh and down the left posterior leg of 3 years' duration. Physical and imaging examinations showed a synovial cyst–induced spinal stenosis at the right L3-L4 level and bilateral L4-L5 spinal stenosis. Intervention and Outcomes Flexion distraction spinal manipulation and physiological therapeutics were applied at the levels of stenosis. After 4 visits, the patient noted total absence of the right and left lower extremity pain and no adverse reaction to treatment. After 3 months of treatment and 16 visits, his low back and buttock pain were minimal; and he had no leg pain. Conclusion Lumbar synovial cyst and stenosis–generated low back and radicular pain was 80% relieved in a 75-year-old man following Cox flexion distraction spinal manipulation. PMID:22942836

  5. Intradural Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Lumbar Spine: A Distinctive Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kaksi, Mustafa; Onoz, Mustafa; Sav, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Solitary fibrous tumors are ubiquitous mesenchymal neoplasms of putative fibroblastic origin. They were originally described in the pleura but subsequently have been reported in many extraserosal sites. Solitary fibrous tumors may also occur in the meninges, central nervous system parenchyma, and spinal cord. Case. A 67-year-old male patient with progressive lower extremity weakness, urinary urgency, and sexual dysfunction has been admitted to our hospital. On his lumbar MRI, we detected an intradural lesion posterior to the L3 vertebral corpus. We resected the lesion by L3 total laminectomy. Immunohistological findings revealed strong and diffuse immunopositivity with vimentin, CD34, and bcl-2. Ki-67 proliferation index was 5–8%. We did not detect any recurrence 12 months after his operation. Conclusion. SFT is mostly seen in young and middle-aged patients and should be considered among differential diagnosis in cases suffering from pain, hypoesthesia, and urinary dysfunction. Gross total resection should be primary treatment. Tumors that have high Ki-67 labeling should be followed up for potential recurrences. PMID:25648160

  6. The morphology of lumbar sympathetic trunk in humans: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, K R; Verma, V K; Chavan, S K; Joshi, S D; Joshi, S S

    2013-08-01

    The vasospastic diseases and chronic pain related to lower limb have been successfully treated by surgical ablation of lumbar sympathetic trunk for last 80 years.Precise knowledge of anatomy of lumbar sympathetic trunk and its adjoining structures is mandatory for safe and uncomplicated lumbar and spinal surgeries.We aim to study the detailed anatomy of entry and exit of lumbar sympathetic trunk, the number, dimensions and location of lumbar ganglia in relation to lumbar vertebra. Thorough dissection was carried out in 30 formalin embalmed cadavers available in the Department of Anatomy, Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Rural Medical College (RMC), Loni, Maharashtra. A total of 238 ganglia were observed in 60 lumbar sympathetic trunks. The sympathetic trunk traversed dorsal to the crus of diaphragm in 72.6% and in 13.3% it entered dorsal to the medial arcuate ligament. The most common site of the location of lumbar ganglia was in relation to the second lumbar vertebra, sometimes extending up to the L2-L3 vertebral disc. There was a medial shift of sympathetic trunk in lumbar region and it coursed over sacral promontory to reach the pelvic region in 96% of specimens. These variations should be kept in mind in order to prevent hazardous complications like accidental avulsion of first lumbar ganglia and genitofemoral neuritis. PMID:24068683

  7. Factors to consider in identifying critical points in lumbar spine flexion relaxation.

    PubMed

    Zwambag, Derek P; Brown, Stephen H M

    2015-12-01

    Flexion relaxation (FR), a myoelectric silence of extensor muscles near end range of lumbar flexion, is commonly reported as the lumbar flexion angle at the instant the extensor muscles become silent. However, lumbar flexion angle alone is insufficient to characterize mechanisms that modulate FR. As FR requires the moment generated by passive lumbar extensor tissues to equilibrate the moment due to gravity, the inter-relationships between lumbar moment, flexion angle, and myoelectrical silence will provide added information in the understanding of FR. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between lumbar moment and flexion angle throughout various flexion manoeuvres. It was hypothesized that lumbar moment and flexion angle would not be linearly related and would be affected by lower limb position, range of motion, and the addition of mass to the torso. Eleven participants performed four different lumbar flexion trials. Results showed that lumbar flexion was correlated with the lumbar moment (r=0.92); however an analysis of residuals found that these measures were not linearly related. The moment was, however, correlated (r=0.99) and linearly related to the sine of trunk inclination (T12 rigid body with respect to global horizontal). Future studies of FR could use trunk inclination as a simple kinematic measure to predict relative changes in lumbar moment with flexion. PMID:26559463

  8. Autonomic dysreflexia and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matias, Ana Catarina; Rocha, João; Cerqueira, Maria Emília; Pereira, João Manuel

    2013-05-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is a syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge in patients who had a spinal cord injury above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow resulting in a sudden increase in blood pressure. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) refers to a clinicoradiologic entity characterized by headache, consciousness impairment, visual disturbances, seizures, and posterior transient changes on neuroimaging (cerebral vasogenic edema). Hypertension is a common cause of PRES. The authors describe two case reports of patients with tetraplegia who developed PRES after an autonomic dysreflexia episode. One of them had recurrence of PRES in a similar clinical context. The authors discuss further aspects of PRES and its recurrence, which seems to be unusual particularly after autonomic dysreflexia. PMID:23117272

  9. Intraneural neurofibromas involving the posterior interosseous nerve

    PubMed Central

    Lallemand, R. C.; Weller, R. O.

    1973-01-01

    Two patients presented with a posterior interosseous nerve palsy with supinator weakness. In each case an intraneural neurofibroma was found proximal to the supinator tunnel with no other stigmata of von Recklinghausen's disease. Both tumours showed a whorl-like histological pattern that has been previously confused with onion-bulb structures in hypertrophic polyneuropathy. Electron-microscopy was useful for the pathological diagnosis. The prognosis and treatment of the lesions are discussed. Images PMID:4772730

  10. Two-level total lumbar disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Bakaloudis, Georgios; Lolli, Francesco; Vommaro, Francesco; Parisini, Patrizio

    2009-01-01

    Total lumbar disc replacement (TDR) has been widely used as a treatment option for 2-level symptomatic degenerative disc disease. However, recent studies have presented conflicting results and some authors concluded that outcome deteriorated when disc replacement was performed bisegmentally, with an increase of complications for bisegmental replacements in comparison with monosegmental disc arthroplasty. The goal of the present retrospective study is to investigate results in a group of patients who have received bisegmental TDR with SB Charitè III artificial disc for degenerative disc disease with a minimum follow-up of 3 years, and to compare the results of 2-level disc replacement versus 1-level patients treated with the same prosthesis. A total of 32 patients had at least 3-years follow-up and were reviewed. The average age of the patients was 38.5 years. There were 11 males and 21 females. About 16 patients received 2-level TDR (SB Charitè III) and 16 received 1-level TDR (SB Charitè III). Both radiographic and functional outcome analysis, including patient’s satisfaction, was performed. There were no signs of degenerative changes of the adjacent segments in any case of the 2- or 1-level TDR. There was no statistically significant difference between 2- and 1-level TDR both at 12 months and at 3-years follow-up on functional outcome scores. There was a statistically insignificant difference concerning the patients satisfaction between 1- and 2-level surgeries at the last follow-up (P = 0.46). In the 2-level TDR patients, there were 5 minor complications (31.25%), whereas major complications occurred in 4 more patients (25%) and required a new surgery in 2 cases (12.5%). In the 1-level cases there were 2 minor complications (12.5%) and 2 major complications (12.5%) and a new revision surgery was required in 1 patient (6.25%). In conclusion, the use of 2-level disc replacement at last follow-up presented a higher incidence of complications than in cases with 1-level replacement. At the same time it was impossible to delineate a clear difference in evaluating the questionnaires between the follow-up results of patients receiving 2- and 1-level TDR: the 2-level group presented slightly lower scores at follow-up, but none was statistically significant. PMID:19399536

  11. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following an inadvertent dural puncture during an emergency laparotomy for ischemic colitis – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Reena; Kubisz-Pudelko, Agnieszka; Reid, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-neuroradiological syndrome characterized by various symptoms of neurological disease. It has commonly been reported in association with acute hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, sepsis, and exposure to immunosuppressants. Here, we report on a normotensive woman who developed a severe frontal headache, visual disturbances, and hypertension 3 days after undergoing an emergency laparotomy for ischemic colitis during which she suffered an inadvertent dural puncture. Neuro-imaging revealed features consistent with PRES. The patient went on to make a good recovery, being discharged 21 days postoperatively, with only minor visual disturbances and memory problems. This case highlights the importance of awareness of PRES to all specialties. On reviewing the literature, we feel that PRES may be a potential differential diagnosis to post-procedural neurological symptoms in those patients undergoing routine procedures such as spinal anesthetics or lumbar punctures. PMID:24600245

  12. Posterior capsular contracture of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Bach, H Gregory; Goldberg, Benjamin A

    2006-05-01

    Posterior capsular contracture is a common cause of shoulder pain in which the patient presents with restricted internal rotation and reproduction of pain. Increased anterosuperior translation of the humeral head occurs with forward flexion and can mimic the pain reported with impingement syndrome; however, the patient with impingement syndrome presents with normal range of motion. Initial management of posterior capsular contracture should be nonsurgical, emphasizing range-of-motion stretching with the goal of restoring normal motion. For patients who fail nonsurgical management, arthroscopic posterior capsule release can result in improved motion and pain relief. In the throwing athlete, repetitive forces on the posteroinferior capsule may cause posteroinferior capsular hypertrophy and limited internal rotation. This may be the initial pathologic event in the so-called dead arm syndrome, leading to a superior labrum anteroposterior lesion and, possibly, rotator cuff tear. Management involves regaining internal rotation such that the loss of internal rotation is not greater than the increase in external rotation. In the athlete who fails nonsurgical management, a selective posteroinferior capsulotomy can improve motion, reduce pain, and prevent further shoulder injury. PMID:16675620

  13. Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization.

  14. Surface strain distribution in isolated single lumbar vertebrae.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, J S; Coggins, J; Rogers, R; Jayson, M I; Hampson, W G

    1976-01-01

    The surface strains of isolated single lumbar vertebrae under compressive load were examined by the techniques of brittlecoat and photoelastic analysis. Directions of principal strain components have been determined. Areas of stress concentration were found around the vertebral rims, near the pedicles, and around the foramina of the basivertebral veins. Images PMID:1275581

  15. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2) Attach the pelvis to the seating surface by a bolt C/328, modified as shown in Figure 18, and the upper legs at the knee axial rotation joints by the attachments shown in Figure 18. Tighten the mountings so that the pelvis-lumbar joining...

  16. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2) Attach the pelvis to the seating surface by a bolt C/328, modified as shown in Figure 18, and the upper legs at the knee axial rotation joints by the attachments shown in Figure 18. Tighten the mountings so that the pelvis-lumbar joining...

  17. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2) Attach the pelvis to the seating surface by a bolt C/328, modified as shown in Figure 18, and the upper legs at the knee axial rotation joints by the attachments shown in Figure 18. Tighten the mountings so that the pelvis-lumbar joining...

  18. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2) Attach the pelvis to the seating surface by a bolt C/328, modified as shown in Figure 18, and the upper legs at the knee axial rotation joints by the attachments shown in Figure 18. Tighten the mountings so that the pelvis-lumbar joining...

  19. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2) Attach the pelvis to the seating surface by a bolt C/328, modified as shown in Figure 18, and the upper legs at the knee axial rotation joints by the attachments shown in Figure 18. Tighten the mountings so that the pelvis-lumbar joining...

  20. 49 CFR 572.115 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.115 Section 572.115 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Side Impact Hybrid...

  1. The diagnostic dilemma of the posterior mediastinal thymus: CT manifestations

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.D.; Weber, T.R.; Sequeira, F.W.; Vane, D.W.; King, H.

    1983-03-01

    Extension of the normal thymus into the posterior mediastinum is rare. The CT appearance of this anomaly in an infant is presented. A mass of soft-tissue density extended from the anterior mediastinum to the posterior chest wall. The absence of any tissue-cleavage plane in the lesion and a smooth continuous lateral margin are signs of posterior extension of the thymus, and they help to distinguish this from a normal anterior thymus being present with a posterior tumor.

  2. Electrocardiographic diagnosis of remote posterior wall myocardial infarction using unipolar posterior lead V9

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, M.W.; Imburgia, M.; King, T.R.; Fischer, K.C.; Kovach, K.L. )

    1989-09-01

    The accuracy of four electrocardiographic criteria for diagnosing remote posterior myocardial infarction was assessed prospectively in 369 patients undergoing exercise treadmill testing with thallium scintigraphy. Criteria included the following: (1) R-wave width greater than or equal to 0.04 s and R-wave greater than or equal to S-wave in V1; (2) R-wave greater than or equal to S-wave in V2; (3) T-wave voltage in V2 minus V6 greater than or equal to 0.38 mV (T-wave index); (4) Q-wave greater than or equal to 0.04 s in left paraspinal lead V9. Twenty-seven patients (7.3 percent) met thallium criteria for posterior myocardial infarction, defined as a persistent perfusion defect in the posterobase of the left ventricle. Sensitivities for the four criteria ranged from 4 to 56 percent, and specificities ranged from 64 to 99 percent. Posterior paraspinal lead V9 provided the best overall predictive accuracy (94 percent), positive predictive value (58 percent), and ability to differentiate patients with and without posterior myocardial infarction of any single criterion (p less than .0001). Combining the T-wave index with lead V9 further enhanced the diagnostic yield: the sensitivity for detecting posterior infarction by at least one of these criteria was 78 percent, and when both criteria were positive, specificity was 98.5 percent. It is concluded that a single, unipolar posterior lead in the V9 position is superior to standard 12-lead electrocardiographic criteria in diagnosing remote posterior myocardial infarction, and that combining V9 with the T-wave index maximizes the diagnostic yield.

  3. Radicular Pain due to Subsidence of the Nitinol Shape Memory Loop for Stabilization after Lumbar Decompressive Laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Son, Byung-Chul; Kim, Deog-Ryeong

    2015-01-01

    A number of dynamic stabilization systems have been used to overcome the problems associated with spinal fusion with rigid fixation recently and the demand for an ideal dynamic stabilization system is greater for younger patients with multisegment disc degeneration. Nitinol, a shape memory alloy of nickel and titanium, is flexible at low temperatures and regains its original shape when heated, and the Nitinol shape memory loop (SML) implant has been used as a posterior tension band mostly in decompressive laminectomy cases because the Nitinol implant has various characteristics such as high elasticity and a tensile force, flexibility, and biological compatibility. The reported short-term outcomes of the application of SMLs as posterior column supporters in cervical and lumbar decompressive laminectomies seem to be positive, and complications are minimal except for the rare occurrence of pullout and fracture of the SML. However, there was no report of neurological complications related to neural compression in spite of the use of the loop of SML in the epidural space. The authors report a case of delayed development of radiating pain caused by subsidence of the SML resulting epidural compression. PMID:25674347

  4. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion. A follow-up study in 136 consecutive patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel; Bünger, Cody

    2007-05-01

    Although cost-effectiveness is becoming the foremost evaluative criterion within health service management of spine surgery, scientific knowledge about cost-patterns and cost-effectiveness is limited. The aims of this study were (1) to establish an activity-based method for costing at the patient-level, (2) to investigate the correlation between costs and effects, (3) to investigate the influence of selected patient characteristics on cost-effectiveness and, (4) to investigate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of (a) posterior instrumentation and (b) intervertebral anterior support in lumbar spinal fusion. We hypothesized a positive correlation between costs and effects, that determinants of effects would also determine cost-effectiveness, and that posterolateral instrumentation and anterior intervertebral support are cost-effective adjuncts in posterolateral lumbar fusion. A cohort of 136 consecutive patients with chronic low back pain, who were surgically treated from January 2001 through January 2003, was followed until 2 years postoperatively. Operations took place at University Hospital of Aarhus and all patients had either (1) non-instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, (2) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, or (3) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion + anterior intervertebral support. Analysis of costs was performed at the patient-level, from an administrator's perspective, by means of Activity-Based-Costing. Clinical effects were measured by means of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire and the Low Back Pain Rating Scale at baseline and 2 years postoperatively. Regression models were used to reveal determinants for costs and effects. Costs and effects were analyzed as a net-benefit measure to reveal determinants for cost-effectiveness, and finally, adjusted analysis (for non-random allocation of patients) was performed in order to reveal the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of (a) posterior instrumentation and (b) anterior support. The costs of non-instrumented posterolateral spinal fusion were estimated at DKK 88,285(95% CI 81,369;95,546), instrumented posterolateral spinal fusion at DKK 94,396(95% CI 89,865;99,574) and instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion + anterior intervertebral support at DKK 120,759(95% CI 111,981;133,738). The net-benefit of the regimens was significantly affected by smoking and functional disability in psychosocial life areas. Multi-level fusion and surgical technique significantly affected the net-benefit as well. Surprisingly, no correlation was found between treatment costs and treatment effects. Incremental analysis suggested that the probability of posterior instrumentation being cost-effective was limited, whereas the probability of anterior intervertebral support being cost-effective escalates as willingness-to-pay per effect unit increases. This study reveals useful and hitherto unknown information both about cost-patterns at the patient-level and determinants of cost-effectiveness. The overall conclusion of the present investigation is a recommendation to focus further on determinants of cost-effectiveness. For example, patient characteristics that are modifiable at a relatively low expense may have greater influence on cost-effectiveness than the surgical technique itself--at least from an administrator's perspective. PMID:16871387

  5. The Lumbar Lordosis in Males and Females, Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Ori; Dar, Gali; Abbas, Janan; Stein, Dan; May, Hila; Masharawi, Youssef; Peled, Nathan; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether differences exist in male and female lumbar lordosis has been debated by researchers who are divided as to the nature of variations in the spinal curve, their origin, reasoning, and implications from a morphological, functional and evolutionary perspective. Evaluation of the spinal curvature is constructive in understanding the evolution of the spine, as well as its pathology, planning of surgical procedures, monitoring its progression and treatment of spinal deformities. The aim of the current study was to revisit the nature of lumbar curve in males and females. Methods Our new automated method uses CT imaging of the spine to measure lumbar curvature in males and females. The curves extracted from 158 individuals were based on the spinal canal, thus avoiding traditional pitfalls of using bone features for curve estimation. The model analysis was carried out on the entire curve, whereby both local and global descriptors were examined in a single framework. Six parameters were calculated: segment length, curve length, curvedness, lordosis peak location, lordosis cranial peak height, and lordosis caudal peak height. Principal Findings Compared to males, the female spine manifested a statistically significant greater curvature, a caudally located lordotic peak, and greater cranial peak height. As caudal peak height is similar for males and females, the illusion of deeper lordosis among females is due partially to the fact that the upper part of the female lumbar curve is positioned more dorsally (more backwardly inclined). Conclusions Males and females manifest different lumbar curve shape, yet similar amount of inward curving (lordosis). The morphological characteristics of the female spine were probably developed to reduce stress on the vertebral elements during pregnancy and nursing. PMID:26301782

  6. Retroperitoneoscopic Lumbar Sympathectomy for Buerger's Disease: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Lakhvinder; Lal, Pawan; Jain, Akhilesh; Lal, Pawanindra; Ramteke, V. K.

    2004-01-01

    Background: The conventional lumbar sympathectomy procedure through the extraperitoneal route requires a muscle cutting-splitting incision, which leads to significant postoperative pain and prolonged convalescence. With increasing experience in retroperitoneoscopic procedures, we did a pilot study to explore the role of retroperitoneoscopy in lumbar sympathectomy. We describe herein our technique used for the surgery. Methods: The patient was placed in a lateral position. A 15-mm incision was made just below the 12th rib, and retroperitoneal space was created using blunt finger dissection. A custom-made, large balloon was inserted and inflated with the equivalent of 750 mL to 1000 mL of saline. The second 10-mm port was placed in line with the first port above the iliac crest. The third and fourth 5-mm ports were placed anterior to the first 2 ports. Peritoneum was retracted anteriorly. The medial border of the psoas muscle was used as a landmark and a chain identified immediately medial to it. Lumbar vessels were ligated on the right side. The first to fourth lumbar sympathetic ganglia were removed with the intervening chain. The port sites were closed without a drain. Results: We attempted and successfully completed this procedure in 8 patients; 6 on the left side and 2 on the right side. The average operating time was 38 minutes. The mean hospital stay was 1.5 days. All patients had symptomatic pain relief and clinical improvement. Conclusions: Retroperitoneoscopic lumbar sympathectomy is a safe and effective procedure. It has a short convalescent time and minimal morbidity; hence, it is a viable alternative for the open procedure. PMID:15347122

  7. Unilateral Acute Closed-Angle Glaucoma After Elective Lumbar Surgery Reveals Multiple Intracranial Aneurysms. A Case Report and Discussion on Workup of Differential Diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Storey, Christopher; Menger, Richard; Hefner, Matthew; Keating, Patrick; Ahmed, Osama; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of our paper is to present a case of a rare complication of posterior lumbar surgery. Our patient presented for elective lumbar decompression, which was complicated by durotomy. She then developed sudden headache and right eye pain once upright on postoperative day 2. Then on postoperative day 3, she developed a dilated nonreactive pupil with extraocular movements intact. A computed tomography scan of the head was negative for subarachnoid hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance angiography showed a possible right posterior communicating artery aneurysm. She was transferred to a tertiary center with a severe headache and a nonreactive pupil, raising concern for evolving third nerve palsy due to aneurysm. A cerebral angiogram was performed and showed multiple aneurysms. Aneurysm location did not explain the patient's symptoms, and ophthalmology was consulted. Elevated intraocular pressure was noted, and the patient was diagnosed with acute angle-closure glaucoma (AACG). Our patient was medically treated and subsequently underwent laser peripheral iridotomy. She has had improved vision and pupillary function at 1 month follow-up. The diagnosis is complicated by a durotomy, which led to cascade in the differential diagnosis to rule out intracranial pathology. Her age and home medications, which had sympathomimetic effects, placed her at increased risk, but lying prone in the dark under the drapes was likely the lead causative factor. In conclusion, a postoperative posterior spine patient with eye pain and changes in vision and pupils should be evaluated with AACG in mind due to the devastating consequences if left untreated or treatment is delayed. PMID:25959248

  8. A method for quantitative measurement of lumbar intervertebral disc structures: an intra- and inter-rater agreement and reliability study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a shortage of agreement studies relevant for measuring changes over time in lumbar intervertebral disc structures. The objectives of this study were: 1) to develop a method for measurement of intervertebral disc height, anterior and posterior disc material and dural sac diameter using MRI, 2) to evaluate intra- and inter-rater agreement and reliability for the measurements included, and 3) to identify factors compromising agreement. Methods Measurements were performed on MRIs from 16 people with and 16 without lumbar disc herniation, purposefully chosen to represent all possible disc contours among participants in a general population study cohort. Using the new method, MRIs were measured twice by one rater and once by a second rater. Agreement on the sagittal start- and end-slice was evaluated using weighted Kappa. Length and volume measurements were conducted on available slices between intervertebral foramens, and cross-sectional areas (CSA) were calculated from length measurements and slice thickness. Results were reported as Bland and Altman’s limits of agreement (LOA) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Results Weighted Kappa (Kw (95% CI)) for start- and end-slice were: intra-: 0.82(0.60;0.97) & 0.71(0.43;0.93); inter-rater: 0.56(0.29;0.78) & 0.60(0.35;0.81). For length measurements, LOA ranged from [?1.0;1.0] mm to [?2.0;2.3] mm for intra-; and from [?1.1; 1.4] mm to [?2.6;2.0] mm for inter-rater. For volume measurements, LOA ranged from [?293;199] mm3 to [?582;382] mm3 for intra-, and from [?17;801] mm3 to [?450;713] mm3 for inter-rater. For CSAs, LOA ranged between [?21.3; 18.8] mm2 and [?31.2; 43.7] mm2 for intra-, and between [?10.8; 16.4] mm2 and [?64.6; 27.1] mm2 for inter-rater. In general, LOA as a proportion of mean values gradually decreased with increasing size of the measured structures. Agreement was compromised by difficulties in identifying the vertebral corners, the anterior and posterior boundaries of the intervertebral disc and the dural sac posterior boundary. With two exceptions, ICCs were above 0.81. Conclusions Length measurements and calculated CSAs of disc morphology and dural sac diameter from MRIs showed acceptable intra- and inter-rater agreement and reliability. However, caution should be taken when measuring very small structures and defining anatomical landmarks. PMID:23953197

  9. Anterior and posterior fixation for delayed treatment of posterior atlantoaxial dislocation without fracture.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai Ming; Malhotra, Karan; Butler, Joseph S; Wu, Shi Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Posterior atlantoaxial dislocation (PAAD) without fracture of the odontoid process is a rare injury. Authors have variously reported closed or open reduction, followed by either anterior or posterior fixation, but there is no consensus on best treatment. We present a particularly unstable case of PAAD. Open reduction through a retropharyngeal approach with odontoidectomy was required for reduction. Anterior fixation with transarticular lag screws was required prior to posterior fixation with pedicle screws. Despite non-compliance with postoperative immobilisation, imaging at 20-month follow-up confirmed solid fusion. The patient is pain-free with a good range of movement of the neck and has returned to a manual job. Our case had a greater degree of instability than was previously reported, which necessitated 360° fixation. This is the first reported case of this treatment strategy, which provided a very stable fixation allowing fusion despite early movement and without causing undue stiffness. PMID:26516249

  10. Diagnostic imaging of posterior fossa anomalies in the fetus and neonate: part 2, Posterior fossa disorders.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Teresa; Mahalingam, Sowmya; Ishak, Gisele E; Nixon, Jason N; Siebert, Joseph; Dighe, Manjiri K

    2015-01-01

    This second portion of a two-part review illustrates examples of posterior fossa disorders detectable on prenatal ultrasound and MRI, with postnatal or pathology correlation where available. These disorders are discussed in the context of an anatomic classification scheme described in Part 1 of this posterior fossa anomaly review. Assessment of the size and formation of the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis is critical. Diagnoses discussed here include arachnoid cyst, Blake's pouch cyst, Dandy-Walker malformation, vermian agenesis, Joubert syndrome, rhombencephalosynapsis, Chiari II malformation, ischemia, and tumors. PMID:25457569

  11. Complications when augmenting the posterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, Paul; Melnick, Philip R; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary posterior edentulous region presents a challenge when planning for restoring missing teeth with a dental implant. The available bone in such cases is often not dense and not adequate for the placement of a properly sized implant because of maxillary sinus pneumatization and alveolar bone loss. Maxillary sinus lift is a predictable procedure to provide adequate bone height for the purpose of implant placement. However, complications are encountered during or after the execution of the sinus lift procedure. In this article, the prevention and management of maxillary sinus complications are discussed. PMID:25434561

  12. Posterior shoulder instability in the contact athlete.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, Eric P; Sekiya, Jon K

    2013-10-01

    Historically, posterior shoulder instability has been a challenging problem for contact athletes and orthopedic surgeons alike. A complete understanding of the normal shoulder anatomy and biomechanics and the pathoanatomy responsible for the instability is necessary for a successful clinical outcome. In addition, the surgeon must be familiar with the diagnostic imaging and physical examination maneuvers required for the correct diagnosis without missing any other concurrent abnormalities. This understanding will allow orthopedists to plan and execute the appropriate management, whether this may involve conservative or surgical intervention. The goal should always be to correct the abnormality and have the patient return to play with full strength and no recurrent instability. PMID:24079434

  13. Posterior consistency in conditional distribution estimation

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Debdeep; Dunson, David B.; Tokdar, Surya T.

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of priors have been proposed for nonparametric Bayesian estimation of conditional distributions, and there is a clear need for theorems providing conditions on the prior for large support, as well as posterior consistency. Estimation of an uncountable collection of conditional distributions across different regions of the predictor space is a challenging problem, which differs in some important ways from density and mean regression estimation problems. Defining various topologies on the space of conditional distributions, we provide sufficient conditions for posterior consistency focusing on a broad class of priors formulated as predictor-dependent mixtures of Gaussian kernels. This theory is illustrated by showing that the conditions are satisfied for a class of generalized stick-breaking process mixtures in which the stick-breaking lengths are monotone, differentiable functions of a continuous stochastic process. We also provide a set of sufficient conditions for the case where stick-breaking lengths are predictor independent, such as those arising from a fixed Dirichlet process prior. PMID:25067858

  14. Experimental models for posterior capsule opacification research.

    PubMed

    Wormstone, Ian Michael; Eldred, Julie Ann

    2016-01-01

    Millions of people worldwide are blinded due to cataract formation. At present the only means of treating a cataract is through surgical intervention. A modern cataract operation involves the creation of an opening in the anterior lens capsule to allow access to the fibre cells, which are then removed. This leaves in place a capsular bag that comprises the remaining anterior capsule and the entire posterior capsule. In most cases, an intraocular lens is implanted into the capsular bag during surgery. This procedure initially generates good visual restoration, but unfortunately, residual lens epithelial cells undergo a wound-healing response invoked by surgery, which in time commonly results in a secondary loss of vision. This condition is known as posterior capsule opacification (PCO) and exhibits classical features of fibrosis, including hyperproliferation, migration, matrix deposition, matrix contraction and transdifferentiation into myofibroblasts. These changes alone can cause visual deterioration, but in a significant number of cases, fibre differentiation is also observed, which gives rise to Soemmering's ring and Elschnig's pearl formation. Elucidating the regulatory factors that govern these events is fundamental in the drive to develop future strategies to prevent or delay visual deterioration resulting from PCO. A range of experimental platforms are available for the study of PCO that range from in vivo animal models to in vitro human cell and tissue culture models. In the current review, we will highlight some of the experimental models used in PCO research and provide examples of key findings that have resulted from these approaches. PMID:25939555

  15. Posterior surgical approaches to the rectum.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, K C; Lang, N P; Broadwater, J R; Thompson, B W

    1982-06-01

    This report summarizes experience with 19 posterior approaches to the rectum including nine trans-sacral (Kraske) and ten trans-sphincteric (Mason) procedures. This study included 12 men and 7 women, ranging in age from 18 to 89 years. Surgical indications included villous tumors in nine patients, various benign problems in four patients, primary carcinomas in three patients, and recurrent cancer in three patients. Eight complications developed in the 19 patients including: four fecal fistulae, two wound dehiscences, one rectal stricture, and one sacrococcygeal hernia. Spontaneous closure of the fecal fistulae occurred in two patients, and two patients required proximal colostomies. Fecal continence was achieved in 18 of the 19 patients. No patient died as a complication of the procedure. No recurrent tumors have developed. The conclusion is that a posterior approach to the rectum is a safe and effective procedure for various benign and for selected malignant conditions. It is particularly suitable for villous tumors that are too high for transanal resection and too low for transabdominal resection. It is an effective procedure for small, exophytic, mobile carcinomas of the lower 10 cm of the rectum in selected patients. PMID:7082059

  16. Posterior malleolar fractures of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Bartoní?ek, J; Rammelt, S; Tu?ek, M; Na?ka, O

    2015-12-01

    Despite an increasing awareness of injuries to PM in ankle fracture-dislocations, there are still many open questions. The mere presence of a posterior fragment leads to significantly poorer outcomes. Adequate diagnosis, classification and treatment require preoperative CT examination, preferably with 3D reconstructions. The indication for surgical treatment is made individually on the basis of comprehensive assessment of the three-dimensional outline of the PM fracture and all associated injuries to the ankle including syndesmotic instability. Anatomic fixation of the avulsed posterior tibiofibular ligament will contribute to syndesmotic stability and restore the integrity of the incisura tibiae thus facilitating anatomic reduction of the distal fibula. A necessary prerequisite is mastering of posterolateral and posteromedial approaches and the technique of direct reduction and internal fixation. Further clinical studies with higher numbers of patients treated by similar methods and evaluation of pre- and postoperative CT scans will be necessary to determine reliable prognostic factors associated with certain types of PM fractures and associated injuries to the ankle. PMID:26253884

  17. Bladder neck incompetence at posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2015-01-01

    The finding of an incompetent bladder neck (BN) at the time of posterior urethroplasty will necessarily exacerbate the already difficult situation. In such cases the aim of the treatment is not only to restore urethral continuity by end-to-end urethral anastomosis, but also to restore the function of the BN to maintain urinary continence. Fortunately, the incidence of incompetence of the BN at posterior urethroplasty is uncommon, usually ?4.5%. It seems that pelvic fracture-related BN injuries, in contrast to urethral injuries which result from a shearing force, are due to direct injury by the sharp edge of the fractured and displaced pubic bone. The risk of injuries to the BN is greater in children, in patients with a fracture involving both superior and inferior pubic rami on the same side, and in those managed initially by primary realignment. An incompetent BN is suspected by finding an open rectangular BN on cystography, and a fixedly open BN on suprapubic cystoscopy. An incompetent BN can be treated either subsequent to or concomitant with the urethral repair, according to whether a perineal or a perineo-abdominal urethroplasty is used, respectively. Several options have been reported to treat pelvic fracture-related BN incompetence, including reconstructing the BN, forming a new sphincter by tubularisation of a rectangular flap of the anterior bladder wall, and mechanical occlusion by an artificial sphincter or collagen injection. Reconstruction of the BN by the Young-Dees-Leadbetter?? procedure probably provides the most successful results. PMID:26019982

  18. Low bone mineral density is associated with intracranial posterior circulation atherosclerosis in women.

    PubMed

    Kang, K

    2015-12-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is associated with carotid atherosclerosis and the incidence of stroke. However, there are no data on the association of BMD with intracranial atherosclerosis. The study population consisted of 357 participants who underwent dual energy x-ray absorptiometric scanning of the lumbar spine and brain 3D time of flight magnetic resonance angiography as part of their voluntary health checks. The basilar, middle cerebral, intracranial internal carotid and intracranial vertebral arteries were evaluated. Low BMD was defined as a T-score of less than -1. All analyses were stratified by sex and intracranial atherosclerosis location. One hundred seventy-six women (53years; 66.9% postmenopausal; 33.5% low BMD; 60.2% intracranial atherosclerosis in the anterior circulation (AC); 60.2% intracranial atherosclerosis in the posterior circulation (PC)) and 181 men (51years; 28.7% low BMD; 61.9% intracranial atherosclerosis in the AC; 55.8% intracranial atherosclerosis in the PC) were included. In women, low BMD was significantly associated with intracranial atherosclerosis in the PC with the odds ratio of 2.57 (95% confidence interval 1.11-5.99). However, intracranial atherosclerosis in the AC was not associated with BMD in women. In men, there were no significant associations between BMD and intracranial atherosclerosis. In conclusion, this study shows that low BMD is associated with subclinical intracranial PC atherosclerosis in women but not in men. PMID:26431918

  19. Early adolescent lumbar intervertebral disc injury: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and discusses the case of an adolescent male with lumbar intervertebral disc injury characterized by chronic low back pain (LBP) and antalgia. A 13-year-old boy presented for care with a complaint of chronic LBP and subsequent loss of quality of life. The patient was examined and diagnosed by means of history, clinical testing and use of imaging. He had showed failure in natural history and conservative management relief in both symptomatic and functional improvement, due to injury to the intervertebral joints of his lower lumbar spine. Discogenic LBP in the young adolescent population must be considered, particularly in cases involving even trivial minor trauma, and in those in which LBP becomes chronic. More research is needed regarding long-term implications of such disc injuries in young people, and how to best conservatively manage these patients. A discussion of discogenic LBP pertaining to adolescent disc injury is included. PMID:23621900

  20. Spondylodiscitis Occurring after Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Berkman, Mehmet Zafer

    2013-01-01

    Spondylodiscitis is a rare disease which is generally seen after long-term epidural catheterization. However, spondylidiscitis developing after diagnostic lumbar puncture is very rare. Early diagnosis has a crucial role in the management of the disease and inclines the morbidity rates. However, the diagnosis is often delayed due to the rarity and insidious onset of the disease usually presenting with low back pain which has a high frequency in the society. If it is diagnosed early before development of an abscess requiring surgery or neurological deficit, it responds to antimicrobial therapy quite well. We report 66-year-old male case of spondylodiscitis developing after diagnostic lumbar puncture. The patient was treated with antimicrobial therapy. After antimicrobial therapy, findings of spondylodiscitis were completely resolved and no recurrence was seen in the period of 9-month followup. PMID:23476837

  1. GNSS integer ambiguity validation based on posterior probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zemin; Bian, Shaofeng

    2015-10-01

    GNSS integer ambiguity validation is considered to be a challenge task for decades. Several kinds of validation tests are developed and widely used in these years, but theoretical basis is their weakness. Ambiguity validation theoretically is an issue of hypothesis test. In the frame of Bayesian hypothesis testing, posterior probability is the canonical standard that statistical decision should be based on. In this contribution, (i) we derive the posterior probability of the fixed ambiguity based on the Bayesian principle and modify it for practice ambiguity validation. (ii) The optimal property of the posterior probability test is proved based on an extended Neyman-Pearson lemma. Since validation failure rate is the issue users most concerned about, (iii) we derive the failure rate upper bound of the posterior probability test, so the user can use the posterior probability test either in the fixed posterior probability or in the fixed failure rate way. Simulated as well as real observed data are used for experimental validations. The results show that (i) the posterior probability test is the most effective within the R-ratio test, difference test, ellipsoidal integer aperture test and posterior probability test, (ii) the posterior probability test is computational efficient and (iii) the failure rate estimation for posterior probability test is useful.

  2. The application of Diapason spinal fixator device: a comparison with the Steffee VSP plate.

    PubMed

    Izawa, K; Yonenobu, K; Kawatsu, N; Hirotsuji, M; Wada, E; Hosono, N

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-five consecutive patients who had a variety of lumbar disorders and who underwent lumbar spinal fusion using the Diapason fixator were followed for a mean period of 20 months. The operations included 16 posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), 7 posterolateral fusion (PLF), and 2 combined PLIF and PLF (PLIF/PLF). As a control group, 38 patients undergoing PLIF using a Steffee VSP plate (VSP) were followed for a mean period of 24 months. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the operation time, blood loss, and improvement of preoperative symptoms. However, incidence of incomplete bony union and radiolucent zone around the screws were higher in the Diapason group than in the VSP group. Our study suggests that there was a possibility of insufficient rigidity of screw-rod fixation in the Diapason system. PMID:7787342

  3. Spontaneous Regression of a Large Lumbar Disc Extrusion

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Sung-Joo

    2010-01-01

    Although the spontaneous disappearance or decrease in size of a herniated disc is well known, that of a large extruded disc has rarely been reported. This paper reports a case of a spontaneous regression of a large lumbar disc extrusion. The disc regressed spontaneously with clinical improvement and was documented on a follow up MRI study 6 months later. The literature is reviewed and the possible mechanisms of spontaneous disc regression are discussed. PMID:21082061

  4. Lumbar ultrasound: useful gadget or time-consuming gimmick?

    PubMed

    Gambling, D R

    2011-10-01

    Despite widespread enthusiasm for using lumbar ultrasound in obstetrics, there are some who believe it is expensive and time-consuming, with undetermined risks and uncertain benefits. For decades, anesthesiologists have striven to perfect the identification and cannulation of the epidural space using skills learned during training and early clinical practice. These skills include knowledge of the relevant anatomy and detection of subtle tactile clues that aid successful placement of an epidural catheter. Indeed, obstetric anesthesiologists have managed to do this with great success without using imaging techniques. There is a long learning curve associated with lumbar ultrasound and it is unclear from the literature if the success rates associated with its use are superior to clinical skill alone. Is it only a matter of time before regulators insist that lumbar ultrasound is used before inserting an epidural? Indeed, this has already happened for central vein catheters. The United States spent $2.2 trillion on health care in 2007, nearly twice the average of other developed nations. If rapid health cost growth persists, one out of every four dollars in the US national economy will be tied up in the health system by 2025. Do obstetric anesthesiologists want to add to these costs by using unnecessary and expensive equipment? Although many feel that diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics is safe, some argue that we have yet to perform an appropriate risk analysis for lumbar ultrasound during pregnancy. The issue of ultrasound bio-safety needs to be considered before we all jump on the ultrasound bandwagon. PMID:21169011

  5. Unilateral Pedicle Fracture Accompanying Spondylolytic Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeun Sung; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Yun Sung

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral pedicle stress fracture accompanying spondylolytic spondylolisthesis is rare even in the elderly. Most are associated with major trauma, previous spine surgery, or stress-related activity. Here, the authors describe an unique case of unilateral pedicle fracture associated with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis at the L5 level, which was successfully treated by posterior lumbar interbody fusion with screw fixation at the L5-S1 level. As far as the authors' knowledge, no such case has been previously reported in the literature. The pathophysiological mechanism of this uncommon entity is discussed and a review of relevant literature is included. PMID:26180621

  6. Autologous Conditioned Serum as a Novel Alternative Option in the Treatment of Unilateral Lumbar Radiculopathy: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Goni, Vijay G.; Y. K., Batra

    2015-01-01

    Study Design The study was conducted on patients who received autologous conditioned serum (ACS) as a line of treatment at the Orthopedics outpatient department of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER, Chandigarh) from January 2011 to June 2012. Of the 1,224 patients, 20 males or females were included in the study based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The institutional board of PGIMER approved the study before it was initiated. Purpose To study the efficacy of ACS in the treatment of unilateral lumbar radiculopathy. Overview of Literature Interleukin (IL)-1 appears to be of special importance among the cytokines identified in orthopedic diseases. ACS contains high concentrations of IL-1 receptor antagonist, antagonist to IL-1 in that is a biochemical 'sensitizer' of nerve roots in radiculopathy. Methods We included 20 patients with unilateral lumbar radiculopathy after obtaining informed consent. We prepared ACS as described by Meijer et al. Under bi-planar fluoroscopic imaging in anterior-posterior and lateral views, ACS was administered via epidural perineural technique. Patients in both groups were evaluated by quadruple visual analogue scale, straight leg raising test, revised Oswestry disability index, and 12-Item Short Form of Health Survey before and after epidural injections at 3 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Results There was a statistically significant change in all parameters from pre-injection to first, second, and third follow-up (p<0.001). Conclusions ACS can modify the disease course in addition to reducing pain, disability and improving general health. PMID:26713125

  7. [Reproducibility of lumbar spine kinematics in clinical gait analysis].

    PubMed

    Portscher, M; Vogt, L; Pfeifer, K; Banzer, W

    2000-06-01

    The objective measurement of functional lumbopelvical movements enables the evaluation of the quantity and quality of movements referring to functional disorders in dynamic test-situations. The goal of the present study is the determination of the reproducibility of time-continuous movement analysis of the pelvic region during walking and the determination of possible errors. The movements of the thoracic (Th12), lumbar and sacrum-region (S1) of 17 healthy subjects (age: 32.1 +/- 2.3 years) during walking on a treadmill (4.5 km/h) were investigated twice in an interval of 24 hours by means of a 3D ultrasonic movement analysis system. The ensemble averages of the low-pass filtered and time-normalized angle-time sequences of all anatomical planes and regions showed high test-retest correlations (r > or = 0.92, p < 0.01) except fo the lumbar movement in the sagittal plane (r = 0.79, p < 0.01). A paired t-test showed no significant differences for the amplitudes of test and retest measurements except for the thoracolumbar movement in the sagittal plane (p < .05). The results show that the evaluation of lumbar movement patterns can be regarded as admissible and desirable for clinical movement analysis. The data can be used as a diagnostic tool for the planning and control of therapeutic interventions. PMID:10939139

  8. Percutaneous treatment of cervical and lumbar herniated disc.

    PubMed

    Kelekis, A; Filippiadis, D K

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic armamentarium for symptomatic intervertebral disc herniation includes conservative therapy, epidural infiltrations (interlaminar or trans-foraminal), percutaneous therapeutic techniques and surgical options. Percutaneous, therapeutic techniques are imaging-guided, minimally invasive treatments for intervertebral disc herniation which can be performed as outpatient procedures. They can be classified in 4 main categories: mechanical, thermal, chemical decompression and biomaterials implantation. Strict sterility measures are a prerequisite and should include extensive local sterility and antibiotic prophylaxis. Indications include the presence of a symptomatic, small to medium sized contained intervertebral disc herniation non-responding to a 4-6 weeks course of conservative therapy. Contraindications include sequestration, infection, segmental instability (spondylolisthesis), uncorrected coagulopathy or a patient unwilling to provide informed consent. Decompression techniques are feasible and reproducible, efficient (75-94% success rate) and safe (>0.5% mean complications rate) therapies for the treatment of symptomatic intervertebral disc herniation. Percutaneous, imaging guided, intervertebral disc therapeutic techniques can be proposed either as an initial treatment or as an attractive alternative prior to surgery for the therapy of symptomatic herniation in both cervical and lumbar spine. This article will describe the mechanism of action for different therapeutic techniques applied to intervertebral discs of cervical and lumbar spine, summarize the data concerning safety and effectiveness of these treatments, and provide a rational approach for the therapy of symptomatic intervertebral disc herniation in cervical and lumbar spine. PMID:24673977

  9. [The efficiency of lumbar transperitoneal laparoscopic sympathectomy--100 cases revue].

    PubMed

    Bâtc?, V; Jitea, N; Albita, O; Bîtc?, T; M?nuc, D

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar sympathectomy, classical surgical technique applied in conventional arteriopathy treatment, has acquired new valence by the development of laparoscopic technique. In a period of ten years (2000-2009), a number of 100 patients with different cause of arteriopathy have been operated by transperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy. Mean age was 62 years. Indication establishment has been achieved by an investigation protocol taking into account clinical and Para clinical criteria and methods. Postop evolution has been simple with very low morbidity and mortality zero. Particularly good evolution had patients in stages II and III of the disease, with missing effort claudication and repaos pain. Unfavourably results were recorded in advanced stages of disease, at diabetic patients with plenty of associated disease, therefore 9 patients suffering amputations of limbs. Results immediate and late were coordinated with stage and age of patients. Lumbar laparoscopic transperitoneal sympathectomy represents a viable alternative in artheriopathy treatment because of reduced morbidity--representing a chance for these very delicate patients. PMID:22165057

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anatomy of the ovine lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Nisolle, J F; Wang, X Q; Squélart, M; Hontoir, F; Kirschvink, N; Clegg, P; Vandeweerd, J M

    2014-06-01

    Although the ovine spine is a useful research model for intervertebral disc pathology and vertebral surgery, there is little peer-reviewed information regarding the MRI anatomy of the ovine spine. To describe the lumbar spine MRI anatomy, 10 lumbar segments of cadaver ewes were imaged by 1.5-Tesla MR. Sagittal and transverse sequences were performed in T1 and T2 weighting (T1W, T2W), and the images were compared to gross anatomic sagittal and transverse sections performed through frozen spines. MRI was able to define most anatomic structures of the ovine spine in a similar way as can be imaged in humans. In both T1W and T2W, the signals of ovine IVDs were similar to those observed in humans. Salient anatomic features were identified: (1) a 2- to 3-mm linear zone of hypersignal was noticed on both extremities of the vertebral body parallel to the vertebral plates in sagittal planes; (2) the tendon of the crura of the diaphragm appeared as a hypointense circular structure between hypaxial muscles and the aorta and caudal vena cava; (3) dorsal and ventral longitudinal ligaments and ligamentum flavum were poorly imaged; (4) no ilio-lumbar ligament was present; (5) the spinal cord ended between S1-S2 level, and the peripheral white matter and central grey matter were easily distinguished on T1W and T2W images. This study provides useful reference images to researchers working with ovine models. PMID:23668479

  11. Remote Cerebellar Hemorrhage Complicating Unintended Durotomy in Lumbar Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Millgram, Michael A; Ashkenazi, Ely; Rand, Nahshon

    2015-01-01

    Study design Case reports and retrospective review of accidental durotomies in lumbar surgeries during 5 years. Objectives To draw attention to a potentially serious complication of incidental durotomy-remote cerebellar hemorrhage. Summary and background data Accidental durotomy is a frequent complication of spinal surgery. In most cases the outcome of incidental durotomy is favorable. A delayed potentially serious complication of CSF loss during and after lumbar surgery is remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH). Methods During 2008-2012, 1169 lumbar spine procedures were performed at our spine center. In 210 surgeries incidental or intentional durotomies occurred. All patients with durotomies were managed with suturing of the dural wound followed by deep wound drainage left for 5 days and tight wound closure. Results Of the 210 patients with CSF loss three patients were identified to suffer from RCH-an incidence of 0.26%. The three patients ages 56, 67 and 75 years developed RCH between 36-192 hours after surgery. All three were managed with supportive treatment and close clinical supervision. A gradual clinical and radiological improvement was noted in all three patients. Conclusions Severe headache after spinal surgery and or declining mental status should not be attributed only to low CSF pressure secondary to dural tearing. It can also be the result of remote cerebral or cerebellar hemorrhage. Once the diagnosis of RCH is made, close clinical supervision is mandatory. In most cases non-operative supportive treatment may lead to eventual full clinical recovery. PMID:26273547

  12. Comparison of lumbar spinal angle between normal body mass index and overweight young adults

    PubMed Central

    Taweetanalarp, Soontharee; Purepong, Nithima

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the upper and lower lumbar angles of normal body mass index and overweight young adults, and examined the relationships among body mass index, waist circumferences, and lumbar angles. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty participants aged 18–25 years were recruited and allocated to 2 groups (n=30 per group): normal body mass index (18.5–24.9?kg/m2) and overweight group (body mass index, ? 25.0?kg/m2). During lumbar angle measurement, the participants stood in a relaxed position with bare feet. The upper and lower lumbar angles of each participant were measured using a flexible ruler, and the angle calculated by the tangent method. The waist circumference was also measured. [Results] The mean lower lumbar angle in the overweight group was significantly greater than that of the normal body weight group. Moreover, only the lower lumbar angle was associated with a significant increase in the body mass index (r=0.28). Waist circumference showed no association with the lumbar angles. [Conclusion] This is the first study to suggest that increased body weight could cause lower lumbar angle deviation in young adults. Further studies should investigate individuals with symptomatic back pain or back dysfunction and the impact of body weight on lumbar spinal angles. PMID:26311979

  13. Anatomical variations of lumbar arteries and their clinical implications: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Karunanayake, Aranjan Lionel; Pathmeswaran, Arunasalam

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar arteries arise from the abdominal aorta. Some abdominal and spinal surgeries can damage these arteries, and that can lead to serious consequences. This study aimed at studying the types and frequencies of variations of lumbar vasculature. We dissected both sides of 109 adult human cadavers and studied the variations of lumbar vasculature. Age range was 43-90?years. Fifty-seven percent were males and 43% were females. The number of lumbar arteries arising from either side of the abdominal aorta varied between 3 and 5 pairs. The lumbar arteries arose from a common single stem in 12% of the cadavers. The third and fourth pairs of lumbar arteries arose from a common single stem in 3% and 11% of cadavers, respectively, and the first and second pairs of lumbar arteries arose from a common single stem in 1% and 2% of cadavers, respectively. The first and second lumbar arteries on the right side traveled anterior to the right crus of the diaphragm in 7% and 8% of cadavers, respectively. There were several variations with regard to the number, origin from the abdominal aorta, and pathway of lumbar arteries from what is described in the literature. PMID:25938093

  14. Treatment of lumbar disc herniation by percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) and modified PLDD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xiao fei; Li, Hong zhi; Wu, Ru zhou; Sui, Yun xian

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To study the micro-invasive operative method and to compare the effect of treatment of PLDD and modified PLDD for Lumbar Disc Herniation. Method: Vaporized part of the nucleus pulposus in single or multiple point after acupuncture into lumbar disc, to reach the purpose of the decompression of the lumbar disc. Result: Among the 19 cases of the regular PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 63.2%, and among the 40 cases of the modified PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 82.5%. Conclusion: The modified PLDD has good effect on the treatment for lumbar disc herniation.

  15. Analysis of post-operative pain patterns following total lumbar disc replacement: results from fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations.

    PubMed

    Siepe, Christoph J; Korge, Andreas; Grochulla, Frank; Mehren, Christoph; Mayer, H Michael

    2008-01-01

    Although a variety of biomechanical laboratory investigations and radiological studies have highlighted the potential problems associated with total lumbar disc replacement (TDR), no previous study has performed a systematic clinical failure analysis. The aim of this study was to identify the post-operative pain sources, establish the incidence of post-operative pain patterns and investigate the effect on post-operative outcome with the help of fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations in patients from an ongoing prospective study with ProDisc II. Patients who reported unsatisfactory results at any of the FU-examinations received fluoroscopically guided spine infiltrations as part of a semi-invasive diagnostic and conservative treatment program. Pain sources were identified in patients with reproducible (> or =2x) significant (50-75%) or highly significant (75-100%) pain relief. Results were correlated with outcome parameters visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI) and the subjective patient satisfaction rate. From a total of 175 operated patients with a mean follow-up (FU) of 29.3 months (range 12.2-74.9 months), n = 342 infiltrations were performed in n = 58 patients (33.1%) overall. Facet joint pain, predominantly at the index level (86.4%), was identified in n = 22 patients (12.6%). The sacroiliac joint was a similarly frequent cause of post-operative pain (n = 21, 12.0%). Pain from both structures influenced all outcome parameters negatively (P < 0.05). Patients with an early onset of pain (< or =6 months) were 2-5x higher at risk of developing persisting complaints and unsatisfactory outcome at later FU-stages in comparison to the entire study cohort (P < 0.05). The level of TDR significantly influenced post-operative outcome. Best results were achieved for the TDRs above the lumbosacral junction at L4/5 (incidence of posterior joint pain 14.8%). Inferior outcome and a significantly higher incidence of posterior joint pain were observed for TDR at L5/S1 (21.6%) and bisegmental TDR at L4/5/S1 (33.3%), respectively. Lumbar facet and/or ISJ-pain are a frequent and currently underestimated source of post-operative pain and the most common reasons for unsatisfactory results following TDR. Further failure-analysis studies are required and adequate salvage treatment options need to be established with respect to the underlying pathology of post-operative pain. The question as to whether or not TDR will reduce the incidence of posterior joint pain, which has been previously attributed to lumbar fusion procedures, remains unanswered. Additional studies will have to investigate whether TDR compromises the index-segment in an attempt to avoid adjacent segment degeneration. PMID:17972116

  16. Iodine-125 radiation of posterior uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, S.

    1987-12-01

    Twenty-eight cases of posterior choroidal melanoma were treated with iodine-125 in gold eye plaques. Eleven cases were located within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve (group A), nine were within 3.0 mm of the fovea (group B), and eight were within 3.0 mm of the optic nerve and fovea (group C). The mean follow-up of group A was 46.3 months; group B, 25.5 months; and group C, 42.7 months. Complications included macular edema, cataract and tumor growth. Visual acuity remained within two lines of that tested preoperatively for 4 of 11 patients in group A, 4 of 9 in group B, and 5 of 8 in group C. These results with iodine-125 suggest it as an appropriate treatment for patients with choroidal melanoma located near optic nerve and/or macula.

  17. Cysticercosis in the posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Cheepsattayakorn, R; Tantachamroon, T

    1994-10-01

    Two cases of neurocysticercosis from Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital were reported with autopsy and surgical findings. The autopsy case was a 14-year-old girl who had a single cyst at the cisterna ambiens of the pineal region, causing hydrocephalus and severe brain edema accompanied with increased intracranial pressure and psychiatric problems but no definite localizing signs. The surgical case was a 35-year-old man with symptoms of increased intracranial pressure, localizing signs of ataxia of the left lower extremity and hearing loss in the right ear. Computed brain tomography showed a posterior fossa cyst with obstructive hydrocephalus. The cyst and the tissues from CP angle region were removed and sent to the Department of Pathology. Histopathologic appearance of both cases showed cysticercosis. PMID:7745377

  18. Pig Lumbar Spine Anatomy and Imaging Guided Lateral Lumbar Puncture: A New Large Animal Model for Intrathecal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pleticha, Josef; Maus, Timothy P.; Jeng-Singh, Christian; Marsh, Michael P.; Al-Saiegh, Fadi; Christner, Jodie A.; Lee, Kendall H.; Beutler, Andreas S.

    2014-01-01

    Intrathecal (IT) administration is an important route of drug delivery. Its modeling in a large animal species is a critical step. Although domestic swine is presently a preferred species in preclinical pharmacology, no proven minimally invasive method has been established to deliver agents into the pig IT space. While a “blind” lumbar puncture (LP) can sample cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), it is unreliable for drug delivery in pigs. Using computed tomography (CT) we determined the underlying anatomical reasons. The pig spinal cord was visualized terminating at the S2-S3 level. The lumbar region contained only small amounts of CSF visualized in the lateral recesses. Additional anatomical constraints identified were ossification of the midline ligaments; overlapping lamina with small interlaminar spaces; and a large bulk of epidural adipose tissue. Accommodating the pig CT anatomy, we developed an injection technique termed lateral LP (LLP) that employs advance planning of the needle path and monitoring of the IT injection progress. Key features of the LLP procedure were choosing a vertebral level without overlapping lamina or spinal ligament ossification; a needle trajectory crossing the midline; and entering the IT space in its lateral recess. Effective IT delivery was validated by injection of contrast media thereby obtaining a CT myelogram. LLP represents a safe and reliable method to deliver agents to the lumbar pig IT space, which can be implemented in a straightforward way by any laboratory with access to CT equipment and is therefore an attractive large animal model for preclinical studies of IT therapies. PMID:23518340

  19. Diagnostics for insufficiencies of posterior calculations in Bayesian signal inference.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Sebastian; Oppermann, Niels; Ensslin, Torsten A

    2013-11-01

    We present an error-diagnostic validation method for posterior distributions in Bayesian signal inference, an advancement of a previous work. It transfers deviations from the correct posterior into characteristic deviations from a uniform distribution of a quantity constructed for this purpose. We show that this method is able to reveal and discriminate several kinds of numerical and approximation errors, as well as their impact on the posterior distribution. For this we present four typical analytical examples of posteriors with incorrect variance, skewness, position of the maximum, or normalization. We show further how this test can be applied to multidimensional signals. PMID:24329375

  20. An ancestral regulatory network for posterior development in arthropods.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alistair P; Pechmann, Matthias; Schwager, Evelyn E; Damen, Wim Gm

    2009-01-01

    A number of recent studies have investigated posterior development in several different arthropods. As previously found in spiders, it has been discovered that Delta-Notch signaling is required for the development of posterior segments in an insect, the cockroach Periplaneta americana. Furthermore analysis of Wnt8 function in the spider Achaearanea tepidariorum and the beetle Tribolium castaneum demonstrates that this Wnt ligand is required for the establishment of the growth zone and development of posterior segments in both these arthropods. Taken together these studies provide an interesting insight into the architecture of the genetic network that regulated posterior development in the common ancestor of the arthropods. PMID:19513274

  1. An ancestral regulatory network for posterior development in arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Pechmann, Matthias; Schwager, Evelyn E; Damen, Wim GM

    2009-01-01

    A number of recent studies have investigated posterior development in several different arthropods. As previously found in spiders, it has been discovered that Delta-Notch signaling is required for the development of posterior segments in an insect, the cockroach Periplaneta americana. Furthermore analysis of Wnt8 function in the spider Achaearanea tepidariorum and the beetle Tribolium castaneum demonstrates that this Wnt ligand is required for the establishment of the growth zone and development of posterior segments in both these arthropods. Taken together these studies provide an interesting insight into the architecture of the genetic network that regulated posterior development in the common ancestor of the arthropods. PMID:19513274

  2. Use of a personalized hybrid biomechanical model to assess change in lumbar spine function with a TDR compared to an intact spine.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Gregory G; Mendel, Ehud; Marras, William S

    2012-06-01

    Total disc replacements (TDRs) have been employed with increasing frequency in recent years with the intention of restoring natural motion to the spine and reducing adjacent level trauma. Previous assessments of the TDRs have subjectively measured patient satisfaction, evaluated sagittal range of motion via static imaging, or examined biomechanical loading in vitro. This study examined the kinematics and biomechanical loading of the lumbar spine with an intact spine compared to a TDR inserted at L5/S1 in the same spine. A validated biologically driven personalized dynamic biomechanical model was used to assess range of motion (ROM) and lumbar spine tissue forces while a subject performed a series of bending and lifting exertions representative of normal life activities. This analysis concluded that with the insertion of a TDR, forces are of much greater magnitude in all three directions of loading and are concentrated at both the endplates and the posterior element structures compared to an intact spine. A significant difference is seen between the intact spine and the TDR spine at levels above the TDR insertion level as a function of supporting an external load (lifting). While ROM within the TDR joint was larger than in the intact spine (yet within the normal ranges under the unloaded bending conditions), the differences between spines were far greater in all three planes of motion under loaded lifting conditions. At levels above the TDR insertion, larger ROM was present during the lifting conditions. Sagittal motions were often greater at the higher lumbar levels, but there appeared to be less lateral and twisting motion. Collectively, this analysis indicates that the insertion of a TDR significantly alters the function of the spine. PMID:21445618

  3. Loading simulation of lumbar spine vertebrae during a compression test using the finite elements method and trabecular bone strength properties, determined by means of nanoindentations.

    PubMed

    Bouzakis, K D; Mitsi, S; Michailidis, N; Mirisidis, I; Mesomeris, G; Maliaris, G; Korlos, A; Kapetanos, G; Antonarakos, P; Anagnostidis, K

    2004-06-01

    The mechanical strength properties of lumbar spine vertebrae are of great importance in a wide range of applications. Herein, through nanoindentations and appropriate evaluation of the corresponding results, trabecular bone struts stress-strain characteristics can be determined. In the frame of the present paper, an L2 fresh cadaveric vertebra, from which posterior elements were removed, was subjected to compression. With the aid of developed finite elements method based algorithms, the cortical shell and the cancellous core bulk elasticity moduli and stresses were determined, whereas the tested vertebra geometrical model used in these algorithms was considered as having a compound structure, consisting of the cancellous bone surrounded by the cortical shell. Moreover nanoindentations were conducted and an appropriate evaluation method of the obtained results was applied to extract stress-strain curves of individual lumbar spine vertebra trabecular bone struts. These data were used in the mathematical description of the vertebrae compression test. The vertebral cancellous bone structure was simulated by a beam elements network, possessing an equivalent porosity and different stiffnesses in vertical and horizontal direction. Thus, the measured course of the compression load versus the occurring specimen deformation was verified. PMID:15615116

  4. Deep Posterior Compartment Strength and Foot Kinematics in Subjects With Stage II Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Christopher; Flemister, Adolph S.; Houck, Jeff R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tibialis posterior muscle weakness has been documented in subjects with Stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) but the effect of weakness on foot structure remains unclear. The association between strength and flatfoot kinematics may guide treatment such as the use of strengthening programs targeting the tibialis posterior muscle. Materials and Methods Thirty Stage II PTTD subjects (age; 58.1 ± 10.5 years, BMI 30.6 ± 5.4) and 15 matched controls (age; 56.5 ± 7.7 years, BMI 30.6 ± 3.6) volunteered for this study. Deep Posterior Compartment strength was measured from both legs of each subject and the strength ratio was used to compare each subject’s involved side to their uninvolved side. A 20% deficit was defined, a priori, to define two groups of subjects with PTTD. The strength ratio for each group averaged; 1.06 ± 0.1 (range 0.87 to 1.36) for controls, 1.06 ± 0.1 (range, 0.89 to 1.25), for the PTTD strong group, and 0.64 ± 0.2 (range 0.42 to 0.76) for the PTTD weak group. Across four phases of stance, kinematic measures of flatfoot were compared between the three groups using a two-way mixed effect ANOVA model repeated for each kinematic variable. Results Subjects with PTTD regardless of group demonstrated significantly greater hindfoot eversion compared to controls. Subjects with PTTD who were weak demonstrated greater hindfoot eversion compared to subjects with PTTD who were strong. For forefoot abduction and MLA angles the differences between groups depended on the phase of stance with significant differences between each group observed at the pre-swing phase of stance. Conclusion Strength was associated with the degree of flatfoot deformity observed during walking, however, flatfoot deformity may also occur without strength deficits. PMID:20371019

  5. Posterior fusion only for thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis of more than 80°: pedicle screws versus hybrid instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Bakaloudis, Georgios; Lolli, Francesco; Vommaro, Francesco; Martikos, Konstantinos; Parisini, Patrizio

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) of more than 80° traditionally consisted of a combined procedure, an anterior release performed through an open thoracotomy followed by a posterior fusion. Recently, some studies have reassessed the role of posterior fusion only as treatment for severe thoracic AIS; the correction rate of the thoracic curves was comparable to most series of combined anterior and posterior surgery, with shorter surgery time and without the negative effect on pulmonary function of anterior transthoracic exposure. Compared with other studies published so far on the use of posterior fusion alone for severe thoracic AIS, the present study examines a larger group of patients (52 cases) reviewed at a longer follow-up (average 6.7 years, range 4.5–8.5 years). The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcome of surgical treatment for severe thoracic (>80°) AIS treated with posterior spinal fusion alone, and compare comprehensively the results of posterior fusion with a hybrid construct (proximal hooks and distal pedicle screws) versus a pedicle screw instrumentation. All patients (n = 52) with main thoracic AIS curves greater than 80° (Lenke type 1, 2, 3, and 4), surgically treated between 1996 and 2000 at one institution, by posterior spinal fusion either with hybrid instrumentation (PSF–H group; n = 27 patients), or with pedicle screw-only construct (PSF–S group; n = 25 patients) were reviewed. There were no differences between the two groups in terms of age, Risser’s sign, Cobb preoperative main thoracic (MT) curve magnitude (PSF–H: 92° vs. PSF–S: 88°), or flexibility on bending films (PSF–H: 27% vs. PSF–S: 25%). Statistical analysis was performed using the t test (paired and unpaired), Wilcoxon test for non-parametric paired analysis, and the Mann–Whitney test for non-parametric unpaired analysis. At the last follow-up, the PSF–S group, when compared to the PSF–H group had a final MT correction rate of 52.4 versus 44.52% (P = 0.001), with a loss of ?1.9° versus ?11.3° (P = 0.0005), a TL/L correction of 50 versus 43% (ns), a greater correction of the lowest instrumented vertebra translation (?1.00 vs. ?0.54 cm; P = 0.04), and tilt (?19° vs. ?10°; P = 0.005) on the coronal plane. There were no statistically significant differences in sagittal and global coronal alignment between the two groups (C7-S1 offset: PSF–H = 0.5 cm vs. PSF–S = 0 cm). In the hybrid series (27 patients) surgery-related complications necessitated three revision surgeries, whereas in the screw group (25 patients) one revision surgery was performed. No neurological complications or deep wound infection occurred in this series. In conclusion, posterior spinal fusion for severe thoracic AIS with pedicle screws only, when compared to hybrid construct, allowed a greater coronal correction of both main thoracic and secondary lumbar curves, less loss of the postoperative correction achieved, and fewer revision surgeries. Posterior-only fusion with pedicle screws enabled a good and stable correction of severe scoliosis. However, severe curves may be amenable to hybrid instrumentation that produced analogous results to the screws-only constructs concerning patient satisfaction; at the latest follow-up, SRS-30 and SF-36 scores did not show any statistical differences between the two groups. PMID:18696126

  6. Lumbar puncture and subdural hygroma and hematomas in hematopoietic cell transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, H; Ressler, J A; Snyder, D S

    2008-05-01

    We reviewed records of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients seen over the past 10 years who had head scan documentation of subdural fluid collections. A total of 17 patients were identified: 13 with allogeneic and 4 with autologous HCT (0.71% of allogeneic and 0.13% of autologous HCT patients seen in this time interval). Although less than 20% of HCT patients have lumbar puncture, 8 of the 17 subdural patients had lumbar puncture. The lumbar puncture was done 5-112 days (median 46 days) before subdural detection. Acute lymphocytic leukemia was the diagnosis in five of these eight; whereas, either acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplasia was the diagnosis in seven of the nine patients without lumbar puncture. In the patient group with lumbar puncture, subdurals were diagnosed earlier after HCT (median 25 days versus 5 months in the patient group without lumbar puncture) and were more often hygromas (37.5 versus 0%). These results support the suggestion of lumbar puncture or intrathecal therapy as a risk factor for subdurals. The presumptive mechanism involves lumbar cerebrospinal leak, low intracranial pressure, downward displacement of the brain, cerebrospinal fluid accumulation into the inner dural layers of the cerebral convexities (hygromas) and bleeding into these fluid collections (hematomas). PMID:18246118

  7. Comparison of chronic low-back pain patients hip range of motion with lumbar instability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang wk; Kim, Suhn Yeop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare differences in hip range of motion between a lumbar stability group and a lumbar instability group of patients with chronic low-back pain. [Subjects] Sixty-nine patients with chronic low-back pain were divided into two groups: a lumbar stability group (n=39) and a lumbar instability group (n=30). [Methods] The patients were assessed using a goniometer to evaluate the hip range of motion at pre-test. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 software for Windows. The experimental data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, repeated one-way ANOVA, and the t-test, and a significance level of 0.05. [Results] The limitation of hip range of motion of the lumbar instability group was significantly greater than that of the lumbar stability group. [Conclusion] The chronic low-back pain patients showed greater limitation of hip range of motion than healthy persons, and among them, those who had lumbar instability showed greater limitation than those with lumbar stability. PMID:25729165

  8. Neonatal Androgen-Dependent Sex Differences in Lumbar Spinal Cord Dopamine Concentrations and

    E-print Network

    Breedlove, Marc

    Neonatal Androgen-Dependent Sex Differences in Lumbar Spinal Cord Dopamine Concentrations to the spinal cord. DA in the dorsal and ventral horns modulates sensory, motor, nociceptive, and sexual in the lumbar spinal cord. The purpose of this study was to determine whether sex dif- ferences in spinal cord

  9. Androgen Regulates the Sexually Dimorphic Gastrin-Releasing Peptide System in the Lumbar Spinal Cord

    E-print Network

    Breedlove, Marc

    lumbar spinal cord of male rats projects to the lower lumbar spinal cord, releasing gastrin later, in a profound decrease in the expression of GRP in the spinal cord, as reflected feminization allele on expression of the receptor for GRP in the spinal cord, but castration did reduce

  10. POSTERIOR CONSISTENCY IN NONPARAMETRIC REGRESSION PROBLEMS UNDER GAUSSIAN PROCESS PRIORS

    E-print Network

    POSTERIOR CONSISTENCY IN NONPARAMETRIC REGRESSION PROBLEMS UNDER GAUSSIAN PROCESS PRIORS By Taeryon regression is to put a nonparametric prior distribution on the unknown regression function using Gaussian processes. In this paper, we study posterior consistency in nonparametric regression problems using Gaussian

  11. Facilitating text reading in posterior cortical atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Kishan; Shakespeare, Timothy J.; Leff, Alexander P.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We report (1) the quantitative investigation of text reading in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), and (2) the effects of 2 novel software-based reading aids that result in dramatic improvements in the reading ability of patients with PCA. Methods: Reading performance, eye movements, and fixations were assessed in patients with PCA and typical Alzheimer disease and in healthy controls (experiment 1). Two reading aids (single- and double-word) were evaluated based on the notion that reducing the spatial and oculomotor demands of text reading might support reading in PCA (experiment 2). Results: Mean reading accuracy in patients with PCA was significantly worse (57%) compared with both patients with typical Alzheimer disease (98%) and healthy controls (99%); spatial aspects of passages were the primary determinants of text reading ability in PCA. Both aids led to considerable gains in reading accuracy (PCA mean reading accuracy: single-word reading aid = 96%; individual patient improvement range: 6%–270%) and self-rated measures of reading. Data suggest a greater efficiency of fixations and eye movements under the single-word reading aid in patients with PCA. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate how neurologic characterization of a neurodegenerative syndrome (PCA) and detailed cognitive analysis of an important everyday skill (reading) can combine to yield aids capable of supporting important everyday functional abilities. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PCA, 2 software-based reading aids (single-word and double-word) improve reading accuracy. PMID:26138948

  12. "Apperceptive" alexia in posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Mario F; Shapira, Jill S; Clark, David G

    2007-02-01

    The most common presenting complaint in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is reading difficulty. Although often described as an alexia without agraphia, alexia in PCA may have multiple causes, including a primary visuoperceptual etiology, attentional alexia, and central reading difficulty. This study evaluated 14 patients with early PCA and disturbances in reading ability in comparison to 14 normal controls. All 14 patients had a progressive disorder of complex visual functions and neuroimaging evidence of occipitoparietal dysfunction. They underwent a task requiring identification of single letters with and without flanking distractors. They also read single words consisting of regular English spelling or irregular grapheme-phoneme correspondence (irregular words) and pronounceable nonsense words (pseudowords). The PCA patients made errors in letter identification when letters were flanked by visually similar letters or numbers. They could read most single regular and irregular words but made visual errors and had particular trouble with pseudowords. They could not use a letter-by-letter reading strategy effectively. The PCA patients had similar difficulties on other visuoperceptual tests. These findings are consistent with an alexia manifested by perceptual and attentional difficulty on attempting serial visual processing of letters in the context of other letters. This "apperceptive alexia" results when the configuration of letters into words is impaired during letter-by-letter reading. Disproportionate difficulty reading pseudowords suggests an additional impairment in phonological processing. PCA patients have variable neuropathology and individual patients may have other contributions to their reading impairment. PMID:17405672

  13. Automatic quantification of posterior capsule opacification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Sarah A.; Uyyanonvara, Bunyarit; Boyce, James F.; Sanguinetti, Giorgia; Hollick, Emma J.; Meacock, William R.; Spalton, David J.; Paplinski, Andrew P.

    2000-06-01

    After Cataract surgery where a plastic implant lens is implanted into the eye to replace the natural lens, many patients suffer from cell growth across a membrane situated at the back of the lens which degrades their vision. The cell growth is known as Posterior Capsule Opacification (or PCO). It is important to be able to quantify PCO so that the effect of different implant lens types and surgical techniques may be evaluated. Initial results obtained using a neural network to detect PCO from implant lenses are compared to an established but less automated method of detection, which segments the images using texture segmentation in conjunction with co- occurrence matrices. Tests show that the established method performs well in clinical validation and repeatability trials. The requirement to use a neural network to analyze the implant lens images evolved from the analysis of over 1000 images using the established co-occurrence matrix segmentation method. The work shows that a method based on neural networks is a promising tool to automate the procedure of calculating PCO.

  14. Abnormal visual phenomena in posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Gorgoraptis, Nikos; Kaski, Diego; Ryan, Natalie; Husain, Masud; Warrington, Elizabeth K

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) report a host of unusual and poorly explained visual disturbances. This preliminary report describes a single patient (CRO), and documents and investigates abnormally prolonged colour afterimages (concurrent and prolonged perception of colours complimentary to the colour of an observed stimulus), perceived motion of static stimuli, and better reading of small than large letters. We also evaluate CRO's visual and vestibular functions in an effort to understand the origin of her experience of room tilt illusion, a disturbing phenomenon not previously observed in individuals with cortical degenerative disease. These visual symptoms are set in the context of a 4-year longitudinal neuropsychological and neuroimaging investigation of CRO's visual and other cognitive skills. We hypothesise that prolonged colour after-images are attributable to relative sparing of V1 inhibitory interneurons; perceived motion of static stimuli reflects weak magnocellular function; better reading of small than large letters indicates a reduced effective field of vision; and room tilt illusion effects are caused by disordered integration of visual and vestibular information. This study contributes to the growing characterisation of PCA whose atypical early visual symptoms are often heterogeneous and frequently under-recognised. PMID:20818540

  15. [Anterior chamber versus posterior chamber phakic IOLs].

    PubMed

    Cochener, B

    2007-05-01

    At a time when some of the limitations of photoablation have been defined, such as worry concerning secondary ectasia, a renewed interest in phakic implantation has arisen. This is driven by the goal of avoiding correcting high ametropia with LASIK and is based on the development of soft foldable biomaterials. When all phakic IOLs are in front of the natural lens, two varieties of lenses can be distinguished, depending on whether it is located in the anterior or posterior chamber. The various models available in 2006 and those under current evaluation are reviewed. We do not report details of clinical studies that vary in cohort size and follow-up. The advantages and limitations are discussed for each type of phakic IOL. Adequate although not exclusive indications are deduced. There is no phakic lens that has proved to be superior to the others in terms of safety. All have the ability to provide a visual benefit with a gain in best corrected visual acuity. The difference is based on anatomical effects, requiring long-term follow-up in the evaluation of angles, lens, iris, and endothelium. PMID:17568350

  16. Posterior Reversible Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Pazopanib

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Robert; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Juergen; Gruellich, Carsten; Jaeger, Dirk; Potthoff, Karin

    2013-01-01

    A 62-year-old female patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma under third-line treatment with pazopanib for 8 weeks suddenly developed severe headaches, grand mal seizures and paresis of the left arm in combination with gait instability as well as nausea and vomiting during her vacation abroad. The emergency physician measured systolic blood pressure values over 300 mm Hg and suspected a stroke. The CT imaging without contrast agent in a local hospital did not show any pathologic findings despite bone metastases. The colleagues suspected cerebral metastases or meningeosis carcinomatosa and referred the patient to our department for further diagnostics and treatment planning. An MRI scan ruled out the suspected cerebral metastases or meningeosis carcinomatosa, but showed signs of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) in the form of band-like hyperintensities as a sign of cytotoxic edema in the gray and white matter of the left parietal lobe. The patient then reported that similar blood pressure values had been measured shortly after the start of a first-line therapy with sunitinib, so that we discontinued the current treatment with pazopanib. Within 6 days the neurologic symptoms vanished and the patient was discharged. An intermittent hypertension persisted. A follow-up MRI 3 weeks later showed an RPLS-typical cortical infarction in the affected area. RPLS should be considered as the actual reason for neurologic findings in hypertensive patients with known metastatic cancers under tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. PMID:23626562

  17. Glioependymal cyst in the posterior fossa.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, T; Kawamoto, K; Sakai, N; Tsutsumi, A

    1997-01-01

    A large cyst filled with clear fluid was resected from the cerebellum of a 29-year-old man. By light microscopy the cyst was lined by flat epithelial cells. These epithelial cells abutted on a glial layer and immunohistochemical staining revealed that some of them expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein. Corpora amylacea were noted within the glial layer. Ultrastructurally, 2 types of cells lining the cyst were identified. One was characterized by electron-dense cytoplasm, cytoplasmic vacuoles, microvilli without surface-coated material, cilia, and basal bodies. The other was a cell with a smooth cytoplasmic membrane, round nucleus, and clear cytoplasm. Zonulae adherentes was observed between cyst lining cells and the cyst lining cells were shown to rest directly on the glial layer. Surprisingly, myelinated axons were identified in the glial layer, although nerve cells were not identified. These findings are compatible with those of a glioependymal cyst. The origin of glioependymal cysts of the posterior fossa is not understood, but possibilities include neuroglial heterotopia, persistent Blake's pouch (diverticulum of the roof of fourth ventricle), and remnants of a tela chorioidea. The location of the cyst and the presence of myelinated axons in the cyst wall may be best explained by an origin from neuroglial heterotopia. PMID:9020388

  18. Isolated posterior capsular rupture following blunt head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Jaroudi, Mahmoud O; Hamam, Rola N; Maalouf, Fadi C

    2014-01-01

    Closed-globe traumatic cataract is not uncommon in males in the pediatric age group. However, there is a relative paucity of literature on isolated posterior lens capsule rupture associated with closed-globe traumatic cataract. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with white cataract 1 day after blunt trauma to the forehead associated with posterior capsular rupture that was detected by B-scan ultrasonography preoperatively. No stigmata of trauma outside the posterior capsule could be detected by slit-lamp exam, funduscopy, and optical coherence tomography. Phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens implant was performed 24 hours after trauma, with the patient achieving 6/6 visual acuity 1 week and 6 months after surgery. Our case is unique, being the youngest (amblyogenic age) to be reported, with prompt surgical intervention, and with no signs of trauma outside the posterior capsule. PMID:25506201

  19. Posterior Corneal Surface Stability after Femtosecond Laser-Assisted Keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Cagini, Carlo; Messina, Marco; Lupidi, Marco; Piccinelli, Francesco; Fiore, Tito; Fruttini, Daniela; Spadea, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate posterior corneal surface variation after femtosecond laser-assisted keratomileusis in patients with myopia and myopic astigmatism. Patients were evaluated by corneal tomography preoperatively and at 1, 6, and 12 months. We analyzed changes in the posterior corneal curvature, posterior corneal elevation, and anterior chamber depth. Moreover, we explored correlation between corneal ablation depth, residual corneal thickness, percentage of ablated corneal tissue, and preoperative corneal thickness. During follow-up, the posterior corneal surface did not have a significant forward corneal shift: no significant linear relationships emerged between the anterior displacement of the posterior corneal surface and corneal ablation depth, residual corneal thickness, or percentage of ablated corneal tissue. PMID:26483972

  20. Outcomes after incidental durotomy during first-time lumbar discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Atman; Ball, Perry A.; Bekelis, Kimon; Lurie, Jon; Mirza, Sohail K.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Weinstein, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Incidental durotomy is an infrequent but well-recognized complication during lumbar disc surgery. The effect of a durotomy on long-term outcomes is however, controversial. We sought to examine whether the occurrence of durotomy during surgery impacts long-term clinical outcome. Methods Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) cohort participants with a confirmed diagnosis of intervertebral disc herniation (IDH) undergoing standard first-time open discectomy were followed from baseline at 6 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months, and yearly thereafter, at 13 spine clinics in 11 US states. Patient data from this prospectively gathered database was reviewed. As of May 2009, the mean (SD) follow-up among all analyzed IDH patients was 41.5 (14.5) months (No durotomy: 41.4 vs. Had durotomy: 40.2, p-value<0.68). The median (range) follow-up time among all analyzed IDH patients was 47 (1 to 95) months. Results 799 patients underwent first-time lumbar discectomy. There was an incidental durotomy in 25 (3.1%) of these patients. There were no significant differences with or without durotomy in age, sex, race, body mass index, the prevalence of smoking, diabetes, hypertension, or herniation level or type. When outcome differences between the groups were analyzed, the durotomy group was found to have significantly increased operative duration, operative blood loss and inpatient stay. However, there were no differences in incidence of nerve root injury, post-op mortality, additional surgeries or SF-36 scores of bodily pain or physical function, or Oswestry Disability Index at 1, 2, 3 or 4 years. Conclusions Incidental durotomy during first time lumbar discectomy does not appear to impact long-term outcome in affected patients. PMID:21375385

  1. Surgical vs Nonoperative Treatment for Lumbar Disk Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, James N.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Hanscom, Brett; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Abdu, William A.; Hilibrand, Alan S.; Boden, Scott D.; Deyo, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Context Lumbar diskectomy is the most common surgical procedure performed for back and leg symptoms in US patients, but the efficacy of the procedure relative to nonoperative care remains controversial. Objective To assess the efficacy of surgery for lumbar intervertebral disk herniation. Design, Setting, and Patients The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial, a randomized clinical trial enrolling patients between March 2000 and November 2004 from 13 multidisciplinary spine clinics in 11 US states. Patients were 501 surgical candidates (mean age, 42 years; 42% women) with imaging-confirmed lumbar intervertebral disk herniation and persistent signs and symptoms of radiculopathy for at least 6 weeks. Interventions Standard open diskectomy vs nonoperative treatment individualized to the patient. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes were changes from baseline for the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey bodily pain and physical function scales and the modified Oswestry Disability Index (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons MODEMS version) at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 and 2 years from enrollment. Secondary outcomes included sciatica severity as measured by the Sciatica Bothersomeness Index, satisfaction with symptoms, self-reported improvement, and employment status. Results Adherence to assigned treatment was limited: 50% of patients assigned to surgery received surgery within 3 months of enrollment, while 30% of those assigned to nonoperative treatment received surgery in the same period. Intent-to-treat analyses demonstrated substantial improvements for all primary and secondary outcomes in both treatment groups. Between-group differences in improvements were consistently in favor of surgery for all periods but were small and not statistically significant for the primary outcomes. Conclusions Patients in both the surgery and the nonoperative treatment groups improved substantially over a 2-year period. Because of the large numbers of patients who crossed over in both directions, conclusions about the superiority or equivalence of the treatments are not warranted based on the intent-to-treat analysis. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00000410 PMID:17119140

  2. Posterior Probability Matching and Human Perceptual Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Richard F.; Patel, Khushbu; Yee, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Probability matching is a classic theory of decision making that was first developed in models of cognition. Posterior probability matching, a variant in which observers match their response probabilities to the posterior probability of each response being correct, is being used increasingly often in models of perception. However, little is known about whether posterior probability matching is consistent with the vast literature on vision and hearing that has developed within signal detection theory. Here we test posterior probability matching models using two tools from detection theory. First, we examine the models’ performance in a two-pass experiment, where each block of trials is presented twice, and we measure the proportion of times that the model gives the same response twice to repeated stimuli. We show that at low performance levels, posterior probability matching models give highly inconsistent responses across repeated presentations of identical trials. We find that practised human observers are more consistent across repeated trials than these models predict, and we find some evidence that less practised observers more consistent as well. Second, we compare the performance of posterior probability matching models on a discrimination task to the performance of a theoretical ideal observer that achieves the best possible performance. We find that posterior probability matching is very inefficient at low-to-moderate performance levels, and that human observers can be more efficient than is ever possible according to posterior probability matching models. These findings support classic signal detection models, and rule out a broad class of posterior probability matching models for expert performance on perceptual tasks that range in complexity from contrast discrimination to symmetry detection. However, our findings leave open the possibility that inexperienced observers may show posterior probability matching behaviour, and our methods provide new tools for testing for such a strategy. PMID:26079134

  3. Revision Surgical Treatment of a Second Lumbar Ewing Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Helin; Wang, Jin; Guo, Peng; Xu, Jianfa; Feng, Jiangang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of a 58-year-old man who presented initially with lumbar pain. According to radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone biopsy results, Ewing sarcoma (ES) was diagnosed. Tumor resection was performed, followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy; pathology confirmed the diagnosis of ES. After surgery, the tumor recurred twice with progressive symptoms, meriting repeated excisional surgery. At the 4-year follow-up, the patient showed apparent improvement, with return of function and strength and resolution of pain. We discuss its clinical features and treatment in the light of the current knowledge. PMID:26222849

  4. Lumbar-pelvic range and coordination during lifting tasks

    E-print Network

    Maduri, Anupama; Pearson, Bethany L.; Wilson, Sara E.

    2008-01-01

    Page 1 of 22 Lumbar-Pelvic Range and Coordination During Lifting Tasks A. Maduri, M.S. 1 B.L. Pearson, B.S. 2 S.E. Wilson, Ph.D. 3 1 National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 2 Burns and Mc...]. In the United States, the total annual costs of back 4 pain are estimated to range from $20 - $50 billion [Nachemson, 1992, Pai and Sundaram, 5 2004]. Jobs involving flexion tasks and lifting heavy loads have been shown to be 6 associated with a higher...

  5. Lumbar spine surgery positioning complications: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shriver, Michael F; Zeer, Valerie; Alentado, Vincent J; Mroz, Thomas E; Benzel, Edward C; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT There are a variety of surgical positions that provide optimal exposure of the dorsal lumbar spine. These include the prone, kneeling, knee-chest, knee-elbow, and lateral decubitus positions. All are positions that facilitate exposure of the spine. Each position, however, is associated with an array of unique complications that result from excessive pressure applied to the torso or extremities. The authors reviewed clinical studies reporting complications that arose from positioning of the patient during dorsal exposures of the lumbar spine. METHODS MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science database searches were performed to find clinical studies reporting complications associated with positioning during lumbar spine surgery. For articles meeting inclusion criteria, the following information was obtained: publication year, study design, sample size, age, operative time, type of surgery, surgical position, frame or table type, complications associated with positioning, time to first observed complication, long-term outcomes, and evidence-based recommendations for complication avoidance. RESULTS Of 3898 articles retrieved from MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science, 34 met inclusion criteria. Twenty-four studies reported complications associated with use of the prone position, and 7 studies investigated complications after knee-chest positioning. Complications associated with the knee-elbow, lateral decubitus, and supine positions were each reported by a single study. Vision loss was the most commonly reported complication for both prone and knee-chest positioning. Several other complications were reported, including conjunctival swelling, Ischemic orbital compartment syndrome, nerve palsies, thromboembolic complications, pressure sores, lower extremity compartment syndrome, and shoulder dislocation, highlighting the assortment of possible complications following different surgical positions. For prone-position studies, there was a relationship between increased operation time and position complications. Only 3 prone-position studies reported complications following procedures of less than 120 minutes, 7 studies reported complications following mean operative times of 121-240 minutes, and 9 additional studies reported complications following mean operative times greater than 240 minutes. This relationship was not observed for knee-chest and other surgical positions. CONCLUSIONS This work presents a systematic review of positioning-related complications following prone, knee-chest, and other positions used for lumbar spine surgery. Numerous evidence-based recommendations for avoidance of these potentially severe complications associated with intraoperative positioning are discussed. This investigation may serve as a framework to educate the surgical team and decrease rates of intraoperative positioning complications. PMID:26424340

  6. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jin Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26512268

  7. Vitamin D deficiency and posterior subcapsular cataract

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Craig J; Akaichi, Faical

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate risk factors associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) development and the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and etiology of PSC. Methods Of 195 consecutive patients from a private ophthalmology practice, diagnosed with PSC, serum vitamin D3 (25-OH D) levels were obtained for 175, and associations among risk factors, comorbidities, and PSC were assessed. Results In all 175 PSC patients, mean 25-OH D levels were low (24 ng/mL ±11 SD) compared with age/sex-matched standards. Significant differences in 25-OH D levels were noted between PSC subjects taking/not taking calcium supplements, systemic steroids, osteoporosis medications, etc. Alone, smoking status and calcium channel blockers and/or topical steroids use made no significant difference in PSC subjects 25-OH D levels, but two or more of these factors were associated with lowered levels of 25-OH D (P<0.001). Low vitamin D was correlated with female sex, autoimmune disease, and non-skin cancer diagnosis, but not with age, or other comorbidities or medication use. In five early-stage PSC patients taking 5,000 IU of 25-OH D daily for vitamin D deficiency, there was resolution of their cataracts during the 2-year follow-up period. Conclusion Vitamin D levels for most PSC patients fell below the 30 ng/mL calcium homeostasis threshold. Some comorbidities and non-ophthalmic interventions are associated with the development of PSC at less depressed levels of 25-OH D. In this series, vitamin D deficiency was associated with PSC cataract, suggesting that raising the level of vitamin D intake may reduce PSC incidence. PMID:26124632

  8. The language profile of Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J.; Lehmann, Manja; Warren, Jason D.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA) is typically considered to be a visual syndrome, primarily characterised by progressive impairment of visuoperceptual and visuospatial skills. However patients commonly describe early difficulties with word retrieval. This paper details the first systematic analysis of linguistic function in PCA. Characterising and quantifying the aphasia associated with PCA is important for clarifying diagnostic and selection criteria for clinical and research studies. Methods Fifteen patients with PCA, 7 patients with logopenic/phonological aphasia (LPA) and 18 age-matched healthy participants completed a detailed battery of linguistic tests evaluating auditory input processing, repetition and working memory, lexical and grammatical comprehension, single word retrieval and fluency, and spontaneous speech. Results Relative to healthy controls, PCA patients exhibited language impairments across all the domains examined, but with anomia, reduced phonemic fluency and slowed speech rate the most prominent deficits. PCA performance most closely resembled that of LPA patients on tests of auditory input processing, repetition and digit span, but was relatively stronger on tasks of comprehension and spontaneous speech. Conclusions The study demonstrates that in addition to the well-reported degradation of vision, literacy and numeracy, PCA is characterised by a progressive oral language dysfunction with prominent word retrieval difficulties. Overlap in the linguistic profiles of PCA and LPA, which are both most commonly caused by Alzheimer’s disease, further emphasises the notion of a phenotypic continuum between typical and atypical manifestations of the disease. Clarifying the boundaries between AD phenotypes has important implications for diagnosis, clinical trial recruitment and investigations into biological factors driving phenotypic heterogeneity in AD. Rehabilitation strategies to ameliorate the phonological deficit in PCA are required. PMID:23138762

  9. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chul-ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects] Two golfers with chronic back pain. [Methods] The pelvis and spinal vertebrae were corrected using the Thompson “drop” technique. Angle and force were adjusted to place the pelvis, lumbar spine, and thoracic vertebrae in neutral position. The technique was applied twice weekly after muscle massage in the back and pelvic areas. The golfers performed corrective, warmup stretching exercises, followed by squats on an unstable surface using the Togu ball. They then used a gym ball for repetitions of hip rotation, upper trunk extension, sit-ups, and pelvic anterior-posterior, pelvic left-right, and trunk flexion-extension exercises. The session ended with cycling as a cool-down exercise. Each session lasted 60 minutes. [Results] The difference in height was measured on the left and right sides of the pelvic bone. The pelvic tilt changed significantly in both participants after the 4-week program. [Conclusion] In golfers, core muscles are critical and are closely related to spinal deformation. Core strengthening and spinal correction play a pivotal role in the correction of spinal deformation. PMID:26504350

  10. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chul-Ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects] Two golfers with chronic back pain. [Methods] The pelvis and spinal vertebrae were corrected using the Thompson "drop" technique. Angle and force were adjusted to place the pelvis, lumbar spine, and thoracic vertebrae in neutral position. The technique was applied twice weekly after muscle massage in the back and pelvic areas. The golfers performed corrective, warmup stretching exercises, followed by squats on an unstable surface using the Togu ball. They then used a gym ball for repetitions of hip rotation, upper trunk extension, sit-ups, and pelvic anterior-posterior, pelvic left-right, and trunk flexion-extension exercises. The session ended with cycling as a cool-down exercise. Each session lasted 60 minutes. [Results] The difference in height was measured on the left and right sides of the pelvic bone. The pelvic tilt changed significantly in both participants after the 4-week program. [Conclusion] In golfers, core muscles are critical and are closely related to spinal deformation. Core strengthening and spinal correction play a pivotal role in the correction of spinal deformation. PMID:26504350

  11. Management of Posterior Malleolar Fractures: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Odak, Saurabh; Ahluwalia, Raju; Unnikrishnan, Puthanveettil; Hennessy, Michael; Platt, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Posterior malleolar fractures are relatively common and usually result from rotational ankle injuries. Although treatment of associated lateral and medial structures is well established, several controversies exist in the management of posterior malleolus fractures. We performed a systematic review of the current published data with regard to the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of posterior malleolus fractures. A total of 33 studies (8 biomechanical and 25 clinical) with >950 patients were reviewed. The outcome of ankle fractures with posterior malleolar involvement was poor; however, the evidence was not enough to prove that the size of the posterior malleolus affects the outcome. Significant heterogeneity was noted in the cutoff size of the posterior malleolar fragment in determining management. The outcome was related to other factors, such as fracture displacement, congruency of the articular surface, and residual tibiotalar subluxation. Indirect evidence showed that large fracture fragments were associated with fracture dislocations and ankle instability and, thus, might require surgical fixation. We have concluded that the evidence to prove that the size of the posterior malleolar affects the outcome of ankle fractures is not enough, and the decision to treat these fractures should be determined by other factors, as stated previously. PMID:26100091

  12. Total Disc Replacement in Lumbar Degenerative Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    More than 10 years have passed since lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) was introduced for the first time to the world market for the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). It seems like the right time to sum up the relevant results in order to understand where LTDR stands on now, and is heading forward to. The pathogenesis of DDD has been currently settled, but diagnosis and managements are still controversial. Fusion is recognized as golden standard of surgical managements but has various kinds of shortcomings. Lately, LTDR has been expected to replace fusion surgery. A great deal of LTDR reports has come out. Among them, more than 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled studies including USA IDE trials were expected to elucidate whether for LTDR to have therapeutic benefit compared to fusion. The results of these studies revealed that LTDR was not inferior to fusion. Most of clinical studies dealing with LTDR revealed that there was no strong evidence for preventive effect of LTDR against symptomatic degenerative changes of adjacent segment disease. LTDR does not have shortcomings associated with fusion. However, it has a potentiality of the new complications to occur, which surgeons have never experienced in fusion surgeries. Consequently, longer follow-up should be necessary as yet to confirm the maintenance of improved surgical outcome and to observe any very late complications. LTDR still may get a chance to establish itself as a substitute of fusion both nominally and virtually if it eases the concerns listed above. PMID:26713139

  13. Predictors of Oswestry Disability Index worsening after lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Gum, Jeffrey L; Carreon, Leah Y; Stimac, Jeffrey D; Glassman, Steven D

    2013-04-01

    The authors identified patients with an increase in their Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score after lumbar spine fusion to evaluate whether this is a plausible definition of deterioration and to determine whether any common patient characteristics exist.A total of 1054 patients who underwent lumbar spinal fusion and had 2-year follow-up data, including the Short Form 36, the ODI, and numeric rating scales for back and leg pain, were identified. Patients with worsening ODI were compared with the remaining cohort. Twenty-eight patients had an absolute increase (worse) in ODI at 1 year postoperatively. Participants with worsening ODI scores included 13 men and 15 women with an average age of 43.3 years; 15 (54%) were smokers. Common medical comorbidities included obesity and hypertension. Complications occurred in 5 (18%) patients and included wound infection, dural tear, and nerve root injury. Pseudarthrosis was common (n=8; 28%). Twenty-one patients required an additional intervention, including epidural injections, fusion revision, and cervical spine surgery.It is important to have a clear definition of deterioration to better provide informed consent or choice of treatment. Only 28 (2.6%) patients were identified as having an increase in ODI score at 2-year follow-up. PMID:23590789

  14. Perioperative morbidity and mortality after lumbar trauma in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Ethan A; Yue, John K; Birk, Harjus; Robinson, Caitlin K; Manley, Geoffrey T; Dhall, Sanjay S; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Traumatic fractures of the thoracolumbar spine are common injuries, accounting for approximately 90% of all spinal trauma. Lumbar spine trauma in the elderly is a growing public health problem with relatively little evidence to guide clinical management. The authors sought to characterize the complications, morbidity, and mortality associated with surgical and nonsurgical management in elderly patients with traumatic fractures of the lumbar spine. METHODS Using the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank, the authors performed a retrospective analysis of patients ? 55 years of age who had traumatic fracture to the lumbar spine. This group was divided into middle-aged (55-69 years) and elderly (? 70 years) cohorts. Cohorts were subdivided into nonoperative, vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty, noninstrumented surgery, and instrumented surgery. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to characterize and identify predictors of medical and surgical complications, mortality, hospital length of stay, ICU length of stay, number of days on ventilator, and hospital discharge in each subgroup. Adjusted odds ratios, mean differences, and associated 95% CIs were reported. Statistical significance was assessed at p < 0.05, and the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was applied for each outcome analysis. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2012, 22,835 people met the inclusion criteria, which represents 94,103 incidents nationally. Analyses revealed a similar medical and surgical complication profile between age groups. The most prevalent medical complications were pneumonia (7.0%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (3.6%), and deep venous thrombosis (3%). Surgical site infections occurred in 6.3% of cases. Instrumented surgery was associated with the highest odds of each complication (p < 0.001). The inpatient mortality rate was 6.8% for all subjects. Multivariable analyses demonstrated that age ? 70 years was an independent predictor of mortality (OR 3.16, 95% CI 2.77-3.60), whereas instrumented surgery (multivariable OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.28-0.52) and vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.17-0.45) were associated with decreased odds of death. In surviving patients, both older age (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.30-0.34) and instrumented fusion (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.33-0.41) were associated with decreased odds of discharge to home. CONCLUSIONS The present study confirms that lumbar surgery in the elderly is associated with increased morbidity. In particular, instrumented fusion is associated with periprocedural complications, prolonged hospitalization, and a decreased likelihood of being discharged home. However, fusion surgery is also associated with reduced mortality. Age alone should not be an exclusionary factor in identifying surgical candidates for instrumented lumbar spinal fusion. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26424342

  15. Detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates from Tonsils and Posterior Oropharynx.

    PubMed

    Bissessor, M; Whiley, D M; Lee, D M; Snow, A F; Fairley, C K; Peel, J; Bradshaw, C S; Hocking, J S; Lahra, M M; Chen, M Y

    2015-11-01

    We examined the factors influencing gonorrhea detection at the pharynx. One hundred men infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae were swabbed from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx. N. gonorrhoeae was reisolated from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx in 62% and 52%, respectively (P = 0.041). Culture positivity was greater with higher gonococcal DNA loads at the tonsils (P = 0.001) and oropharynx (P < 0.001). N. gonorrhoeae can be cultured from the tonsils and posterior oropharynx with greater isolation rates where gonococcal loads are higher. PMID:26292303

  16. Incidence and surgical importance of the posterior gastric artery.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, K; Prates, J C; DiDio, L J

    1978-01-01

    In a series of 61 adult cadavers, the posterior gastric artery was found in 38 (62.3%), originating from the superior aspect of the mid-third of the splenic artery. The posterior gastric artery, running behind the parietal peritoneum of the omental bursa, produced a peritoneal fold before reaching the posterior wall of the superior portion of the gastric body, near the cardiac region, and the fundus. Its high incidence, hidden origin, deep course, and distribution make this artery very important for surgical procedures relating to the stomach, pancreas, spleen, and celiac region. It may be crucial, especially if partial gastric resection of splenectomy have obliterated other gastric vessels. PMID:629615

  17. Factors associated with low levels of lumbar strength in adolescents in Southern Brazil?

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Diego Augusto Santos; Gonçalves, Eliane Cristina de Andrade; Grigollo, Leoberto Ricardo; Petroski, Edio Luiz

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and factors associated with low levels of lumbar strength in adolescents. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study involving 601 adolescents, aged 14 to 17 years, enrolled in public schools in the western region of Santa Catarina State - Southern Brazil. Lumbar strength was analyzed by the lumbar extension test developed by the Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology, which proposes different cutoffs for boys and girls. Independent variables were sex, age, socioeconomic status, dietary habits, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and aerobic fitness. For data analysis, univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used, with significance level of 5%. RESULTS: The prevalence of low levels of lumbar strength was 27.3%. The population subgroups most likely to present low levels of lumbar strength were females (OR: 1.54, 95% CI : 1.06 to 2.23), adolescents with low levels of aerobic fitness (OR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.41 to 3.11) and the overweight (OR: 2.28, 95% CI: 1.35 to 3.81). CONCLUSION: Almost one-third of the studied students have low levels of lumbar strength. Interventions in the school population should be taken with special attention to female adolescents, those with low levels of aerobic fitness, and those with overweight, as these population subgroups were most likely to demostrate low levels of lumbar strength. PMID:25511000

  18. Should routine MRI of the lumbar spine be required prior to lumbar epidural steroid injection for sciatica pain?

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Ramis F.; Lissounov, Alexei; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2015-01-01

    Background: We describe three patients who received lumbar epidural steroid injections (LESI) for lumbosacral radicular pain that resulted in worsening of their symptoms. The procedures were performed following a review of remote diagnostic imaging studies. These cases demonstrate the lack of consensus in pain management domains for how to approach the workup and treatment of persistent/chronic low back pain, with a noted fragmentation in pain management strategies and applied therapies. Case Description: We present three patients; two female patients (37 and 38 years old) undergoing LESI for remotely diagnosed disc herniations, and one 61-year-old male receiving an LESI for a presumed, unverified lumbar intervertebral disc disorder. Following a worsening of symptoms after LESI, neurosurgical consultations ultimately determined the presence of, respectively, an epidural hematoma, a neurilemoma, and a lung cancer metastasis to the sacrum as the source of symptoms, instead of being due to the intervertebral disc pathology. Conclusions: We would like to emphasize several principles in the diagnosis and use of imaging of the lumbosacral region prior to undertaking invasive neuraxial procedures. PMID:25883840

  19. Sagittal plane lumbar intervertebral motion during seated flexion-extension radiographs of 658 asymptomatic nondegenerated levels.

    PubMed

    Staub, Blake N; Holman, Paul J; Reitman, Charles A; Hipp, John

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Evaluation of lumbar stability is fundamentally dependent on a clear understanding of normal lumbar motion. There are inconsistencies in reported lumbar motion across previously published studies, and it is unclear which provide the most reliable reference data. New technology now allows valid and reliable determination of normal lumbar intervertebral motion (IVM). The object of this study was to provide normative reference data for lumbar IVM and center of rotation (COR) using validated computer-assisted measurement tools. METHODS Sitting flexion-extension radiographs were obtained in 162 asymptomatic volunteers and then analyzed using a previously validated and widely used computerized image analysis method. Each lumbar level was subsequently classified as "degenerated" or "nondegenerated" using the Kellgren-Lawrence classification. Of the 803 levels analyzed, 658 were nondegenerated (Kellgren-Lawrence grade < 2). At each level of the lumbar spine, the magnitude of intervertebral rotation and translation, the ratio of translation per degree of rotation (TPDR), and the position of the COR were calculated in the nondegenerative cohort. Translations were calculated in millimeters and percentage endplate width. RESULTS All parameters were significantly dependent on the intervertebral level. The upper limit of the 95% CIs for anteroposterior intervertebral translation in this asymptomatic cohort ranged from 2.1 mm (6.2% endplate width) to 4.6 mm (13.3% endplate width). Intervertebral rotation upper limits ranged from 16.3° to 23.5°. The upper limits for TPDR ranged from 0.49% to 0.82% endplate width/degree. The COR coordinates were clustered in level-dependent patterns. CONCLUSIONS New normal values for IVM, COR, and the ratio of TPDR in asymptomatic nondegenerative lumbar levels are proposed, providing a reference for future interpretation of sagittal plane motion in the lumbar spine. PMID:26296193

  20. Mandibular fracture patterns consistent with posterior maxillary fractures involving the posterior maxillary sinus, pterygoid plate or both: CT characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sukegawa, S; Kanno, T; Fujita, G; Yamamoto, N; Furuki, Y; Michizawa, M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of posterior maxillary fractures involving the posterior maxillary sinus wall, pterygoid plate or both, unrelated to major midface fractures in patients with mandibular fractures, and to characterize associated fractures. Methods: A CT study was performed in patients with mandibular fractures to identify posterior maxillary fractures. Patients aged under 16 years, those with mandibular fractures involving only dentoalveolar components and those with concurrent major midfacial fractures were excluded. Results: 13 (6.7%) of 194 patients with mandibular fractures also had posterior maxillary fractures (case group). The injury pattern correlated with the external force directed to the lateral side of the mandible (p?posterior mandible occurred with significant frequency (p?=?0.001) when the posterior maxillary fractures involved only the sinus. Conclusions: Mandibular fractures accompanied by posterior maxillary fractures are not rare. The finding of a unilateral posterior maxillary fracture on CT may aid the efficient radiological examination of the mandible based on possible patterns of associated fractures, as follows: in the ipsilateral posterior region as a direct fracture when the impact is a medially directed force, and in the symphysis/parasymphysis or contralateral condylar neck as an indirect fracture. PMID:24336313

  1. 21 CFR 872.3900 - Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...false Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert. 872.3900 Section 872...3900 Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert. (a) Identification. A posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert is a porcelain device with...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3900 - Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...false Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert. 872.3900 Section 872...3900 Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert. (a) Identification. A posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert is a porcelain device with...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3900 - Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...false Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert. 872.3900 Section 872...3900 Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert. (a) Identification. A posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert is a porcelain device with...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3900 - Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...false Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert. 872.3900 Section 872...3900 Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert. (a) Identification. A posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert is a porcelain device with...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3900 - Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert. 872.3900 Section 872...3900 Posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert. (a) Identification. A posterior artificial tooth with a metal insert is a porcelain device with...

  6. Effect of an artificial disc on lumbar spine biomechanics: a probabilistic finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Anke; Zander, Thomas; Bergmann, Georg

    2008-01-01

    The effects of different parameters on the mechanical behaviour of the lumbar spine were in most cases determined deterministically with only one uncertain parameter varied at a time while the others were kept fixed. Thus most parameter combinations were disregarded. The aim of the study was to determine in a probabilistic finite element study how intervertebral rotation, intradiscal pressure, and contact force in the facet joints are affected by the input parameters implant position, implant ball radius, presence of scar tissue, and gap size in the facet joints. An osseoligamentous finite element model of the lumbar spine ranging from L3 vertebra to L5/S1 intervertebral disc was used. An artificial disc with a fixed center of rotation was inserted at level L4/L5. The model was loaded with pure moments of 7.5 Nm to simulate flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. In a probabilistic study the implant position in anterior–posterior (ap) and in lateral direction, the radius of the implant ball, and the gap size of the facet joint were varied. After implanting an artificial disc, scar tissue may develop, replacing the anterior longitudinal ligament. Thus presence and absence of scar tissue were also simulated. For each loading case studied, intervertebral rotations, intradiscal pressures and contact forces in the facet joints were calculated for 1,000 randomized input parameter combinations in order to determine the probable range of these output parameters. Intervertebral rotation at implant level varies strongly for different combinations of the input parameters. It is mainly affected by gap size, ap-position and implant ball radius for flexion, by scar tissue and implant ball radius for extension and lateral bending, and by gap size and implant ball radius for axial torsion. For extension, intervertebral rotation at implant level varied between 1.4° and 7.5°. Intradiscal pressure in the adjacent discs is only slightly affected by all input parameters. Contact forces in the facet joints at implant level vary strongly for the different combinations of the input parameters. For flexion, forces are 0 in 63% of the cases, but for small gap sizes and large implant ball radii they reach values of up to 533 N. Similar results are found for extension with a maximum predicted force of 560 N. Here the forces are mainly influenced by gap size, implant ball radius and scar tissue. The forces vary between 0 and 300 N for lateral bending and between 0 and 200 N for axial torsion. The parameters that have the greatest effect in both loading cases are the same as those for extension. Intervertebral rotation and contact force in the facet joints depend strongly on the input parameters studied. The probabilistic study shows a large variation of the results and likelihood of certain values. Clinical studies will be required to show whether or not there is a strong correlation of parameter combinations that cause high facet joint forces and low back pain after total disc replacement. PMID:19043744

  7. Arthroscopic preparation of the posterior and posteroinferior glenoid labrum.

    PubMed

    Provencher, Matthew T; Romeo, Anthony A; Solomon, Daniel J; Bach, Bernard R; Cole, Brian J

    2007-11-01

    Using an anterior portal for a labral elevator and shaver instrument, with the arthroscope in the anterosuperior portal, allows the posterior and posteroinferior chondrolabral junction to be safely prepared. PMID:18019981

  8. Posterior-based confidence measures for spoken term detection 

    E-print Network

    Wang, Dong; Tejedor, Javier; Frankel, Joe; King, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Confidence measures play a key role in spoken term detection (STD) tasks. The confidence measure expresses the posterior probability of the search term appearing in the detection period, given the speech. Traditional ...

  9. Vitrectorhexis versus forceps posterior capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kochgaway, Lav; Biswas, Partha; Paul, Ajoy; Sinha, Sourav; Biswas, Rupak; Maity, Puspen; Banerjee, Sumita

    2013-01-01

    This study was done to compare the results of posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis created using forceps with those created using vitrector in eyes suffering from congenital cataract. Vitrectorhexis term was first used by Wilson et al in 1999.[1] Fifty eyes with congenital and developmental cataract were included in this study. The posterior capsulorhexis was created using utrata forceps in 17 eyes or through a vitrector in 33 eyes. Forceps capsulorhexis was performed before IOL implantation, while vitrectorhexis was performed after IOL implantation in the bag. The results of both the surgery were compared using the following criteria: incidence of extension of rhexis, ability to achieve posterior rhexis of appropriate size, ability to implant the IOL in the bag, the surgical time, and learning curve. Vitrectorhexis after IOL implantation was an easy to learn alternative to manual posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract surgery. It was more predictable and reproducible, with a short learning curve and lesser surgical time. PMID:23571249

  10. Vitrectorhexis versus forceps posterior capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Kochgaway, Lav; Biswas, Partha; Paul, Ajoy; Sinha, Sourav; Biswas, Rupak; Maity, Puspen; Banerjee, Sumita

    2013-07-01

    This study was done to compare the results of posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis created using forceps with those created using vitrector in eyes suffering from congenital cataract. Vitrectorhexis term was first used by Wilson et al in 1999. [1] Fifty eyes with congenital and developmental cataract were included in this study. The posterior capsulorhexis was created using utrata forceps in 17 eyes or through a vitrector in 33 eyes. Forceps capsulorhexis was performed before IOL implantation, while vitrectorhexis was performed after IOL implantation in the bag. The results of both the surgery were compared using the following criteria: incidence of extension of rhexis, ability to achieve posterior rhexis of appropriate size, ability to implant the IOL in the bag, the surgical time, and learning curve. Vitrectorhexis after IOL implantation was an easy to learn alternative to manual posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract surgery. It was more predictable and reproducible, with a short learning curve and lesser surgical time. PMID:23571249

  11. Abnormalities of fixation, saccade and pursuit in posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, Timothy J; Kaski, Diego; Yong, Keir X X; Paterson, Ross W; Slattery, Catherine F; Ryan, Natalie S; Schott, Jonathan M; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-01

    The clinico-neuroradiological syndrome posterior cortical atrophy is the cardinal 'visual dementia' and most common atypical Alzheimer's disease phenotype, offering insights into mechanisms underlying clinical heterogeneity, pathological propagation and basic visual phenomena (e.g. visual crowding). Given the extensive attention paid to patients' (higher order) perceptual function, it is surprising that there have been no systematic analyses of basic oculomotor function in this population. Here 20 patients with posterior cortical atrophy, 17 patients with typical Alzheimer's disease and 22 healthy controls completed tests of fixation, saccade (including fixation/target gap and overlap conditions) and smooth pursuit eye movements using an infrared pupil-tracking system. Participants underwent detailed neuropsychological and neurological examinations, with a proportion also undertaking brain imaging and analysis of molecular pathology. In contrast to informal clinical evaluations of oculomotor dysfunction frequency (previous studies: 38%, current clinical examination: 33%), detailed eyetracking investigations revealed eye movement abnormalities in 80% of patients with posterior cortical atrophy (compared to 17% typical Alzheimer's disease, 5% controls). The greatest differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical Alzheimer's disease were seen in saccadic performance. Patients with posterior cortical atrophy made significantly shorter saccades especially for distant targets. They also exhibited a significant exacerbation of the normal gap/overlap effect, consistent with 'sticky fixation'. Time to reach saccadic targets was significantly associated with parietal and occipital cortical thickness measures. On fixation stability tasks, patients with typical Alzheimer's disease showed more square wave jerks whose frequency was associated with lower cerebellar grey matter volume, while patients with posterior cortical atrophy showed large saccadic intrusions whose frequency correlated significantly with generalized reductions in cortical thickness. Patients with both posterior cortical atrophy and typical Alzheimer's disease showed lower gain in smooth pursuit compared to controls. The current study establishes that eye movement abnormalities are near-ubiquitous in posterior cortical atrophy, and highlights multiple aspects of saccadic performance which distinguish posterior cortical atrophy from typical Alzheimer's disease. We suggest the posterior cortical atrophy oculomotor profile (e.g. exacerbation of the saccadic gap/overlap effect, preserved saccadic velocity) reflects weak input from degraded occipito-parietal spatial representations of stimulus location into a superior collicular spatial map for eye movement regulation. This may indicate greater impairment of identification of oculomotor targets rather than generation of oculomotor movements. The results highlight the critical role of spatial attention and object identification but also precise stimulus localization in explaining the complex real world perception deficits observed in posterior cortical atrophy and many other patients with dementia-related visual impairment. PMID:25895507

  12. Abnormalities of fixation, saccade and pursuit in posterior cortical atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kaski, Diego; Yong, Keir X. X.; Paterson, Ross W.; Slattery, Catherine F.; Ryan, Natalie S.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Crutch, Sebastian J.

    2015-01-01

    The clinico-neuroradiological syndrome posterior cortical atrophy is the cardinal ‘visual dementia’ and most common atypical Alzheimer’s disease phenotype, offering insights into mechanisms underlying clinical heterogeneity, pathological propagation and basic visual phenomena (e.g. visual crowding). Given the extensive attention paid to patients’ (higher order) perceptual function, it is surprising that there have been no systematic analyses of basic oculomotor function in this population. Here 20 patients with posterior cortical atrophy, 17 patients with typical Alzheimer’s disease and 22 healthy controls completed tests of fixation, saccade (including fixation/target gap and overlap conditions) and smooth pursuit eye movements using an infrared pupil-tracking system. Participants underwent detailed neuropsychological and neurological examinations, with a proportion also undertaking brain imaging and analysis of molecular pathology. In contrast to informal clinical evaluations of oculomotor dysfunction frequency (previous studies: 38%, current clinical examination: 33%), detailed eyetracking investigations revealed eye movement abnormalities in 80% of patients with posterior cortical atrophy (compared to 17% typical Alzheimer’s disease, 5% controls). The greatest differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical Alzheimer’s disease were seen in saccadic performance. Patients with posterior cortical atrophy made significantly shorter saccades especially for distant targets. They also exhibited a significant exacerbation of the normal gap/overlap effect, consistent with ‘sticky fixation’. Time to reach saccadic targets was significantly associated with parietal and occipital cortical thickness measures. On fixation stability tasks, patients with typical Alzheimer’s disease showed more square wave jerks whose frequency was associated with lower cerebellar grey matter volume, while patients with posterior cortical atrophy showed large saccadic intrusions whose frequency correlated significantly with generalized reductions in cortical thickness. Patients with both posterior cortical atrophy and typical Alzheimer’s disease showed lower gain in smooth pursuit compared to controls. The current study establishes that eye movement abnormalities are near-ubiquitous in posterior cortical atrophy, and highlights multiple aspects of saccadic performance which distinguish posterior cortical atrophy from typical Alzheimer’s disease. We suggest the posterior cortical atrophy oculomotor profile (e.g. exacerbation of the saccadic gap/overlap effect, preserved saccadic velocity) reflects weak input from degraded occipito-parietal spatial representations of stimulus location into a superior collicular spatial map for eye movement regulation. This may indicate greater impairment of identification of oculomotor targets rather than generation of oculomotor movements. The results highlight the critical role of spatial attention and object identification but also precise stimulus localization in explaining the complex real world perception deficits observed in posterior cortical atrophy and many other patients with dementia-related visual impairment. PMID:25895507

  13. Comparative Study of Modified Posterior Operation to Treat Kümmell's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Dachuan; Tan, Bingyi; Dong, Jun; Feng, Rongjie; Yuan, Zenong; Wang, Naiguo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present study aimed at examining the curative effect of modified posterior operation on treatment of Kümmell's disease. About 30 patients of Kümmell's disease with complete image and clinical data treated during June 2004 to July 2013 were conducted with anterior and posterior approaches, respectively. Kyphotic Cobb angle, fractured vertebra wedge angle, and the anterior and posterior heights of fractured vertebra were all measured through x-ray before and after operation, and the pain visual analog scale (VAS) was determined for evaluating the effect of operations. The injury and restoration of neurological function were assessed using Frankel classification. Patients in group A were treated with anterior operation, whereas group B was posterior operation. Postoperatively, VAS score, kyphotic Cobb angle, anterior vertebra height, and pathologic vertebra wedge angle were all significantly improved in patients with Kümmell's disease receiving modified posterior operation (group B). Similar results were also observed in patients with anterior operation. The improvement of VAS and correction rate of kyphotic Cobb angle indicated equivalent effects of posterior and anterior operations. Meanwhile, alleviated neurological function damage was observed in 2 groups. Relevant factor analysis illustrated that there was no significant correlation of the severity and improvement rate of pain symptoms with age, medical history, anterior and posterior vertebra heights, kyphotic Cobb angle, and pathological vertebra wedge angle. Compared with traditional anterior approach, modified posterior operation, adopting transpedicular vertebral body grafting combined with vertebral pedicle screw fixation, could produce equivalent effects on kyphosis correction, pain relief, and improvement of neurological function in patients with Kümmell's disease. PMID:26426639

  14. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy in a machine gunner.

    PubMed

    Sonna, L A; Scott, B R

    1995-07-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old Infantryman who developed posterior interosseous nerve palsy and a transient sensory deficit in a radial distribution after prolonged carrying of an M60 machine gun. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy has been reported in association with a variety of activities involving forceful, repetitive pronation and supination; however, to our knowledge, no previous cases of this palsy have been reported in association with use of a military weapon. PMID:7659246

  15. Comparative Study of Modified Posterior Operation to Treat Kümmell's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Dachuan; Tan, Bingyi; Dong, Jun; Feng, Rongjie; Yuan, Zenong; Wang, Naiguo

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed at examining the curative effect of modified posterior operation on treatment of Kümmell's disease. About 30 patients of Kümmell's disease with complete image and clinical data treated during June 2004 to July 2013 were conducted with anterior and posterior approaches, respectively. Kyphotic Cobb angle, fractured vertebra wedge angle, and the anterior and posterior heights of fractured vertebra were all measured through x-ray before and after operation, and the pain visual analog scale (VAS) was determined for evaluating the effect of operations. The injury and restoration of neurological function were assessed using Frankel classification. Patients in group A were treated with anterior operation, whereas group B was posterior operation. Postoperatively, VAS score, kyphotic Cobb angle, anterior vertebra height, and pathologic vertebra wedge angle were all significantly improved in patients with Kümmell's disease receiving modified posterior operation (group B). Similar results were also observed in patients with anterior operation. The improvement of VAS and correction rate of kyphotic Cobb angle indicated equivalent effects of posterior and anterior operations. Meanwhile, alleviated neurological function damage was observed in 2 groups. Relevant factor analysis illustrated that there was no significant correlation of the severity and improvement rate of pain symptoms with age, medical history, anterior and posterior vertebra heights, kyphotic Cobb angle, and pathological vertebra wedge angle. Compared with traditional anterior approach, modified posterior operation, adopting transpedicular vertebral body grafting combined with vertebral pedicle screw fixation, could produce equivalent effects on kyphosis correction, pain relief, and improvement of neurological function in patients with Kümmell's disease. PMID:26426639

  16. Erupted complex odontoma of the posterior maxilla: A rarity

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonika; Arul, A. Sri Kennath J.; Arul, A. Sri Sennath J.; Chitra, S.

    2015-01-01

    Complex odontomas, hamartomas of aborted tooth development, mainly occur in posterior part of the mandible and rarely erupt into the oral cavity. The spontaneous eruption may be associated with pain, inflammation of adjacent soft tissues or recurrent infection. The present case of complex odontoma is of particular interest due to its apparent eruption in the maxillary posterior segment, its association with agenesis of the second molar and impacted third molar; with the lesion being completely asymptomatic. PMID:26604611

  17. Posterior partially edentulous jaws, planning a rehabilitation with dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Douglas R; Silva, Emily V F; Pellizzer, Eduardo P; Filho, Osvaldo Magro; Goiato, Marcelo C

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To discuss important characteristics of the use of dental implants in posterior quadrants and the rehabilitation planning. METHODS: An electronic search of English articles was conducted on MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1990 up to the period of March 2014. The key terms were dental implants and posterior jaws, dental implants/treatment planning and posterior maxilla, and dental implants/treatment planning and posterior mandible. No exclusion criteria were used for the initial search. Clinical trials, randomized and non randomized studies, classical and comparative studies, multicenter studies, in vitro and in vivo studies, case reports, longitudinal studies and reviews of the literature were included in this review. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty-two articles met the inclusion criteria of treatment planning of dental implants in posterior jaw and were read in their entirety. The selected articles were categorized with respect to their context on space for restoration, anatomic considerations (bone quantity and density), radiographic techniques, implant selection (number, position, diameter and surface), tilted and pterygoid implants, short implants, occlusal considerations, and success rates of implants placed in the posterior region. The results derived from the review process were described under several different topic headings to give readers a clear overview of the literature. In general, it was observed that the use of dental implants in posterior region requires a careful treatment plan. It is important that the practitioner has knowledge about the theme to evaluate the treatment parameters. CONCLUSION: The use of implants to restore the posterior arch presents many challenges and requires a detailed treatment planning. PMID:25610852

  18. Mature Runt Cow Lumbar Intradiscal Pressures And Motion Segment Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Buttermann, Glenn Robin; Beaubien, Brian P; Saeger, Louis C

    2009-01-01

    Background Context The optimal animal model for in vivo testing of spinal implants, particularly total or partial disc replacement devices, has not yet been determined. Mechanical and morphological similarities of calf and human spines have been reported; however, limitations of the calf model include open growth plates and oversized vertebrae with growth. Mature runt cows (Corrientes breed) may avoid these limitations. Purpose This study compared vertebral morphology and biomechanical properties of human and runt cow lumbar motion segments. Study Design In vivo disc pressure measurements were obtained in six mature runt cows at L4–5. In vitro evaluation was performed on these same segments and repeated on twelve human motion segments. Methods Disc pressures were measured in vivo in runt cow (Corrientes breed) L45 discs using a percutaneous transducer with the animal performing various activities. These motion segments were then harvested and morphologic and biomechanical evaluations (disc pressure in compression, flexibility tests to 7.5 Nm) were performed on both cow and male human L23 and L45 segments. Results The transverse lumbar disc dimensions were slightly smaller for (mixed gender) cow vs. (male) humans, but were within the range of reported (mixed gender) human values. The mean ± SD disc height was smaller for runt cow (7 ± 1 mm) vs. human discs (13 ± 2 mm, p<0.001). The vertebral bodies of the cow were approximately twice as tall as the human. In vitro testing revealed significantly greater disc pressure response to applied axial loading in the runt cow vs. humans (1.27 ± 0.18 kPa/N vs. 0.84 ± 0.15 kPa/N respectively) but similar overall stiffness (2.15 ± 0.71 kN/mm vs. 1.91 ± 0.94 kN/mm, respectively). Runt cow and human segments flexibility curves were similar with the following exceptions: runt cow stiffness was ~40% greater in torsion (p<0.05), runt cow segment lateral bending motion was greater vs. humans (range of motion by 30%, neutral zone by 100%; both p<0.05) and flexion range of motion tended to be smaller in runt cow vs. human specimens (by ~40%, p=NS). In vivo, the standing disc pressure in the runt cow was 0.80 ± 0.24 MPa. Conclusions Although no animal replicates the human motion segment, the runt cow lumbar spine had a number of biomechanical and morphological measurements within the range of human values. The closed physes and temporally stable morphology of the mature runt cow may make this model more suitable vs. standard calf models for human intradiscal implant studies. PMID:18037351

  19. Surgical vs Nonoperative Treatment for Lumbar Disk Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, James N.; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Hanscom, Brett; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Herkowitz, Harry; Fischgrund, Jeffrey; Cammisa, Frank P.; Albert, Todd; Deyo, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Context For patients with lumbar disk herniation, the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) randomized trial intent-to-treat analysis showed small but not statistically significant differences in favor of diskectomy compared with usual care. However, the large numbers of patients who crossed over between assigned groups precluded any conclusions about the comparative effectiveness of operative therapy vs usual care. Objective To compare the treatment effects of diskectomy and usual care. Design, Setting, and Patients Prospective observational cohort of surgical candidates with imaging-confirmed lumbar intervertebral disk herniation who were treated at 13 spine clinics in 11 US states and who met the SPORT eligibility criteria but declined randomization between March 2000 and March 2003. Interventions Standard open diskectomy vs usual nonoperative care. Main Outcome Measures Changes from baseline in the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) bodily pain and physical function scales and the modified Oswestry Disability Index (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons/MODEMS version). Results Of the 743 patients enrolled in the observational cohort, 528 patients received surgery and 191 received usual nonoperative care. At 3 months, patients who chose surgery had greater improvement in the primary outcome measures of bodily pain (mean change: surgery, 40.9 vs nonoperative care, 26.0; treatment effect, 14.8; 95% confidence interval, 10.8-18.9), physical function (mean change: surgery, 40.7 vs nonoperative care, 25.3; treatment effect, 15.4; 95% CI, 11.6-19.2), and Oswestry Disability Index (mean change: surgery, ?36.1 vs nonoperative care, ?20.9; treatment effect, ?15.2; 95% CI, ?18.5. to ?11.8). These differences narrowed somewhat at 2 years: bodily pain (mean change: surgery, 42.6 vs nonoperative care, 32.4; treatment effect, 10.2; 95% CI, 5.9-14.5), physical function (mean change: surgery, 43.9 vs nonoperavtive care 31.9; treatment effect, 12.0; 95% CI; 7.9-16.1), and Oswestry Disability Index (mean change: surgery ?37.6 vs nonoperative care ?24.2; treatment effect, ?13.4; 95% CI, ?17.0 to ?9.7). Conclusions Patients with persistent sciatica from lumbar disk herniation improved in both operated and usual care groups. Those who chose operative intervention reported greater improvements than patients who elected nonoperative care. However, nonrandomized comparisons of self-reported outcomes are subject to potential confounding and must be interpreted cautiously. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00000410 PMID:17119141

  20. Computational modelling of mobile bearing TKA anterior-posterior dislocation.

    PubMed

    Müller, J H; Zakaria, T; van der Merwe, W; D'Angelo, F

    2016-04-01

    Anterior-posterior stability in an unconstrained mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and one with rotational constraints is compared in a computational model based on an ASTM test. Both TKA designs dislocate at loads greater than reported maximum in vivo forces. The posterior drawer forces (mean: 3027 N vs. 1817 N) needed to induce subluxation increase with a greater anterior jump distance (12 mm vs. 7 mm; refers to the vertical height of the anterior or posterior border of the tibial insert's articulating surface). The posterior jump distance for both tested TKA differed by 1.5 mm and had minimal effect on the magnitude of the anterior drawer forces at dislocation in mid-flexion (unconstrained vs. constrained: 445 N vs. 412 N). The unconstrained insert dislocated by means of spin-out whereas in the constrained TKA the femur dislocated from the bearing during posterior drawer and the bearing from the baseplate during anterior drawer. MCL function is an important consideration during ligament balancing since a ± 10% variation in MCL tension affects dislocation forces by ± 20%. The simulation platform provided the means to investigate TKA designs in terms of anterior-posterior stability as a function of knee flexion, collateral ligament function and mechanical morphology. PMID:26047039

  1. One step arthroscopically assisted Latarjet and posterior bone-block, for recurrent posterior instability and anterior traumatic dislocation

    PubMed Central

    D’Ambrosi, Riccardo; Perfetti, Carlo; Garavaglia, Guido; Taverna, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    This case presents the challenges of the surgical management for a patient with a history of recurrent posterior shoulder instability and subsequently traumatic anterior dislocation. The patient was already on the waiting list for an arthroscopic posterior stabilization with anchors, when a car accident caused an additional anterior shoulder dislocation. This traumatic anterior dislocation created a bone loss with a glenoid fracture and aggravated the preexisting posterior instability. In order to address both problems, we decided to perform an arthroscopically assisted Latarjet procedure for anterior instability and to stabilize with a bone graft for posterior instability. To our best knowledge, this type of surgical procedure has so far never been reported in the literature. The purpose of this report is to present the surgical technique and to outline the decision making process. PMID:26288539

  2. Epiduroscopic Removal of a Lumbar Facet Joint Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyun Seung; Bae, Jun Yeol; In, Chi Bum; Choi, Eun Joo; Lee, Pyung Bok

    2015-01-01

    Facet joint synovial cysts are usually associated with osteoarthritis of the adjacent facet joint and/or spondylolisthesis. In between the conservative and operative ends of the treatment spectrum lie minimally invasive techniques such as cyst rupture using epiduroscopy. In this report, we describe an 82-year-old male patient presenting with low back pain radiating to his lower left extremity and associated paresthesia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine revealed a synovial cyst at left L4/5 facet joint. Using epiduroscopy, the cyst was mechanically ruptured by popping it with the tip of the scope. The patient remained symptom-free at his successive visits until 12 months after the procedure, and was opened for desired follow up. PMID:26495082

  3. [Epidurography in lesions of the lumbar intervertebral disks].

    PubMed

    Zemskaia, A G; Musikhin, V N

    1989-01-01

    Operations were carried out on 850 patients with neurological complications of lumbar osteochondrosis. Epidurography with 35-40% verografin solution was conducted before the operation in 795 patients. The method is described. Two variants of epidurograms are distinguished. The 1st variant is characteristic of protrusions of the disk or Schmorl's body and is manifested by a distorted band of the contrast medium at the level of the affected disk. The 2nd variant is typical of epiduritis with or without Schmorl's body; in this case the contrast medium is distributed irregularly in the epidural space or is absent at the level of the affected segments. Statistically significant data were obtained in 89% of patients. PMID:2800831

  4. Abdominal Aortocaval Vascular Injury following Routine Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Marc James; Kontautaite, Ruta; Sharma, Mukesh; Shanbhag, Sumant

    2014-01-01

    Vascular complications following spinal surgery are potentially fatal; however, fortunately they are rare. This risk is often focused on the close proximity of the surgical field to retroperitoneal structures. Prompt diagnosis is essential; however, bleeding is often occult, and this may therefore delay management of this condition. Despite previous reports many clinicians may not be aware of this potentially fatal complication. The overall morbidity and mortality may be reduced by prompt diagnosis and treatment. Clinicians must, therefore, have a high degree of suspicion in all patients who undergo spinal surgery. We therefore present a case of a 51-year-old man who sustained an aortocaval injury during a revisional lumbar discectomy. The patient developed refractory hypotension, which deteriorated into PEA arrest. Emergency laparotomy was performed which revealed an aortocaval injury. Immediate primary vascular repair was successfully performed. The patient was resuscitated and made a full recovery. PMID:25400952

  5. The role of laparoscopic biopsies in lumbar spondylodiscitis.

    PubMed

    Corpataux, J M; Halkic, N; Wettstein, M; Dusmet, M

    2000-11-01

    The infection of an intervertebral disk is a serious condition. The diagnosis often is elusive and difficult to make. It is imperative to have appropriate microbiologic specimens before the initiation of treatment. We report the case of a 51-year-old woman with lumbar spondylodiscitis caused by infection after the placement of an epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia. A spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan confirmed the diagnosis, but computed tomography (CT)-guided fine-needle biopsy did not yield adequate material for a microbiologic diagnosis. Laparoscopic biopsies of the involved disk provided good specimens and a diagnosis of Propionibacterium acnes infection. We believe that this minimally invasive procedure should be performed when CT-guided fine-needle biopsy fails to yield a microbiologic diagnosis in spondylodiscitis. PMID:11285529

  6. The role of laparoscopic biopsies in lumbar spondylodiscitis.

    PubMed

    Corpataux, J M; Halkic, N; Wettstein, M; Dusmet, M

    2000-12-01

    Infection of an intervertebral disk is a serious condition. Diagnosis often is elusive and difficult. It is imperative to obtain appropriate microbiological specimens before initiation of treatment. The authors describe a 51-year-old woman with lumbar spondylodiscitis that was because of infection after the placement of an epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia. A spinal magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis, but computed tomography-guided fine needle biopsy did not provide adequate material for a microbiologic diagnosis. Laparoscopic biopsies of the involved disk provided good specimens and a diagnosis of Propionibacterium acnes infection. The authors believe that this minimally invasive procedure should be performed when computed tomography-guided fine needle biopsy does not provide a microbiologic diagnosis in spondylodiscitis. PMID:11147923

  7. The effects of gait with use of smartphone on repositioning error and curvature of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeong-Oh; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Jun-Seok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effect of smartphone use on lumbar spine repositioning error and lumbar curvature while walking on a treadmill. [Subjects] A total of 20 healthy individuals (18 males and 2 females) volunteered for this study. [Methods] The subjects walked for 20?min on a treadmill while using a smartphone. To determine the effect of smartphone use, lumbar repositioning error was measured using an electronic goniometer while lumbar curvature was assessed using a Spinal Mouse before and immediately after treadmill use. Differences in the lumbar repositioning error and lumbar curvature data between the pre- and post-walking were compared using the paired t-test. [Results] The lumbar spine repositioning error was significantly greater post-walking compared with pre-walking (6.70±2.91° vs. 3.02±1.79°). There was no significant difference in lumbar curvature between pre- and post-walking (14.24±3.18° vs. 13.94±3.12°). [Conclusion] These findings indicate that the lumbar repositioning error increased immediately after walking while using a smartphone, but that the lumbar curvature was unchanged. PMID:26357430

  8. The effects of gait with use of smartphone on repositioning error and curvature of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong-Oh; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Jun-Seok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effect of smartphone use on lumbar spine repositioning error and lumbar curvature while walking on a treadmill. [Subjects] A total of 20 healthy individuals (18 males and 2 females) volunteered for this study. [Methods] The subjects walked for 20?min on a treadmill while using a smartphone. To determine the effect of smartphone use, lumbar repositioning error was measured using an electronic goniometer while lumbar curvature was assessed using a Spinal Mouse before and immediately after treadmill use. Differences in the lumbar repositioning error and lumbar curvature data between the pre- and post-walking were compared using the paired t-test. [Results] The lumbar spine repositioning error was significantly greater post-walking compared with pre-walking (6.70±2.91° vs. 3.02±1.79°). There was no significant difference in lumbar curvature between pre- and post-walking (14.24±3.18° vs. 13.94±3.12°). [Conclusion] These findings indicate that the lumbar repositioning error increased immediately after walking while using a smartphone, but that the lumbar curvature was unchanged. PMID:26357430

  9. Single-stage posterior midline approach for dumbbell tumors of the thoracic spine, with intraoperative CT guidance

    PubMed Central

    Thorat, Jayant D.; Rajendra, T.; Thirugnanam, Agasthian; Ng, Ivan H. B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several different procedures have been advocated for thoracic spine dumbbell tumor resection, combining thoracic and neurosurgical approaches, in single and multiple stages, using various incisions and positions. These have led to controversies in the ideal management. The authors report their analysis of a series of 11 patients successfully treated through a one-step midline approach for complete resection and instrumentation when indicated under intraoperative CT (ICT) guidance. Methods: The patients’ clinical presentations, imaging results, operative findings and follow-up were reviewed in 11 patients (age ranged from 11 to 62 years), over the period from August 2007 to May 2010. A single-stage, posterior midline incision approach with laminectomy, facetectomy, costotransversectomy, for complete resection of intraspinal and paraspinal components of tumor was used. Spinal instrumentation under ICT guidance was also carried out in relevant (six) cases with tumors involving junctional spinal regions such the cervico-thoracic or thoraco-lumbar region. Results: The initial clinical presenting symptom was pain in eight patients and paresthesia in one, while two patients were detected incidentally on routine chest X-rays. Total excision was achieved in 10 patients (9 schwanommas, 1 neurofibroma) with the exception of one patient who had a recurrent malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor adherent to the vertebral artery. No significant postoperative complications occurred and an early mobilization/discharge was achieved in all patients with an average hospital stay of 5 days. Conclusions: A one-step approach through a posterior midline incision is feasible, safe and efficient for complete excision of thoracic dumbbell tumors. This approach facilitates laminectomy, facetectomy, costotransversectomy and instrumentation under ICT guidance, while limiting muscle damage, blood loss, operative time, postoperative pain, thus enabling early mobilization with a reduced hospital stay. PMID:21541199

  10. Early embryonic development of the camel lumbar spinal cord segment.

    PubMed

    Elmonem, M E A; Mohamed, S A; Aly, K H

    2007-02-01

    The lumbar spinal cord segment of the one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius) embryos at 2.4- to 28-cm crown vertebral rump length (CVRL) was examined. Major changes are occurring in the organization of the lumbar spinal cord segment at this early developmental period. At first, the spinal cord is flattened from side to side but with increase in gestational age it becomes flattened dorsoventrally. The size and shape of the lumen changes in indifferent stage of development. These changes may be in relation to the decrease of ependymal layer and increase of the mantel layer during the developmental stages. The lumen of the spinal cord is a wide spindle in shape at 2.4-cm CVRL, diamond in shape at 5.5-cm CVRL and narrow oval in shape at 28-cm CVRL. It occupies about the whole, half and one-seventh of the total height of the spinal cord at 2.4-, 5.5- and 28-cm CVRL, respectively. At the 2.4-2.7 CVRL, the spinal cord is formed of six plates: roof, floor, two alar and two basal plates. The present investigation indicates that the distribution of the ependymal, mantle and marginal layers differs in the various developmental stages of the camel embryos. The majority of the cross section of the spinal cord consists at first of ependymal and mantle layers, and a thin outer rim of the marginal layer. With the advancement of age, the ependymal layer diminishes in size, while the mantle and marginal layers increase in size forming the future grey and white matters, respectively. PMID:17266667

  11. Clinical and Statistical Correlation of Various Lumbar Pathological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J. Michael; Mahfouz, Mohamed; Battaglia, Nicholas V.; Sharma, Adrija; Cheng, Joseph S.; Komistek, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Current clinical evaluations often rely on static anatomic imaging modalities for diagnosis of mechanical low back pain, which provide anatomic snapshots and a surrogate analysis of a functional disease. Three dimensional in vivo motion is available with the use of digital fluoroscopy, which was used to capture kinematic data of the lumbar spine in order to identify coefficients of motion that may assist the physician in differentiating patient pathology. 40 patients distributed among 4 classes of lumbar degeneration, from healthy to degenerative, underwent CT, MRI, and digital x-ray fluoroscopy. Each patient underwent diagnosis by a neurosurgeon. Fluoroscopy was taken as the patient performed lateral bending (LB), axial rotation (AR) and flexion-extension (FE). Patient specific models were registered with the fluoroscopy images to obtain in vivo kinematic data. Motion coefficients, CLB, CAR, CFE, were calculated as the ratio of in-plane motion to total out-of-plane motion. Range of motion (ROM) was calculated about the axis of motion for each exercise. Inter- and Intra- group statistics were examined for each coefficient and a flexible Bayesian classifier was used to differentiate patients with degeneration. The motion coefficients CLB and CFE were significantly different (p < 0.05) in 4 of 6 group comparisons. In plane motion, ROMLB, was significantly different in only 1 of 6 group comparisons. The classifier achieved 95% sensitivity and specificity using (CFE, CLB, ROMLB) as input features, and 40% specificity and 80% sensitivity using ROM variables. The new coefficients were better correlated with patient pathology than ROM measures. The coefficients suggest a relationship between pathology and measured motion which has not been reported previously. PMID:23270717

  12. Hemorrhagic lumbar synovial cyst: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Cannarsa, Gregory; Clark, Shannon W.; Chalouhi, Norah; Zanaty, Mario; Heller, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intraspinal synovial cysts are infrequent causes of back and radicular leg pain. Commonly associated with degenerative spinal disease, the majority of synovial cysts appear in the lumbar spine. Rarely, intracystic hemorrhage can occur through an unclear mechanism. Similarly rare, cysts may also become migratory. The pathogenesis of hemorrhagic synovial cysts remains uncertain and their potential for migration also remains unclear. A 36 year-old male presented to the clinic with 5 months of back pain and leg pain that began after a work-related injury. An initial MRI obtained by another surgeon 3 month prior demonstrated an epidural cystic mass with T1 hypointensity and T2 hyperintensity at L2-L3. With worsening pain, the patient came to our clinic for a second opinion. A second MRI demonstrated resolution of the L2-L3 epidural cystic mass and formation of a new epidural cystic mass at L3-L4 causing compression of the thecal sac. The patient subsequently underwent decompressive hemilaminectomy with cyst removal. We present a case of two lumbar synovial cysts, separated over time and a vertebral level and giving the appearance of a single, migratory cyst. This is the first case of an "occult migratory" synovial cyst with repeat MR imaging capturing spontaneous resolution of the initial cyst and formation of a hemorrhagic cyst one level below. We also present a summary of the 44 cases of hemorrhagic synovial cysts reported in the literature and propose a mechanism that may account for the hemorrhagic and migratory progression in some patients. PMID:26412895

  13. Developing electrical properties of postnatal mouse lumbar motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Jacques; Filipchuk, Anton; Pambo-Pambo, Arnaud; Amendola, Julien; Borisovna Kulagina, Iryna; Guéritaud, Jean-Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We studied the rapid changes in electrical properties of lumbar motoneurons between postnatal days 3 and 9 just before mice weight-bear and walk. The input conductance and rheobase significantly increased up to P8. A negative correlation exists between the input resistance (Rin) and rheobase. Both parameters are significantly correlated with the total dendritic surface area of motoneurons, the largest motoneurons having the lowest Rin and the highest rheobase. We classified the motoneurons into three groups according to their discharge firing patterns during current pulse injection (transient, delayed onset, sustained). The delayed onset firing type has the highest rheobase and the fastest action potential (AP) whereas the transient firing group has the lowest rheobase and the less mature AP. We found 32 and 10% of motoneurons with a transient firing at P3–P5 and P8, respectively. About 20% of motoneurons with delayed onset firing were detected at P8. At P9, all motoneurons exhibit a sustained firing. We defined five groups of motoneurons according to their discharge firing patterns in response to ascending and descending current ramps. In addition to the four classical types, we defined a fifth type called transient for the quasi-absence of discharge during the descending phase of the ramp. This transient type represents about 40% between P3–P5 and tends to disappear with age. Types 1 and 2 (linear and clockwise hysteresis) are the most preponderant at P6–P7. Types 3 and 4 (prolonged sustained and counter clockwise hysteresis) emerge at P8–P9. The emergence of types 3 and 4 probably depends on the maturation of L type calcium channels in the dendrites of motoneurons. No correlation was found between groups defined by step or triangular ramp of currents with the exception of transient firing patterns. Our data support the idea that a switch in the electrical properties of lumbar motoneurons might exist in the second postnatal week of life in mice. PMID:26388736

  14. The effects of needle deformation during lumbar puncture

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Hasan Hüseyin; Demir, Caner F.; Varol, Sefer; Arslan, Demet; Y?ld?z, Mustafa; Akil, E?ref

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to assess deformation of the tip and deflection from the axis of 22-gauge Quincke needles when they are used for diagnostic lumbar puncture (LP). Thus, it can be determined whether constructional alterations of needles are important for predicting clinical problems after diagnostic LP. Materials and Methods: The 22-gauge Quincke needles used for diagnostic LP were evaluated. A specially designed protractor was used for measurement and evaluation. Waist circumference was measured in each patient. Patients were questioned about headaches occurring after LP. Results: A total of 115 Quincke-type spinal needles used in 113 patients were evaluated. No deflection was detected in 38 (33.1%) of the needles. Deflection between 0.1° and 5° occurred in 43 (37.3%) of the needles and deflection ? 5.1° occurred in 34 patients (29.6%). Forty-seven (41.5%) patients experienced post lumbar puncture headache (PLPH) and 13 (11.5%) patients experienced intracranial hypotension (IH). No statistically significant correlation between the degree of deflection and headache was found (P > 0.05). Epidural blood patch was performed for three patients. Deformity in the form of bending like a hook occurred in seven needles and IH occurred in six patients using these needles. Two of the needles used in three patients requiring blood patch were found to be bent. Conclusion: Deformation of needles may increase complications after LP. Needle deformation may lead to IH. In case of deterioration in the structure of the needle, termination of the puncture procedure and the use of a new needle could reduce undesirable clinical consequences, especially IH. PMID:25883480

  15. Feasibility of using interstitial ultrasound for intradiscal thermal therapy: a study in human cadaver lumbar discs.

    PubMed

    Nau, William H; Diederich, Chris J; Shu, Richard

    2005-06-21

    Application of heat in the spine using resistive wire heating devices is currently being used clinically for minimally invasive treatment of discogenic low back pain. In this study, interstitial ultrasound was evaluated for the potential to heat intradiscal tissue more precisely by directing energy towards the posterior annular wall while avoiding vertebral bodies. Two single-element directional applicator design configurations were tested: a 1.5 mm OD direct-coupled (DC) applicator which can be implanted directly within the disc, and a catheter-cooled (CC) applicator which is inserted in a 2.4 mm OD catheter with integrated water cooling and implanted within the disc. The transducers were sectored to produce 90 degrees spatial heating patterns for directional control. Both applicator configurations were evaluated in four human cadaver lumbar disc motion segments. Two heating protocols were employed in this study in which the temperature measured 5 mm away from the applicator was controlled to either T=52 degrees C, or T>70 degrees C for the treatment period. These temperatures (thermal doses) are representative of those required for thermal necrosis of in-growing nociceptor nerve fibres and disc cellularity alone, or with coagulation and restructuring of annular collagen in the high-temperature case. Steady-state temperature maps, and thermal doses (t43) were used to assess the thermal treatments. Results from these studies demonstrated the capability of controlling temperature distributions within selected regions of the disc and annular wall using interstitial ultrasound, with minimal vertebral end-plate heating. While directional heating was demonstrated with both applicator designs, the CC configuration had greater directional heating capabilities and offered better temperature control than the DC configuration, particularly during the high-temperature protocol. Further, ultrasound energy was capable of penetrating within the highly attenuating disc tissue to produce more extensive radial thermal penetration, lower maximum intradiscal temperature, and shorter treatment times than can be achieved with current clinical intradiscal heating technology. Thus, interstitial ultrasound offers potential as a more precise and faster heating modality for the clinical management of low back pain. PMID:15930604

  16. Feasibility of using interstitial ultrasound for intradiscal thermal therapy: a study in human cadaver lumbar discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nau, William H.; Diederich, Chris J.; Shu, Richard

    2005-06-01

    Application of heat in the spine using resistive wire heating devices is currently being used clinically for minimally invasive treatment of discogenic low back pain. In this study, interstitial ultrasound was evaluated for the potential to heat intradiscal tissue more precisely by directing energy towards the posterior annular wall while avoiding vertebral bodies. Two single-element directional applicator design configurations were tested: a 1.5 mm OD direct-coupled (DC) applicator which can be implanted directly within the disc, and a catheter-cooled (CC) applicator which is inserted in a 2.4 mm OD catheter with integrated water cooling and implanted within the disc. The transducers were sectored to produce 90° spatial heating patterns for directional control. Both applicator configurations were evaluated in four human cadaver lumbar disc motion segments. Two heating protocols were employed in this study in which the temperature measured 5 mm away from the applicator was controlled to either T = 52 °C, or T > 70 °C for the treatment period. These temperatures (thermal doses) are representative of those required for thermal necrosis of in-growing nociceptor nerve fibres and disc cellularity alone, or with coagulation and restructuring of annular collagen in the high-temperature case. Steady-state temperature maps, and thermal doses (t43) were used to assess the thermal treatments. Results from these studies demonstrated the capability of controlling temperature distributions within selected regions of the disc and annular wall using interstitial ultrasound, with minimal vertebral end-plate heating. While directional heating was demonstrated with both applicator designs, the CC configuration had greater directional heating capabilities and offered better temperature control than the DC configuration, particularly during the high-temperature protocol. Further, ultrasound energy was capable of penetrating within the highly attenuating disc tissue to produce more extensive radial thermal penetration, lower maximum intradiscal temperature, and shorter treatment times than can be achieved with current clinical intradiscal heating technology. Thus, interstitial ultrasound offers potential as a more precise and faster heating modality for the clinical management of low back pain.

  17. Development and Validation of a Synthetic Lumbar Facet Joint and its Load Bearing Characteristics

    E-print Network

    Mar, Damon

    2011-12-31

    There is a substantial need in the spine research community for an anatomical and mechanically correct synthetic model of the human lumbar spine. This model could be used in nearly every aspect of spinal research including the design of implants...

  18. Criteria for prognostic evaluation of the results of lumbar sympathectomy: clinical, haemodynamic and angiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Pistolese, G R; Speziale, F; Taurino, M; Spartera, C; Faraglia, V

    1982-01-01

    Lumbar sympathectomy still has an important role in the surgical treatment of occlusive peripheral arterial diseases of the lower limbs located below the inguinal ligament, when the presence of peripheral lesions makes revascularization difficult. A consecutive series of 143 patients who underwent lumbar sympathectomy was considered, and the clinical, angiographic and haemodynamic findings evaluated. Haemodynamic studies on these patients showed a relation between the clinical improvement and the pressure index, measured at the ankle before lumbar sympathectomy. The patients with pressure index values above 0.5 had a symptomatic improvement whereas the patients with a pressure index below 0.3 gave less good results. It is therefore believed that lumbar sympathectomy showed not be considered a second operative choice but an elective operation, especially in patients affected by lesion of the superficial femoral artery, the popliteal artery and its branches, with pressure indices above 0.5 where revascularization is not possible. PMID:7130263

  19. The Relation Between Rotation Deformity and Nerve Root Stress in Lumbar Scoliosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Kang, Kyoung-Tak

    Even though several finite element models of lumbar spine were introduced, there has been no model including the neural structure. Therefore, the authors made the novel lumbar spine finite element model including neural structure. Using this model, we investigated the relation between the deformity pattern and nerve root stress. Two lumbar models with different types of curve pattern (lateral bending and lateral bending with rotation curve) were made. In the model of lateral bending curves without rotation, the principal compressive nerve root stress on the concave side was greater than the principal tensile stress on the convex side at the apex vertebra. Contrarily, in the lateral bending curve with rotational deformity, the nerve stress on the convex side was higher than that on the concave side. Therefore, this study elicit that deformity pattern could have significantly influence on the nerve root stress in the lumbar spine.

  20. Composite Features for Automatic Diagnosis of Intervertebral Disc Herniation from Lumbar MRI

    E-print Network

    Chaudhary, Vipin

    of the spinal column that provide body flexi- bility. Discs in the lumbar spine (lower-back) are composed the spinal canal due to Subarna Ghosh, Raja' S. Alomari and Vipin Chaudhary are affiliated to the Department

  1. Iatrogenic left common iliac artery and vein perforation during lumbar discectomy: a fatal case.

    PubMed

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Frati, Paola; Carbone, Iacopo; Pugnetti, Paola; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic vascular injury during lumbar disk surgery, although rare, is a serious complication, and when it does occur, can be sudden and life-threatening. The risk of injury to the pelvic vessels intra-operatively can be explained by the close proximity of the retroperitoneal vessels to the vertebral column therefore causing injury to the anterior longitudinal ligament, which can give access to the retroperitoneal space. If signs of circulatory instability are noted during lumbar disk surgery, early diagnosis of vascular injury and urgent transperitoneal surgery or emergency stenting can save the patient's life. Here, is presented the case of a 52-year-old man who underwent an elective lumbar discectomy for a rightward disk herniation in the L4-L5 intervertebral space and died 12h after the operation for a hemorrhagic shock due to a severe intra-abdominal hemorrhage following iatrogenic left common iliac artery and vein perforation during lumbar discectomy. PMID:25467198

  2. In vivo lumbar spine biomechanics : vertebral kinematics, intervertebral disc deformation, and disc loads

    E-print Network

    Wang, Shaobai

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of lumbar spine biomechanics in living human subjects is fundamental for understanding mechanisms of spinal injury and pathology, for improvement of corresponding clinical treatments, and for design of spinal ...

  3. The Influence of Lumbar Joint Mobilization on Joint Position Sense in Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wontae

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of lumbar joint mobilization on the joint position sense (JPS) of normal adults. [Subjects] A total of 30 normal adults were divided into an experimental group (n = 15) and a control group (n = 15). [Methods] The experimental group received lumbar joint mobilization and massage, and the control group received massage only. Both the experimental and control groups were evaluated for joint position error (JPE) by using a digital dual inclinometer before and after the experiment. [Results] In the before and after comparison for the experimental group, statistically significant differences were found in flexion, extension, left lateral flexion, and right lateral flexion. There was no statistically significant difference in the before and after comparison for the control group. [Conclusion] Because lumbar joint mobilization can reduce JPE and improve JPS, its use in the treatment of patients with lumbar problems is recommended. PMID:25540513

  4. Efficacy of traditional treatment regimen on Kati Shoola with special reference to lumbar spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ediriweera, E. R. H. S. S.; Gunathilka, H. D. P.; Weerasinghe, K. D. C. M.; Kalawana, O. T. M. R. K. S. B.

    2013-01-01

    According to Ayurveda, Kati Shoola is a disease with pain in lumbar region. Lumbar spondylolisthesis, anterior displacement of a vertebra or the vertebral column in relation to the vertebrae below, is one of the common causes. Current case study was carried out at Ayurveda Teaching hospital, Borella, to evaluate the efficacy of a treatment regimen used by Sri Lankan traditional physician family “Weerasinghe.” A 59-year-old female with a 9-month history of lumbar spondylolisthesis was treated with this regimen. The patient had progressive pain in left lower back, right and left buttocks, and difficulty in bending forward over 5°. X-ray of lumbo sacral region indicated that patient was suffering from Grade 3 lumbar spondylolisthesis. She was treated for 65 days with four treatment packages consisting of 13 prepared medicines. The response to the treatment was recorded and therapeutic effects were evaluated through symptomatic relief. Clinical symptoms were significantly reduced and degree of anterior flexion increased from 5° to 90°. However, X-rays indicated that the patient was still suffering from Grade 3 lumbar spondylolisthesis. This regimen is effective in successfully treating Kati Shoola (lumbar spondylolisthesis) by helping to reduce the symptoms and improving the degree of anterior flexion. PMID:24049411

  5. Lumbar paraspinal electromyographic activity during trunk extension exercises on two types of exercise machines.

    PubMed

    Walsworth, M

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare lumbar paraspinal muscle activity during trunk extension exercises on two lumbar extension machines with different types of pelvic stabilization mechanisms. Thirteen healthy male (n = 9) and female (n = 4) volunteers aged 21-24 (22.6 +/- 1.4) were recruited in a university setting. Surface electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally from the L3-4 paraspinal region during trunk extension exercises performed on two different exercise machines. One machine, the MedX, has a complex pelvic stabilization mechanism. The other machine, the Cybex, has a relatively simple pelvic stabilization mechanism. There was no significant difference between lumbar paraspinal electromyographic activity during trunk extension on the MedX compared to the Cybex dynamic variable resistance trunk extension machine. These results suggest that a complex pelvic stabilization mechanism does not significantly enhance the level of activation of the lumbar paraspinal muscles during lumbar extension exercises. Thus, a less expensive trunk extension machine with a less sophisticated pelvic stabilization mechanism, such as the Cybex, can be used to train the lumbar paraspinal muscles. This is important to rehabilitation clinicians because these machines are often more readily available and easier for patients to use. Further research is warranted to determine the applicability of these findings to a patient population. PMID:15224814

  6. Intracranial hypotension as a complication of lumbar puncture prior to elective aneurysm clipping

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jian; Couldwell, William T.; Taussky, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lumbar dural defects are an uncommon but important cause of persistent intracranial hypotension in the neurosurgical population. We present a case of intracranial hypotension after elective craniotomy due to a lumbar puncture performed 3 weeks earlier. Case Description: A 55-year-old female underwent uneventful craniotomy for clipping of an unruptured left middle cerebral artery bifurcation aneurysm. Postoperatively, the patient showed a gaze deviation and failed to wake up. Computed tomography demonstrated significant postoperative pneumocephalus. Family members indicated that the patient underwent a lumbar puncture 3 weeks prior to surgery to rule out a subarachnoid hemorrhage. The excessive pneumocephalus was initially interpreted as a result of spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak, and the patient was placed in the Trendelenburg position. This positioning resulted in some improvement in her mental status, although she was unable to tolerate any subsequent elevation in the head of her bed. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis of her spinal axis did not demonstrate any evidence of cerebrospinal fluid leak, but a subsequent lumbar blood patch resulted in rapid and dramatic improvement in the patient's status. She was subsequently discharged after an uneventful hospital stay. Conclusion: Although uncommon, persistent intracranial hypotension caused by lumbar dural defects must be considered in patients who have recently undergone procedures that compromise the lumbar dura because prompt intervention can significantly improve the patient's condition. PMID:25324976

  7. Surgical approaches to posterior polar cataract: a review

    PubMed Central

    Vasavada, A R; Raj, S M; Vasavada, V; Shrivastav, S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of surgical methods used in the emulsification of posterior polar cataracts (PPCs) that have been devised to minimize the risk of posterior capsule rupture (PCR) and its consequences. A Pubmed and Medline search of relevant literature on PPC was done. Only articles relevant to the treatment of PPC were included. The posterior capsule in eyes with PPC are known to have an abnormal adhesion to the polar opacity or a pre-existing weakness of the capsule that predisposes the eye to PCR. To circumvent the consequences of cleaving the abnormal adhesion, a majority of the surgeons use the anterior approach through the limbus, whereas some advocate the posterior approach through the pars plana. Emulsifying the nucleus and cleaving the central opacity of the PPC off the posterior capsule without disrupting its integrity provides optimal surgical outcomes. To achieve this, various modifications have been applied by surgeons during different phases of surgery. The advantages, disadvantages, complications, and results of each method have been discussed. Phacoemulsification is the preferred technique for removing PPC. This review will provide methods to avoid and /or deal with intraocular surgical difficulties that can arise during emulsification. Employing these would result in least ocular morbidity and satisfactory visual outcomes for the patient. This is particularly relevant given the major advancements in technology and refinements in surgical techniques in phacoemulsification. PMID:22441026

  8. Surgical approaches to posterior polar cataract: a review.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, A R; Raj, S M; Vasavada, V; Shrivastav, S

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of surgical methods used in the emulsification of posterior polar cataracts (PPCs) that have been devised to minimize the risk of posterior capsule rupture (PCR) and its consequences. A Pubmed and Medline search of relevant literature on PPC was done. Only articles relevant to the treatment of PPC were included. The posterior capsule in eyes with PPC are known to have an abnormal adhesion to the polar opacity or a pre-existing weakness of the capsule that predisposes the eye to PCR. To circumvent the consequences of cleaving the abnormal adhesion, a majority of the surgeons use the anterior approach through the limbus, whereas some advocate the posterior approach through the pars plana. Emulsifying the nucleus and cleaving the central opacity of the PPC off the posterior capsule without disrupting its integrity provides optimal surgical outcomes. To achieve this, various modifications have been applied by surgeons during different phases of surgery. The advantages, disadvantages, complications, and results of each method have been discussed. Phacoemulsification is the preferred technique for removing PPC. This review will provide methods to avoid and /or deal with intraocular surgical difficulties that can arise during emulsification. Employing these would result in least ocular morbidity and satisfactory visual outcomes for the patient. This is particularly relevant given the major advancements in technology and refinements in surgical techniques in phacoemulsification. PMID:22441026

  9. Posterior sagittal approach in complicated Swenson's pull-through

    PubMed Central

    Sowande, O. A.; Adejuyigbe, O.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Swenson's pull-through is one of the standard operations for the treatment of children with Hirschsprung's disease. Complications arising from the operation are difficult to treat because of fibrosis in the pelvis. The posterior sagittal approach may be a safer alternative. Aims: The aim of this paper is to highlight our experience with the use of the posterior sagittal trans-sphincteric approach to treat unusual complications of Swenson's pull-through. Settings and Design: A retrospective study of four patients who had posterior sagittal repair of their complications of Swenson pull-through at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital, Ile Ife, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Four cases of Hirschsprung's disease that developed post-Swenson pull-through complications are presented. There were three males and one female. Their age ranged between 10 months and 15 years. The patients had rectovaginal fistula, rectourethral fistula, high trans-sphincteric fistula-in-ano and complete anastomotic disruption. Result: All the patients were successfully treated using the posterior sagittal approach. The approach was used twice in one patient without significant sequelae. The three patients were old enough to be assessed and had a Kelly score of 4-6 at follow-up. Conclusion: The posterior sagittal technique offers a safe approach to treat the complications of Swenson pull-through. PMID:20177480

  10. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  11. Posterior myocardial infarction: the dark side of the moon.

    PubMed

    van Gorselen, E O F; Verheugt, F W A; Meursing, B T J; Oude Ophuis, A J M

    2007-01-01

    The clinical presentation of posterior myocardial infarction is not always easy, not even for the cardiologist. In this article a 70-year-old woman who presented with chest pain is described. The electrocardiogram at presentation showed marked ST-segment depression in leads V(1) to V(5) and slight ST-segment depression in leads I and aVL. There was ST-segment elevation in the posterior leads V(7) to V(9). Elevation of specific cardiac enzymes confirmed the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. True posterior myocardial infarction is difficult to recognise because the leads of the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram are not a direct representation of the area involved. Only with indirect changes in the precordial leads as such the diagnosis can be suspected. This review will highlight the electrocardiographic fine-tuned diagnosis of posterior myocardial infarction by using the posterior leads V(7) to V(9) leading to easier and faster recognition with consequences for treatment and improved prognosis. (Neth Heart J 2007;15:16-21.). PMID:17612703

  12. MIS Fusion of the SI Joint: Does Prior Lumbar Spinal Fusion Affect Patient Outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Rudolf, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sacroiliac (SI) joint pain is a challenging condition to manage as it can mimic discogenic or radicular low back pain, and present as low back, hip, groin and/or buttock pain. Patients may present with a combination of lumbar spine and SI joint symptoms, further complicating the diagnosis and treatment algorithm [1-3]. SI joint pain after lumbar spinal fusion has been reported in the literature. Both clinical and biomechanical studies show the SI joint to be susceptible to increased motion and stress at the articular surface with up to 40-75% of patients developing significant SI joint degeneration after 5 years. In a recent case series study of 50 patients who underwent minimally invasive SI joint arthrodesis, 50% had undergone previous lumbar spinal fusion and 18% had symptomatic lumbar spine pathology treated conservatively [4]. The purpose of this study is to determine if history of previous lumbar fusion or lumbar pathology affects patient outcomes after MIS SI joint fusion surgery. Methods: We report on 40 patients with 24 month follow up treated with MIS SI joint fusion using a series of triangular porous plasma coated titanium implants (iFuse, SI-Bone, Inc. San Jose, CA). Outcomes using a numerical rating scale (NRS) for pain were obtained at 3-, 6-, 12- and 24 month follow up intervals. Additionally, patient satisfaction was collected at the latest follow up interval. Patients were separated into 3 cohorts: 1) underwent prior lumbar spine fusion (PF), 2) no history of previous lumbar spine fusion (NF), 3) no history of previous lumbar spine fusion with symptomatic lumbar spine pathology treated conservatively (LP). A repeated measures analysis of variance (rANOVA) was used to determine if the change in NRS pain scores differed across timepoints and subgroups. A decrease in NRS by 2 points was deemed clinically significant [5]. Results: Mean age was 54 (±13) years and varied slightly but not statistically between groups. All subgroups experienced a clinically and statistically significant reduction in pain at all time points (mean change >2 points, p<0.001). There was a statistically significant effect of cohort (p=0.045), with the NF cohort (no prior lumbar spinal fusion) having a somewhat greater decrease in pain (by approximately 1 point) compared to the other 2 groups (PF and LP).Patient reported satisfaction by cohort was: 89% (NF), 92% (PF) and 63% (LP).Overall satisfaction rate was 87%. Discussion and Conclusion: Patients with SI joint pain, regardless of prior lumbar spine fusion history, show significant improvement in pain after minimally invasive SI joint fusion. The presence of symptomatic lumbar spine pathology potentially confounds the treatment affect, as patients may not be able to discriminate between symptoms arising from the SI joint and the lumbar spine. These patients expressed a lower satisfaction with surgery. Patients without other confounding lumbar spine pathology and who have not undergone previous spine surgery tend to be younger and experience a greater reduction in pain. PMID:23730380

  13. Quantification of Posterior Globe Flattening: Methodology Development and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkins, Sarah B.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Berggren, Michael D.; Ebert, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Microgravity exposure affects visual acuity in a subset of astronauts and mechanisms may include structural changes in the posterior globe and orbit. Particularly, posterior globe flattening has been implicated in the eyes of several astronauts. This phenomenon is known to affect some terrestrial patient populations and has been shown to be associated with intracranial hypertension. It is commonly assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) or B-mode Ultrasound (US), without consistent objective criteria. NASA uses a semiquantitative scale of 0-3 as part of eye/orbit MRI and US analysis for occupational monitoring purposes. The goal of this study was ot initiate development of an objective quantification methodology to monitor small changes in posterior globe flattening.

  14. [Implantation of posterior chamber IOL after traumatic cataract extraction].

    PubMed

    Chen, G L

    1989-09-01

    Traumatic cataracts are often complicated with posterior capsule perforation and opacity to render implantation of posterior chamber IOL difficult. The authors operated on 62 cases using McIntyre's canula and Peyman's vitrophage with satisfactory results. The visual acuity was 0.5 or better in 66%, 0.7 or better in 45%, less than 0.1 in 3 patients because of vitreous opacity and corneal leucoma. In 2 cases associated with aniridia, the IOL was implanted into the capsule bag to obtain visual acuity of 1.2 and 1.0. In 4 patients with intraocular foreign body, the combined operation of foreign body and cataract extraction, vitrectomy, and posterior chamber IOL implantation was performed. PMID:2633900

  15. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Ozyurek, Hamit; Oguz, Gulben; Ozen, Seza; Akyuz, Canan; Karli Oguz, Kader; Anlar, Banu; Aysun, Sabiha

    2005-12-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is characterized clinically by headache, abnormalities of mental status and visual perception, and seizures. Despite its diverse causes, common precipitating factors are defined as abrupt elevations of blood pressure, renal decompensation, fluid retention, and immunosuppressive therapy. We report three children with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome presenting with generalized seizures and headache. The causes of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome were considered to be acute hypertension and immunosuppressive therapy in case 1 with systemic lupus erythematosus, chemotherapy (vincristine and/or actinomycin-D) and hyponatremia in case 2, and acute hypertension in case 3, admitted with a familial Mediterranean fever attack. In light of these cases, we review the literature for the etiology, clinical and laboratory findings, and pathogenetic mechanisms of the disease. PMID:16417849

  16. Endothelin: A novel peptide in the posterior pituitary system

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizawa, Toshihiro; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Shinmi, Osamu; Kimura, Sadao; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Masaki, Tomoh; Uchiyama, Yasuo ); Giaid, A.; Gibson, S.J.; Polak, J.M. )

    1990-01-26

    Endothelin (ET), originally characterized as a 21-residue vasoconstrictor peptide from endothelial cells, is present in the porcine spinal cord and may act as a neuropeptide. Endothelin-like immunoreactivity has now been demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclear neurons and their terminals in the posterior pituitary of the pig and the rat. The presence of ET in the porcine hypothalamus was confirmed by reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay. Moreover, in situ hybridization demonstrated ET messenger RNA in porcine paraventricular nuclear neurons. Endothelin-like immunoreactive products in the posterior pituitary of the rat were depleted by water deprivation, suggesting a release of ET under physiological conditions. These findings indicate that ET is synthesized in the posterior pituitary system and may be involved in neurosecretory functions.

  17. Quantification of Posterior Globe Flattening: Methodology Development and Validationc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkins, S. B.; Garcia, K. M.; Sargsyan, A. E.; Hamilton, D. R.; Berggren, M. D.; Antonsen, E.; Ebert, D.

    2011-01-01

    Microgravity exposure affects visual acuity in a subset of astronauts, and mechanisms may include structural changes in the posterior globe and orbit. Particularly, posterior globe flattening has been implicated in several astronauts. This phenomenon is known to affect some terrestrial patient populations, and has been shown to be associated with intracranial hypertension. It is commonly assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), or B-mode ultrasound (US), without consistent objective criteria. NASA uses a semi-quantitative scale of 0-3 as part of eye/orbit MRI and US analysis for occupational monitoring purposes. The goal of this study was to initiate development of an objective quantification methodology for posterior globe flattening.

  18. Spinal Posture of Thoracic and Lumbar Spine and Pelvic Tilt in Highly Trained Cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Muyor, José M.; López-Miñarro, Pedro A.; Alacid, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sagittal thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in elite and master cyclists when standing on the floor, and sitting on a bicycle at three different handlebar-hand positions. A total of 60 elite male cyclists (mean age: 22.95 ± 3.38 years) and 60 master male cyclists (mean age: 34.27 ± 3.05 years) were evaluated. The Spinal Mouse system was used to measure sagittal thoracic and lumbar curvature in standing on the floor and sitting positions on the bicycle at three different handlebar-hand positions (high, medium, and low). The mean values for thoracic and lumbar curvatures and pelvic tilt in the standing position on the floor were 48.17 ± 8.05°, -27.32 ± 7.23°, and 13.65 ± 5.54°, respectively, for elite cyclists and 47.02 ± 9.24°, -25.30 ± 6.29°, and 11.25 ± 5.17° for master cyclists. A high frequency of thoracic hyperkyphosis in the standing position was observed (58.3% in elite cyclists and 53.3% in master cyclists), whereas predominately neutral values were found in the lumbar spine (88.3% and 76.7% in elite and master cyclists, respectively). When sitting on the bicycle, the thoracic curve was at a lower angle in the three handlebar-hand positions with respect to the standing position on the floor in both groups (p < 0.01). The lumbar curve adopted a kyphotic posture. In conclusion, cyclists present a high percentage of thoracic hyperkyphotic postures in standing positions on the floor. However, thoracic hyperkyphosis is not directly related to positions adopted on the bicycle. Key points This study evaluated thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in elite and master cyclists while standing and sitting on the bicycle. Elite and master cyclists showed a high frequency of thoracic hyperkyphosis and neutral lumbar lordosis in standing. Cyclists adopted a significantly lower thoracic kyphosis on the bicycle at the three handlebar positions analysed (upper, middle and lower handlebars) than in standing posture. The lumbar spine showed a kyphotic posture. The high percentage of standing thoracic hyperkyphosis in both groups of cyclists may be related to factors other than the specific posture adopted while cycling. Lumbar kyphosis on the bicycle may not affect the sagittal configuration of the lumbar spine in standing. PMID:24149883

  19. Prophylactic inferior vena cava filter placement prior to lumbar surgery in morbidly obese patients: Two-case study and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preoperative “prophylactic” placement of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in morbidly obese patients (e.g., body mass index [BMI] >40 or BMI over 35 with hypertension/diabetes) undergoing multilevel decompressive lumbar laminectomies may reduce the risk of postoperative pulmonary embolism (PE), and death. Methods: Two patients, ages 69 and 68, with morbid obesity (BMI's of 40.4 and 37.5 both with hypertension and diabetes), received prophylactic IVC filters prior to L1–S1 laminectomies. Intraoperatively and postoperatively, both received alternating compression stocking prophylaxis, and received subcutaneous heparin 5000 U q12 h 48 h after surgery until discharge; none developed deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or PE, and both filters were uneventfully removed within 3 postoperative months. Results: The spinal surgical literature largely supports the placement of IVC filters for major risk factors; obesity (BMI >40), a history of DVT/PE, cancer, fusions, hypercoagulation syndromes, pulmonary/circulatory disorders, preoperative/postoperative immobility, staged procedures (five spinal levels), combined anterior-posterior surgery, iliocaval manipulation, age >80, and prolonged surgery (e.g., >261 min vs. >8 h). Although the safety and efficacy of prophylactic IVC filters for spine surgery in patients with morbidly obesity are well substantiated, those for bariatric patients are less clear. Conclusions: Prophylactic IVC filters were successfully placed/retrieved in 2 morbidly obese patients, ages 68 and 69, undergoing L1–S1 lumbar decompressions. Although the spine surgery literature documents the safety/efficacy of prophylactic IVC filters in patients with morbid obesity, the bariatric literature still has major concerns. PMID:26605108

  20. A biomechanical comparison of repair techniques in posterior type II superior labral anterior and posterior (SLAP) lesions.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Chul; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Lee, Sang Hak; Lim, Hong Chul; Choi, Kui Won; Bae, Tae Soo; Lee, Chang Yang

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the 3 different fixation methods of posterior type superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) II lesion. Fifteen cadavers were randomly divided into 3 groups to compare the initial strength of 3 different fixation methods in posterior type II SLAP lesions. Group I used 1 anchor for 1-point fixation with a conventional simple suture; group II used 1 anchor passing both limbs through the posterior-superior labrum in a mattress fashion; and group III used 2 anchors for 2-point fixation with conventional simple sutures. Repair failure (2 mm permanent displacement of repaired site) and ultimate failure were measured. The mean load to (clinical) failure was 156 +/- 22 N in group I, 117 +/- 33 N in group II, and 161 +/- 44 N in group III. The mean load to ultimate failure was 198 +/- 6 N in group I, 189 +/- 23 N in group II, and 179 +/- 22 N in group III. The specimen stiffness was equivalent among groups. In mode of failure, clinical failure (more than 2 mm separations) first occurred between the markers on the biceps tendon just above (A) and below (B) compared to other markers, and ultimate failure occurred at the labral-implant interface. A single simple suture anchor repair in posterior type II SLAP seems sufficient to withstand the initial load without clinical failure. A mattress suture, although it anchors the biceps root, seems to be inferior than simple suture technique. PMID:18069010

  1. Morphologic study of posterior articular depression in Schatzker IV fractures.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qilin; Hu, Chengfang; Xu, Yafeng; Wang, Dan; Luo, Congfeng

    2015-02-01

    The Schatzker classification of tibial plateau fractures is widely accepted. Type IV fractures are medial tibial plateau fractures that are either split off as a wedge fragment or depressed and comminuted. Posterior articular surface depression in Schatzker type IV tibial plateau fractures can be seen as a unique variant that increases the difficulty of reduction of the articular surface. Its morphologic characteristics have not been fully studied, and the incidence is sometimes underestimated. The goal of this study was to evaluate the morphologic characteristics of posterior articular depression in Schatzker type IV fractures based on computed tomography measurements. From January 2009 to December 2011, the medical records, including digital radiologic data, of all patients treated for tibial plateau fracture at the authors' institution were retrospectively analyzed. Articular surface depression deeper than 5 mm was the criterion for study inclusion. The depression depth, precise location of the articular depression center, surface area percentage, and distance of the fracture gap to the depression center were calculated. One hundred fifteen cases of Schatzker type IV fracture were retrieved, and a total of 47.83% (55 of 115) cases had posterior articular surface depression. The average depth of the depressed articular surface was 12.41 mm, the surface area percentage was 20.15% of the entire tibial plateau, and the gap distance from the medial direction was 41.40 mm, 2.8 times longer than that from the posterior direction, which was 14.91 mm. Posterior articular surface depression occurs in nearly half of Schatzker type IV fractures, and the posterior approach provides more direct access to the depression than the medial approach. PMID:25665117

  2. INTRAOCULAR LENS IMPLANTATION IN PEDIATRIC EYES WITH POSTERIOR LENTIGLOBUS

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M. Edward; Trivedi, Rupal H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To report the outcome of intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in pediatric eyes with posterior lentiglobus. Methods Retrospective chart review of pediatric cataract surgery cases with primary IOL implantation. Results Of 553 eyes that received IOL implantation by the lead author, 364 eyes were identified as having been implanted with an IOL at the time of surgery for a nontraumatic cataract. Nineteen (5.2%) of 364 eyes were diagnosed with posterior lentiglobus. The average age at surgery was 5.8 ± 3.8 years (range, 0.6 to 13.9) years. All eyes had monocular cataract. Gender and ethnic distribution were as follows: male-female ratio, 12:7, and African American–Caucasian ratio, 4:15. A preexisting posterior capsule tear was noted at surgery in eight eyes, six of which presented with leukocoria from white cataracts. Site of IOL implantation was as follows: in-the-bag in 14 and sulcus in five, with optic capture into the anterior and posterior capsulotomy in four of those five. The average postoperative follow-up was 3.7 ± 3.0 years. Median postoperative visual acuity was 20/30, and postoperative strabismus was noted in five eyes. Secondary surgery was required in one eye for visual axis opacification and one eye for lysis of synechiae (diagnosed with postoperative spike in intraocular pressure). No other intraoperative or postoperative complications were observed. Conclusion Posterior lentiglobus causes a progressive unilateral cataract. Spontaneous rupture can result in leukocoria from a total white cataract. IOL implantation with posterior lentiglobus provided a satisfactory outcome in children. PMID:17471338

  3. Application of 3D Rapid Prototyping Technology in Posterior Corrective Surgery for Lenke 1 Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingyuan; Li, Chao; Li, Yanming; Zhao, Yingchuan; Wei, Xianzhao; Zhang, Guoyou; Fan, Jianping; Ni, Haijian; Chen, Ziqiang; Bai, Yushu; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A retrospective study to evaluate the effectiveness of 3-dimensional rapid prototyping (3DRP) technology in corrective surgery for Lenke 1 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. 3DRP technology has been widely used in medical field; however, no study has been performed on the effectiveness of 3DRP technology in corrective surgery for Lenke 1 AIS patients. Lenke 1 AIS patients who were preparing to undergo posterior corrective surgery from a single center between January 2010 and January 2012 were included in this analysis. Patients were divided into 2 groups. In group A, 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology was used to create subject-specific spine models in the preoperative planning process. Group B underwent posterior corrective surgery as usual (by free hand without image guidance). Perioperative and postoperative clinical outcomes were compared between 2 groups, including operation time, perioperative blood loss, transfusion volume, postoperative hemoglobin (Hb), postoperative complications, and length of hospital stay. Radiological outcomes were also compared, including the assessment of screw placement, postoperative Cobb angle, coronal balance, sagittal vertical axis, thoracic kyphosis, and lumbar lordosis. Subgroup was also performed according to the preoperative Cobb angle: mean Cobb angle <50° and mean Cobb angle >50°. Besides, economic evaluation was also compared between 2 groups. A total of 126 patients were included in this study (group A, 50 and group B, 76). Group A had significantly shorter operation time, significantly less blood loss and transfusion volume, and higher postoperative Hb (all, P?0.05). There was also no significant difference in misplacement of screws in total populations (16.90% vs 18.82%, P?=?0.305), whereas a low misplacement rate of pedicle screws was observed in patients whose mean Cobb angle was >50° (9.15% vs 13.03%, P?=?0.02). Besides, using 3DRP increased the economic burden of patients (157,000?±?9948.85?Ren Min Bi (RMB) vs 152,500?±?11,445.52?RMB, P?=?0.03). Using the 3D printing technology before posterior corrective surgery might reduce the operation time, perioperative blood loss, and transfusion volume. There did not appear to be a benefit to using this technology with respect to complication rate and postoperative radiological outcomes; however, 3D technology could reduce the misplacement rate in patients whose preoperative mean Cobb angle was >50°. Besides, it also increased the patients’ hospital cost. Therefore, future prospective studies are needed to elucidate the efficacy of this emerging technology. PMID:25715261

  4. Management of posterior reversible syndrome in preeclamptic women.

    PubMed

    Poma, S; Delmonte, M P; Gigliuto, C; Imberti, R; Delmonte, M; Arossa, A; Iotti, G A

    2014-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurological syndrome associated with a number of conditions including preeclampsia. It is characterized by seizures, alteration of consciousness, visual disturbances, and symmetric white matter abnormalities, typically in the posterior parietooccipital regions of the cerebral hemispheres, at computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MRI). We report three new cases of PRES in preeclamptic patients and describe the management of these patients. We present a brief review of other cases in the literature, with particular attention to the anesthetic management. PMID:25506009

  5. Management of Posterior Reversible Syndrome in Preeclamptic Women

    PubMed Central

    Poma, S.; Delmonte, M. P.; Gigliuto, C.; Imberti, R.; Delmonte, M.; Arossa, A.; Iotti, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurological syndrome associated with a number of conditions including preeclampsia. It is characterized by seizures, alteration of consciousness, visual disturbances, and symmetric white matter abnormalities, typically in the posterior parietooccipital regions of the cerebral hemispheres, at computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MRI). We report three new cases of PRES in preeclamptic patients and describe the management of these patients. We present a brief review of other cases in the literature, with particular attention to the anesthetic management. PMID:25506009

  6. Rare posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Sofia; Monteiro, Marta; Moreira, Bruno; França, Margarida

    2013-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an uncommon neurological disorder, characterised by the rapid onset of neurological deficits and characteristic neuroimaging findings—cerebral oedema with a typical preference for the posterior white matter. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman with an untreated HIV infection and hypertension with a PRES diagnosis and a rare involvement of the basal ganglia and brainstem, with microhemorrhages. HIV infection, particularly if untreated, is associated with an inflammatory status and therefore endothelial damage and dysfunction that might have an important role in predisposing acute hypertensive crisis and PRES. PMID:24252840

  7. Shock absorption in lumbar disc prosthesis: a preliminary mechanical study.

    PubMed

    LeHuec, J C; Kiaer, T; Friesem, T; Mathews, H; Liu, M; Eisermann, L

    2003-08-01

    Lumbar disc prostheses have been used in treating symptomatic degenerative disc diseases. A few prostheses of the ball-socket design are currently available for clinical use, the joint mechanism being materialized either with a hard polymer core or a metal-to-metal couple. Other prostheses of "shock absorber" design were not available at the time of the study. The objective of this work was to establish whether there was a difference in the shock absorption capacity between a device having an ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene center core and a device having a metal-on-metal bearing. Vibration and shock loading were applied to two lumbar total disc prostheses: PRODISC, manufactured by Spine Solutions, and MAVERICK Total Disc Replacement, manufactured by Medtronic Sofamor Danek. The shock absorption capacity of the device was evaluated by comparing the input and the output force measurements. The disc prosthesis was mounted onto a test apparatus. Each side of the device was equipped with a force sensor. The input shock load and the output resulting forces were simultaneously measured and recorded. The loading force pattern included 1). a static preload of 350 N plus an oscillating vibration of 100 N with frequency sweeping from 0 to 100 Hz and 2). a sudden shock load of 250 N applied over a 0.1-second interval. Both input and output signal data were processed and were transformed into their frequency spectrums. The vibration and shock transmissibility of the device, defined as the ratio of the output spectrum over the input spectrum, were calculated in sweeping the frequency from 0 to 100 Hz. The phase deviation was calculated to characterize the shock absorber effects. For both tested devices under vibration and shock loading, the phase angle displacement between the input and the output signals was 10 degrees. Under oscillating vibration loading, both tested devices had a transmission ratio higher than 99.8%. Over the frequency interval 1-100 Hz, the difference in transmission ratio between the two devices was <0.3%. Under sudden shock loading, both tested devices had a transmission ratio higher than 98%. The difference between the two devices was <0.8%. Both tested devices have identical vibration and shock transmissibility. PMID:12902950

  8. Analysis of adjacent segment reoperation after lumbar total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Scott; Blumenthal, Scott L.; Zigler, Jack E.; Guyer, Richard D.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusion has long been used for treating chronic back pain unresponsive to nonoperative care. However, potential development of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation is a concern. Total disc replacement (TDR) has been proposed as a method for addressing back pain and preventing or reducing adjacent segment degeneration. The purpose of the study was to determine the reoperation rate at the segment adjacent to a level implanted with a lumbar TDR and to analyze the pre-TDR condition of the adjacent segment. Methods This study was based on a retrospective review of charts and radiographs from a consecutive series of 1000 TDR patients to identify those who underwent reoperation because of adjacent segment degeneration. Some of the patients were part of randomized studies comparing TDR with fusion. Adjacent segment reoperation data were also collected from 67 patients who were randomized to fusion in those studies. The condition of the adjacent segment before the index surgery was compared with its condition before reoperation based on radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography. Results Of the 1000 TDR patients, 20 (2.0%) underwent reoperation. The mean length of time from arthroplasty to reoperation was 28.3 months (range, 0.5–85 months). Of the adjacent segments evaluated on preoperative MRI, 38.8% were normal, 38.8% were moderately diseased, and 22.2% were classified as having severe degeneration. None of these levels had a different grading at the time of reoperation compared with the pre-TDR MRI study. Reoperation for adjacent segment degeneration was performed in 4.5% of the fusion patients. Conclusions The 2.0% rate of adjacent segment degeneration resulting in reoperation in this study is similar to the 2.0% to 2.8% range in other studies and lower than the published rates of 7% to 18% after lumbar fusion. By carefully assessing the presence of pre-existing degenerative changes before performing arthroplasty, this rate may be reduced even more. PMID:25694883

  9. Relationships between joint motion and facet joint capsule strain during cat and human lumbar spinal motions

    PubMed Central

    Ianuzzi, Allyson; Pickar, Joel G; Khalsa, Partap S

    2011-01-01

    Objective The lumbar facet joint capsule (FJC) is innervated with mechanically sensitive neurons and is thought to contribute to proprioception and pain. Biomechanical investigations of the FJC have commonly used human cadaveric spines, while combined biomechanical and neurophysiological studies have typically used non-human animal models. The purpose of this study was develop mathematical relationships describing vertebral kinematics and facet joint capsule strain in cat and human lumbar spine specimens during physiological spinal motions in order to facilitate future efforts at understanding the mechanosensory role of the FJC. Methods Cat lumbar spine specimens were tested during extension, flexion and lateral bending. Joint kinematics and FJC principal strain were measured optically. FJC strain-intervertebral angle (IVA) regression relationships were established for the three most caudal lumbar joints using cat (current study) and human (prior study) data. FJC strain-IVA relationships were utilized to estimate cat and human spine kinematics that corresponded to published sensory neuron response thresholds for low threshold mechanoreceptors (5% and 10%). Results Significant linear relationships between IVA and strain were observed for both human and cat during motions that produced tension in the FJCs (p<0.01). During motions that produced tension in the FJCs, the models predicted that FJC strain magnitudes corresponding to published sensory neuron response thresholds would be produced by IVA magnitudes within the physiological range of lumbar motion. Conclusions Data from the current study support the proprioceptive role of lumbar spine FJC and low threshold mechanoreceptive afferents, and can be utilized in interpreting combined neurophysiological and biomechanical studies of cat lumbar spines. PMID:21875516

  10. Occupational risk factors for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation; a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, A; Bolm-Audorff, U; Siol, T; Henkel, N; Fuchs, C; Schug, H; Leheta, F; Marquardt, G; Schmitt, E; Ulrich, P; Beck, W; Missalla, A; Elsner, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: Previous studies mostly did not separate between symptomatic disc herniation combined with osteochondrosis/spondylosis of the lumbar spine and symptomatic disc herniation in radiographically normal intervertebral spaces. This may at least in part explain the differences in the observed risk patterns. Aims: To investigate the possible aetiological relevance of physical and psychosocial workload to lumbar disc herniation with and without concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. Methods: A total of 267 cases with acute lumbar disc herniation (in two practices and four clinics) and 197 control subjects were studied. Data were gathered in a structured personal interview and analysed using logistic regression to control for age, region, nationality, and diseases affecting the lumbar spine. Cases without knowledge about osteochondrosis/spondylosis (n=42) were excluded from analysis. Risk factors were examined separately for those cases with (n=131) and without (n=94) radiographically diagnosed concomitant osteochondrosis or spondylosis. Results: There was a statistically significant positive association between extreme forward bending and lumbar disc herniation with, as well as without concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. There was a statistically significant relation between cumulative exposure to weight lifting or carrying and