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Sample records for posterior lumbar interbody

  1. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    DiPaola, Christian P; Molinari, Robert W

    2008-03-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) create intervertebral fusion by means of a posterior approach. Both techniques are useful in managing degenerative disk disease, severe instability, spondylolisthesis, deformity, and pseudarthrosis. Successful results have been reported with allograft, various cages (for interbody support), autograft, and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2. Interbody fusion techniques may facilitate reduction and enhance fusion. The rationale for PLIF and TLIF is biomechanically sound. However, clinical outcomes of different anterior and posterior spinal fusion techniques tend to be similar. PLIF has a high complication rate (dural tear, 5.4% to 10%; neurologic injury, 9% to 16%). These findings, coupled with the versatility of TLIF throughout the entire lumbar spine, may make TLIF the ideal choice for an all-posterior interbody fusion. PMID:18316711

  2. A Comparative Study of Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander P.; Sama, Andrew A.; Girardi, Federico P.; Lebl, Darren R.; Cammisa, Frank P.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Level 4 retrospective review. Purpose To compare the radiographic and clinical outcomes between posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) with posterior segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI) for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Both PLIF and LLIF have been performed for degenerative spondylolisthesis with good results, but no study has directly compared these two techniques so far. Methods The electronic medical and radiographic records of 78 matched patients were analyzed. In one group, 39 patients underwent PLIF with SSI at 41 levels (L3-4/L4-5), while in the other group, 39 patients underwent the LLIF procedure at 48 levels (L3-4/L4-5). Radiological outcomes such as restoration of disc height and neuroforaminal height, segmental lumbar lordosis, total lumbar lordosis, incidence of endplate fracture, and subsidence were measured. Perioperative parameters were also recorded in each group. Clinical outcome in both groups was assessed by the short form-12, Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale scores. The average follow-up period was 16.1 months in the LLIF group and 21 months in the PLIF group. Results The restoration of disc height, foraminal height, and segmental lumbar lordosis was significantly better in the LLIF group (p<0.001). The duration of the operation was similar in both groups, but the average blood loss was significantly lower in the LLIF group (p<0.001). However, clinical outcome scores were similar in both groups. Conclusions Safe, effective interbody fusion can be achieved at multiple levels with neuromonitoring by the lateral approach. LLIF is a viable treatment option in patients with new onset symptoms due to degenerative spondylolisthesis who have had previous lumbar spine surgery, and it results in improved sagittal alignment and indirect foraminal decompression. PMID:26435782

  3. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with facet-screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Stonecipher, T; Wright, S

    1989-04-01

    The optimal surgical construct for lumbar fusion remains controversial. The posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) operation offers advantages including total nuclear disc excision, restoration of disc-space height, root decompression, limited muscle retraction and injury, and solid mechanical arthrodesis. Major disadvantages have included graft displacement, neurologic injury and nonunion. The use of posterior fixation as an adjunct to PLIF reduces the probability of these complications and increases the chances of fusion. This study examines 35 patients who underwent PLIF and facet-screw fixation. Indications for surgery included disabling low-back pain with discographic/MRI-demonstrated disc derrangement, recurrent disc herniation, and failed inter-transverse process fusions. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 18 months. There were no patients with significant neurologic injury or functional root loss. One patient developed graft displacement and failure of fixation (laminar fracture in markedly obese patient). Three patients had subcutaneous hematomas (no surgical treatment required). None of the cases required blood replacement. The authors have concluded that the addition of facet fixation/fusion to the PLIF operation substantially reduces the complication rate of the procedure. PMID:2718053

  4. Biomechanical comparison of supplemental posterior fixations for two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Tang, Shu-Jie; McGrady, Linda M; Rao, Raj D

    2013-03-01

    Posterior instrumentations have been used to supplement anterior lumbar interbody fusion with cages. Biomechanical studies on single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion show that stand-alone cages supplemented with posterior translaminar facet or transfacet screw fixation exhibit comparable stability to those supplemented with pedicle screw/rod fixation, while stability of multilevel anterior lumbar interbody fusion remains mostly unknown. The objectives of this study are to compare the stabilization of three supplemental posterior fixations to two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion, including translaminar facet fixation, transfacet screw fixation, and pedicle screw/rod fixation. Flexibility tests were conducted on fresh-frozen calf spines with moment up to 8.5 N m in flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Each specimen was tested at three stages: intact, anterior lumbar interbody fusion using Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) interbody cage at L3-L4 and L4-L5, and the same anterior lumbar interbody fusion plus one of the three supplemental posterior fixations. The addition of the supplemental posterior fixation increased stiffness at the fusion levels significantly in flexion (9.9 times), extension (5.4 times), and lateral bending (4.1 times). The pedicle screw/rod and translaminar screw fixations provide approximately 40% higher stiffness than the transfacet screw in lateral bending. The pedicle screw/rod fixation also displayed a trend of superior fixation in extension. Supplemental posterior fixation significantly improved stability of two-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion when compared to the stand-alone cages. Pedicle screw/rod system is still the "gold standard" in providing supplemental stability. However, both translaminar facet screws and transfacet screws are good alternatives to provide adequate fixation. PMID:23662340

  5. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using rhBMP-2.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Hans Jörg; Schnöring, Mark; Hohaus, Christian; Minkus, Yvonne; Beier, Andre; Ganey, Timothy; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2008-12-01

    The use of biological technologies for the treatment of degenerative spinal diseases has undergone rapid clinical and scientific development. BMP strategies have gained wide support for an inherent potential to improve the ossification process. It has been extensively studied in combination with various techniques for spinal stabilisation from both anterior and posterior approach. We studied the fusion process after implantation of rhBMP-2 in 17 patients with degenerative lumbar spine diseases in combination with dorsal fixation with pedicle screws and poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) interbody cages. We used 12 mg rhBMP-2 carried by collagen sponge, 6 mg in every cage. Patient follow up consisted of pre-operative radiographic and clinical evaluation. Similar post-operative evaluations were performed at 3 and 6 months. Clinical assessment demonstrated clear improvement in all patients despite evidence of vertebral endplate osteoclastic activity in the 3-month radiographs. The 6-month radiograph, however, confirmed evidence of fusion, and no untoward results or outcomes were noted. While previous studies have shown exclusively positive results in both fusion rates and process, our study demonstrated an intermediate morphology at 3 months during the ossification process using Induct Os in combination with peek-cages using a PLIF-technique. The transient resorption of bone surrounding the peek cage did not result in subsidence, pain or complication, and fusion was reached in all cases within a 6-month-controlled evaluation. Although there was no negative influence on clinical outcome, the potential for osteoclastic or metabolic resorption bears watching during the post-surgical follow up. PMID:18839225

  6. Treatment of Surgical Site Infection in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Su; Chang, Byung Kwon; Lee, Jae Il

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective observational and case control study. Purpose To identify appropriate treatment options according to the types of surgical site infections (SSI) in instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Overview of Literature There has been no agreement or consensus with regard to this matter. Methods Thirty-two consecutive SSIs were included and followed for more than one year. The elapsed time to diagnosis (ETD) according to the type of SSI was analyzed. The treatment options for each type and consequent clinical results were reviewed. The risk factors of removing the implants were analyzed. Results There were 6/32 (19%) superficial incisional, 6/32 (19%) deep incisional, and 20/32 (62%) organ/space infection cases (SII, DII, and O/SI, respectively) (p=0.002). ETD was 8.5±2.3 days in SII, 8.7±2.3 days in DII, and 164.5±131.1 days in O/SI (p=0.013). All cases of SII and DII retained implants and were treated by repeated irrigation and secondary closure. Among O/SIs, 10/20 were treated conservatively. Nine out of ten underwent posterior one stage simultaneous revision (POSSR) and in one case, the cage was removed anteriorly. Those who had ETDs longer than 3 months showed a significant risk of implant removal (p=0.008, odds ratio [OR]=40.3). The Oswestry disability index (ODI) improved from 47.3% to 33.8% in SII, from 55.0% to 32.3% in DII, and from 53.4% to 42.1% in O/SI (p=0.002). There was no difference among the three groups (p=0.106); however, there was a partial correlation between ETD and final ODI (r=0.382, p=0.034). Conclusions Latent O/SI was the most common type of SSI in PLIF. In cases of SII and DII, early aggressive wound management and secondary closure was effective and implant removal was not necessary. In some cases of O/SI, implant removal was unavoidable. However, implant removal could be averted by an earlier diagnosis. POSSR was feasible and safe. Functional outcomes were improved; however, disability increased as ETD increased. PMID:26713114

  7. Perioperative complications of threaded cylindrical lumbar interbody fusion devices: anterior versus posterior approach.

    PubMed

    Scaduto, Anthony A; Gamradt, Seth C; Yu, Warren D; Huang, Jerry; Delamarter, Rick B; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2003-12-01

    Few data are available to evaluate approach-related differences in perioperative complications with lumbar interbody fusion devices. Complications occurring in the intraoperative and immediate postoperative period were identified and categorized for 31 consecutive posterior lumbar interbody fusions (PLIFs) and 88 consecutive anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIFs). In this study, all lumbar interbody fusions were conducted with threaded cylindrical devices as stand-alone internal fixation devices. Multivariate analysis was used to account for potential covariates and identify factors associated with an increased complication risk. Twenty-two percent of the patients had a perioperative complication. The relative risk of having a perioperative complication was 4.75 times higher for the PLIF group. All intraoperative complications occurred in the PLIF group. The relative risk of having a major postoperative complication was 6.8 times higher in the PLIF group than the ALIF group. Anterior approached patients tended to have visceral (ileus, 6%) and vascular (deep venous thrombosis, 2%) complications. In the posterior group, complications were neurologic and dura related (pseudomeningocele, 16%; epidural hematoma, 3%) and occurred most frequently in patients that had had previous posterior lumbar surgery (31% with major complication). PMID:14657745

  8. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  9. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  10. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion as a Salvage Technique for Pseudarthrosis following Posterior Lumbar Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin; Thayaparan, Ganesha K; Rao, Prashanth J

    2016-02-01

    Study Design?Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected observational data. Objective?To assess the safety and efficacy of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) as a salvage option for lumbar pseudarthrosis following failed posterior lumbar fusion surgery. Methods?From 2009 to 2013, patient outcome data was collected prospectively over 5 years from 327 patients undergoing ALIF performed by a single surgeon (R.J.M.) with 478 levels performed. Among these, there were 20 cases of failed prior posterior fusion that subsequently underwent ALIF. Visual analog score (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form 12-item health survey (SF-12) were measured pre- and postoperatively. The verification of fusion was determined by utilizing a fine-cut computed tomography scan at 12-month follow-up. Results?There was a significant difference between the preoperative (7.25??0.8) and postoperative (3.1??2.1) VAS scores (p?lumbar pseudarthrosis. Future multicenter registry studies and randomized controlled trials should be conducted to confirm the long-term benefit of ALIF as a salvage option for failed posterior lumbar fusion. PMID:26835197

  11. Comparison of posterior versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shujie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the influence of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) on adjacent segment degeneration. Methods: The study was carried out in the Traumatology and Orthopedics Laboratory, Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Medical School, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China, between December 2013 and November 2014. A normal, healthy finite element model of L3-5 was developed, a PLIF and a TLIF model were modified from the normal model, and interbody fusions were performed in the L4-5 segment. An 800 N compressive loading plus 10 Nm moments simulating flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were imposed on the L3 superior endplate. Intradiscal pressure and intersegmental rotation in L3-4 were investigated. Results: The values of intradiscal pressure and intersegmental rotation in the PLIF or TLIF model were higher than those in the normal, healthy model, but the values in the TLIF model were relatively lower than those in the PLIF model in all directions. Conclusion: Posterior lumbar interbody fusion has more adverse influence on the superior adjacent segment than TLIF. PMID:26219453

  12. Clinical and Radiological Results of Microsurgical Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Decompression without Posterior Instrumentation for Lateral Recess Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Şişman, Lokman; Türkmen, Faik; Efe, Duran; Pekince, Oğuzhan; Göncü, Recep Gani; Sever, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A single-center, retrospective patient review of clinical and radiological outcomes of microsurgical posterior lumbar interbody fusion and decompression, without posterior instrumentation, for the treatment of lateral recess stenosis. Purpose This study documented the clinical and radiological results of microsurgical posterior lumbar interbody fusion and decompression of the lateral recess using interbody cages without posterior instrumentation for the treatment of lateral recess stenosis. Overview of Literature Although microsurgery has some advantages, various complications have been reported following microsurgical decompression, including cage migration, pseudoarthrosis, neurologic deficits, and persistent pain. Methods A total of 34 patients (13 men, 21 women), with a mean age of 56.65±9.1 years (range, 40-77 years) confirmed spinal stability, and preoperative radiological findings of lateral recess stenosis, were included in the study. Interbody polyetheretherketone cages and auto grafts were used in all patients. Posterior instrumentation was not used because of limited resection of the posterior lumbar structures. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging were assessed and compared to images taken at the final follow-up. Functional recovery was also evaluated according to the Macnab criteria at the final follow-up. Results The average follow-up time was 35.05±8.65 months (range, 24-46 months). The clinical results, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, and duration of hospital stay were similar to previously published results; the fusion rate (85.2%) was decreased and the migration rate (5.8%) was increased, compared with prior reports. Conclusions Although microsurgery has some advantages, migration and pseudoarthrosis remain challenges to achieving adequate lumbar interbody fusion. PMID:26435789

  13. Complete cage migration/subsidence into the adjacent vertebral body after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Corniola, Marco V; Jägersberg, Max; Stienen, Martin N; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2015-03-01

    A variety of implant-related short and long-term complications after lumbar fusion surgery are recognized. Mid to long-term complications due to cage migration and/or cage subsidence are less frequently reported. Here, we report a patient with a complete cage migration into the superior adjacent vertebral body almost 20 years after the initial posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure. In this patient, the cage migration/subsidence was clinically silent, but a selective decompression for adjacent segment degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis was performed. We discuss the risk factors for cage migration/subsidence in view of the current literature. PMID:25455736

  14. Comparison of the Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization System and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Shan, Jian-Lin; Liu, Xiu-Mei; Li, Fang; Guan, Kai; Sun, Tian-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been few studies comparing the clinical and radiographic outcomes between the Dynesys dynamic stabilization system and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The objective of this study is to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of Dynesys and PLIF for lumbar degenerative disease. Methods Of 96 patients with lumbar degenerative disease included in this retrospectively analysis, 46 were treated with the Dynesys system and 50 underwent PLIF from July 2008 to March 2011. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated. We also evaluated the occurrence of radiographic and symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). Results The mean follow-up time in the Dynesys group was 53.6 ± 5.3 months, while that in the PLIF group was 55.2 ± 6.8 months. At the final follow-up, the Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale score were significantly improved in both groups. The range of motion (ROM) of stabilized segments in Dynesys group decreased from 7.1 ± 2.2° to 4.9 ± 2.2° (P < 0.05), while that of in PLIF group decreased from 7.3 ± 2.3° to 0° (P < 0.05). The ROM of the upper segments increased significantly in both groups at the final follow-up, the ROM was higher in the PLIF group. There were significantly more radiographic ASDs in the PLIF group than in the Dynesys group. The incidence of complications was comparable between groups. Conclusions Both Dynesys and PLIF can improve the clinical outcomes for lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to PLIF, Dynesys stabilization partially preserves the ROM of the stabilized segments, limits hypermobility in the upper adjacent segment, and may prevent the occurrence of ASD. PMID:26824851

  15. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion as a Salvage Technique for Pseudarthrosis following Posterior Lumbar Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mobbs, Ralph J.; Phan, Kevin; Thayaparan, Ganesha K.; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected observational data. Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) as a salvage option for lumbar pseudarthrosis following failed posterior lumbar fusion surgery. Methods From 2009 to 2013, patient outcome data was collected prospectively over 5 years from 327 patients undergoing ALIF performed by a single surgeon (R.J.M.) with 478 levels performed. Among these, there were 20 cases of failed prior posterior fusion that subsequently underwent ALIF. Visual analog score (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form 12-item health survey (SF-12) were measured pre- and postoperatively. The verification of fusion was determined by utilizing a fine-cut computed tomography scan at 12-month follow-up. Results There was a significant difference between the preoperative (7.25 ± 0.8) and postoperative (3.1 ± 2.1) VAS scores (p < 0.0001). The ODI scale also demonstrated a statistically significant reduction from preoperative (56.3 ± 16.5) and postoperative (30.4 ± 19.3) scores (p < 0.0001). The SF-12 scores were significantly improved after ALIF salvage surgery: Physical Health Composite Score (32.18 ± 5.5 versus 41.07 ± 9.67, p = 0.0003) and Mental Health Composite Score (36.62 ± 12.25 versus 50.89 ± 10.86, p = 0.0001). Overall, 19 patients (95%) achieved successful fusion. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that the ALIF procedure results not only in radiographic improvements in bony fusion but in significant improvements in the patient's physical and mental experience of pain secondary to lumbar pseudarthrosis. Future multicenter registry studies and randomized controlled trials should be conducted to confirm the long-term benefit of ALIF as a salvage option for failed posterior lumbar fusion. PMID:26835197

  16. Intraoperative antepulsion of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion cage: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Davut; Yaldiz, Can; Asil, Kiyasettin; Kaçira, Tibet; Tatarli, Necati; Can, Aytaç

    2015-01-01

    Spinal fusion surgery techniques develop together with technologic advancements. New complications are seen as the result of new techniques and these may be very severe due to spinal cord and vascular structures in the lumbar region. The posterior lumbar interbody fusion cage (PLIFC) was shown to enhance spinal fusion and to prevent pseudoarthrosis due to its basic dynamic characteristics. PLIFC migrations are usually observed during the postoperative period, just after the mobilization of the patient and usually toward spinal canal. Migration to the retroperitoneal region is a extremely rare condition in the literature. In this article we discussed three cases of PLIFC antepulsion into the retroperitoneal region during the intraoperative period. PMID:26175832

  17. Vertebral osteolytic defect due to cellulose particles derived from gauze fibers after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shota; Mukai, Yoshihiro; Hosono, Noboru; Tateishi, Kosuke; Fuji, Takeshi

    2014-12-01

    Vertebral cystic lesions may be observed in pseudarthroses after lumbar fusion surgery. The authors report a rare case of pseudarthrosis after spinal fusion, accompanied by an expanding vertebral osteolytic defect induced by cellulose particles. A male patient originally presented at the age of 69 years with leg and low-back pain caused by a lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis. He underwent a posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and his neurological symptoms and pain resolved within a year but recurred 14 months after surgery. Radiological imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion on the inferior endplate of L-5 and the superior endplate of S-1, which rapidly enlarged into a vertebral osteolytic defect. The patient underwent revision surgery, and his low-back pain resolved. A histopathological examination demonstrated foreign body-type multinucleated giant cells, containing 10-?m particles, in the sample collected just below the defect. Micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that the foreign particles were cellulosic, presumably originating from cotton gauze fibers that had contaminated the interbody cages used during the initial surgery. Vertebral osteolytic defects that occur after interbody fusion are generally presumed to be the result of infection. This case suggests that some instances of vertebral osteolytic defects may be aseptically induced by foreign particles. Hence, this possibility should be carefully considered in such cases, to help prevent contamination of the morselized bone used for autologous grafts by foreign materials, such as gauze fibers. PMID:25259557

  18. Computational comparison of three posterior lumbar interbody fusion techniques by using porous titanium interbody cages with 50% porosity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Heng; Chung, Chi-Jen; Wang, Chih-Wei; Peng, Yao-Te; Chang, Chih-Han; Chen, Chih-Hsien; Chen, Yen-Nien; Li, Chun-Ting

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the biomechanical response of porous cages and lumbar spine segments immediately after surgery and after bone fusion, in addition to the long-term effects of various posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) techniques, by using the finite element method. Lumbar L3-L4 models based on three PLIF techniques (a single cage at the center of the intervertebral space, a single cage half-anterior to the intervertebral space, and two cages bilateral to the intervertebral space) with and without bone ingrowth were used to determine the biomechanical response of porous cages and lumbar segments instrumented with porous titanium cages (cage porosity=50%, pore diameter=1mm). The results indicated that bone fusion enhanced the stability of the lumbar segments with porous cages without any posterior instrumentation and reduced the peak von Mises stress in the cortical bones and porous cages. Two cages placed bilateral to the intervertebral space achieved the highest structural stability in the lumbar segment and lowest von Mises stress in the cages under both bone fusion conditions. Under identical loading (2-Nm), the range of motion in the single cage at the center of the intervertebral space with bone fusion decreased by 11% (from 1.18° to 1.05°) during flexion and by 66.5% (from 4.46° to 1.5°) during extension in the single cage half-anterior to the intervertebral space with bone fusion compared with no-fusion models. Thus, two porous titanium cages with 50% porosity can achieve high stability of a lumbar segment with PLIF. If only one cage is available, placing the cage half-anterior to the intervertebral space is recommended for managing degenerated lumbar segments. PMID:26874064

  19. Biomechanical Evaluation of a Novel Autogenous Bone Interbody Fusion Cage for Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in a Cadaveric Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Huang, Hai; Zhang, Zhenshan; Zhang, Zhi; Zhang, Liang; Li, Jian

    2014-02-27

    Study Design. A human cadaveric biomechanical study of a novel, prefabricated autogenous bone interbody fusion (ABIF) cage.Objective. To evaluate the biomechanical properties of the ABIF cage in a single-level construct with and without transpedicular screw and rod fixation.Summary of Background Data. In current practice, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is generally carried out using synthetic interbody spacers or corticocancellous iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) in combination with posterior instrumentation. However, questions remain concerning the use of synthetic intervertebral implants as well as the morbidity ICBG harvesting. Therefore, ABIF cage has been developed to obviate some of the challenges in conventional PLIF instrumentation and to facilitate the fusion process.Methods. Eighteen adult cadaveric lumbosacral (L3-S1) specimens were tested. Test conditions included single lumbosacral segments across (1) intact, (2) decompressed, (3) intervertebral cage alone, and (4) intervertebral cage with bilateral transpedicular fixation. Range of motion (ROM), neutral zone (NZ) and axial failure load were tested for each condition.Resluts. The ICBG, PEEK cage or ABIF cage alone exhibited a significantly lower (p<0.05) ROM and NZ compared to the decompressed spine. In comparison with the intact spine, all three test conditions without supplemental fixation was able to decrease ROM and NZ to near intact levels. When stabilized with pedicle screws, the ROM was significantly less and the NZ significantly lower (p<0.05) for each group both compared to the intact spine. In axial compression testing, the failure load of PEEK cage was the highest, with no significant difference between the ICBG and the ABIF cage.Conclusion. These data suggest the novel ABIF cage can bear the physiologic intervertebral peak load, similar to ICBG. When combined with pedicle screw and rod fixation, it exhibits similar biomechanical properties as the PEEK cage plus posterior instrumentation. Based on the biomechanical properties of ABIF cage, the prospect of these cages in clinical practice is expected. PMID:24583726

  20. Repeated migration of a fusion cage after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Gue; Lee, Sung Myung; Kim, Seok Won; Shin, Ho

    2013-03-01

    Although posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is a widely accepted procedure, perioperative and postoperative complications are still encountered. In particular, cage migration can result in severe sequelae, and revision surgery is technically demanded. Here, we report a rare case of repeated migration of a fusion cage after PLIF. To the best of our knowledge, no report has been previously issued on repeated migration of a fusion cage after PLIF. The authors discuss the radiological and clinical findings of this unusual complication with a review of the literature. PMID:24757453

  1. Large volume inside the cage leading incomplete interbody bone fusion and residual back pain after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Kamiya, Mitsuhiro; Wakao, Norimitsu; Hirasawa, Atsuhiko; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Osuka, Koji; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare intervertebral bone fusion and clinical outcomes in L4-5 posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using the same posterior instrumentation with four combinations of one of three types of interbody cage with one of two bone grafts, iliac and local or only local. In 67 patients who underwent L4-5 PLIF, 19 patients had the Brantigan cage and iliac and local bone graft, 18 with the TELAMON C cage and iliac and local bone graft, 16 with the TELAMON C cage and local bone graft (TL), and 14 with the OIC PEEK cage and local bone graft. Clinical assessments were based on Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores and on the visual analogue scale (VAS). The bone fusion assessments were based on radiography and CT scans according to the Brantigan, Steffee, and Fraser criteria. More than 2 years after surgery, these assessments were made. In the results, the fusion outcome for the group receiving TL was significantly less than those for the other three groups. In TL, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the inside volume of the cage of ?2.0 mL was the only significant factor for incomplete fusion. Moreover, the VAS (low back pain) score was significantly higher for TL than for the other three groups. In conclusions, we believe that the large volume inside the cage (?2.0 mL) with local bone graft may lead incomplete interbody bone fusion and residual postsurgical low back pain after PLIF. PMID:25666390

  2. Postoperative Flat Back: Contribution of Posterior Accessed Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Spinopelvic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Deok Ryeng; Kim, Joo Seung

    2014-01-01

    Objective Posterior accessed lumbar interbody fusion (PALIF) has a clear objective to restore disc height and spinal alignment but surgeons may occasionally face the converse situation and lose lumbar lordosis. We analyzed retrospective data for factors contributing to a postoperative flat back. Methods A total of 105 patients who underwent PALIF for spondylolisthesis and stenosis were enrolled. The patients were divided according to surgical type [posterior lumbar inter body fusion (PLIF) vs. unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF)], number of levels (single vs. multiple), and diagnosis (spondylolisthesis vs. stenosis). We measured perioperative index level lordosis, lumbar lordosis, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, pelvic incidence, and disc height in standing lateral radiographs. The change and variance in each parameter and comparative group were analyzed with the paired and Student t-test (p<0.05), correlation coefficient, and regression analysis. Results A significant perioperative reduction was observed in index-level lordosis following TLIF at the single level and in patients with spondylolisthesis (p=0.002, p=0.005). Pelvic tilt and sacral slope were significantly restored following PLIF multilevel surgery (p=0.009, p=0.003). Sacral slope variance was highly sensitive to perioperative variance of index level lordosis in high sacral sloped pelvis. Perioperative variance of index level lordosis was positively correlated with disc height variance (R2=0.286, p=0.0005). Conclusion Unilateral TLIF has the potential to cause postoperative flat back. PLIF is more reliable than unilateral TLIF to restore spinopelvic parameters following multilevel surgery and spondylolisthesis. A high sacral sloped pelvis is more vulnerable to PALIF in terms of a postoperative flat back. PMID:25371781

  3. Oblique Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Revision of Non-union Following Prior Posterior Surgery: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-11-01

    We report the case of a 75-year-old lady who presented with a L2-3 non-union 18 months following a L2-3 and L3-4 posterior decompression and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. Halo of the L2 pedicle screws on imaging was consistent with a non-union at the L2-3 level. An anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) approach was originally considered. However, due to the high lumbar approach and patient habitus [body mass index (BMI) > 35], a decision was made to approach the L2-3 level using an oblique technique. This involved dissection anterior to the psoas muscle to access the L2-3 disc space. The psoas, kidney and retroperitoneum were retracted using a Synframe for the oblique trajectory. Removal of the prior trans-foraminal lumbar interbody fusion cage was performed via the oblique approach and insertion of a revised implant. The operation was completed successfully with no perioperative complications noted. Length of stay was 3 days, with the patient achieving rapid pain relief. In the present report, we report the first case using an oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) approach for revision of a prior posterior fusion non-union at the L2,3 level. The OLIF technique is feasible for revision of a non-union of upper lumbar levels, with satisfactory fusion achieved with acceptable feasibility. PMID:26791588

  4. Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using Compressive Bone Graft with Allograft and Autograft in the Pyogenic Discitis

    PubMed Central

    An, Ki Chan; Kim, Tae Hyoung; Kim, Jin Suck; Park, Dae Hyoun; Kim, Jeon Gyo; Sung, Tae Woo

    2012-01-01

    Study Design This is a retrospective study. Purpose To evaluate the advantages and effects of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using allograft and posterior instrumentation in the lumbar pyogenic discitis, which are resistant to antibiotics. Overview of Literature To present preliminary results of PLIF using a compressive bone graft with allograft and pedicle screw fixation in the lumbar pyogenic discitis. Methods Fifteen patients who had lumbar pyogenic discitis were treated by posterior approach from May 2004 to July 2008. The mean follow-up duration was 27.2 18.68 months. The standing radiographs of the lumbar spine and clinical results were compared and analyzed in order to assess the bony union, the changes in the distance between the two vertebral bodies and the changes in the lordotic angle formed between the fused bodies immediately after surgery and at the final follow-up. Results Fifteen solid unions at an average of 15.2 3.5 weeks after operation. The mean preoperative lordotic angle of the affected segments was 14.3 15.1, compared to 20.3 12.3 after surgery and 19.8 15.2 at last follow-up. For the functional result according to the Kirkaldy-Willis criteria, the outcome was excellent in 9, good in 5, fair in 1, and there were no poor cases. The average visual analogue scale score was decreased from 7.4 before surgery to 3.4 at 2 weeks postoperative. Conclusions The main advantage in the procedure of PLIF using compressive bone graft with allograft and post instrumentation is early ambulation. We believe that this is another good procedure for patients with poor general condition because a further autograft bone harvest is not required. PMID:22439083

  5. Mini posterior lumbar interbody fusion with presacral screw stabilization in early lumbosacral instability

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Arjun; Kini, Abhishek R; Chacko, A; Sunil, Upadhyaya; Vinod, K; Geover, Lobo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical options for the management of early lumbosacral spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease with instability vary from open lumbar interbody fusion with transpedicular fixation to a variety of minimal access fusion and fixation procedures. We have used a combination of micro discectomy and axial lumbosacral interbody fusion with presacral screw fixation to treat symptomatic patients with lumbosacral spondylolisthesis or lumbosacral degenerative disc disease, which needed surgical stabilization. This study describes the above technique along with analysis of results. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients with symptomatic lumbosacral (L5-S1) instability and degenerative lumbosacral disc disease were treated by micro discectomy and interbody fusion using presacral screw stabilization. Patients with history of bowel, bladder dysfunction and local anorectal diseases were excluded from this study. Postoperatively all patients were evaluated neurologically and radiologically for screw position, fusion and stability. Oswestry disability index was used to evaluate results. Results: We had nine females and three males with a mean age of 47.33 years (range 26–68 years). Postoperative assessment revealed three patients to have screw placed in anterior 1/4th of the 1st sacral body, in rest nine the screws were placed in the posterior 3/4th of sacral body. At 2 years followup, eight patients (67%) showed evidence of bridging trabeculae at bone graft site and none of the patients showed evidence of instability or implant failure. Conclusion: Presacral screw fixation along with micro discectomy is an effective procedure to manage early symptomatic lumbosacral spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease with instability. PMID:26015626

  6. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, combined with instrumented posterolateral fusion: a study of 75 cases.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Kumar; Shah, Kalpesh; Wheelwright, Eugene F

    2008-04-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with cages can be combined with decompression of the spinal canal and with instrumented posterolateral fusion (IPLF) with pedicle screws, through a single posterior incision. The authors wanted to assess retrospectively the clinical and radiological outcome of PLIF + IPLF performed by the senior author. Between July 1997 and December 2003, 75 patients underwent PLIF with cages and IPLF with transpedicular instrumentation, for either degenerative disc disease, stenosis, spondylolisthesis or post-discectomy syndrome. The clinical outcome was evaluated according to the criteria of Kirkaldy-Willis. Flexion/extension radiographs and CT-scans were obtained in cases where there was any doubt about the fixation/fusion status. The mean age was 48.7 years (range: 30 to 75). The mean duration of follow-up was 29.17 months (range: 12 to 67). The clinical outcome was excellent or good in 85.3% of the patients. There were 4/75 patients (5.3%) who failed to return to their original occupation. Four posterolateral fusions were uncertain, but all anterior fusions succeeded: thus circumferential fusion was obtained in 71 out of 75 cases, or 94.6%. Three patients sustained a neurological complication, but only one was left with a partial drop foot. The results were comparable with similar studies. Therefore the authors recommend further use of PLIF + IPLF in painful lumbar degenerative spinal disease where conservative management has failed. PMID:18564483

  7. Extension CT scan: its suitability for assessing fusion after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroaki; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Ito, Keigo; Horie, Yumiko; Machino, Masaaki; Kanbara, Shunsuke; Morita, Daigo; Imagama, Shiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kato, Fumihiko

    2011-09-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is a popular procedure for treating lumbar canal stenosis with spinal instability, and several reports concerning fusion assessment methods exist. However, there are currently no definitive criteria for diagnosing a successful interbody fusion in the lumbar spine. We suggested evaluating fusion status using computed tomography (CT) in extension position to detect pseudoarthrosis more precisely. The purpose of this study was to evaluate its usefulness for determining bone union quality after PLIF. Eighty-one patients who underwent PLIF at 97 levels were retrospectively enrolled. The study population included 48 men and 33 women (mean age 58.9 years, range 21-85 years). Patients were followed up for more than 12 months after surgery. The mean follow-up period was 27.6 months (range 14-49 months). Fusion status was evaluated using three ways: flexion-extension radiographs, CT images in flexion and extension position. In the flexion-extension radiographs, mobility of more than 3, a remaining clear zone, or an uncertain bone connection constituted an incomplete union. For CT images, a remaining clear zone, a gas pattern, or an uncertain bone connection constituted an incomplete union. Flexion-extension radiographs demonstrated a solid fusion in 90.7% of the 97 levels at 10.7 months postoperatively. When fusion was demonstrated on flexion-extension radiographs, the rate of fusion affirmed by flexion CT and extension CT was 87.6 and 69.1% of the levels assessed, respectively. The rate of pseudoarthrosis detected on extension CT images was significantly higher than that on flexion-extension radiographs (P < 0.001) and flexion CT (P < 0.01). The rate of fusion achieved on extension CT was 85.6% at 15.1 months postoperatively. Extension CT could detect pseudoarthrosis more clearly than flexion-extension radiography and flexion CT. The CT images are influenced by body position and dilating anterior disc space in extension CT contributes to detect pseudoarthrodesis. Thus, extension CT was a useful method for assessing fusion status after PLIF. PMID:21380745

  8. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with instrumented postero-lateral fusion: 5-year results in 60 patients.

    PubMed

    Freeman, B J; Licina, P; Mehdian, S H

    2000-02-01

    The technique of posterior lumbar interbody fusion allows decompression of the spinal canal and interbody fusion through one posterior incision. A number of techniques exist to achieve additional posterior stability. The literature reports wide variation in outcomes for these different techniques. We assessed retrospectively the clinical and radiological outcome of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) supplemented with an instrumented postero-lateral fusion (IPLF) using a pedicle screw system. Between July 1987 and April 1997, 60 patients underwent PLIF + IPLF. Clinical outcome was measured with physical examination in the outpatient setting and a patient questionnaire (patient satisfaction, analgesic use, return to work, Oswestry Disability Index). Radiological outcome was assessed with serial radiographs. If doubt existed regarding fixation, flexion/extension radiographs and plain tomograms were performed. The mean age was 44 years (range 19-69 years). The average follow-up was 5.3 years (range 1-10 years). Eighty percent of patients returned sufficiently completed questionnaires; 83% of these patients rated their outcome as good or excellent. Fifty percent of patients were able to return to full-time employment. All patients showed radiographic evidence of stable fixation. Four patients sustained a neurological complication, three of which resolved completely. The combination of PLIF with IPLF demonstrates clinical success, a stable circumferential fixation and a low complication rate. PMID:10766076

  9. Lifestyle-Related Diseases Affect Surgical Outcomes after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-02-01

    Study Design?Retrospective study. Objective?Hyperlipidemia (HL) and hypertension (HT) lead to systemic atherosclerosis. Not only atherosclerosis but also bone fragility and/or low bone mineral density result from diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The purpose of this study was to examine whether these lifestyle-related diseases affected surgical outcomes after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Methods?The subjects comprised 122 consecutive patients who underwent single-level PLIF for degenerative lumbar spinal disorders. The clinical results were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score before surgery and at 2 years postoperatively. The fusion status was graded as union in situ, collapsed union, or nonunion at 2 years after surgery. The abdominal aorta calcification (AAC) score was assessed using preoperative lateral radiographs of the lumbar spine. Results?HL did not significantly affect the JOA score recovery rate. On the other hand, HT and CKD (stage 3 to 4) had a significant adverse effect on the recovery rate. The recovery rate was also lower in the DM group than in the non-DM group, but the difference was not significant. The AAC score was negatively correlated with the JOA score recovery rate. The fusion status was not significantly affected by HL, HT, DM, or CKD; however, the AAC score was significantly higher in the collapsed union and nonunion group than in the union in situ group. Conclusions?At 2 years after PLIF, the presence of HT, CKD, and AAC was associated with significantly worse clinical outcomes, and advanced AAC significantly affected fusion status. PMID:26835195

  10. Lifestyle-Related Diseases Affect Surgical Outcomes after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Retrospective study. Objective?Hyperlipidemia (HL) and hypertension (HT) lead to systemic atherosclerosis. Not only atherosclerosis but also bone fragility and/or low bone mineral density result from diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The purpose of this study was to examine whether these lifestyle-related diseases affected surgical outcomes after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Methods?The subjects comprised 122 consecutive patients who underwent single-level PLIF for degenerative lumbar spinal disorders. The clinical results were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score before surgery and at 2 years postoperatively. The fusion status was graded as union in situ, collapsed union, or nonunion at 2 years after surgery. The abdominal aorta calcification (AAC) score was assessed using preoperative lateral radiographs of the lumbar spine. Results?HL did not significantly affect the JOA score recovery rate. On the other hand, HT and CKD (stage 3 to 4) had a significant adverse effect on the recovery rate. The recovery rate was also lower in the DM group than in the non-DM group, but the difference was not significant. The AAC score was negatively correlated with the JOA score recovery rate. The fusion status was not significantly affected by HL, HT, DM, or CKD; however, the AAC score was significantly higher in the collapsed union and nonunion group than in the union in situ group. Conclusions?At 2 years after PLIF, the presence of HT, CKD, and AAC was associated with significantly worse clinical outcomes, and advanced AAC significantly affected fusion status. PMID:26835195

  11. Outcome of posterior lumbar interbody fusion for L4-L5 degenerative spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Kato, Satoshi; Kawahara, Norio; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) has become the standard in the treatment for degenerative spondylolisthesis since improvement of spinal instrumentation However, few published studies have reported long term outcomes of PLIF using a same surgical procedure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a long term outcome of PLIF using a same surgical procedure for L4-L5 degenerative spondylolisthesis. Materials and Methods: Out of 45 patients who underwent L4-L5 PLIF for degenerative spondylolisthesis between 1995 and 2003, 37 patients (16 males and 21 females) were evaluated in this study. Mean age was 61.8 years. The average followup period was 121 months. We evaluated % slip, lordosis at L4/L5, lumbar lordosis, Japanese Orthopedic Association's (JOA) score and adjacent segment degeneration. Results: The % slip significantly improved from an average of 17.0% before surgery to 9.7% at the last followup. Lordosis at L4/L5 averaged 3.6° before surgery, 8.2° after surgery and 6.9° at the last followup. Although patients experienced some loss of correction at last followup, their lordosis at L4/L5 at last followup still was significantly different from their lordosis at L4/L5 before surgery. Lumbar lordosis did not significantly change. Mean JOA score was 13.4 before surgery and 24.5 at the last followup; mean recovery ratio was 71.2%. Adjacent segment degeneration occurred in 40.5% of patients, almost all of which occurred in the cranial adjacent segment. Three patients (8.1%) required reoperation due to adjacent segment degeneration, at an average of 76 months after their initial surgery. Conclusions: With more than 10-year followup after L4-L5 PLIF for degenerative spondylolisthesis, the adjacent segment degeneration occurred in 40.5% and reoperation was required in 8.1%. PMID:26015627

  12. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2015-08-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report?We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the drainage tube. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately, and the patients recovered successfully, but they showed severe motor loss after awakening. The results of laboratory data, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, computed tomography, and echocardiography ruled out pulmonary embolism, hemorrhagic shock, and cardiogenic shock. Although the reasons for the postoperative shock were obscure, reoperation was performed to explore the cause of paralysis. At reoperation, a cerebrospinal fluid collection and the incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets through a small dural tear were observed. The incarcerated cauda equina rootlets were reduced, and the dural defect was closed. In both cases, the reoperation was uneventful. From the intraoperative findings at reoperation, it was thought that the pathology was neurogenic shock via the vasovagal reflex. Conclusion?Incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets following the accidental dural tear by suction drainage caused a sudden decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and traction of the cauda equina, which may have led to the vasovagal reflex. PMID:26225287

  13. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the drainage tube. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately, and the patients recovered successfully, but they showed severe motor loss after awakening. The results of laboratory data, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, computed tomography, and echocardiography ruled out pulmonary embolism, hemorrhagic shock, and cardiogenic shock. Although the reasons for the postoperative shock were obscure, reoperation was performed to explore the cause of paralysis. At reoperation, a cerebrospinal fluid collection and the incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets through a small dural tear were observed. The incarcerated cauda equina rootlets were reduced, and the dural defect was closed. In both cases, the reoperation was uneventful. From the intraoperative findings at reoperation, it was thought that the pathology was neurogenic shock via the vasovagal reflex. Conclusion Incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets following the accidental dural tear by suction drainage caused a sudden decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and traction of the cauda equina, which may have led to the vasovagal reflex. PMID:26225287

  14. Hybrid Biosynthetic Autograft Extender for Use in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Safety and Clinical Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chedid, Mokbel K; Tundo, Kelly M; Block, Jon E; Muir, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Autologous iliac crest bone graft is the preferred option for spinal fusion, but the morbidity associated with bone harvest and the need for graft augmentation in more demanding cases necessitates combining local bone with bone substitutes. The purpose of this study was to document the clinical effectiveness and safety of a novel hybrid biosynthetic scaffold material consisting of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, 75:25) combined by lyophilization with unmodified high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (10-12% wt:wt) as an extender for a broad range of spinal fusion procedures. We retrospectively evaluated all patients undergoing single- and multi-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion at an academic medical center over a 3-year period. A total of 108 patients underwent 109 procedures (245 individual vertebral levels). Patient-related outcomes included pain measured on a Visual Analog Scale. Radiographic outcomes were assessed at 6 weeks, 3-6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Radiographic fusion or progression of fusion was documented in 221 of 236 index levels (93.6%) at a mean (±SD) time to fusion of 10.2+4.1 months. Single and multi-level fusions were not associated with significantly different success rates. Mean pain scores (+SD) for all patients improved from 6.8+2.5 at baseline to 3.6+2.9 at approximately 12 months. Improvements in VAS were greatest in patients undergoing one- or two-level fusion, with patients undergoing multi-level fusion demonstrating lesser but still statistically significant improvements. Overall, stable fusion was observed in 64.8% of vertebral levels; partial fusion was demonstrated in 28.8% of vertebral levels. Only 15 of 236 levels (6.4%) were non-fused at final follow-up PMID:26161161

  15. A minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion using percutaneous long arm pedicle screw system for degenerative lumbar disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Er-Xing; Cui, Ji-Hao; Yin, Zhi-Xun; Li, Chuang; Tang, Cheng; He, Yi-Qian; Liu, Cheng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of patients with lumbar degeneration and instability treated with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation and minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion. Twenty-one patients were selected in our hospital from November, 2012 to March, 2013. The patients with an average age 55.62 years, including 8 vertebral spondylolisthesis, 4 lumbar intervertebral disc herniation, and 9 lumbar spinal canal stenosis cases. All the patients were managed to take the lumbar MRI and radiographs. The comparison of preoperative and postoperative (3 days, 2 weeks, 3 months) VAS and ODI score were analyzed. The results indicated that VAS scores were 7.14 0.79 before operation, and 5.19 0.81 in 3 days after operation, 4 0.84 after 2 weeks, and 2.67 0.66 after 3 months. The pain was relieved, and the postoperative VAS score was lower than that before treatment (P < 0.05). ODI score was 55.8 11.4 before operation, 47.38 9.38 after 3 days, 41.38 8.09 after 2 weeks, 35.76 4.50 after 3 months. ODI score was obviously decreased (P < 0.05). In conclusion, percutaneous pedicle screw fixation combined with minimally invasive interbody fusion is a safe, effective, feasible minimally invasive spine operation, with worthy for spreading. PMID:25550904

  16. Particular Features of Surgical Site Infection in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hak; Kim, Jin Woo; Kim, Go We

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous reports have observed differences only in infection rates between posterolateral fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). There have been no reports that describe the particular features of surgical site infection (SSI) in PLIF. In this study, we endeavor to identify the distinguishing characteristics and risk factors of SSI in PLIF. Methods Our study undertook a review of a case series of an institute. Patients who had undergone PLIF consecutively in the author's hospital were reviewed. Two proactive procedures were introduced during the study period. One was irrigation of the autolocal bone, and the other was the intradiscal space irrigation with a nozzle. Infection rate and risk factors were analyzed. For subgroup analysis, the elapsed time to a diagnosis (ETD), clinical manifestations, hematologic findings, and causative bacteria were examined in patients with SSI. Results In a total of 1,831 cases, there were 30 cases of SSI (1.6%). Long operation time was an independent risk factor (p = 0.008), and local bone irrigation was an independent protective factor (p = 0.001). Two cases of referred SSI were included in the subgroup analysis. There were 6/32 (19%) superficial incisional infections (SII), 6/32 (19%) deep incisional infections (DII), and 20/32 (62%) organ/space infections (O/SI). The difference of incidence among three groups was significant (p = 0.002).The most common bacteria encountered were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis followed by methicillin-resistant S. aureus in incisional infections, and no growth followed by S. epidermidis in O/SI. ETD was 8.5 ± 2.3 days in SII, 8.7 ± 2.3 days in DII and 164.5 ± 131.1 days in O/SI (p = 0.013). Conclusions The rate of SSI in PLIF was 1.6%, with the most common type being O/SI. The causative bacteria of O/SI was of lower virulence than in the incisional infection, and thus diagnosis was delayed due to its latent and insidious feature. Contamination of auto-local bone was presumed attributable to the progression of SSI. Irrigation of auto-local bone helped in the reduction of SSI. PMID:26330956

  17. Effect of soft tissue thickness over the posterior border of the vertebral body and disc space on cage placement during posterior lumbar interbody fusion: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae Hyuk; Kasat, Niraj Sharad; Whang, Jin Ho; Kim, Min Keun; Min, Kyueng-Whan; Hong, Jae Young; Modi, Hitesh N; Suh, Seung Woo

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether there is a difference between visual depth (VD) and radiological image depth (RD) of cages (i.e., structural interbody support devices) placed in disc spaces during posterior lumbar interbody fusion and whether soft tissues covering the posterior border of the vertebral body and associated disc space are the cause of any observed differences. Using digital calipers, cages were inserted at a depth of 5 mm from the soft tissues covering the posterior border of the vertebral body and disc space under direct vision; this depth was defined as VD. After insertion, RD was measured in triplicate. The reliability of RD measurements was evaluated using an intraclass coefficient test. To identify the cause of differences between VD and RD, the thicknesses of soft tissues were measured microscopically. A total of 40 lumbar intervertebral disc spaces with cages were evaluated. The mean RD of cages was 3.12 mm, while the mean difference between the VD and RD of cages (DVRD) was 1.91 mm. On histological examination, the mean thickness of the soft tissue was 2.02 mm. Comparative analysis between histological values and DVRD showed no statistical difference (P = 1.14, 1.55, 0.06). There was a significant difference between VD and RD during cage placement, and soft tissue structure appeared to be responsible for the DVRD of inserted cages. Therefore, cages should be inserted deeper to account for differences between visual and radiological image depths. PMID:22508190

  18. Comparison of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion in Monosegmental Vacuum Phenomenon within an Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    An, Ki-Chan; Kong, Gyu-Min; Park, Dae-Hyun; Youn, Ji-Hong; Lee, Woon-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose To compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of posterolateral lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in monosegmental vacuum phenomenon within an intervertebral disc. Overview of Literature The vacuum phenomenon within an intervertebral disc is a serious form of degenerative disease that destabilizes the intervertebral body. Outcomes of PLIF and PLF in monosegmental vacuum phenomenon are unclear. Methods Monosegmental instrumented PLIF and PLF was performed on 84 degenerative lumbar disease patients with monosegmental vacuum phenomenon (PLIF, n=38; PLF, n=46). Minimum follow-up was 24 months. Clinical outcomes of leg and back pain were assessed using visual analogue scales for leg pain (LVAS) and back pain (BVAS), and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). The radiographic outcome was the estimated bony union rate. Results LVAS, BVAS, and ODI improved in both groups. There was no significant difference in the degree of these improvements between PLIF and PLF patients (p>0.05). Radiological union rate was 91.1% in PLIF group and 89.4% in PLF group at postoperative 24 months (p>0.05). Conclusions No significant differences in clinical results and union rates were found between PLIF and PLF patients. Selection of the operation technique will reflect the surgeon's preferences and patient condition. PMID:26949464

  19. Postoperative Cyst Associated with Bone Morphogenetic Protein Use in Posterior and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Managed Conservatively: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mejía, Diana M; Drazin, Doniel; Anand, Neel

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein use in spinal surgery for off-label indications continues to remain popular. One area where its use has known associated radicular complications is posterior or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. These complications include radiculitis, cyst development, and heterotopic ossification, amongst others. Typically, cyst development has been treated surgically. We present two cases of bone morphogenetic protein-related cysts treated medically and thus, present medical treatment as an alternative treatment option. PMID:27014519

  20. Postoperative Cyst Associated with Bone Morphogenetic Protein Use in Posterior and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Managed Conservatively: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Baron, Eli M; Mejía, Diana M; Drazin, Doniel; Anand, Neel

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein use in spinal surgery for off-label indications continues to remain popular. One area where its use has known associated radicular complications is posterior or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. These complications include radiculitis, cyst development, and heterotopic ossification, amongst others. Typically, cyst development has been treated surgically. We present two cases of bone morphogenetic protein-related cysts treated medically and thus, present medical treatment as an alternative treatment option. PMID:27014519

  1. Single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis treated with mini-open anterior debridement and fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified anterior lumbar interbody fusion approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang; Li, Feng; Chen, Wenjian; Zeng, Heng; Chen, Anmin; Xiong, Wei

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation for single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis. METHODS This is a retrospective study. Twenty-two patients with single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis underwent mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) approach. Patients underwent follow-up for 24 to 38 months. Clinical data, etiological examinations, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grade, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) lumbar function score, visual analog scale (VAS) score, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), postoperative complications, and the bony fusion rate were recorded. RESULTS The mean operative time was 181.1 22.6 minutes (range 155-240 minutes). The mean intraoperative blood loss was 173.2 70.1 ml (range 100-400 ml). Infection was found in lumbar vertebrae L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 in 2, 6, and 14 patients, respectively. Bacterial cultures were positive in 15 patients, including 4 with Staphylococcus aureus, 6 with Staphylococcus epidermidis, 4 with Streptococcus, and 1 with Escherichia coli. Postoperative complications included urinary retention, constipation, and numbness in the thigh in 5, 3, and 2 patients, respectively. Compared with before surgery, the VAS scores and ODI were significantly lower at the final follow-up, the JOA scores were significantly higher, and the ASIA grades had improved. All patients achieved good intervertebral bony fusion. CONCLUSIONS Mini-open anterior debridement and lumbar interbody fusion in combination with posterior percutaneous fixation via a modified ALIF approach results in little surgical trauma and intraoperative blood loss, acceptable postoperative complications, and is effective and safe for the treatment of single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis. This approach could be an alternative to the conventional open surgery. PMID:26340382

  2. Demineralized Bone Matrix, as a Graft Enhancer of Auto-Local Bone in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sang Ho; Kim, Tae Woo; Boo, Kyung Hwan; Hong, Sung Won

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A case controlled study with prospective data collection. Purpose To evaluate the early influence and the final consequence of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) on auto-local bone as a graft enhancer in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Overview of Literature DBM is known as an osteoinductive material; however, it has not been clearly recognized to enhance auto-local bone with a small amount. Methods Patients who had a PLIF were allocated into two groups. Group I (70 cases) used auto-local bone chips and group II (44 cases) used DBM as an additive to auto-local bone, 1 mL per a segment. Group selection was alternated. Early assessment was performed by computed tomography at 6 months and final assessment was done by simple radiography after 24 months at least. The degree of bone formation was assessed by 4 grade scale. Results The subjects of both groups were homogenous and had similar Oswestry Disability Index at final assessment. The ratio of auto-local bone chips and DBM was 6:1. The degree of bone formation at 6 months after surgery was superior in group II. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups at the final assessment. Conclusions DBM was not recognized to enhance auto-local bone with small amount. PMID:24761193

  3. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion: Analogous procedures in decreasing the index of disability in patients with spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Alijani, Babak; Emamhadi, Mohamahreza; Behzadnia, Hamid; Aramnia, Ali; Chabok, Shahrokh Yousefzadeh; Ramtinfar, Sara; Leili, Ehsan Kazemnejad; Golmohamadi, Shabnam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the disability in patients with spondylolisthesis who assigned either to posterolateral fusion (PLF) or posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and to compare it between two groups. Methods: In a prospective observational study, 102 surgical candidates with low-grade degenerative and isthmic spondylolisthesis enrolled from 2012 to 2014, and randomly assigned into two groups: PLF and PLIF. Evaluation of disability has been done by a questionnaire using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). The questionnaire was completed by all patients before the surgery, the day after surgery, after 6 months and after 1-year. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in terms of age and sex distribution and pre-operation ODI between groups (P > 0.05). Comparison of the mean ODI scores of two groups over the whole study period showed no significant statistical difference (P = 0.074). ODIs also showed no significant differences between two groups the day after surgery, 6th months and 1-year after surgery (P = 0.385, P = 0.093, P = 0.122 and P = 433) respectively. Analyzing the course of ODI over the study period, showed a significant descending pattern for either of groups (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Both surgical fusion techniques (PLF and PLIF) were efficient to lessen the disability of patients with spondylolisthesis, and none of the fusion techniques were related to a better outcome in terms of disability. PMID:25767584

  4. The influence of cage positioning and cage type on cage migration and fusion rates in patients with monosegmental posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior fixation

    PubMed Central

    Abbushi, Alexander; Čabraja, Mario; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm; Woiciechowsky, Christian

    2009-01-01

    In posterior lumbar interbody fusion, cage migrations and lower fusion rates compared to autologous bone graft used in the anterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure are documented. Anatomical and biomechanical data have shown that the cage positioning and cage type seem to play an important role. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of cage positioning and cage type on cage migration and fusion. We created a grid system for the endplates to analyze different cage positions. To analyze the influence of the cage type, we compared “closed” box titanium cages with “open” box titanium cages. This study included 40 patients with 80 implanted cages. After pedicle screw fixation, 23 patients were treated with a “closed box” cage and 17 patients with an “open box” cage. The follow-up period averaged 25 months. Twenty cages (25%) showed a migration into one vertebral endplate of <3 mm and four cages (5%) showed a migration of ≥3 mm. Cage migration was highest in the medio-medial position (84.6%), followed by the postero-lateral (42.9%), and the postero-medial (16%) cage position. Closed box cages had a significantly higher migration rate than open box cages, but fusion rates did not differ. In conclusion, cage positioning and cage type influence cage migration. The medio-medial cage position showed the highest migration rate. Regarding the cage type, open box cages seem to be associated with lower migration rates compared to closed box cages. However, the cage type did not influence bone fusion. PMID:19475436

  5. Clinical outcomes of lumbar degenerative disc disease treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion allograft spacer: a prospective, multicenter trial with 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Paul M; Robbins, Stephen; Paullus, Wayne; Faust, Stephen; Holt, Richard; McGuire, Robert

    2009-07-01

    The clinical benefits and complications of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) have been studied over the past 60 years. In recent years, spine surgeons have had the option of treating low back pain caused by degenerative disc disease using PLIF with machined allograft spacers and posterior pedicle fixation. The purpose of this clinical series was to assess the clinical benefits of using a machined PLIF allograft spacer and posterior pedicle fixation to treat degenerative disc disease, both in terms of fusion rates and patient outcomes, and to compare these results with those in previous studies using autograft and metal interbody fusion devices. Results were also compared with results from studies using transverse process fusion. This prospective, nonrandomized clinical series was conducted at 10 US medical centers. Eighty-nine (55 male, 34 female) patients underwent PLIF with a presized, machined allograft spacer and posterior pedicle fixation between January 2000 and April 2003. Their outcomes were compared with outcomes in previous series described in the literature. All patients had experienced at least 6 months of low back pain that had been unresponsive to nonsurgical treatment. Physical examinations were performed before surgery, after surgery, and at 4 follow-up visits (6 weeks, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months). At each interval, we obtained radiographs and patient outcome measures, including SF-36 Bodily Pain Score, visual analog scale pain rating, and Oswestry Disability Index. The primary outcome was fusion results at 12 and 24 months; the secondary outcomes were pain, disability, function/quality of life, and satisfaction. One-level PLIFs were performed in 65 patients, and 2-level PLIFs in 24 patients. Flexion-extension radiographs at 12 and 24 months revealed a 98% fusion rate. Of the 72 patients who reached the 12-month follow-up, 86% reported decreased pain and disability as measured with the Oswestry Disability Index. Decreased pain as measured with the SF-36 Bodily Pain Score was reported by 74% of patients who reached the 12-month follow-up. The graft-related complication rate among all patients who underwent PLIF was 1.61%. When performed with machined allograft spacers and posterior pedicle fixation, PLIF is a safe and effective surgical treatment for low back pain caused by degenerative disc disease. The patients in this clinical series had outcomes equal or superior to the outcomes in previous series. PMID:19714280

  6. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Results of Posterolateral Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in the Treatment of L4 Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kuraishi, Shugo; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Shimizu, Masayuki; Ikegami, Shota; Futatsugi, Toshimasa; Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Hashidate, Hiroyuki; Tateiwa, Yutaka; Kinoshita, Hisatoshi; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Multicenter analysis of two groups of patients surgically treated for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Purpose To compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of posterolateral fusion (PLF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis is widely performed. However, few reports have compared the outcome of PLF to that of PLIF for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Methods Patients with L4 unstable spondylolisthesis with Meyerding grade II or more, slip of >10° or >4 mm upon maximum flexion and extension bending, and posterior opening of >5 degree upon flexion bending were studied. Patients were treated from January 2008 to January 2010. Patients who underwent PLF (n=12) and PLIF (n=19) were followed-up for >2 years. Radiographic findings and clinical outcomes evaluated by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score were compared between the two groups. Radiographic evaluation included slip angle, translation, slip angle and translation during maximum flexion and extension bending, intervertebral disc height, lumbar lordotic angle, and fusion rate. Results JOA scores of the PLF group before surgery and at final follow-up were 12.3±4.8 and 24.1±3.7, respectively; those of the PLIF group were 14.7±4.8 and 24.2±7.8, respectively, with no significant difference between the two groups. Correction of slip estimated from postoperative slip angle, translation, and maintenance of intervertebral disc height in the PLIF group was significantly (p<0.05) better than those in the PLF group. However, there was no significant difference in lumbar lordotic angle, slip angle and translation angle upon maximum flexion, or extension bending. Fusion rates of the PLIF and PLF groups had no significant difference. Conclusions The L4–L5 level posterior instrumented fusion for unstable spondylolisthesis using both PLF and PLIF could ameliorate clinical symptoms when local stability is achieved. PMID:26949470

  7. Effects of Lordotic Angle of a Cage on Sagittal Alignment and Clinical Outcome in One Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Ho; Lee, Dong-Oh; Lee, Jae Hyup; Shim, Hee Jong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the differences in the radiological and clinical results depending on the lordotic angles of the cage in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). We reviewed 185 segments which underwent PLIF using two different lordotic angles of 4 and 8 of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage. The segmental lordosis and total lumbar lordosis of the 4 and 8 cage groups were compared preoperatively, as well as on the first postoperative day, 6th and 12th months postoperatively. Clinical assessment was performed using the ODI and the VAS of low back pain. The pre- and immediate postoperative segmental lordosis angles were 12.9 and 12.6 in the 4 group and 12 and 12.0 in the 8 group. Both groups exhibited no significant different segmental lordosis angle and total lumbar lordosis over period and time. However, the total lumbar lordosis significantly increased from six months postoperatively compared with the immediate postoperative day in the 8 group. The ODI and the VAS in both groups had no differences. Cages with different lordotic angles of 4 and 8 showed insignificant results clinically and radiologically in short-level PLIF surgery. Clinical improvements and sagittal alignment recovery were significantly observed in both groups. PMID:25685795

  8. Effects of lordotic angle of a cage on sagittal alignment and clinical outcome in one level posterior lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Ho; Lee, Dong-Oh; Lee, Jae Hyup; Shim, Hee Jong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the differences in the radiological and clinical results depending on the lordotic angles of the cage in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). We reviewed 185 segments which underwent PLIF using two different lordotic angles of 4 and 8 of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage. The segmental lordosis and total lumbar lordosis of the 4 and 8 cage groups were compared preoperatively, as well as on the first postoperative day, 6th and 12th months postoperatively. Clinical assessment was performed using the ODI and the VAS of low back pain. The pre- and immediate postoperative segmental lordosis angles were 12.9 and 12.6 in the 4 group and 12 and 12.0 in the 8 group. Both groups exhibited no significant different segmental lordosis angle and total lumbar lordosis over period and time. However, the total lumbar lordosis significantly increased from six months postoperatively compared with the immediate postoperative day in the 8 group. The ODI and the VAS in both groups had no differences. Cages with different lordotic angles of 4 and 8 showed insignificant results clinically and radiologically in short-level PLIF surgery. Clinical improvements and sagittal alignment recovery were significantly observed in both groups. PMID:25685795

  9. [Laparoscopic anterior lumbar interbody spinal fusion].

    PubMed

    Beglaibter, Nahum; Zamir, Oded; Milgrum, Michael; Askenazi, Eli; Grinbaum, Ronit; Floman, Yzhar; Freund, Herbert

    2003-05-01

    The technique of Laparoscopic Anterior Lumbar Interbody Spinal Fusion (ALIF) has been developed in recent years for treating patients with spondylolisthesis, symptomatic degenerative disc disease and as salvage for failed posterior spinal fusion. The authors have performed 23 laparoscopic ALIF procedures with the close cooperation of spine and laparoscopic surgeons. This collaboration resulted in the successful laparoscopic completion of 87% of our cases. Postoperative length of stay was 2 days and patients required only minimal amounts of oral pain medications. Fourteen patients (70%) achieved excellent long term pain relief while 3 patients subsequently required an additional posterior fusion. There was only one major complication of bleeding from an ileac vein. Our results, similar to the results published by others, demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of laparoscopic ALIF. Further proof is still necessary to determine whether this procedure carries significant advantages vis-a-vis the open anterior or retroperitoneal approach. PMID:12803051

  10. Clinical and radiological outcome of anteriorposterior fusion versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for symptomatic disc degeneration: a retrospective comparative study of 133 patients

    PubMed Central

    Schwender, James D.; Safriel, Yair; Gilbert, Thomas J.; Mehbod, Amir A.; Denis, Francis; Transfeldt, Ensor E.; Wroblewski, Jill M.

    2009-01-01

    Abundant data are available for direct anterior/posterior spine fusion (APF) and some for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), but only few studies from one institution compares the two techniques. One-hundred and thirty-three patients were retrospectively analyzed, 68 having APF and 65 having TLIF. All patients had symptomatic disc degeneration of the lumbar spine. Only those with one or two-level surgeries were included. Clinical chart and radiologic reviews were done, fusion solidity assessed, and functional outcomes determined by pre- and postoperative SF-36 and postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and a satisfaction questionnaire. The minimum follow-up was 24 months. The mean operating room time and hospital length of stay were less in the TLIF group. The blood loss was slightly less in the TLIF group (409 vs. 480 cc.). Intra-operative complications were higher in the APF group, mostly due to vein lacerations in the anterior retroperitoneal approach. Postoperative complications were higher in the TLIF group due to graft material extruding against the nerve root or wound drainage. The pseudarthrosis rate was statistically equal (APF 17.6% and TLIF 23.1%) and was higher than most published reports. Significant improvements were noted in both groups for the SF-36 questionnaires. The mean ODI scores at follow-up were 33.5 for the APF and 39.5 for the TLIF group. The patient satisfaction rate was equal for the two groups. PMID:19125304

  11. Clinical and Radiological Comparison of Posterolateral Fusion and Posterior Interbody Fusion Techniques for Multilevel Lumbar Spinal Stabilization In Manual Workers

    PubMed Central

    Çakar, Albert; Hüseyinoğlu, Nergiz; Hüseyinoğlu, Urfettin; Çelik, Recep

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Eighty-four patients who had been treated for degenerative spinal diseases between January 2006 and June 2009 were reviewed retrospectively. Purpose We aimed to compare the clinical and radiologic findings of manual workers who underwent posterolateral fusion (PLF) or posterior interbody fusion (PLIF) involving fusion of 3 or more levels of the spine. Overview of Literature Previous studies have concluded that there is no significant difference between the clinical outcome of PLF and PLIF techniques. Methods After standard decompression, 42 patients underwent PLF and the other 42 patients underwent PLIF. Radiologic findings, Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores, and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were assessed preoperatively and at 6-month intervals postoperatively and return to work times/rates were assessed for 48 months. Results Patients who underwent PLF had significantly shorter surgical time and less blood loss. According to the 48-month clinical results, ODI and VAS scores were reduced significantly in the two groups, but the PLIF group showed better results than the PLF group at the last follow-up. Return to work rate was 63% in the PLF group and 87% in the PLIF group. Union rates were found to be 81% and 89%, respectively, after 24 months (p=0.154). Conclusions PLIF is a preferable technique with respect to stability and correction, but the result does not depend on only the fusion rates. Discectomy and fusion mass localization should be considered for achieving clinical success with the fusion technique. Before performing PLIF, the association of the long operative time and high blood loss with mortality and morbidity should be taken into consideration, particularly in the elderly and disabled patients. PMID:25346809

  12. A Comparative Radiographic Analysis of Fusion Rate between L4-5 and L5-S1 in a Single Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Hyun; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Jahng, Tae-Ahn

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate radiographic fusion rates at L4-5 and L5-S1 after single level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and evaluate the relationship between fusion rates and preoperative disc slope angle (DSA), lumbar lordosis (LL), segmental angle (SA), and pelvic parameters. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of patients who underwent single level PLIF at L4-5 or L5-S1 during May 2003-December 2012 at our institution. 73 patients were finally enrolled. Fusion was assessed by use of the Brantigan-Steffee classification, less than 2mm translation and less than 5 motion on the flexion-extension lateral radiographs. We analyzed the radiographic fusion rates, risk factors, and relationship of fusion rates with DSA, LL, SA, and pelvic parameters. Results There were 59 patients (80.8%) in the L4-5 group and 14 (19.2%) in L5-S1 (average follow-up, 34 months). The radiographic fusion rates were 89.8% in the L4-5 group (53/59) and 42.9% in L5-S1 (6/14) (p<0.001).The preoperative DSA was significantly lesser in the L4-5 group than in the L5-S1 group (13.18.1 vs. 27.26.7, p<0.001). The LL, SA, and pelvic parameters were not related with radiographic fusion rates in both groups. Risk factors for non-union were not identified between the two groups except for the surgery level (p<0.001). Conclusion The radiographic fusion rate at L5-S1 was less than half that at L4-5 after single level PLIF. This may be due to the anatomical and biomechanical differences between the two levels. More vigorous effort to achieve successful fusion at L5-S1 should be considered. PMID:26217384

  13. Mini-Open Anterior Retroperitoneal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Oblique Lateral Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Spinal Degeneration Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Toyone, Tomoaki; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Surgery for lumbar spinal degeneration disease is widely performed. While posterior decompression and fusion are popular, anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is also used for treatment. Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) is commonly used for noninvasive ALIF; however, several complications, such as spinal nerve and psoas muscle injury, have been reported. In the current study, we examined the clinical efficacy and complications of oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) for lumbar spinal degeneration disease. Materials and Methods Thirty-five patients with degenerated spondylolisthesis, discogenic pain, and kyphoscoliosis were examined. All patients underwent OLIF surgery (using a cage and bone graft from the iliac crest) with or without posterior decompression, without real-time electromyography monitoring. Posterior screws were used in all patients. Visual analog scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were evaluated before and 6 months after surgery. Surgical complications were also evaluated. Results Pain scores significantly improved after surgery, compared to those before surgery (p<0.05). There was no patient who underwent revision surgery. There was no spinal nerve, major vessel, peritoneal, or urinary injury. Few patients showed symptoms from psoas invasion. Conclusion OLIF surgery produced good surgical results without any major complication. PMID:26069130

  14. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Indications, Outcomes, and Complications.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian; Kim, David Hanwuk

    2016-02-01

    Lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a minimally invasive spinal fusion technique that uses the retroperitoneal approach to the anterior spinal column. Mechanical and technical results of the technique compare favorably with those of anterior lumbar interbody fusion in regard to large graft placement, graft volumes, and early initial stability. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion uses the transpsoas approach and traverses near the lumbar plexus. It is not, however, without its unique complications. Groin pain or numbness is well tolerated and often temporary; however, quadriceps palsy can be long-lasting and debilitating. Rarer but serious complications include vascular and visceral injury. Lateral lumbar interbody fusion has been used successfully to treat common degenerative spinal conditions such as spinal instability, stenosis, scoliosis, and degenerative disk disease. While understanding of the lumbar plexus and the technical challenges of the procedure improves, lateral lumbar interbody fusion will continue to provide safe and successful clinical outcomes with less morbidity than traditional procedures. PMID:26803545

  15. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumented posterolateral fusion in adult spondylolisthesis: description and association of clinico-surgical variables with prognosis in a series of 36 cases

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Moreta, Juan A.; Hernandez-Vicente, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background We present our experience in the treatment of patients with isthmic or degenerative spondylolisthesis, by means of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and instrumented posterolateral fusion (IPLF), and we compare them with those published in the literature. We analyse whether there exists any statistical association between the clinical characteristics of the patient, radiological characteristics of the disease and our surgical technique, with the complications and the clinical-radiological prognosis of the cases. Method We designed a prospective study. A total of 36 cases were operated. The patients included were 14 men and 22 women, with an average age of 57.17±27.32 years. Our technique consists of PLIF+IPLF, using local bone for the fusion. The clinical results were evaluated with the Visual Analogical Scale (VAS) and the Kirkaldy-Willis criteria. The radiological evaluation followed the Bratingan (PLIF) and Lenke (IPLF) methodology. A total of 42 variables were statistically analysed by means of SPSS18. We used the Paired Student's T-test, logistic regression and Pearson's Chi-square-test. Results The spondylolisthesis was isthmic in 15 cases and degenerative in 21 cases. The postoperative evaluations had excellent or good results in 94.5% (n = 34), with a statistically significant improvement in the back pain and sciatica (p < 0.01). The rate of circumferential fusion reached was approximately 92%. We had 13.88% of transitory morbility and 0% of mortality associated with our technique. A greater age, degree of listhesis or length of illness before the intervention, weakly correlated with worse clinical results (p< -0.2). In our series, the logistical regression showed that the clinical characteristics of the patient, radiological characteristics of the lesion and our surgical technique were not associated with greater postoperative complications. Conclusion Although a higher level of training is necessary, we believe that the described technique is a very effective decision in cases of spondylolisthesis, isthmic or degenerative, refractory to conservative treatment, for the obtaining the best clinical results and rates of fusion, with similar risks to those of the other published techniques. Our statistical analysis could contribute to improve outcomes after surgery. PMID:26196029

  16. Extreme lateral interbody fusion with posterior instrumentation for spondylodiscitis.

    PubMed

    Blizzard, Daniel J; Hills, Christopher P; Isaacs, Robert E; Brown, Christopher R

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate our initial experience utilizing extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF; NuVasive, San Diego, CA, USA) with percutaneous posterior instrumentation to treat 11 spondylodiscitis patients between January 2011 and February 2014. Although medical management is the first line treatment for spondylodiscitis, many patients fail antibiotic therapy and bracing, or present with instability, neurologic deficits, or sepsis, requiring operative debridement and stabilization. High rates of fusion and infection clearance have been reported with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), but this approach requires a morbid exposure, associated with non-trivial rates of vascular and peritoneal complications. XLIF is an increasingly popular interbody fusion technique which utilizes a fast and minimally invasive approach, sparing the anterior longitudinal ligament, and allowing sufficient visualization of the intervertebral discs and bodies to debride and place a large, lordotic cage. The outcome measures for this study included lumbar lordosis, sagittal balance, subsidence, fusion, pain, neurological deficit, and microbiology/laboratory evidence of infection. The mean follow-up time was 9.3 months. All patients had improvements in pain and neurological symptoms. The mean lordosis change was 11.0, from 23.1 preoperatively to 34.0 postoperatively. Fusion was confirmed with CT scans in five of six patients. At the last follow-up, all patients had normalization of inflammatory markers, no symptoms of infection, and none required repeat surgical treatment for spondylodiscitis. XLIF with percutaneous posterior instrumentation is a minimally invasive technique with reduced morbidity for lumbar spine fusion which affords adequate exposure to the vertebral bodies and discs to aggressively debride necrotic and infected tissue. This study suggests that XLIF may be a safe and effective alternative to ALIF for the treatment of spondylodiscitis. PMID:26138052

  17. Biomechanical analysis of an expandable lateral cage and a static transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion cage with posterior instrumentation in an in vitro spondylolisthesis model.

    PubMed

    Mantell, Matthew; Cyriac, Mathew; Haines, Colin M; Gudipally, Manasa; O'Brien, Joseph R

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Insufficient biomechanical data exist from comparisons of the stability of expandable lateral cages with that of static transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) cages. The purpose of this biomechanical study was to compare the relative rigidity of L4-5 expandable lateral interbody constructs with or without additive pedicle screw fixation with that of L4-5 static TLIF cages in a novel cadaveric spondylolisthesis model. METHODS Eight human cadaver spines were used in this study. A spondylolisthesis model was created at the L4-5 level by creating 2 injuries. First, in each cadaver, a nucleotomy from 2 channels through the anterior side was created. Second, the cartilage of the facet joint was burred down to create a gap of 4 mm. Light-emitting-diode tracking markers were placed at L-3, L-4, L-5, and S-1. Specimens were tested in the following scenarios: intact model, bilateral pedicle screws, expandable lateral 18-mm-wide cage (alone, with unilateral pedicle screws [UPSs], and with bilateral pedicle screws [BPSs]), expandable lateral 22-mm-wide cage (alone, with UPSs, and with BPSs), and TLIF (alone, with UPSs, and with BPSs). Four of the spines were tested with the expandable lateral cages (18-mm cage followed by the 22-mm cage), and 4 of the spines were tested with the TLIF construct. All these constructs were tested in flexion-extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. RESULTS The TLIF-alone construct was significantly less stable than the 18- and 22-mm-wide lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) constructs and the TLIF constructs with either UPSs or BPSs. The LLIF constructs alone were significantly less stable than the TLIF construct with BPSs. However, there was no significant difference between the 18-mm LLIF construct with UPSs and the TLIF construct with BPSs in any of the loading modes. CONCLUSIONS Expandable lateral cages with UPSs provide stability equivalent to that of a TLIF construct with BPSs in a degenerative spondylolisthesis model. PMID:26384133

  18. Transdural retrieval of a retropulsed lumbar interbody cage: Technical case report

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Hasan Aqdas; Shah, Ashish; Kakarla, Udaya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case report was to describe a novel method to retrieve a herniated lumbar interbody cage. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is an increasingly popular method of spinal fixation and fusion. Unexpected retropulsion of an interbody is a rare event that can result in intractable pain or motor compromise necessitating surgical retrieval of the interbody. Both anterior and posterior approaches to removing migrated cages may be associated with significant surgical morbidity and mortality. A 60-year-old woman underwent an L4-S1 TLIF coupled with pedicle screw fixation at a previous hospital 5 years prior to admission. She noted sudden-onset bilateral lower extremity weakness and right-sided foot drop. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographs were notable for purely centrally herniated interbody. A posterior, midline transdural approach was used to retrieve the interbody. Situated in between nerve rootlets to the ventral canal, this virgin corridor allowed us to easily visualize and protect neurological structures while safely retrieving the interbody. The patient experienced an immediate improvement in symptoms and was discharged on postoperative day 3. At 12-month follow-up, she had no evidence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and had returned to normal activities of daily living. While the risk of CSF leak may be higher with a transdural approach, we maintain that avoiding unnecessary retraction of the nerve roots may outweigh this risk. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a transdural approach for the retrieval of a retropulsed lumbar interbody cage. PMID:26889290

  19. Biomechanical Characteristics of an Integrated Lumbar Interbody Fusion Device

    PubMed Central

    Voronov, Leonard I.; Vastardis, Georgios; Zelenakova, Julia; Carandang, Gerard; Havey, Robert M.; Waldorff, Erik I.; Zindrick, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We hypothesized that an Integrated Lumbar Interbody Fusion Device (PILLAR SA, Orthofix, Lewisville, TX) will function biomechanically similar to a traditional anterior interbody spacer (PILLAR AL, Orthofix, Lewisville, TX) plus posterior instrumentation (FIREBIRD, Orthofix, Lewisville, TX). Purpose of this study was to determine if an Integrated Interbody Fusion Device (PILLAR SA) can stabilize single motion segments as well as an anterior interbody spacer (PILLAR AL) + pedicle screw construct (FIREBIRD). Methods Eight cadaveric lumbar spines (age: 43.94.3 years) were used. Each specimen's range of motion was tested in flexion-extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR) under intact condition, after L4-L5 PILLAR SA with intervertebral screws and after L4-L5 360 fusion (PILLAR AL + Pedicle Screws and rods (FIREBIRD). Each specimen was tested in flexion (8Nm) and extension (6Nm) without preload (0 N) and under 400N of preload, in lateral bending (6 Nm) and axial rotation (5 Nm) without preload. Results Integrated fusion using the PILLAR SA device demonstrated statistically significant reductions in range of motion of the L4-L5 motion segment as compared to the intact condition for each test direction. PILLAR SA reduced ROM from 8.91.9 to 2.91.1 in FE with 400N follower preload (67.4%), 8.01.7 to 2.51.1 in LB, and 2.21.2 to 0.70.3 in AR. A comparison between the PILLAR SA integrated fusion device versus 360 fusion construct with spacer and bilateral pedicle screws was statistically significant in FE and LB. The 360 fusion yielded motion of 1.00.5 in FE, 1.00.8 in LB (p0.05). Conclusions The PILLAR SA resulted in motions of less than 3 in all modes of motion and was not as motion restricting as the traditional 360 using bilateral pedicle screws. The residual segmental motions compare very favorably with published biomechanical studies of other interbody integrated fusion devices. PMID:25694931

  20. Sequential Changes of Plasma C-Reactive Protein, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and White Blood Cell Count in Spine Surgery : Comparison between Lumbar Open Discectomy and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Man Kyu; Kim, Kee D; Ament, Jared D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often utilized to evaluate for postoperative infection. Abnormal values may be detected after surgery even in case of non-infection because of muscle injury, transfusion, which disturbed prompt perioperative management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the perioperative CRP, ESR, and white blood cell (WBC) counts after spine surgery, which was proved to be non-infection. Methods Twenty patients of lumbar open discectomy (LOD) and 20 patients of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) were enrolled in this study. Preoperative and postoperative prophylactic antibiotics were administered routinely for 7 days. Blood samples were obtained one day before surgery and postoperative day (POD) 1, POD3, and POD7. Using repeated measures ANOVA, changes in effect measures over time and between groups over time were assessed. All data analysis was conducted using SAS v.9.1. Results Changes in CRP, within treatment groups over time and between treatment groups over time were both statistically significant F(3,120)=5.05, p=0.003 and F(1,39)=7.46, p=0.01, respectively. Most dramatic changes were decreases in the LOD group on POD3 and POD7. Changes in ESR, within treatment groups over time and between treatment groups over time were also found to be statistically significant, F(3,120)=6.67, p=0.0003 and F(1,39)=3.99, p=0.01, respectively. Changes in WBC values also were be statistically significant within groups over time, F(3,120)=40.52, p<0.001, however, no significant difference was found in between groups WBC levels over time, F(1,39)=0.02, p=0.89. Conclusion We found that, dramatic decrease of CRP was detected on POD3 and POD7 in LOD group of non-infection and dramatic increase of ESR on POD3 and POD7 in PLIF group of non-infection. We also assumed that CRP would be more effective and sensitive parameter especially in LOD than PLIF for early detection of infectious complications. Awareness of the typical pattern of CRP, ESR, and WBC may help to evaluate the early postoperative course. PMID:25368764

  1. Surgical Results of Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using Calcium Phosphate Cement

    PubMed Central

    HIRASAWA, Motohiro; MURE, Hideo; TOI, Hiroyuki; NAGAHIRO, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and radiological outcomes of lumbar interbody fusion using artificial fusion cages filled with calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) were retrospectively reviewed. Between 2002 and 2011, 25 patients underwent lumbar interbody fusion at Tokushima University Hospital, and 22 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, 5 patients received autologous local bone grafts and 17 received CPC. Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was used for clinical outcome assessments. Lumbar radiography and computed tomography (CT) were performed at 12, 24 months and last follow-up period to assess bony fusion. The mean JOA score of all patients improved from 9.3 before surgery to 21.0 at 24 months after surgery. Fusion had occurred in 5 of 5 patients in the local bone graft group and in 16 of 17 patients in CPC group at 24 months postoperatively. No surgically related complication was occurred in both groups. CPC is a useful and safe graft material for lumbar interbody fusion. PMID:25169138

  2. Technical Note - Lateral Approach to the Lumbar Spine for the Removal of Interbody Cages.

    PubMed

    Moisi, Marc; Page, Jeni; Paulson, David; Oskouian, Rod J

    2015-05-01

    Revision surgery to address the migration or fracture of a lumbar interbody cage can be technically challenging.Scar tissue and fibrosis, among other anatomic barriers, can make removal of the cage a complicated procedure, potentially increasing postoperative pain as well as the probability of neurologic deficits.Use of the lateral surgical technique for removal of the cage can avoid these potential complications.In this case report, we describe the removal of interbody cages through a lateral approach in three patients without the necessity of additional posterior hardware revision. PMID:26180692

  3. Dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disease: a clinical and radiological outcomes-based meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Chi Heon; Park, Sung-Bae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Chung, Chun Kee; Kim, Hyun-Jib; Lee, Soo-Eon

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The Dynesys, a pedicle-based dynamic stabilization (PDS) system, was introduced to overcome the drawbacks of fusion procedures. Nevertheless, the theoretical advantages of PDS over fusion have not been clearly confirmed. The aim of this study was to compare clinical and radiological outcomes of patients who underwent PDS using the Dynesys system with those who underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). METHODS The authors searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Database. Studies that reported outcomes of patients who underwent PDS or PLIF for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disease were included. The primary efficacy end points were perioperative outcomes. The secondary efficacy end points were changes in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and back and leg pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores and in range of motion (ROM) at the treated and adjacent segments. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate weighted mean differences (WMDs), 95% confidence intervals, Q statistics, and I(2) values. Forest plots were constructed for each analysis group. RESULTS Of the 274 retrieved articles, 7 (which involved 506 participants [Dynesys, 250; PLIF, 256]) met the inclusion criteria. The Dynesys group showed a competitive advantage in mean surgery duration (20.73 minutes, 95% CI 8.76-32.70 minutes), blood loss (81.87 ml, 95% CI 45.11-118.63 ml), and length of hospital stay (1.32 days, 95% CI 0.23-2.41 days). Both the Dynesys and PLIF groups experienced improved ODI and VAS scores after 2 years of follow-up. Regarding the ODI and VAS scores, no statistically significant difference was noted according to surgical procedure (ODI: WMD 0.12, 95% CI -3.48 to 3.72; back pain VAS score: WMD -0.15; 95% CI -0.56 to 0.26; leg pain VAS score: WMD -0.07; 95% CI -0.47 to 0.32). The mean ROM at the adjacent segment increased in both groups, and there was no substantial difference between them (WMD 1.13; 95% CI -0.33 to 2.59). Although the United States is the biggest market for Dynesys, no eligible study from the United States was found, and 4 of 8 enrolled studies were performed in China. The results must be interpreted with caution because of publication bias. During Dynesys implantation, surgeons have to decide the length of the spacer and cord pretension. These values are debatable and can vary according to the surgeon's experience and the patient's condition. Differences between the surgical procedures were not considered in this study. CONCLUSIONS Fusion still remains the method of choice for advanced degeneration and gross instability. However, spinal degenerative disease with or without Grade I spondylolisthesis, particularly in patients who require a quicker recovery, will likely constitute the main indication for PDS using the Dynesys system. PMID:26721581

  4. Radiographic Comparison of Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion Versus Traditional Fusion Approaches: Analysis of Sagittal Contour Change

    PubMed Central

    Sembrano, Jonathan N.; Horazdovsky, Ryan D.; Santos, Edward Rainier G.; Polly, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lateral approach to lumbar fusion has been gaining popularity in recent years. With increasing awareness of the significance of sagittal balance restoration in spinal surgery, it is important to investigate the potential of this relatively new approach in correcting sagittal deformities in comparison to conventional approaches. The aim of this study was to evaluate sagittal contour changes seen in lateral lumbar interbody fusion and compare them with radiographic changes in traditional approaches to lumbar fusion. Methods Lumbar fusion procedures from January 2008 to December 2009 were reviewed. Four approaches were compared: anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF), transforaminal interbody fusion (TLIF) and posterior spinal fusion (PSF). Standing pre-operative and 6-week post-operative radiographs were measured in terms of operative level, suprajacent and subjacent level, and regional lumbar lordosis (L1-S1) as well as operative level anterior (ADH) and posterior disc heights (PDH). T-test was used to analyze differences between and within different approaches (α=0.05). Results A total of 147 patients underwent lumbar fusion at 212 levels. Mean operative level segmental lordosis change after each procedure is as follows: ALIF 3.8 ± 6.6° (p < 0.01); LLIF 3.2 ± 3.6° (p<0.01); TLIF 1.9 ± 3.9° (p<0.01); and PSF 0.7 ± 2.9° (p =0.13). Overall lumbar lordosis change after each procedure is as follows: ALIF 4.2 ± 5.8° (p < 0.01); LLIF 2.5 ± 4.1° (p<0.01); TLIF 2.1 ± 6.0 (p = 0.02); PSF -0.5 ± 6.2° (p = 0.66). There were no significant changes in the supradjcent and subjacent level lordosis in all approaches except in ALIF where a significant decrease in supradjecent level lordosis was seen. Mean ADH and PDH significantly increased for all approaches except in PSF where PDH decreased post-operatively. Conclusion LLIF has the ability to improve sagittal contour as well as other interbody approaches and is superior to posterioronly approach in disc height restoration. However, ALIF provides the greatest amount of segmental and overall lumbar lordosis correction. Level of Evidence This is a Level III study. Clinical Relevance Regional lordosis correction may be effectively achieved with LLIF. This approach is a good addition to a surgeon's armamentarium in maintenance or restoration of normal lumbar sagittal alignment. PMID:26114085

  5. The Memory Metal Spinal System in a Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF) Procedure: A Prospective, Non-Comparative Study to Evaluate the Safety and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kok, D; Grevitt, M; Wapstra, FH; Veldhuizen, AG

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: A prospective, non-comparative study of 27 patients to evaluate the safety and performance of the Memory Metal Spinal System used in a PLIF procedure in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD). Objective: To evaluate the clinical performance, radiological outcome and safety of the Memory Metal Spinal System, used in a PLIF procedure, in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease in human subjects. Summary of Background Data: Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylosis or degenerative disc disease, use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection devices. The Memory Metal Spinal System consists of a single square spinal rod made from a nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) used in conjunction with connection devices. Nitinol is characterized by its shape memory effect and is a more flexible material than either stainless steel or titanium. With current systems there is loss of achieved reposition due to the elastic properties of the spine. By using a memory metal in this new system the expectation was that this loss of reposition would be overcome due to the metals inherent shape memory properties. Furthermore, we expect a higher fusion rate because of the elastic properties of the memory metal. Methods: Twenty-seven subjects with primary diagnosis of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD) were treated with the Memory Metal Spinal System in conjunction with the Brantigan IF Cage in two consecutive years. Clinical performance of the device was evaluated over 2 years using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. Safety was studied by collection of adverse events intra-operative and during the followup. Interbody fusion status was assessed using radiographs and a CT scan. Results: The mean pre-operative ODI score of 40.9 (14.52) significantly improved to 17.7 (16.76) at 24 months postoperative. Significant improvement in the physical component from the SF36 questionnaire was observed with increases from the baseline result of 42.4 to 72.7 at 24 months (p<.0001); The emotional component in the SF36 questionnaires mean scores highlighted a borderline significant increase from 56.5 to 81.7 at 24 months (p=0.0441). The average level of leg pain was reduced by more than 50% postoperation (VAS values reduced from 5.7 (2.45) to 2.2 (2.76) at 24 month post-operation with similar results observed for back pain. CT indicated interbody fusion rate was not significantly faster compared to other devices in literature. No device related adverse events were recorded in this study. Conclusions: The Memory Metal Spinal System, different from other devices on the market with regard to material and the one rod configuration, is safe and performed very well by improving clinically important outcomes in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease. In addition the data compares favorably to that previously reported for other devices in the literature. PMID:22754599

  6. Extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for cage migration after screw removal: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung Hoon; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2013-06-01

    The use of titanium cages for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) has gained popularity because it offers the advantages of anterior column support and stabilization. However, cage migration into the spinal canal may have severe or disastrous consequences. Here, the authors report an unexpected case of posterior migration of fusion cages after screw removal in a patient that underwent PLIF 12 months previously. Removal of the offending cages through revision extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF) with percutaneous screw fixation successfully managed this complication. As far as the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report to describe this sort of complication, and cautions that care must be taken to prevent cage migration. PMID:24757471

  7. Complications and Morbidities of Mini-open Anterior Retroperitoneal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Oblique Lumbar Interbody Fusion in 179 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Hilmi, Radwan; Roussouly, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study including 179 patients who underwent oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) at one institution. Purpose To report the complications associated with a minimally invasive technique of a retroperitoneal anterolateral approach to the lumbar spine. Overview of Literature Different approaches to the lumbar spine have been proposed, but they are associated with an increased risk of complications and a longer operation. Methods A total of 179 patients with previous posterior instrumented fusion undergoing OLIF were included. The technique is described in terms of: the number of levels fused, operative time and blood loss. Persurgical and postsurgical complications were noted. Results Patients were age 54.1 ± 10.6 with a BMI of 24.8 ± 4.1 kg/m2. The procedure was performed in the lumbar spine at L1-L2 in 4, L2-L3 in 54, L3-L4 in 120, L4-L5 in 134, and L5-S1 in 6 patients. It was done at 1 level in 56, 2 levels in 107, and 3 levels in 16 patients. Surgery time and blood loss were, respectively, 32.5 ± 13.2 minutes and 57 ± 131 ml per level fused. There were 19 patients with a single complication and one with two complications, including two patients with postoperative radiculopathy after L3-5 OLIF. There was no abdominal weakness or herniation. Conclusions Minimally invasive OLIF can be performed easily and safely in the lumbar spine from L2 to L5, and at L1-2 for selected cases. Up to 3 levels can be addressed through a 'sliding window'. It is associated with minimal blood loss and short operations, and with decreased risk of abdominal wall weakness or herniation. PMID:22708012

  8. Comparison of Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Direct Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Clinical and Radiological Results

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Seok; Park, Seung Won; Chung, Chan

    2014-01-01

    Objective The use of direct lumbar interbody fusion (DLIF) has gradually increased; however, no studies have directly compared DLIF and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). We compared DLIF and TLIF on the basis of clinical and radiological outcomes. Methods A retrospective review was performed on the medical records and radiographs of 98 and 81 patients who underwent TLIF and DLIF between January 2011 and December 2012. Clinical outcomes were compared with a visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). The preoperative and postoperative disc heights, segmental sagittal/coronal angles, and lumbar lordosis were measured on radiographs. Fusion rates, operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), length of hospital stay, and complications were assessed. Results DLIF was superior to TLIF regarding its ability to restore disc height, foraminal height, and coronal balance (p<0.001). As the extent of surgical level increased, DLIF displayed significant advantages over TLIF considering the operative time and EBL. However, fusion rates at 12 months post-operation were lower for DLIF (87.8%) than for TLIF (98.1%) (p=0.007). The changes of VAS and ODI between the TLIF and DLIF were not significantly different (p>0.05). Conclusion Both DLIF and TLIF are less invasive and thus good surgical options for treating degenerative lumber diseases. DLIF has higher potential in increasing neural foramina and correcting coronal balance, and involves a shorter operative time and reduced EBL, in comparison with TLIF. However, DLIF displayed a lower fusion rate than TLIF, and caused complications related to the transpsoas approach. PMID:25628805

  9. Simultaneous Lateral Interbody Fusion and Posterior Percutaneous Instrumentation: Early Experience and Technical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Drazin, Doniel; Kim, Terrence T.; Johnson, J. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar fusion surgery involving lateral lumbar interbody graft insertion with posterior instrumentation is traditionally performed in two stages requiring repositioning. We describe a novel technique to complete the circumferential procedure simultaneously without patient repositioning. Twenty patients diagnosed with worsening back pain with/without radiculopathy who failed exhaustive conservative management were retrospectively reviewed. Ten patients with both procedures simultaneously from a single lateral approach and 10 control patients with lateral lumbar interbody fusion followed by repositioning and posterior percutaneous instrumentation were analyzed. Pars fractures, mobile grade 2 spondylolisthesis, and severe one-level degenerative disk disease were matched between the two groups. In the simultaneous group, avoiding repositioning leads to lower mean operative times: 130 minutes (versus control 190 minutes; p = 0.009) and lower intraoperative blood loss: 108 mL (versus 93 mL; NS). Nonrepositioned patients were hospitalized for an average of 4.1 days (versus 3.8 days; NS). There was one complication in the control group requiring screw revision. Lateral interbody fusion and percutaneous posterior instrumentation are both readily accomplished in a single lateral decubitus position. In select patients with adequately sized pedicles, performing simultaneous procedures decreases operative time over sequential repositioning. Patient outcomes were excellent in the simultaneous group and comparable to procedures done sequentially. PMID:26649303

  10. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using non resorbable poly-ether-ether-ketone versus resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide fusion devices. Clinical outcome at a minimum of 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Jiya, Timothy U; Smit, T; van Royen, B J; Mullender, M

    2011-04-01

    Previous papers on resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide (PLDLLA) cages in spinal fusion have failed to report adequately on patient-centred clinical outcome measures. Also comparison of PLDLLA cage with a traditionally applicable counterpart has not been previously reported. This is the first randomized prospective study that assesses clinical outcome of PLDLLA cage compared with a poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) implant. Twenty-six patients were randomly assigned to undergo instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) whereby either a PEEK cage or a PLDLLA cage was implanted. Clinical outcome based on visual analogue scale scores for leg pain and back pain, as well as Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and SF-36 questionnaires were documented and analysed. When compared with preoperative values, all clinical parameters have significantly improved in the PEEK group at 2 years after surgery with the exception of SF-36 general health, SF-36 mental health and SF-36 role emotional scores. No clinical parameter showed significant improvement at 2 years after surgery compared with preoperative values in the PLDLLA patient group. Only six patients (50%) in the PLDLLA group showed improvement in the VAS scores for leg and back pain as well as the ODI, as opposed to 10 patients (71%) in the PEEK group. One-third of the patients in the PLDLLA group actually reported worsening of their pain scores and ODI. Three cases of mild to moderate osteolysis were seen in the PLDLLA group. Following up on our preliminary report, these 2-year results confirm the superiority of the PEEK implant to the resorbable PLDLLA implant in aiding spinal fusion and alleviating symptoms following PLIF in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis associated with either canal stenosis or foramen stenosis or both and emanating from a single lumbar segment. PMID:20842388

  11. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Management of Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To study the surgical outcome of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with trans-pedicular screws fixation for management of selected cases of recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Overview of Literature Recurrent lumbar disc herniation is a major cause of surgical failure, occurring in 5%–11% of cases. The optimal technique for treatment is controversial. Some authors believe that repeated simple discectomy is the treatment of choice, but approach-related complications can be considerable. Other surgeons prefer more removal of posterior elements (as lamina and facet joints) with posterior fusion. Methods The study included 15 patients who presented with symptomatic recurrent lumbar disc herniation who underwent reoperation through posterior trans-pedicular screws and TLIF in our department from April 2008 to May 2010, with a 24-month follow-up. Japanese Orthopedic Association Scale (JOA) was used for low back pain. The results of surgery were also evaluated with the MacNab classification. Results The mean JOA score showed significant improvement, increasing from 9.5 before surgery to 24.0 at the end of follow-up (p<0.001). Clinical outcome was excellent in 7 patients (46% of cases), good in 6 patients (40%) and fair in only 2 patients (14%). There was a significant difference (p<0.05) between patients presenting with recurrent disc at the ipsilateral side and those at the contralateral side. Conclusions In spite of the small number of patients and the short follow-up period, the good clinical and radiological outcome achieved in this study encourage the belief that TLIF is an effective option for the treatment of selected cases of recurrent lumbar disc herniation. PMID:26949458

  12. A novel minimally invasive technique for lumbar decompression, realignment, and navigated interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Reinshagen, Clemens; Ruess, Daniel; Walcott, Brian P; Molcanyi, Marek; Goldbrunner, Roland; Rieger, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel, minimally invasive, navigation-guided approach for surgical treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) that is a hybrid of the two most common techniques, posterior interbody fusion (PLIF) and transforaminal interbody fusion (TLIF). DS is an acquired condition with intersegmental instability of one or more lumbar motion segments. Seven patients with single level lumbar DS underwent lumbar arthrodesis utilizing the hybrid technique (HLIF) in our center. Using a standard unilateral midline approach a decompression and partial facetectomy on one side was performed, allowing for implantation of a specially designed interbody cage. Pedicle screws were placed using neuronavigation in a vertical vector on the side of the partial facetectomy and dorsolaterally (percutaneous) on the contralateral side. Patient and operative data, numeric rating scale (NRS) pain scores, core outcome measures index (COMI) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were recorded preoperatively as well as 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. All patients completed the 1 year follow-up. There was significant postoperative improvement of NRS, COMI and ODI scores at all postoperative follow-up time points (p<0.05). The radiological assessments of realignment showed a reduction of listhesis from an average of 21.04% (standard deviation [SD] 5.1) preoperatively to 9.14% (SD 4.0) postoperatively (p<0.001). The average blood loss was 492 ml. Post-procedure CT scans demonstrated correct implant placement in all but one patient who required a revision of a single pedicle screw. HLIF allows thorough decompression as well as realignment and interbody fusion for patients with DS and may help reduce tissue trauma in comparison to other minimally invasive lumbar fusion techniques. PMID:26100155

  13. Does Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Have Advantages over Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis?

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Takahito; Le, Hai; Schairer, William W.; Berven, Sigurd H.; Qamirani, Erion; Hu, Serena S.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective To compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in the treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods This study compared 24 patients undergoing TLIF and 32 patients undergoing PLF with instrumentation. The clinical outcomes were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) for low back pain and leg pain, physical component summary (PCS) of the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiographic parameters included slippage of the vertebra, local disk lordosis, the anterior and posterior disk height, lumbar lordosis, and pelvic parameters. Results The improvement of VAS of leg pain was significantly greater in TLIF than in PLF unilaterally (3.4 versus 1.0; p = 0.02). The improvement of VAS of low back pain was significantly greater in TLIF than in PLF (3.8 versus 2.2; p = 0.02). However, there was no significant difference in improvement of ODI or PCS between TLIF and PLF. Reduction of slippage and the postoperative disk height was significantly greater in TLIF than in PLF. There was no significant difference in local disk lordosis, lumbar lordosis, or pelvic parameters. The fusion rate was 96% in TLIF and 84% in PLF (p = 0.3). There was no significant difference in fusion rate, estimated blood loss, adjacent segmental degeneration, or complication rate. Conclusions TLIF was superior to PLF in reduction of slippage and restoring disk height and might provide better improvement of leg pain. However, the health-related outcomes were not significantly different between the two procedures. PMID:25844282

  14. Mini-Open Anterior Retroperitoneal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Oblique Lateral Interbody Fusion for Degenerated Lumbar Spinal Kyphoscoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Mannoji, Chikato; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Toyone, Tomoaki; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective case series. Purpose To examine the clinical efficacy of mini-open anterior retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion: oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) for degenerated lumbar spinal kyphoscoliosis. Overview of Literature The existing surgical procedures for the treatment of spinal kyphotic deformity, including Smith-Petersen osteotomy, pedicle subtraction osteotomy, and vertebral column resection procedures, are invasive in nature. Extreme lateral interbody fusion to provide less invasive treatment of the deformity has been reported, but complications including spinal nerve and psoas muscle injury have been noted. In the current study, we examined the clinical efficacy and complications of OLIF for degenerated lumbar spinal kyphoscoliosis. Methods Twelve patients with degenerated lumbar spinal kyphoscoliosis were examined. All patients underwent OLIF surgery (using a cage and bone graft from the iliac crest) with open pedicle screws or percutaneous pedicle screws, without real-time monitoring by electromyography. Visual analog scale score and Oswestry disability index were evaluated before and 12 months after surgery, and fusion rate at OLIF cage, correction of the deformity, total blood loss, and surgical complications were also evaluated. Results Pain scores significantly improved after surgery (p<0.05). Fusion rate was found to be 90%, balance parameters also improved after surgery (p<0.05), and average total blood loss was less than 350 mL. There was no spinal nerve, major vessel, peritoneal, or urinary injury, or breakage of instrumentation. Conclusions OLIF surgery for degenerated lumbar spinal kyphoscoliosis is less invasive than other procedures and good surgical results were produced without major complications. PMID:26240716

  15. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the lumbar spine, do more nerve root injuries occur utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques versus open lumbar procedures? To answer this question, we compared the frequency of nerve root injuries for multiple open versus MIS operations including diskectomy, laminectomy with/without fusion addressing degenerative disc disease, stenosis, and/or degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods: Several of Desai et al. large Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial studies showed the frequency for nerve root injury following an open diskectomy ranged from 0.13% to 0.25%, for open laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion it was 0%, and for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion it was 2%. Results: Alternatively, one study compared the incidence of root injuries utilizing MIS transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) techniques; 7.8% of PLIF versus 2% of TLIF patients sustained root injuries. Furthermore, even higher frequencies of radiculitis and nerve root injuries occurred during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIFs) versus extreme lateral interbody fusions (XLIFs). These high frequencies were far from acceptable; 15.8% following ALIF experienced postoperative radiculitis, while 23.8% undergoing XLIF sustained root/plexus deficits. Conclusions: This review indicates that MIS (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) lumbar surgery resulted in a higher incidence of root injuries, radiculitis, or plexopathy versus open lumbar surgical techniques. Furthermore, even a cursory look at the XLIF data demonstrated the greater danger posed to neural tissue by this newest addition to the MIS lumbar surgical armamentariu. The latter should prompt us as spine surgeons to question why the XLIF procedure is still being offered to our patients? PMID:26904372

  16. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using unilateral pedicle screws and a translaminar screw.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Anil; Lee, Sandra; Vaidya, Rahul

    2009-03-01

    Lumbar spinal fusion is advancing with minimally invasive techniques, bone graft alternatives, and new implants. This has resulted in significant reductions of operative time, duration of hospitalization, and higher success in fusion rates. However, costs have increased as many new technologies are expensive. This study was carried out to investigate the clinical outcomes and fusion rates of a low implant load construct of unilateral pedicle screws and a translaminar screw in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) which reduced the cost of the posterior implants by almost 50%. Nineteen consecutive patients who underwent single level TLIF with this construct were included in the study. Sixteen patients had a TLIF allograft interbody spacer placed, while in three a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage was used. Follow-up ranged from 15 to 54 months with a mean of 32 months. A clinical and radiographic evaluation was carried out preoperatively and at multiple time points following surgery. An overall improvement in Oswestry scores and visual analogue scales for leg and back pain (VAS) was observed. Three patients underwent revision surgery due to recurrence of back pain. All patients showed radiographic evidence of fusion from 9 to 26 months (mean 19) following surgery. This study suggests that unilateral pedicle screws and a contralateral translaminar screw are a cheaper and viable option for single level lumbar fusion. PMID:19015896

  17. Combined magnetic fields provide robust coverage for interbody and posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion sites.

    PubMed

    Stippick, Timothy Wade; Sheller, Michael Richard

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields generated by spinal bone growth stimulation devices have been computationally modelled to determine coverage of the lumbar spinal vertebrae. The underlying assumption of these models was that the electric field, but not the magnetic field, was therapeutically relevant. However, there are no published studies examining the therapeutic coverage of spinal fusion sites by stimulators utilizing combined magnetic fields. To assess the coverage, an anatomical model of the vertebrae and discs of the lumbar spine was developed to represent interbody and posterolateral fusion sites. Computer simulations of the induced electromagnetic fields were analysed to determine coverage of the fusion sites. For both interbody and posterolateral fusion models, combined magnetic fields provided 100% coverage of the fusion sites for all intervertebral disc spaces and for all posterior planes from L1 to L5, respectively. Within the vertebral column, the magnitude of the electric field reached a maximum value of 3.6נ10(-4)V/m, which is several orders of magnitude less than any reported study demonstrating a biological effect. Given its clinical efficacy,a bone growth stimulator utilizing combined magnetic fields must rely on the action of its magnetic field rather than its electric field for a therapeutic effect. PMID:26044553

  18. Expandable Polyaryl-Ether-Ether-Ketone Spacers for Interbody Distraction in the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Alimi, Marjan; Shin, Benjamin; Macielak, Michael; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Njoku, Innocent; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Elowitz, Eric; Hrtl, Roger

    2015-06-01

    Study Design?Retrospective case series. Objective?StaXx XD (Spine Wave, Inc., Shelton, CT, United States) is an expandable polyaryl-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) wafer implant utilized in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. PEEK implants have been successfully used as interbody devices. Few studies have focused on expandable PEEK devices. The aim of the current study is to determine the radiographic and clinical outcome of expandable PEEK cages utilized for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with lumbar degenerative diseases. Methods?Forty-nine patients who underwent lumbar interbody fusion with implantation of expandable PEEK cages and posterior instrumentation were included. The clinical outcome was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiographic parameters including disk height, foraminal height, listhesis, local disk angle of the index level/levels, regional lumbar lordosis, and graft subsidence were measured preoperatively, postoperatively, and at latest follow-up. Results?At an average follow-up of 19.3 months, the minimum clinically important difference for the ODI and VAS back, buttock, and leg were achieved in 64, 52, 58, and 52% of the patients, respectively. There was statistically significant improvement in VAS back (6.42 versus 3.11, p?

  19. Expandable Polyaryl-Ether-Ether-Ketone Spacers for Interbody Distraction in the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Alimi, Marjan; Shin, Benjamin; Macielak, Michael; Hofstetter, Christoph P.; Njoku, Innocent; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Elowitz, Eric; Härtl, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective StaXx XD (Spine Wave, Inc., Shelton, CT, United States) is an expandable polyaryl-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) wafer implant utilized in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. PEEK implants have been successfully used as interbody devices. Few studies have focused on expandable PEEK devices. The aim of the current study is to determine the radiographic and clinical outcome of expandable PEEK cages utilized for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with lumbar degenerative diseases. Methods Forty-nine patients who underwent lumbar interbody fusion with implantation of expandable PEEK cages and posterior instrumentation were included. The clinical outcome was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiographic parameters including disk height, foraminal height, listhesis, local disk angle of the index level/levels, regional lumbar lordosis, and graft subsidence were measured preoperatively, postoperatively, and at latest follow-up. Results At an average follow-up of 19.3 months, the minimum clinically important difference for the ODI and VAS back, buttock, and leg were achieved in 64, 52, 58, and 52% of the patients, respectively. There was statistically significant improvement in VAS back (6.42 versus 3.11, p < 0.001), VAS buttock (4.66 versus 1.97, p = 0.002), VAS leg (4.55 versus 1.96, p < 0.001), and ODI (21.7 versus 12.1, p < 0.001) scores. There was a significant increase in the average disk height (6.49 versus 8.18 mm, p = 0.037) and foraminal height (15.6 versus 18.53 mm, p = 0.0001), and a significant reduction in the listhesis (5.13 versus 3.15 mm, p = 0.005). The subsidence of 0.66 mm (7.4%) observed at the latest follow-up was not significant (p = 0.35). Conclusions Midterm results indicate that expandable PEEK spacers can effectively and durably restore disk and foraminal height and improve the outcome without significant subsidence. PMID:26131383

  20. Incidence of graft extrusion following minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Khanna, Ryan; Choy, Winward; Lawton, Cort D; Nixon, Alex T; Wong, Albert P; Koski, Tyler R; Liu, John C; Song, John K; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Smith, Zachary A; Fessler, Richard G

    2016-02-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) has been scrutinized for having a complex learning curve. Careful assessment of MI-TLIF complications and critical analyses of prevention may aid a safe adoption of this technique. The current report focuses on the incidence of interbody cage extrusions following MI-TLIF in a series of 513 patients. The authors discuss their experience with graft extrusions and provide methods to minimize this complication. This study retrospectively reviewed 513 prospectively followed patients who underwent MI-TLIF over a 10year period. The inclusion criteria consisted of all patients who underwent one to three level MI-TLIF, from whom the incidence of cage extrusion was analyzed. Cage extrusion was defined as an interbody graft migrating outside the cephalad and caudal vertebral body posterior margin. Cage extrusions were diagnosed by comparing the intraoperative radiographs to the postoperative radiographs. Patients with >10° coronal curves, significant sagittal malalignment, infection, and preoperative instrumentation failure were excluded. Of 513 patients undergoing MI-TLIF, five patients (0.97%) were diagnosed with cage migrations. The mean follow-up duration was 13.6±standard deviation of 8.8months. Complications included asymptomatic cage migration alone (two patients) neurological decline (two patients) and epidural hematoma (one patient). On average, cage migrations cost a university hospital an additional $US17,217 for revision treatment. While the incidence of cage migrations is low (0.97%), it can lead to postoperative complications that require revision surgery and increased hospital costs. The risk for this significant complication can be minimized with proper technique and patient selection. PMID:26578209

  1. Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Postoperative Spondylodiscitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Han; Kang, Moo-Sung; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical courses and outcomes after anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for the treatment of postoperative spondylodiscitis. Methods A total of 13 consecutive patients with postoperative spondylodiscitis treated with ALIF at our institute from January, 1994 to August, 2013 were included (92.3% male, mean age 54.5 years old). The outcome data including inflammatory markers (leukocyte count, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate), the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the modified Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and bony fusion rate using spine X-ray were obtained before and 6 months after ALIF. Results All of the cases were effectively treated with combination of systemic antibiotics and ALIF with normalization of the inflammatory markers. The mean VAS for back and leg pain before ALIF was 6.8±1.1, which improved to 3.2±2.2 at 6 months after ALIF. The mean ODI score before ALIF was 70.0±14.8, which improved to 34.2±27.0 at 6 months after ALIF. Successful bony fusion rate was 84.6% (11/13) and the remaining two patients were also asymptomatic. Conclusion Our results suggest that ALIF is an effective treatment option for postoperative spondylodiscitis. PMID:25371780

  2. Direct Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Clinical and Radiological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Young Baeg

    2014-01-01

    Objective According to the recent development of minimally invasive spinal surgery, direct lumbar interbody fusion (DLIF) was introduced as an effective option to treat lumbar degenerative diseases. However, comprehensive results of DLIF have not been reported in Korea yet. The object of this study is to summarize radiological and clinical outcomes of our DLIF experience. Methods We performed DLIF for 130 patients from May 2011 to June 2013. Among them, 90 patients, who could be followed up for more than 6 months, were analyzed retrospectively. Clinical outcomes were compared using visual analog scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Bilateral foramen areas, disc height, segmental coronal and sagittal angle, and regional sagittal angle were measured. Additionally, fusion rate was assessed. Results A total of 90 patients, 116 levels, were underwent DLIF. The VAS and ODI improved statistically significant after surgery. All the approaches for DLIF were done on the left side. The left and right side foramen area changed from 99.5 mm2 and 102.9 mm2 to 159.2 mm2 and 151.2 mm2 postoperatively (p<0.001). Pre- and postoperative segmental coronal and sagittal angles changed statistically significant from 4.1 and 9.9 to 1.1 and 11.1. Fusion rates of 6 and 12 months were 60.9% and 87.8%. Complications occurred in 17 patients (18.9%). However, most of the complications were resolved within 2 months. Conclusion DLIF is not only effective for indirect decompression and deformity correction but also shows satisfactory mechanical stability and fusion rate. PMID:25132930

  3. [The results of decompression and anterior lumbar interbody fusion with the use of interbody cages for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis].

    PubMed

    Luczkiewicz, Piotr; Smoczy?ski, Andrzej; Smoczy?ski, Maciej; Pankowski, Rafa?; Piotrowski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we reviewed 28 patients who had been treated surgically for lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. They were operated between 1998-2003. The decompression and anterior lumbar interbody fusion with the use of interbody cages, was performed in all of them. The outcome was assessed using rating system of Prolo and VAPS. The disc height, degree of slippage and segmental lordosis were measured, on the radiographs, before surgery, after 6 weeks and at the time of final follow-up. In all cases spinal fusion was achieved. The disc height, degree of slipage and segmental lordosis were improved and these results were stable in time. A significant decrease in radicular pain and low back pain were seen but the relation between clinical and radiological autcomes was not observed. PMID:17131721

  4. Acute Contralateral Radiculopathy after Unilateral Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Young-Baeg; Park, Yong-Sook; Nam, Taek-Kyun; Lee, Young-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cases of contralateral radiculopathy after a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with a single cage (unilateral TLIF) had been reported, but the phenomenon has not been explained satisfactorily. The purpose of this study was to determine its incidence, causes, and risk factors. Methods We did retrospective study with 546 patients who underwent a unilateral TLIF, and used CT and MRI to study the causes of contralateral radicular symptoms that appeared within a week postoperatively. Clinical and radiological results were compared by dividing the patients into the symptomatic group and asymptomatic group. Results Contralateral symptoms occurred in 32 (5.9%) of the patients underwent unilateral TLIF. The most common cause of contralateral symptoms was a contralateral foraminal stenosis in 22 (68.8%), screw malposition in 4 (12.5%), newly developed herniated nucleus pulposus in 3 (9.3%), hematoma in 1 (3.1%), and unknown origin in 2 patients (6.3%). 16 (50.0%) of the 32 patients received revision surgery. There was no difference in visual analogue scale and Oswestry disability index between the two groups at discharge. Both preoperative and postoperative contralateral foraminal areas were significantly smaller, and postoperative segmental angle was significantly greater in the symptomatic group comparing to those of the asymptomatic group (p<0.05). Conclusion The incidence rate is not likely to be small (5.9%). If unilateral TLIF is performed for cases when preoperative contralateral foraminal stenosis already exists or when a large restoration of segmental lordosis is required, the probability of developing contralateral radiculopathy is increased and caution from the surgeon is needed. PMID:26587189

  5. Current status of bone graft options for anterior interbody fusion of the cervical and lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Chau, Anthony Minh Tien; Xu, Lileane Liang; Wong, Johnny Ho-Yin; Mobbs, Ralph Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) are common surgical procedures for degenerative disc disease of the cervical and lumbar spine. Over the years, many bone graft options have been developed and investigated aimed at complimenting or substituting autograft bone, the traditional fusion substrate. Here, we summarise the historical context, biological basis and current best evidence for these bone graft options in ACDF and ALIF. PMID:23743981

  6. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Disorders: Mini-open TLIF and Corrective TLIF

    PubMed Central

    HARA, Masahito; NISHIMURA, Yusuke; NAKAJIMA, Yasuhiro; UMEBAYASHI, Daisuke; TAKEMOTO, Masaya; YAMAMOTO, Yuu; HAIMOTO, Shoichi

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) as a short fusion is widely accepted among the spine surgeons. However in the long fusion for degenerative kyphoscoliosis, corrective spinal fixation by an open method is thought to be frequently selected. Our objective is to study whether the mini-open TLIF and corrective TLIF contribute to the improvement of the spinal segmental and global alignment. We divided the patients who performed lumbar fixation surgery into three groups. Group 1 (G1) consisted of mini-open TLIF procedures without complication. Group 2 (G2) consisted of corrective TLIF without complication. Group 3 (G3) consisted of corrective TLIF with instrumentation-related complication postoperatively. In all groups, the lumbar lordosis (LL) highly correlated with developing surgical complications. LL significantly changed postoperatively in all groups, but was not corrected in the normal range in G3. There were statistically significant differences in preoperative and postoperative LL and mean difference between the pelvic incidence (PI) and LL between G3 and other groups. The most important thing not to cause the instrumentation-related failure is proper correction of the sagittal balance. In the cases with minimal sagittal imbalance with or without coronal imbalance, short fusion by mini-open TLIF or long fusion by corrective TLIF contributes to good clinical results if the lesion is short or easily correctable. However, if the patients have apparent sagittal imbalance with or without coronal imbalance, we should perform proper correction of the sagittal spinal alignment introducing various technologies. PMID:26119895

  7. Finite Element Analysis of a New Pedicle Screw-Plate System for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Changqing; Liu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) is increasingly popular for the surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar disc diseases. The constructs intended for segmental stability are varied in MI-TLIF. We adopted finite element (FE) analysis to compare the stability after different construct fixations using interbody cage with posterior pedicle screw-rod or pedicle screw-plate instrumentation system. Methods A L3S1 FE model was modified to simulate decompression and fusion at L4L5 segment. Fixation modes included unilateral plate (UP), unilateral rod (UR), bilateral plate (BP), bilateral rod (BR) and UP+UR fixation. The inferior surface of the S1 vertebra remained immobilized throughout the load simulation, and a bending moment of 7.5 Nm with 400N pre-load was applied on the L3 vertebra to recreate flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Range of motion (ROM) and Von Mises stress were evaluated for intact and instrumentation models in all loading planes. Results All reconstructive conditions displayed decreased motion at L4L5. The pedicle screw-plate system offered equal ROM to pedicle screw-rod system in unilateral or bilateral fixation modes respectively. Pedicle screw stresses for plate system were 2.2 times greater than those for rod system in left lateral bending under unilateral fixation. Stresses for plate were 3.1 times greater than those for rod in right axial rotation under bilateral fixation. Stresses on intervertebral graft for plate system were similar to rod system in unilateral and bilateral fixation modes respectively. Increased ROM and posterior instrumentation stresses were observed in all loading modes with unilateral fixation compared with bilateral fixation in both systems. Conclusions Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion augmentation with pedicle screw-plate system fixation increases fusion construct stability equally to the pedicle screw-rod system. Increased posterior instrumentation stresses are observed in all loading modes with plate fixation, and bilateral fixation could reduce stress concentration. PMID:26649749

  8. Ectopic bone formation with joint impingement after posterior lumbar fusion with rhBMP-2.

    PubMed

    Bannwarth, M; Kleiber, J C; Marlier, B; Eap, C; Duntze, J; Litre, C F

    2016-04-01

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was recently licensed for local administration during posterior lumbar fusion. In this indication, considerable uncertainty remains about the nature and mechanisms of the many adverse effects of rhBMP-2, such as ectopic bone formation. We report a case of ectopic bone formation with impingement on a facet joint and incapacitating low back pain after minimally invasive transforaminal L5-S1 interbody fusion with local application of rhBMP-2 (InductOs(®)). Revision surgery was eventually performed to alleviate the symptoms by removing the ectopic bone. Caution is in order regarding the use of rhBMP-2 during posterior lumbar fusion. Every effort should be made to minimise the risk of complications. PMID:26947733

  9. Use of an advanced formulation of beta-tricalcium phosphate as a bone extender in interbody lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Linovitz, Raymond J; Peppers, Timothy A

    2002-05-01

    Despite numerous advances in the development of bone graft substitutes over the past 20 years, iliac crest autograft remains the gold standard for lumbar spinal fusion. However, donor site morbidity associated with the harvesting of iliac crest autograft remains problematic. Acute and chronic pain, prolonged operative time, bleeding, infection, deformity, and nerve and vascular injury still produce significant postoperative morbidity, even in the presence of careful surgical technique. Although allograft circumvents donor site morbidity, the growing number of spinal fusions performed in the United States and worldwide is creating a shortage of cadaver bone acceptable for use. Additionally, the extensive processing and storage of allograft is expensive. Synthetic materials, such as beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), have been developed as alternatives to both autograft and allograft. A novel formulation of ultraporous beta-TCP (Vitoss, Orthovita, Malvern, Pa) offers interconnected microporosity, providing it with good wicking and hydrophilic properties. These properties allow the migration of nutrients, growth factors, and osteogenic cells into the ultraporous beta-TCP scaffold, thereby promoting new bone growth and concurrent scaffold resorption. This study presents a retrospective review of 7 patients who underwent anterior (ALIF) or posterior (PLIF) interbody fusion at 12 levels with a 3- to 6-month follow-up. At the patients' last radiographic examination, all 12 levels were solidly fused with interbody grafting material consisting only of allograft plus a combination of ultraporous beta-TCP and venous blood as an extender. Additionally, all 7 patients had segmental pedicle-screw fixation. PMID:12038846

  10. Hemothorax caused by the trocar tip of the rod inserter after minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: case report.

    PubMed

    Maruo, Keishi; Tachibana, Toshiya; Inoue, Shinichi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) is widely used for lumbar degenerative diseases. In the paper the authors report a unique case of a hemothorax caused by the trocar tip of the rod inserter after MIS-TLIF. A 61-year-old woman presented with thigh pain and gait disturbance due to weakness in her lower right extremity. She was diagnosed with a lumbar disc herniation at L1-2 and the MIS-TLIF procedure was performed. Immediately after surgery, the patient's thigh pain resolved and she remained stable with normal vital signs. The next day after surgery, she developed severe anemia and her hemoglobin level decreased to 7.6 g/dl, which required blood transfusions. A chest radiograph revealed a hemothorax. A CT scan confirmed a hematoma of the left paravertebral muscle. A chest tube was placed to treat the hemothorax. After 3 days of drainage, there was no active bleeding. The patient was discharged 14 days after surgery without leg pain or any respiratory problems. This complication may have occurred due to injury of the intercostal artery by the trocar tip of the rod inserter. A hemothorax after spine surgery is a rare complication, especially in the posterior approach. The rod should be caudally inserted in the setting of the thoracolumbar spine. PMID:26588499

  11. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in symptomatic low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M K; Sakeb, N; Rahman, M G; Zaman, N; Karim, R; Jannat, S N

    2014-07-01

    Isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS) is the most common spondylolytic disorders and one of the most common causes of low back pain and sciatica in adolescents and adults. Although the initial management is conservative, surgery is often the ultimate solution. Interbody fusion has been found superior and replaced the gold standard postero-lateral fusion. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF) has been associated with fewer complications and has become the choice of surgery. This study was done to evaluate the clinical, radiological and functional outcome of TLIF in Low Grade Isthmic Spondylolisthesis (LGIS). The clinical records of 46 consecutive patients within the age range of 31 to 60 years, who had symptomatic unstable Low Grade Isthmic Spondylolisthesis (LGIS) with or without unilateral radiculopathy in Bangabandhu Sheik Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and private settings, from April 2007 to March 2012 were reviewed with 2 year completed follow-up. Patients were evaluated for pain by Visual Analogue Score (VAS), Disability by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), radiological fusion by Brantigan and Steffee criteria, reduction of listhesis by Taillard's method and the overall functional outcome by the Macnab's criteria. Pain (Low back and leg), disability, neurological status had highly significant (p<0.001, paired t test) improvement. Forty two (91.30%) cases achieved satisfactory radiological fusion with overall 30% reduction of slip. Satisfactory outcome was reached in 45(97.83%) cases. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion results in significant improvement of clinical, radiological and functional debility of symptomatic LGIS in adults. PMID:25178598

  12. Clinical and Radiological Outcomes of a New Cage for Direct Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Jae; Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Young Baeg; Hung, Vo Tan

    2014-01-01

    Objective In Korea, direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) was started since 2011, using standard cage (6° lordotic angle, 18mm width). Recently, a new wider cage with higher lordotic angle (12°, 22mm) was introduced. The aim of our study is to compare the clinical and radiologic outcomes of the two cage types. Methods We selected patients underwent DLIF, 125 cases used standard cages (standard group) and 38 cases used new cages (wide group). We followed them up for more than 6 months, and their radiological and clinical outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. For radiologic outcomes, lumbar lordotic angle (LLA), segmental lordoic angle (SLA), disc angle (DA), foraminal height change (FH), subsidence and intraoperative endplate destruction (iED) were checked. Clinical outcomes were compared using visual analog scale (VAS) score, Oswestry disability index (ODI) score and complications. Results LLA and SLA showed no significant changes postoperatively in both groups. DA showed significant increase after surgery in the wide group (p<0.05), but not in the standard group. Subsidence was significantly lower in the wide group (p<0.05). There was no difference in clinical outcomes between the two groups. Additional posterior decompression was done more frequently in the wide group. Postoperative change of foraminal height was significantly lower in the wide group (p<0.05). The iED was observed more frequently in the wide group (p<0.05) especially at the anterior edge of cage. Conclusion The new type of cage seems to result in more DA and less subsidence. But indirect foraminal decompression seems to be less effective than standard cage. Intraoperative endplate destruction occurs more frequently due to a steeper lordotic angle of the new cage. PMID:25346760

  13. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Deep Vein Thrombosis in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Si-Dong; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Da-Long; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Feng, Shi-Qing; Zhao, Feng-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional study was designed to obtain the current prevalence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and analyze related risk factors in patients undergoing lumbar interbody fusion. Medical record data were collected from Department of Spinal Surgery, The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, between July 2014 and March 2015. Both univariate analysis and binary logistic regression analysis were performed to determine risk factors for DVT. A total of 995 patients were admitted into this study, including 484 men and 511 women, aged from 14 to 89 years old (median 50, IQR 19). The detection rate of lower limb DVT by ultrasonography was 22.4% (223/995) in patients undergoing lumbar interbody fusion. Notably, average VAS (visual analog scale) score in the first 3 days after surgery in the DVT group was more than that in the non-DVT group (Z = −21.69, P < 0.001). The logistic regression model was established as logit P = −13.257 + 0.056∗X1 − 0.243∗X8 + 2.085∗X10 + 0.001∗X12, (X1 = age; X8 = HDL; X10 = VAS; X12 = blood transfusion; x2 = 677.763, P < 0.001). In conclusion, advanced age, high postoperative VAS scores, and blood transfusion were risk factors for postoperative lower limb DVT. As well, the logistic regression model may contribute to an early evaluation postoperatively to ascertain the risk of lower limb DVT in patients undergoing lumbar interbody fusion surgery. PMID:26632909

  14. Clinical outcomes of single-level lumbar artificial disc replacement compared with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in an Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Ting; Liu, Gabriel; Thambiah, Joseph; Wong, Hee Kit

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this study was to examine the clinical outcome of single-level lumbar artificial disc replacement (ADR) compared to that of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative disc disease (DDD) in an Asian population. METHODS This was a retrospective review of 74 patients who had surgery performed for discogenic lower backs that involved only the L4/5 and L5/S1 levels. All the patients had lumbar DDD without radiculopathy or spondylolithesis, and concordant pain with discogram at the pathological level. The patients were divided into two groups those who underwent ADR and those who underwent TLIF. RESULTS A trend suggesting that the ADR group had better perioperative outcomes (less blood loss, shorter operating time, shorter hospital stay and shorter time to ambulation) than the TLIF group was observed. However, a trend indicating that surgical-approach-related complications occurred more frequently in the ADR group than the TLIF group was also observed. The rate of revision surgery was comparable between the two groups. CONCLUSION Our findings suggest that for the treatment of discogenic lower back pain, lumbar ADR has better perioperative outcomes and a similar revision rate when compared with TLIF. However, the use of ADR was associated with a higher incidence of surgical-approach-related complications. More studies with bigger cohort sizes and longer follow-up periods are needed to determine the long-term efficacy and safety of ADR in lumbar DDD. PMID:25917472

  15. Instrumented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with bioabsorbable polymer implants and iliac crest autograft.

    PubMed

    Coe, Jeffrey D

    2004-03-15

    Object. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic results in 31 patients from one center who underwent instrumented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for primarily degenerative indications. Methods. Bioabsorbable polymer spacers manufactured with a copolymer of 70:30 poly(L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide) and filled with iliac crest autograft bone were used for the TLIF procedure. In this paper the details of this procedure, intermediate (1- to 2-year) clinical and radiographic outcomes, and the basic science and rationale for the use of bioabsorbable polymers are discussed. At a mean of 18.4 months of follow up, 30 patients (96.8%) were judged to have attained solid fusions and 25 patients (81%) had good to excellent results. Three patients (9.7%) experienced complications, none of which were directly or indirectly attributable to the use of the bioabsorbable polymer implant. Only one implant in one patient (3.2%) demonstrated mechanical failure on insertion, and that patient experienced no clinical sequelae. Conclusions. This is the first clinical series to be published in which the mean follow-up duration equals or exceeds the biological life expectancy of this material (12-18 months). Both the clinical and radiographic results of this study support the use of interbody devices manufactured from biodegradable polymers for structural interbody support in the TLIF procedure. PMID:15198499

  16. Clinical and Radiological Outcomes of Segmental Spinal Fusion in Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Spinous Process Tricortical Autograft

    PubMed Central

    Tangviriyapaiboon, Teera

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose To investigate clinical and radiological outcomes when using spinous process as a tricortical autograft for segmental spinal fusion in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Overview of Literature Interbody spinal fusion is one of the important procedures in spinal surgery. Many types of autografts are harvested at the expense of complications. Clinical and radiographic results of patients who underwent TLIF with intraoperative harvested spinous process autograft in Prasat Neurological Institue, Bangkok, Thailand, were assessed as new technical innovation. Methods Between October 2005 to July 2009, 30 cases of patients who underwent TLIF with spinous process tricortical autograft were included. Clinical evaluations were assessed by visual analog scales (VAS) and Prolo functional and economic scores at the preoperation and postoperation and at 2 years postoperation. Static and dynamic plain radiograph of lumbar spine were reviewed for achievement of fusion. Results Initial successful fusion time in lumbar interbody fusion with spinous process tricortical autograft was 4.72 months (range, 3.8-6.1 months) postoperation and 100% fusion rate was reported at 2 years. Our initial successful fusion time in lumbar interbody fusion was compared to the other types of grafts in previous literatures. Conclusions The use of intraoperative harvested spinous process tricortical autograft has overcome many disadvantages of harvesting autograft with better initial successful fusion time (4.72 months). VAS and Prolo scores showed some improvement in the outcomes between the preoperative and postoperative periods. PMID:24761199

  17. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Correction of Spondylolisthesis and Adult Degenerative Scoliosis in High-Risk Patients: Early Radiographic Results and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Brad; Briski, David; Qadir, Rabah; Godoy, Gustavo; Houston, Allison Howard; Rudman, Ernest; Zavatsky, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is not associated with many of the complications seen in other interbody fusion techniques. This study used computed tomography (CT) scans, the radiographic gold standard, to assess interbody fusion rates achieved utilizing the LLIF technique in high-risk patients. Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent LLIF between January 2008 and July 2013. Forty-nine patients underwent nonstaged or staged LLIF on 119 levels with posterior correction and augmentation. Per protocol, patients received CT scans at their 1-year follow-up. Of the 49 patients, 21 patients with LLIF intervention on 54 levels met inclusion criteria. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists and the senior surgeon (JZ) assessed fusion. Results Of the 21 patients, 6 patients had had previous lumbar surgery, and the cohort's comorbidities included osteoporosis, diabetes, obesity, and smoking, among others. Postoperative complications occurred in 12 (57.1%) patients and included anterior thigh pain and weakness in 6 patients, all of which resolved by 6 months. Two cases of proximal junctional kyphosis occurred, along with 1 case of hardware pullout. Two cases of abdominal atonia occurred. By CT scan assessment, each radiologist found fusion was achieved in 53 of 54 levels (98%). The radiologists' findings were in agreement with the senior surgeon. Conclusion Several studies have evaluated LLIF fusion and reported fusion rates between 88%-96%. Our results demonstrate high fusion rates using this technique, despite multiple comorbidities in the patient population. Spanning the ring apophysis with large LLIF cages along with supplemental posterior pedicle screw augmentation can enhance stability of the fusion segment and increase fusion rates. PMID:24688329

  18. Iatrogenic Baastrup's Syndrome: A Potential Complication Following Anterior Interbody Lumbar Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Glenn S.; Castro, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Baastrup's Syndrome is a condition that occurs when there is abnormal contact between two adjacent spinous processes resulting in back pain. An alteration in lumbar spinal alignment and/or adjacent segment compensatory motion is thought to be potential causative factors. The objective of this study was to present a case series of what appears to be iatrogenic Baastrup's Syndrome as a mid-to-late term complication following anterior lumbar interbody surgery. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of all patients undergoing anterior lumbar surgery for either fusion or disc replacement to determine the prevalence of Baastrup's Syndrome. Results Over a 12-year period, 855 patients who had undergone an anterior approach for lumbar spine surgery were identified. Of them 8 patients with evidence of Baastrup's Syndrome were found; this demonstrated a prevalence of 0.9%. Diagnostic injection was a helpful clinical tool in confirming the diagnosis of iatrogenic Baastrup's Syndrome. The partial removal of the impinging spinous processes resulted in excellent clinical relief. Conclusions Iatrogenic Baastrup's Syndrome may be an iatrogenic result of anterior lumbar surgery in small group of patients. Spinous process excision is a suggested treatment option. Further studies are necessary to explore the above phenomenon. This study is a Level 3 retrospective case series. PMID:26767158

  19. Comparison of complication rates of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and lateral lumbar interbody fusion: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jacob R; Smith, Brandon W; La Marca, Frank; Park, Paul

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) and lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) are 2 currently popular techniques for lumbar arthrodesis. The authors compare the total risk of each procedure, along with other important complication outcomes. METHODS This systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Relevant studies (up to May 2015) that reported complications of either MI-TLIF or LLIF were identified from a search in the PubMed database. The primary outcome was overall risk of complication per patient. Secondary outcomes included risks of sensory deficits, temporary neurological deficit, permanent neurological deficit, intraoperative complications, medical complications, wound complications, hardware failure, subsidence, and reoperation. RESULTS Fifty-four studies were included for analysis of MI-TLIF, and 42 studies were included for analysis of LLIF. Overall, there were 9714 patients (5454 in the MI-TLIF group and 4260 in the LLIF group) with 13,230 levels fused (6040 in the MI-TLIF group and 7190 in the LLIF group). A total of 1045 complications in the MI-TLIF group and 1339 complications in the LLIF group were reported. The total complication rate per patient was 19.2% in the MI-TLIF group and 31.4% in the LLIF group (p < 0.0001). The rate of sensory deficits and temporary neurological deficits, and permanent neurological deficits was 20.16%, 2.22%, and 1.01% for MI-TLIF versus 27.08%, 9.40%, and 2.46% for LLIF, respectively (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p = 0.002, respectively). Rates of intraoperative and wound complications were 3.57% and 1.63% for MI-TLIF compared with 1.93% and 0.80% for LLIF, respectively (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.034, respectively). No significant differences were noted for medical complications or reoperation. CONCLUSIONS While there was a higher overall complication rate with LLIF, MI-TLIF and LLIF both have acceptable complication profiles. LLIF had higher rates of sensory as well as temporary and permanent neurological symptoms, although rates of intraoperative and wound complications were less than MI-TLIF. Larger, prospective comparative studies are needed to confirm these findings as the current literature is of relative poor quality. PMID:26424344

  20. Non-Union Rate With Stand-Alone Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Robert; Watkins, Robert; Hanna, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Retrospective radiographic analysis. To determine the fusion rate of stand-alone lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). Biomechanical studies have indicated that LLIF may be more stable than anterior or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. Early clinical reports of stand-alone LLIF have shown success in obtaining fusion and indirectly decompressing nerve roots. A consecutive case series of stand-alone LLIF was analyzed with chart and radiographic review. Non-union was determined by symptomatology consistent with non-union and absence of bridging bone on the CT scan. Thirty-nine levels of stand alone LLIF were performed in 23 patients. Eleven patients received 1-level surgery, 7 patients received 2-level surgery, 3 patients received 3-level surgery, and 1 patient received 4-level surgery. Excluding 1 infected case, we analyzed 37 levels of stand alone LLIF in 22 patients. Non-union incidence was 7 levels in 6 patients. Non-union rate was 7/37 (19%) per level and 6/22 (27%) per patient. While our study population was relatively low, a non-union rate of 19% to 27% is concerning for modern spine surgery. Currently in our practice, we occasionally still perform stand-alone LLIF utilizing 22?mm wide grafts in low-demand levels in non-smoking and non-osteoporotic patients. However, in a majority of patients, we provide supplemental fixation: bilateral pedicle screws in most patients and unilateral pedicle screws or spinous process plates in some patients. PMID:25546670

  1. A randomized double-blind prospective study of the efficacy of pulsed electromagnetic fields for interbody lumbar fusions

    SciTech Connect

    Mooney, V. )

    1990-07-01

    A randomized double-blind prospective study of pulsed electromagnetic fields for lumbar interbody fusions was performed on 195 subjects. There were 98 subjects in the active group and 97 subjects in the placebo group. A brace containing equipment to induce an electromagnetic field was applied to patients undergoing interbody fusion in the active group, and a sham brace was used in the control group. In the active group there was a 92% success rate, while the control group had a 65% success rate (P greater than 0.005). The effectiveness of bone graft stimulation with the device is thus established.

  2. Intraspinal metalloma causing lumbar stenosis after interbody fusion with cylindrical titanium cages.

    PubMed

    Fernndez-Ballo, Nicomedes; Snchez Marquez, Jos Miguel; Conde Gallego, Esther; Martn Esteban, Ana

    2012-12-01

    Intraspinal metallomas are rare. The authors present a case after implantation of two titanium threaded interbody cages at the L4L5 level, without posterior instrumentation. To their knowledge this is the first case due to intervertebral cages. The lack of additional instrumentation had probably allowed the cages to make contact. Subsequently, friction generated wear debris, which led to the formation of a granuloma, responsible for compression of the dural sac. Intraspinal metallosis should be kept in mind as an infrequent cause of delayed neurological symptoms after spinal surgery with metallic instrumentation. PMID:23409582

  3. A Meta-Analysis of Unilateral versus Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation in Minimally Invasive Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Fei, Qi; Wang, Bingqiang; Lv, Pengfei; Chi, Cheng; Yang, Yong; Zhao, Fan; Lin, Jisheng; Ma, Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Meta-analysis. Background Bilateral pedicle screw fixation (PS) after lumbar interbody fusion is a widely accepted method of managing various spinal diseases. Recently, unilateral PS fixation has been reported as effective as bilateral PS fixation. This meta-analysis aimed to comparatively assess the efficacy and safety of unilateral PS fixation and bilateral PS fixation in the minimally invasive (MIS) lumbar interbody fusion for one-level degenerative lumbar spine disease. Methods MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, BIOSIS Previews, and Cochrane Library were searched through March 30, 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) on unilateral versus bilateral PS fixation in MIS lumbar interbody fusion that met the inclusion criteria and the methodological quality standard were retrieved and reviewed. Data on participant characteristics, interventions, follow-up period, and outcomes were extracted from the included studies and analyzed by Review Manager 5.2. Results Six studies (5 RCTs and 1 CCT) involving 298 patients were selected. There were no significant differences between unilateral and bilateral PS fixation procedures in fusion rate, complications, visual analogue score (VAS) for leg pain, VAS for back pain, Oswestry disability index (ODI). Both fixation procedures had similar length of hospital stay (MD = 0.38, 95% CI = −0.83 to 1.58; P = 0.54). In contrast, bilateral PS fixation was associated with significantly more intra-operative blood loss (P = 0.002) and significantly longer operation time (P = 0.02) as compared with unilateral PS fixation. Conclusions Unilateral PS fixation appears as effective and safe as bilateral PS fixation in MIS lumbar interbody fusion but requires less operative time and causes less blood loss, thus offering a simple alternative approach for one-level lumbar degenerative disease. PMID:25375315

  4. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Uninstrumented Posterolateral Fusion in the Degenerative Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Jalalpour, Kourosh; Neumann, Pavel; Johansson, Christer; Hedlund, Rune

    2015-08-01

    Study Design?Randomized controlled trial. Objective?Despite a large number of publications of outcomes after spinal fusion surgery, there is still no consensus on the efficacy of the several different fusion methods. The aim of this study was to determine whether transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) results in an improved clinical outcome compared with uninstrumented posterolateral fusion (PLF) in the surgical treatment for chronic low back pain. Methods?This study included 135 patients with degenerative disk disease (n?=?96) or postdiskectomy syndrome (n?=?39). Inclusion criteria were at least 1?year of back pain with or without leg pain in patients aged 20 to 65 with one- or two-level disease. Exclusion criteria were sequestration of disk hernia, psychosocial instability, isthmic spondylolisthesis, drug abuse, and previous spine surgery other than diskectomy. Pain was assessed by visual analog scale (pain index). Functional disability was quantified by the disability rating index and Oswestry Disability Index. The global outcome was assessed by the patient and classified as much better, better, unchanged, or worse. The patients were randomized to conventional uninstrumented PLF (n?=?67) or TLIF (n?=?68). PLF was performed in a standardized fashion using autograft. TLIF was performed with pedicle titanium screw fixation and a porous tantalum interbody spacer with interbody and posterolateral autograft. The clinical outcome measurements were obtained preoperatively and at 12 and 24 months postoperatively. The 2-year follow-up rate was 98%. Results?The two treatment groups improved significantly from preoperatively to 2 years' follow-up. At final follow-up, the results in the TLIF group were significantly superior to those in the PLF group in pain index (2.0 versus 3.9, p?=?0.007) and in disability rating index (22 versus 36, p?=?0.003). The Oswestry Disability Index was better in the TLIF group (20 versus 28, p?=?0.110, not significant). The global assessment was clearly superior in the TLIF group: 63% of patients scored "much better" in the TLIF group as compared with 48% in the PLF group (p?=?0.017). Conclusions?The results of the current study support the use of TLIF rather than uninstrumented PLF in the surgical treatment of the degenerative lumbar spine. The less optimal outcome after uninstrumented PLF may be explained by the much higher reoperation rate. PMID:26225282

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Uninstrumented Posterolateral Fusion in the Degenerative Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Jalalpour, Kourosh; Neumann, Pavel; Johansson, Christer; Hedlund, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Objective Despite a large number of publications of outcomes after spinal fusion surgery, there is still no consensus on the efficacy of the several different fusion methods. The aim of this study was to determine whether transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) results in an improved clinical outcome compared with uninstrumented posterolateral fusion (PLF) in the surgical treatment for chronic low back pain. Methods This study included 135 patients with degenerative disk disease (n = 96) or postdiskectomy syndrome (n = 39). Inclusion criteria were at least 1 year of back pain with or without leg pain in patients aged 20 to 65 with one- or two-level disease. Exclusion criteria were sequestration of disk hernia, psychosocial instability, isthmic spondylolisthesis, drug abuse, and previous spine surgery other than diskectomy. Pain was assessed by visual analog scale (pain index). Functional disability was quantified by the disability rating index and Oswestry Disability Index. The global outcome was assessed by the patient and classified as much better, better, unchanged, or worse. The patients were randomized to conventional uninstrumented PLF (n = 67) or TLIF (n = 68). PLF was performed in a standardized fashion using autograft. TLIF was performed with pedicle titanium screw fixation and a porous tantalum interbody spacer with interbody and posterolateral autograft. The clinical outcome measurements were obtained preoperatively and at 12 and 24 months postoperatively. The 2-year follow-up rate was 98%. Results The two treatment groups improved significantly from preoperatively to 2 years' follow-up. At final follow-up, the results in the TLIF group were significantly superior to those in the PLF group in pain index (2.0 versus 3.9, p = 0.007) and in disability rating index (22 versus 36, p = 0.003). The Oswestry Disability Index was better in the TLIF group (20 versus 28, p = 0.110, not significant). The global assessment was clearly superior in the TLIF group: 63% of patients scored “much better” in the TLIF group as compared with 48% in the PLF group (p = 0.017). Conclusions The results of the current study support the use of TLIF rather than uninstrumented PLF in the surgical treatment of the degenerative lumbar spine. The less optimal outcome after uninstrumented PLF may be explained by the much higher reoperation rate. PMID:26225282

  6. Unilateral versus bilateral pedicle screw instrumentation for single-level minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaolong; Zhang, Hailong; Gu, Xin; Gu, Guangfei; Zhou, Xu; He, Shisheng

    2014-09-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) has become an increasingly popular method of lumbar arthrodesis. However, there are few published studies comparing the clinical outcomes between unilateral and bilateral instrumented MIS TLIF. Sixty-five patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease were enrolled in this study. Thirty-one patients were randomized to the unilateral group and 34 to the bilateral group. Recorded demographic data included sex, age, preoperative diagnosis, and degenerated segment. Operative time, blood loss, hospital stay length, complication rates, and fusion rates were also evaluated. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score data were obtained. All patients were asked to follow-up at 3 and 6 months after surgery, and once every 6 months thereafter. The mean follow-up was 26.6 months (range 18-36 months). The two groups were similar in sex, age, preoperative diagnosis, and operated level. The unilateral group had significantly shorter operative time, lower blood loss, and shorter hospital time than the bilateral group. The average postoperative ODI and VAS scores improved significantly in each group. No significant differences were found between the two groups in relation to ODI and VAS. All patients showed evidence of fusion at 12 months postoperatively. The total fusion rate, screw failure, and general complication rate were not significantly different. Results showed that single-level MIS TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw fixation would be sufficient in the management of preoperatively stable patients with lumbar degenerative disease. It seems that MIS TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw instrumentation is a better choice for single-level degenerative lumbar spine disease. PMID:24814852

  7. Outcomes and Complications following Posterior Long Lumbar Fusions Exceeding Three Levels

    PubMed Central

    NISHIMURA, Yusuke; HARA, Masahito; NAKAJIMA, Yasuhiro; HAIMOTO, Shoichi; YAMAMOTO, Yuu; WAKABAYASHI, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The outcomes and complications of posterior-only lumbar instrumented long fusions exceeding three segments with selective segmental transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of degenerative lumbar scoliosis, kyphosis, or both combined with spondylolisthesis were analyzed to investigate risk factors associated with surgical instrumentation failure. Fifteen consecutive patients with degenerative lumbar scoliosis, kyphosis, or both combined with spondylolisthesis were studied retrospectively. There were 5 male and 10 female patients, with a mean age of 71.8 years. All the patients were followed for a mean duration of 19.4 months postoperatively. Radiographic evaluation included coronal Cobb angle, lumbar lordosis (LL) angle, pelvic incidence (PI), and pelvic tilt (PT). The clinical outcomes were assessed by means of Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score. Patients were divided into two groups: group 17 patients with surgical complications; group 28 patients without complications. The preoperative and postoperative coronal Cobb's angle were not significantly different between groups 1 and 2. The LL highly correlated with developing surgical complications. There were statistically significant differences in preoperative and postoperative LL and the mean difference between PI and the LL (PILL) between groups 1 and 2. Linear correlation and regression analysis showed that there was no correlation between JOA score and the coronal Cobb angle in degenerative scoliosis patients. However, we found a positive correlation between JOA and LL. Our series of long lumbar fusions had a high complication and instrumentation failure. Creating adequate LL angle in harmony with PI was a key to prevent surgical complications and attain neurological improvement. PMID:25169031

  8. Comparison Between Posterior Short-segment Instrumentation Combined With Lateral-approach Interbody Fusion and Traditional Wide-open Anterior-Posterior Surgery for the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Fractures.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Lu, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the radiographic and clinical outcomes between posterior short-segment pedicle instrumentation combined with lateral-approach interbody fusion and traditional anterior-posterior (AP) surgery for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures.Lateral-approach interbody fusion has achieved satisfactory results for thoracic and lumbar degenerative disease. However, few studies have focused on the use of this technique for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures.Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established. All patients who meet the above criteria were prospectively treated by posterior short-segment instrumentation and secondary-staged minimally invasive lateral-approach interbody fusion, and classified as group A. A historical group of patients who were treated by traditional wide-open AP approach was used as a control group and classified as group B. The radiological and clinical outcomes were compared between the 2 groups.There were 12 patients in group A and 18 patients in group B. The mean operative time and intraoperative blood loss of anterior reconstruction were significantly higher in group B than those in group A (127.1??21.7 vs 197.5??47.7?min, P?posterior short-segment pedicle instrumentation, combined with minimally invasive lateral-approach interbody fusion, can achieve similar clinical results with significant less operative time, blood loss, and surgical complication. This procedure seems to be a reasonable treatment option for selective patients with thoracolumbar fractures. PMID:26554800

  9. Instrumented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in surgical treatment of recurrent disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Ghayem Hasankhani, Ebrahim; Noroozi, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: The incidence of recurrence in patients undergoing primary discectomy due to lumbar disc herniation (LDH), is regularly reported as 5-15%. In this study we aimed to evaluate surgical outcome of instrumented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in the patients suffering from recurrent LDH. Methods: We retrospectively studied 51 patients (30 female, 21 male) from August 2007 to October 2011. The mean age and follow-up of the patients was 46.4±14.8 (ranged; 29-77 years old) and 31.4±6.8 (ranged; 25-50 months), respectively. Clinical improvement was assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjective satisfaction rate, while fusion was appraised radiologically. Data analysis was by one sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov, paired t, and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: Surgery could significantly improve mean leg and lumbar VAS and ODI from preoperative 7.4±2.5, 7.8±3.1, and 72.1±21.5 to postoperative 3.4±3.6, 3.5±2.6, and 27.5±18.0, respectively at the last follow-up visit. Subjective satisfaction rate was excellent in 24 patients (47.1%), good in 14 (27.5%), fair 11 (21.6%), and poor in two (3.9%). We had one patient with iatrogenic partial L5 nerve root injury and one with unknown late onset refractory postoperative back pain. Fusion rate was 100% and instrument failure was nil. Conclusion: In surgical treatment of the patients with recurrent LDH, bilaterally instrumented TLIF is a relatively safe and effective procedure and can be associated with least instrument failure and highest fusion rate while no postoperative bracing is also needed. PMID:25679003

  10. Comparison of SpineJet XL and Conventional Instrumentation for Disk Space Preparation in Unilateral Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Han-Yong; Ji, Cheol; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik

    2010-01-01

    Objective Although unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is widely used because of its benefits, it does have some technical limitations. Removal of disk material and endplate cartilage is difficult, but essential, for proper fusion in unilateral surgery, leading to debate regarding the surgery's limitations in removing the disk material on the contralateral side. Therefore, authors have conducted a randomized, comparative cadaver study in order to evaluate the efficiency of the surgery when using conventional instruments in the preparation of the disk space and when using the recently developed high-pressure water jet system, SpineJet XL. Methods Two spine surgeons performed diskectomies and disk preparations for TLIF in 20 lumbar disks. All cadaver/surgeon/level allocations for preparation using the SpineJet XL (HydroCision Inc., Boston, MA, USA) or conventional tools were randomized. All assessments were performed by an independent spine surgeon who was unaware of the randomizations. The authors measured the areas (cm2) and calculated the proportion (%) of the disk surfaces. The duration of the disk preparation and number of instrument insertions and withdrawals required to complete the disk preparation were recorded for all procedures. Results The proportion of the area of removed disk tissue versus that of potentially removable disk tissue, the proportion of the area of removed endplate cartilage, and the area of removed disk tissue in the contralateral posterior portion showed 74.5 17.2%, 18.5 12.03%, and 67.55 16.10%, respectively, when the SpineJet XL was used, and 52.6 16.9%, 22.8 17.84%, and 51.64 19.63%, respectively, when conventional instrumentations were used. The results also showed that when the SpineJet XL was used, the proportion of the area of removed disk tissue versus that of potentially removable disk tissue and the area of removed disk tissue in the contralateral posterior portion were statistically significantly high (p < 0.001, p < 0.05, respectively). Also, compared to conventional instrumentations, the duration required to complete disk space preparation was shorter, and the frequency of instrument use and the numbers of insertions/withdrawals were lower when the SpineJet XL was used. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that hydrosurgery using the SpineJet XL unit allows for the preparation of a greater portion of disk space and that it is less traumatic and allows for more precise endplate preparation without damage to the bony endplate. Furthermore, the SpineJet XL appears to provide tangible benefits in terms of disk space preparation for graft placement, particularly when using the unilateral TLIF approach. PMID:20539797

  11. Accidental Durotomy in Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Frequency, Risk Factors, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Florian; Krüger, Marie T.; Kogias, Evangelos; Rölz, Roland; Sircar, Ronen; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the frequency, risk factors, and management of accidental durotomy in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF). Methods. This single-center study retrospectively investigates 372 patients who underwent MIS TLIF and were mobilized within 24 hours after surgery. The frequency of accidental durotomies, intraoperative closure technique, body mass index, and history of previous surgery was recorded. Results. We identified 32 accidental durotomies in 514 MIS TLIF levels (6.2%). Analysis showed a statistically significant relation of accidental durotomies to overweight patients (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2; P = 0.0493). Patient age older than 65 years tended to be a positive predictor for accidental durotomies (P = 0.0657). Mobilizing patients on the first postoperative day, we observed no durotomy-associated complications. Conclusions. The frequency of accidental durotomies in MIS TLIF is low, with overweight being a risk factor for accidental durotomies. The minimally invasive approach seems to minimize durotomy-associated complications (CSF leakage, pseudomeningocele) because of the limited dead space in the soft tissue. Patients with accidental durotomy can usually be mobilized within 24 hours after MIS TLIF without increased risk. The minimally invasive TLIF technique might thus be beneficial in the prevention of postoperative immobilization-associated complications such as venous thromboembolism. This trial is registered with DRKS00006135. PMID:26075294

  12. Usefulness of Contralateral Indirect Decompression through Minimally Invasive Unilateral Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jun-Yeul

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose This study aims to investigate the clinical and radiological results of contralateral indirect decompression through minimally invasive unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF). Overview of Literature Several studies have proposed that blood loss and operation time could be reduced through a unilateral approach, although many surgeons have forecast that satisfactory foraminal decompression is difficult to achieve through a unilateral approach. Methods The study included 30 subjects who had undergone single-level MI-TLIF. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were analyzed for clinical assessment. Disc height, segmental lordosis, and lumbar lordosis angle were examined for radiological assessment. The degree of contralateral indirect decompression was evaluated through a comparative analysis, with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed preoperatively and at one year postoperatively. Results Intraoperative blood loss volume was 308.75 mL in the unilateral approach group (UAP), and 575.00 mL in the bilateral approach group (BAP), showing a statistically significant difference. Operation time was 139.50 minutes in the UAP group, and 189.00 minutes in the BAP group, exhibiting a statistically significant difference (p<0.05). On the other hand, no significant difference was found in VAS, ODI, disc height, lordosis angles and the degree of nerve decompression in the vertebral foramen, using MRI, between the two groups (p>0.05). Conclusions Satisfactory results were acquired with MI-TLIF conducted through the unilateral approach of contralateral indirect decompression, in alignment with the bilateral approach. Therefore, contralateral indirect decompression is thought to be a useful procedure in reducing the operation time and volume of blood loss. PMID:25187862

  13. Minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion for adult degenerative scoliosis with 1 or 2 dislocated levels.

    PubMed

    Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles-Henri; Ratte, Louis; Poignard, Alexandre; Auregan, Jean-Charles; Queinnec, Steffen; Hernigou, Philippe; Allain, Jrme

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Frequent complications of posterolateral instrumented fusion have been reported after treatment of degenerative scoliosis in elderly patients. Considering that in some cases, most of the symptomatology of adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS) is a consequence of the segmental instability at the dislocated level, the use of minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) to manage symptoms can be advocated to reduce surgical morbidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the midterm outcomes of 1- or 2-level minimally invasive ALIFs in ADS patients with 1- or 2-level dislocations. METHODS A total of 47 patients (average age 64 years; range 43-80 years) with 1- or 2-level ALIF performed for ADS (64 levels) in a single institution were included in the study. An independent spine surgeon retrospectively reviewed all the patients' medical records and radiographs to assess operative data and surgery-related complications. Clinical outcome was reported using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the visual analog scale (VAS) for lumbar and leg pain. Intraoperative data and complications were collected. Fusion and risk for adjacent-level degeneration were assessed. RESULTS The mean follow-up duration was 3 years (range 1-10 years). ODI, and back and leg pain VAS scores were significantly improved at last follow-up. A majority of patients (74%) had a statistically significant improvement in their ODI score of more than 20 points at latest follow-up and 1 had a worsening of his disability. The mean operating time was 166 minutes (range 70-355 minutes). The mean estimated blood loss was 410 ml (range 50-1700 ml). Six (5 major and 1 minor) surgical complications (12.7% of patients) and 13 (2 major and 11 minor) medical complications (27.7% of patients) occurred without death or wound infection. Fusion was achieved in 46 of 47 patients. Surgery resulted in a slight but significant decrease of the Cobb angle, and improved the pelvic parameters and lumbar lordosis, but had no effect on the global sagittal balance. At latest follow-up, 9 patients (19.1%) developed adjacent-segment disease at a mean of 2 years' delay from the index surgery; 4 were symptomatic but treated medically, and none required iterative surgery. CONCLUSIONS Single- or 2-level minimally invasive fusion through a minimally invasive anterior approach in some selected cases of ADS produced a good functional outcome with a high fusion rate. They were associated with a significantly lower rate of complications in this study than the historical control. PMID:26315959

  14. Minimally-invasive posterior lumbar stabilization for degenerative low back pain and sciatica. A review.

    PubMed

    Bonaldi, G; Brembilla, C; Cianfoni, A

    2015-05-01

    The most diffused surgical techniques for stabilization of the painful degenerated and instable lumbar spine, represented by transpedicular screws and rods instrumentation with or without interbody cages or disk replacements, require widely open and/or difficult and poorly anatomical accesses. However, such surgical techniques and approaches, although still considered "standard of care", are burdened by high costs, long recovery times and several potential complications. Hence the effort to open new minimally-invasive surgical approaches to eliminate painful abnormal motion. The surgical and radiological communities are exploring, since more than a decade, alternative, minimally-invasive or even percutaneous techniques to fuse and lock an instable lumbar segment. Another promising line of research is represented by the so-called dynamic stabilization (non-fusion or motion preservation back surgery), which aims to provide stabilization to the lumbar spinal units (SUs), while maintaining their mobility and function. Risk of potential complications of traditional fusion methods (infection, CSF leaks, harvest site pain, instrumentation failure) are reduced, particularly transitional disease (i.e., the biomechanical stresses imposed on the adjacent segments, resulting in delayed degenerative changes in adjacent facet joints and discs). Dynamic stabilization modifies the distribution of loads within the SU, moving them away from sensitive (painful) areas of the SU. Basic biomechanics of the SU will be discussed, to clarify the mode of action of the different posterior stabilization devices. Most devices are minimally invasive or percutaneous, thus accessible to radiologists' interventional practice. Devices will be described, together with indications for patient selection, surgical approaches and possible complications. PMID:24906245

  15. Open and Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Comparison of Intermediate Results and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Hee, Hwan Tak

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Purpose To compare clinical and radiological outcomes of open vs. minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF). Overview of Literature MI-TLIF promises smaller incisions and less soft tissue dissection resulting in lower morbidity and faster recovery; however, it is technically challenging. Methods Twenty-five patients with MI-TLIF were compared with 25 matched open TLIF controls. A minimum 2 year follow-up and a statistical analysis of perioperative and long-term outcomes were performed. Potential complications were recorded. Results The mean ages for the open and MI-TLIF cases were 44.4 years (range, 19-69 years) and 43.6 years (range, 20-69 years), respectively. The male:female ratio was 13:12 for both groups. Average follow-up was 26.9 months for the MI-TLIF group and 29.3 months for the open group. Operative duration was significantly longer in the MI-TLIF group than that in the open group (p<0.05). No differences in estimated blood loss, duration to ambulation, or length of stay were found. Significant improvements in the Oswestry disability index and EQ-5D functional scores were observed at 6-, 12-, and 24-months in both groups, but no significant difference was detected between the groups. Fusion rates were comparable. Cage sizes were significantly smaller in the MI-TLIF group at the L5/S1 level (p<0.05). One patient had residual spinal stenosis at the MI-TLIF level, and one patient who underwent two-level MI-TLIF developed a deep vein thrombosis resulting in a pulmonary embolism. Conclusions MI-TLIF and open TLIF had comparable long-term benefits. Due to technical constraints, patients should be advised on the longer operative time and potential undersizing of cages at the L5S1 level. PMID:25901228

  16. Minimally Invasive Extraforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Revision Surgery: A Technique through Kambin's Triangle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Gue; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of minimally invasive extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF) for revision surgery. Methods From January 2011 to December 2012, 12 patients who underwent minimally invasive ELIF through the Kambin's triangle for revision surgery were included in this study. All patients underwent the surgical procedure in the following sequence: (1) epidural anesthesia, (2) exposing the Kambin's triangle toward the lateral part of the dura (partial resection of the superior articular process), (3) bilateral cage insertion for reinforcement of stabilization and fusion, and (4) percutaneous transpedicular screwing. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS), and Oswestry disability index (ODI). Imaging and clinical findings including surgical techniques, clinical outcomes, and related complications were depicted and analyzed. Results The mean age of the patients (5 men, 7 women) was 60.7±13.4 years, and the mean follow-up period was 27.1±4.9 months. The mean VAS (back and leg) score improved significantly at final follow-up. The mean ODI score decreased as follows: preoperative, 76.78±6.08; 3 months after the surgery, 37.74±6.67; and at final follow-up, 29.91±2.98. Two patients presented with transient nerve root irritation, but there were no cases of incidental dural tear or serious infection. No significant neurological deterioration or major complication was noted in any of the patients. Conclusion Minimally invasive ELIF for revision surgery is an effective surgical option with a low complication rate. PMID:26834815

  17. Outcomes of Two Different Techniques Using the Lateral Approach for Lumbar Interbody Arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ivan; Briseño, Michael R.; Arrigo, Robert T.; Bains, Navpreet; Ravi, Shashank; Tran, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective To determine the short-term outcomes of two different lateral approaches to the lumbar spine. Methods This was a retrospective review performed with four fellowship-trained spine surgeons from a single institution. Two different approach techniques were identified. (1) Traditional transpsoas (TP) approach: dissection was performed through the psoas performed using neuromonitored sequential dilation. (2) Direct visualization (DV) approach: retractors are placed superficial to the psoas followed by directly visualized dissection through psoas. Outcome measures included radiographic fusion and adverse event (AE) rate. Results In all, 120 patients were identified, 79 women and 41 men. Average age was 64.2 years (22 to 86). When looking at all medical and surgical AEs, 31 patients (25.8%) had one or more AEs; 22 patients (18.3%) had a total of 24 neurologically related AEs; 15 patients (12.5%) had anterior/lateral thigh dysesthesias; 6 patients (5.0%) had radiculopathic pain; and 3 patients (2.5%) had postoperative weakness. Specifically, for neurologic AEs, the DV group had a rate of 28.0% and the TP group had a rate of 14.2% (p < 0.18). When looking at the rate of neurologic AEs in patients undergoing single-level fusions only, the DV group rate was 28.6% versus 10.2% for the TP group (p < 0.03). Conclusion Overall, 18.3% of patients sustained a postoperative neurologic AE following lateral interbody fusions. The TP approach had a statistically lower rate of neurologic-specific AE for single-level fusions. PMID:26225280

  18. Injection of Bupivacaine into Disc Space to Detect Painful Nonunion after Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF) Surgery in Patients with Discogenic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Inoue, Gen; Eguchi, Yawara; Takaso, Masashi; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Gou; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Toyone, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Junichi; Kishida, Shunji; Sato, Jun; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bupivacaine is commonly used for the treatment of back pain and the diagnosis of its origin. Nonunion is sometimes observed after spinal fusion surgery; however, whether the nonunion causes pain is controversial. In the current study, we aimed to detect painful nonunion by injecting bupivacaine into the disc space of patients with nonunion after anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) surgery for discogenic low back pain. Materials and Methods From 52 patients with low back pain, we selected 42 who showed disc degeneration at only one level (L4-L5 or L5-S1) on magnetic resonance imaging and were diagnosed by pain provocation on discography and pain relief by discoblock (the injection of bupivacaine). They underwent ALIF surgery. If the patients showed low back pain and nonunion 2 years after surgery, we injected bupivacaine into the nonunion disc space. Patients showing pain relief after injection of bupivacaine underwent additional posterior fixation using pedicle screws. These patients were followed up 2 years after the revision surgery. Results Of the 42 patient subjects, 7 showed nonunion. Four of them did not show low back pain; whereas 3 showed moderate or severe low back pain. These 3 patients showed pain reduction after injection of bupivacaine into their nonunion disc space and underwent additional posterior fixation. They showed bony union and pain relief 2 years after the revision surgery. Conclusion Injection of bupivacaine into the nonunion disc space after ALIF surgery for discogenic low back pain is useful for diagnosis of the origin of pain. PMID:24532522

  19. BMP-2-induced Neuroforaminal Bone Growth in the Setting of a Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Junyoung; Tabaraee, Ehsan; Singh, Kern

    2015-06-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) has become a popular alternative to traditional methods of lumbar decompression and fusion. When compared with the open technique, the minimally invasive approach can result in decreased pain and blood loss as well as a shorter length of hospitalization. However, the narrower working channel through the tubular retractor increases the difficulty of decortication and bone grafting. Therefore, recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMP-2) is often utilized (although this is off-label) to create a more favorable interbody fusion environment. Recently, the use of rhBMP-2 has been associated with excessive bone growth in an MIS-TLIF. If this bone growth compresses the neighboring neural structures, patients may present with either new or recurrent radicular pain. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging can demonstrate heterotopic bone growth extending from the disk space into either the ipsilateral neuroforamen or lateral recess, which may result in the compression of the exiting or traversing root, respectively. The purpose of this article and the accompanying video is to demonstrate a technique for defining and resecting rhBMP-2-induced heterotopic bone growth following a previous MIS-TLIF. PMID:25978140

  20. Microendoscopy-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar degenerative disease: short-term and medium-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Bin; Rong, Li-Min; Chen, Rui-Qiang; Dong, Jian-Wen; Xie, Pei-Gen; Zhang, Liang-Ming; Feng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate short-term and medium-term outcomes of microendoscopy-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) and open TLIF for lumbar degenerative disease. Methods: In this prospective, randomized control study, 50 cases received microendoscopy-assisted MIS-TLIF (MIS group), while another well-matched 50 cases accepted open TLIF (open group). Parameters between both groups, including surgical duration, intraoperative blood loss and radiologic exposure, postoperative analgesic usage and ambulatory time, visual analogue scale (VAS) for back and leg, functional scores, self-evaluation of surgical outcome (modified MacNab criteria), interbody fusion rate, adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) rate, as well as complication incidence were compared at 1 month and 24 months postoperatively. Results: Intraoperative blood loss and postoperative analgesic usage were significantly reduced in MIS group (P<0.05). Patients undergoing microendoscopy-assisted MIS-TLIF were able to ambulate earlier postoperatively than those receiving open TLIF (P<0.05). However, it showed prolonged surgical duration and enhanced radiologic exposure in MIS group (P<0.05). At 1 month postoperatively, MIS group was associated with more improvement of VAS and functional scores compared with open group (P<0.05). While at 24 months postoperatively, both groups revealed similar VAS and functional scores (P>0.05). Excellent and perfect scale rating by modified MacNab criteria, interbody fusion rate, ASD rate and complication incidence between both groups were nearly the same (P>0.05). Conclusions: Microendoscopy-assisted MIS-TLIF owns advantages of less iatrogenic injury, decreased blood loss, reduced analgesic usage and earlier rehabilitation, while it has drawbacks of more surgical duration and radiologic exposure. It is superior than open TLIF in terms of short-term clinical outcomes and has similar medium-term clinical outcomes.

  1. Novel Pedicle Screw and Plate System Provides Superior Stability in Unilateral Fixation for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: An In Vitro Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qingan; Zhou, Yue; Li, Changqing; Liu, Huan; Huang, Zhiping; Shang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to compare the biomechanical properties of the novel pedicle screw and plate system with the traditional rod system in asymmetrical posterior stabilization for minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF). We compared the immediate stabilizing effects of fusion segment and the strain distribution on the vertebral body. Methods Seven fresh calf lumbar spines (L3-L6) were tested. Flexion/extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were induced by pure moments of 5.0 Nm and the range of motion (ROM) was recorded. Strain gauges were instrumented at L4 and L5 vertebral body to record the strain distribution under flexion and lateral bending (LB). After intact kinematic analysis, a right sided TLIF was performed at L4-L5. Then each specimen was tested for the following constructs: unilateral pedicle screw and rod (UR); unilateral pedicle screw and plate (UP); UR and transfacet pedicle screw (TFS); UP and TFS; UP and UR. Results All instrumented constructs significantly reduced ROM in all motion compared with the intact specimen, except the UR construct in axial rotation. Unilateral fixation (UR or UP) reduced ROM less compared with the bilateral fixation (UP/UR+TFS, UP+UR). The plate system resulted in more reduction in ROM compared with the rod system, especially in axial rotation. UP construct provided more stability in axial rotation compared with UR construct. The strain distribution on the left and right side of L4 vertebral body was significantly different from UR and UR+TFS construct under flexion motion. The strain distribution on L4 vertebral body was significantly influenced by different fixation constructs. Conclusions The novel plate could provide sufficient segmental stability in axial rotation. The UR construct exhibits weak stability and asymmetrical strain distribution in fusion segment, while the UP construct is a good alternative choice for unilateral posterior fixation of MI-TLIF. PMID:25807513

  2. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation: Comparison between Primary and Revision Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Moo Sung; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery with a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) is an important minimally invasive fusion technique for the lumbar spine. Lumbar spine reoperation is challenging and is thought to have greater complication risks. The purpose of this study was to compare MIS TLIF with unilateral screw fixation perioperative results between primary and revision surgeries. This was a prospective study that included 46 patients who underwent MIS TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw. The patients were divided into two groups, primary and revision MIS TLIF, to compare perioperative results and complications. The two groups were similar in age, sex, and level of operation, and were not significantly different in the length of follow-up or clinical results. Although dural tears were more common with the revision group (primary 1; revision 4), operation time, blood loss, total perioperative complication, and fusion rates were not significantly different between the two groups. Both groups showed substantial improvements in VAS and ODI scores one year after surgical treatment. Revision MIS TLIF performed by an experienced surgeon does not necessarily increase the risk of perioperative complication compared with primary surgery. MIS TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw fixation is a valuable option for revision lumbar surgery. PMID:24949483

  3. Lateral Pressure and VAS Pain Score Analysis for the Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion Procedure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) procedure is a minimally invasive procedure that has become widely utilized. The LLIF procedure typically involves bending the table to access the disc spaces of interest due to anatomical constraints. It is unknown if this bending process is painful or what pressures are exhibited on the downside part of the body. The goal of the study was to determine whether sex, height, weight, body mass index, bed angle, or positioning relative to the break of the bed affects the downside skin pressures and VAS pain scores in awake volunteers. Methods Fifty-six volunteers were placed in the lateral decubitus position and pressure sensors were placed at the downside part of their anatomy (shoulder, T10 rib , iliac crest, and greater trochanter). The pressures were checked with the iliac crest or greater trochanter at 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 degree bed angles. VAS scores were checked when the iliac crest or greater trochanter were at the maximum bed break angles. Results A significant positive association was found between increased bed angle and pressure at all five areas on the downside body locations (p<0.0001). The greatest pressures were located at the iliac crest and greater trochanter when these specific locations were centered over the break of the bed (p<0.0001). When the iliac crest was placed at maximal bed break, each unit increase in BMI increased the VAS pain by 0.13 (p<0.0001)and men had 1.96 (p=0.0009)higher VAS scores then women. When the greater trochanter was placed at the maximal bed break, each unit increase in BMI decreased VAS pain by 0.19 (p<0.0001) and women had 1.55 (p=0.0002)higher VAS pain scores then men. Conclusions In awake volunteers, the pressure at the iliac crest or greater trochanter at the break of the bed increases by increasing the bed angle. Women with a lower BMI had high VAS pain scores when their greater trochanter was at maximal bed break. Men with higher BMI had high VAS pain scores when their iliac crest was at maximal bed break. An awareness of the iliac crest or greater trochanter at the break of the bed should be considered to prevent pain and increased pressure based on the patient's sex and BMI. PMID:26512342

  4. Prospective Analysis of a New Bone Graft in Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a 2- Year Prospective Clinical and Radiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Raskin, Yannic

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examined the efficacy and safety of bone graft material ABM/P-15 (iFACTOR) for use in posterior lumbar interbody fusion. ABM/P-15 has been used safely for more than a decade in dental applications. Methods Forty patients underwent PLIF surgery, with each patient as control. Assessments up to 24 months included radiographs, CT scan, VAS, and ODI. Primary success criteria were fusion and safety. Results Intra-cage bridging bone occurred earlier with ABM/P-15 than autograft (97.73% vs. 59.09% at 6 months). On average pain decreased 29 points and function improved 43 points. Radio dense material outside the disk space occurred more frequently with ABM/P-15 than autograft, without clinical consequence. Conclusions This study suggests that ABM/P-15 has equal or greater efficacy at 6 and 12 months. Pain improvements exceeded success criteria at all time points. Functional improvement exceeded success criteria at all time points. Clinical Relevance This study explores the safety and efficacy of an osteobiologic peptide enhanced bone graft material as a viable alternative to autograft and its attendant risks. PMID:25709887

  5. Anterior lumbar interbody surgery for spondylosis results from a classically-trained neurosurgeon.

    PubMed

    Chatha, Gurkirat; Foo, Stacy W L; Lind, Christopher R P; Budgeon, Charley; Bannan, Paul E

    2014-09-01

    Anterior lumbar surgery for degenerative disc disease (DDD) is a relatively novel technique that can prevent damage to posterior osseous, muscular and ligamentous spinal elements. This study reports the outcomes and complications in 286 patients who underwent fusion - with artificial disc implants or combined fusion and artificial disc implants - by a single-operator neurosurgeon, with up to 24 months of follow-up. The visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 (SF36) and prospective log of adverse events were used to assess the clinical outcome. Radiographic assessments of implant position and bony fusion were analysed. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were also recorded. Irrespective of pre-surgical symptoms (back pain alone or back and leg pain combined), workers' compensation status and type of surgical implant, clinically significant improvements in VAS, ODI and SF36 were primarily observed at 3 and/or 6 month follow-up, and improvements were maintained at 24 months after surgery. A 94% fusion rate was obtained; the overall complication was 9.8% which included 3.5% with vascular complications. The anterior lumbar approach can be used for treating DDD for both back pain and back and leg pain with low complication rates. With appropriate training, single-operator neurosurgeons can safely perform these surgeries. PMID:24786717

  6. Analysis of spinal lumbar interbody fusion cage subsidence using Taguchi method, finite element analysis, and artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassau, Christopher John; Litofsky, N. Scott; Lin, Yuyi

    2012-09-01

    Subsidence, when implant penetration induces failure of the vertebral body, occurs commonly after spinal reconstruction. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages may subside into the vertebral body and lead to kyphotic deformity. No previous studies have utilized an artificial neural network (ANN) for the design of a spinal interbody fusion cage. In this study, the neural network was applied after initiation from a Taguchi L 18 orthogonal design array. Three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to address the resistance to subsidence based on the design changes of the material and cage contact region, including design of the ridges and size of the graft area. The calculated subsidence is derived from the ANN objective function which is defined as the resulting maximum von Mises stress (VMS) on the surface of a simulated bone body after axial compressive loading. The ANN was found to have minimized the bone surface VMS, thereby optimizing the ALIF cage given the design space. Therefore, the Taguchi-FEA-ANN approach can serve as an effective procedure for designing a spinal fusion cage and improving the biomechanical properties.

  7. Clear Zone Formation around Screws in the Early Postoperative Stages after Posterior Lumbar Fusion Using the Cortical Bone Trajectory Technique

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To evaluate the initial fixation using the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique for posterior lumbar fusion through assessment of the clear zones around the screws and the risk factors involved. Overview of Literature Postoperative radiolucent zones (clear zones) are an indicator of poor conventional pedicle screw fixation. Methods Between January 2013 and April 2014, 19 patients (8 men and 11 women) underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion or posterior lumbar fusion using the CBT technique. A total of 109 screws were used for evaluation with measurement of the maximum insertional torque of last two screw rotations. Clear zone-positivity on plain radiographs was investigated 6 months after surgery. The relation between intraoperative insertional torque and clear zone-positivity was investigated by one-way analysis of variance. In addition, the correlation between clear zone-positivity and gender, age (<75 years old or >75 years old), or operative stabilization level (<2 or >3 vertebral levels) was evaluated using the chi-square test. Results Clear zones were observed around six screws (5.50%) in five patients (26.3%). The mean insertional torque (4.00±2.09 inlbs) of clear zone-positive screws was lower than that of clear zone-negative screws (8.12±0.50 in-lbs), but the difference was not significant. There was a significant correlation between clear zone-positivity and operative level of stabilization. Conclusions The low incidence of clear zone-positive screws indicates good initial fixation using the CBT technique. Multilevel fusions may be risk factors for clear zone generation. PMID:26713120

  8. Comparison between Minimally Invasive and Open Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Meta-Analysis of Clinical Results and Safety Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang; Chen, Wenjian; Chen, Anmin; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Objective?A meta-analysis comparing the efficacy and safety of minimally invasive and open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for degenerative lumbar diseases. Methods?A literature search of PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect, OVID, Google scholar, and Cochrane Library databases was conducted to identify relevant articles published before May 2013. Only studies that directly compared the efficacy and safety of minimally invasive and open TLIF in patients with degenerative lumbar diseases were selected. The main outcomes analyzed were the visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), complications, and fusion rates. Also evaluated were intraoperative X-ray exposure, intra-postoperative blood loss, operating time, and hospitalization. Results?The selected 14 studies included 494 patients who received minimally invasive TLIF and 500 patients given open TLIF. According to the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies, the quality scores of the studies ranged from 11 to 19. No significant differences in preoperative VAS or ODI scores, operating time, complication rate, or fusion rate were observed between these two procedures. Compared with open TLIF, minimally invasive TLIF was associated with significantly less blood loss, shorter hospitalization, and lower VAS during follow-up assessment. However, minimally invasive TLIF involved significantly more intraoperative X-ray exposure. Conclusion?Although the clinical efficacy, risk of complications and fusion rate were comparable between the two procedures, minimally invasive TLIF resulted in less blood loss, lower follow-up VAS score, and shorter perioperative hospitalization relative to open TLIF. PMID:26091113

  9. Viscoelastic Disc Arthroplasty Provides Superior Back and Leg Pain Relief in Patients with Lumbar Disc Degeneration Compared to Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Burkhard; Smith, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) is one of the most frequently diagnosed spinal diseases. The symptoms these disorders cause are anticipated to increase as the population in Western countries ages. Purpose Compare back and leg pain alleviation in patients with LDD and a viscoelastic disc prosthesis documented in the SWISSspine registry versus patients with anterior lumbar interbody fusion documented in the Spine Tango registry. Study Design Prospectively collected clinical and outcome data in two independent spine registries. Outcome Measures were back and leg pain relief on 0 to 10 numerical rating scales. Materials and Methods The analysis included a single surgeon series of 48 patients with viscoelastic total disc replacement (VTDR) from the SWISSspine registry which were compared to 131 patients with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) from the Spine Tango registry. Two linear multivariate regression models were built to assess the associations of patient characteristics with back and leg pain relief. The following covariates were included in the models: patient age and sex, disc herniation as additional diagnosis, number of treated segments, level of treated segment, treatment type (VTDR, ALIF), preoperative back and leg pain levels and follow-up interval. Results Both models showed VTDR to be associated with significantly higher back (2.76 points; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.78 - 3.73; p < 0.001) and leg pain (2.12 points; 95% CI 1.12 to 3.13; p < 0.001) relief than ALIF. Other influential factors for higher back pain relief were female sex compared with male sex (1.03 additional points; 95% CI 0.27 to 1.78; p = 0.008), monosegmental surgery compared with bisegmental surgery (1.02 additional points; 95% CI 0.21 to 1.83; p = 0.014), and higher back pain at baseline (0.87 points additional pain relief per level of preoperative back pain; 95% CI 0.70 to 1.03; p < 0.001). Other influential factors for leg pain relief were monosegmental surgery (0.93 additional points; 95% CI 0.10 to 1.77; p = 0.029) and higher leg pain at baseline (0.83 points additional pain relief per level of preoperative leg pain; 95% CI 0.70 to 0.96). In both models the L3/4 segment showed 2.36 points (95% CI -4.27 to -0.45; p = 0.016) and 3.69 points (95% CI -5.66 to -1.71; p < 0.001) less pain relief than L5/S1. Discussion Significantly higher back and leg pain relief were observed after viscoelastic total disc replacement in comparison with anterior lumbar interbody fusion. The new less rigid materials used in the second generation total disc replacements (TDRs) may make artificial disc replacement an increasingly attractive option for patients with degenerative lumbar disc disease. Further controlled and long-term follow-up studies are required for more detailed comparisons of the outcomes of these types of disc implants. The Freedom Lumbar Disc is limited by U.S. federal law to investigational use only. PMID:26196033

  10. Deep venous thrombosis following posterior lumbar spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ferree, B A; Wright, A M

    1993-06-15

    Postoperative duplex scans were performed on 185 patients undergoing posterior lumbar spinal surgery in order to identify deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Elastic compression stockings were used for prophylaxis in 74 patients (Group E.S.); intermittent pneumatic compression was used in the remaining 111 patients (Group P.C.). High-risk patients were not eliminated from either group. Laminectomy was performed on 84 patients (40 from Group E.S. and 44 from Group P.C.), and spinal fusion, on 101 patients (34 from Group E.S. and 67 from Group P.C.). A total of four patients, all from Group E.S., developed acute postoperative DVT. Intermittent pneumatic compression significantly reduced the incidence of acute postoperative DVT (P < 0.05). No statistically significant differences were found in the incidence of DVT in relation to the type of spinal procedure, length of procedure, duration of bed rest, or age of the patient. In conclusion, considering the low rate of DVT (2%) following posterior lumbar surgery and the potential complications of prophylactic anticoagulation, we continue to use intermittent pneumatic compression rather than elastic stockings for prophylaxis. PMID:8367776

  11. The Use of a Dehydrated Amnion/Chorion Membrane Allograft in Patients Who Subsequently Undergo Reexploration after Posterior Lumbar Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Subach, Brian R.; Copay, Anne G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Context. Products that can reduce development of epidural fibrosis may reduce risk for ongoing pain associated with development of scar tissue and make subsequent epidural reexploration easier. Purpose. To evaluate the use of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM) on the formation of soft tissue scarring in the epidural space. Study Design. Case series. Patient Sample. Five patients having transforaminal lumbar interbody lumbar fusion (TLIF) with posterior instrumentation and implantation of dHACM in the epidural space and subsequent epidural reexploration. Outcome Measures. Degree of scar tissue adjacent to the epidural space at reexploration. Intraoperative and postoperative complications related to dHACM and patient reported outcomes. Methods. The degree of scar tissue adjacent to the epidural space was assessed during the reexploration surgery. Patients' outcomes were collected using standard validated questionnaires. Results. Four of 5 cases had easily detachable tissue during epidural reexploration. Angiolipoma of 10% was noted in 1 case and 5% in 2 cases. Significant improvements in patient reported outcomes were observed. No intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that dHACM implant during TLIF may have favorable effects on epidural fibrosis and is well tolerated. Further studies with larger cohorts are required to prove our results. PMID:25653880

  12. [First experiences using microsurgical techniques for minimally invasive ventral interbody fusion of the lumbar spine (MINI-ALIF)].

    PubMed

    Wolf, O; Meier, U

    1999-06-01

    Minimal invasive techniques recently have become more important in spine surgery. Ventral approaches for lumbar fusion techniques are known for a long time. Their disadvantages are their size and the associated trauma. Since the early nineties two schools of minimal invasive procedures were developed. On one hand surgeons developed laparascopic methods, on the other hand traditional ventral approaches were minimized and combined with microsurgical techniques, in a way that they offer all advantages of minimal invasive procedures. This technique widely known under the acronym MINI-ALIF, which stands for MINImal invasive Antero-Lumbar Interbody Fusion, was developed for retroperitoneal approaches to the segments L2/3, L3/4, L4/5 and for the transperitoneal approach to the segment L5/S1. Its advantages include reduced technical and personnel effort, minimal traumatized tissue, low blood-loss, short operating times and reduced rates of complications. Additionally the surgeon does not need to be experienced in laparascopic methods. The operation technique is explained and discussed from the neurosurgical point of view. PMID:10432570

  13. Flexibility and fatigue evaluation of oblique as compared with anterior lumbar interbody cages with integrated endplate fixation.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Andrew L; Camisa, William J; Buttermann, Glenn R; Malcolm, James R

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT This study was undertaken to quantify the in vitro range of motion (ROM) of oblique as compared with anterior lumbar interbody devices, pullout resistance, and subsidence in fatigue. METHODS Anterior and oblique cages with integrated plate fixation (IPF) were tested using lumbar motion segments. Flexibility tests were conducted on the intact segments, cage, cage + IPF, and cage + IPF + pedicle screws (6 anterior, 7 oblique). Pullout tests were then performed on the cage + IPF. Fatigue testing was conducted on the cage + IPF specimens for 30,000 cycles. RESULTS No ROM differences were observed in any test group between anterior and oblique cage constructs. The greatest reduction in ROM was with supplemental pedicle screw fixation. Peak pullout forces were 637 ± 192 N and 651 ± 127 N for the anterior and oblique implants, respectively. The median cage subsidence was 0.8 mm and 1.4 mm for the anterior and oblique cages, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Anterior and oblique cages similarly reduced ROM in flexibility testing, and the integrated fixation prevented device displacement. Subsidence was minimal during fatigue testing, most of which occurred in the first 2500 cycles. PMID:26407089

  14. Minimally Invasive Unilateral vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation and Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Treatment of Multi-Segment Lumbar Degenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Guangrun; Wang, Jiefeng; Zhang, Heqing

    2015-01-01

    Background The choice for instrumentation with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in treatment of degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD) remains controversial. The goal of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes in consecutive patients with multi-segment DLD treated with unilateral pedicle screw (UPS) vs. bilateral pedicle screw (BPS) instrumented TLIF. Material/Methods Eighty-four consecutive patients who had multi-level MIS-TLIF were retrospectively reviewed. All data were collected to compare the clinical outcomes between the 2 groups. Results Both groups showed similar clinical function scores in VAS and ODI. The two groups differed significantly in operative time (P<0.001), blood loss (P<0.001), and fusion rate (P=0.043), respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated similar clinical outcomes between UPS fixation and BPS procedure after MIS-TLIF for multi-level DLD. Moreover, UPS technique was superior in operative time and blood loss, but represented lower fusion rate than the BPS construct did. PMID:26603050

  15. Postoperative posterior lumbar muscle changes and their relationship to segmental motion preservation or restriction: a randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Strube, Patrick; Putzier, Michael; Streitparth, Florian; Hoff, Eike K; Hartwig, Tony

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT To date, it remains unclear whether the preservation of segmental motion by total disc replacement (TDR) or motion restriction by stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) have an influence on postoperative degeneration of the posterior paraspinal muscles or the associated clinical results. Therefore, the purpose of the present prospective randomized study was to evaluate the clinical parameters and 3D quantitative radiological changes in the paraspinal muscles of the lumbar spine in surgically treated segments and superior adjacent segments after ALIF and TDR. METHODS A total of 50 patients with chronic low-back pain caused by single-level intervertebral disc degeneration (Pfirrmann Grade ? III) and/or osteochondrosis (Modic Type ? 2) without symptomatic facet joint degeneration (Fujiwara Grade ? 2, infiltration test) of the segments L4-5 or L5-S1 were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups. Twenty-five patients were treated with a stand-alone ALIF and the remaining 25 patients underwent TDR. For ALIF and TDR, a retroperitoneal approach was used. At 1 week and at 12 months after surgery, CT was used to analyze paraspinal lumbar muscle tissue volume and relative fat content. Residual muscle tissue volume at 12 months and change in the relative fat content were compared between the groups. In addition, clinical parameters (visual analog scale [VAS] for low-back pain and Oswestry Disability Index [ODI] Questionnaire Version 2 for function) were compared. RESULTS Compared with 1 week after surgery, the radiological analysis at 12 months revealed a small decrease in the posterior muscle volume (the mean decrease was < 2.5%), along with a small increase in the relative fat content (the mean increase was < 1.9%), in both groups at the index and superior adjacent segments. At the adjacent segment, the ALIF group presented significantly less muscle tissue volume atrophy and a smaller increase in fat content compared with the TDR group. At final follow-up, the clinical parameters related to pain and function were significantly improved in both groups compared with 1 week postsurgery, but there were no differences between the groups. CONCLUSIONS Motion restriction via stand-alone ALIF and motion preservation via TDR both present small changes in the posterior lumbar paraspinal muscles with regard to volume atrophy or fatty degeneration at the index and superior adjacent segments. Therefore, although the clinical outcome was not affected by the observed muscular changes, the authors concluded that the expected negative influence of motion restriction on the posterior muscles compared with motion preservation does not occur on a clinically relevant level. PMID:26360146

  16. Sacrum fracture following L5-S1 stand-alone interbody fusion for isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-11-01

    We report a 72-year-old man with a rare sacral fracture following stand-alone L5-S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion for isthmic spondylolisthesis. The man underwent a minimally invasive management strategy using posterior percutaneous pedicle fixation and partial reduction of the deformity. We also discuss the current literature on fusion procedures for isthmic spondylolisthesis. PMID:26100158

  17. Interbody fusion and instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Enker, P; Steffee, A D

    1994-03-01

    Fusion indications in adult degenerative disk disease of the lumbosacral spine include isolated disk resorption, primary and secondary instability, recurrent disk herniation, and pseudarthrosis. Common to these indications are variable proportions of biomechanical insufficiency of the motion segment, instability, deformity, and spinal stenosis. Apart from favorable psychosocial and work related variables, satisfactory outcome is dependent on treatment by a combination of diskectomy, decompression, and deformity correction, in addition to fusion. Isolated intertransverse or interbody fusions show variable fusion rates that are increased by concurrent instrumentation. Persistent pseudarthrosis rates and instrumentation failures have prompted circumferential fusion techniques. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and segmental pedicle-based plate fixation overcome earlier problems with PLIF by allowing for wide decompression and increased exposure for disk space preparation, minimizing neural injury. Pedicle fixation restores segmental stability and minimizes graft retropulsion. Restoration of anterior column support prolongs instrumentation life, and increases fusion rates irrespective of the number of levels fused. Disk space distraction, with the use of instrumentation as a working tool, permits safer decompression of the intraforaminal zone, a common area of stenosis, and single or multilevel deformity correction to restore coronal, axial, and sagittal alignment and spinal balance. Even though the surgical technique is demanding, fusion rates up to 96% and clinical success up to 86% are achieved. PMID:8131360

  18. A novel synthetic material for spinal fusion: a prospective clinical trial of porous bioactive titanium metal for lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Neo, Masashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Doi, Kenji; Ito, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Akira; Nakamura, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the efficacy and safety of porous bioactive titanium metal for use in a spinal fusion device, based on a prospective human clinical trial. A high-strength spinal interbody fusion device was manufactured from porous titanium metal. A bioactive surface was produced by simple chemical and thermal treatment. Five patients with unstable lumbar spine disease were treated surgically using this device in a clinical trial approved by our Ethics Review Committee and the University Hospital Medical Information Network. Clinical and radiological results were reported at the minimum follow-up period of 1 year. The optimal mechanical strength and interconnected structure of the porous titanium metal were adjusted for the device. The whole surface of porous titanium metal was treated uniformly and its bioactive ability was confirmed before clinical use. Successful bony union was achieved in all cases within 6 months without the need for autologous iliac crest bone grafting. Two specific findings including an anchoring effect and gap filling were evident radiologically. All clinical parameters improved significantly after the operation and no adverse effects were encountered during the follow-up period. Although a larger and longer-term follow-up clinical study is mandatory to reach any firm conclusions, the study results show that this porous bioactive titanium metal is promising material for a spinal fusion device. PMID:21369760

  19. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion rates in patients using a novel titanium implant and demineralized cancellous allograft bone sponge

    PubMed Central

    Girasole, Gerard; Muro, Gerard; Mintz, Abraham; Chertoff, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Background Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with grafting and implant options like iliac crest bone graft (ICBG), recombinant bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP), and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages have been reported to achieve extremely high fusion rates. Unfortunately, these options have also been frequently cited in the literature as causing postoperative morbidity and complications at a high cost. Knowing this, we sought to investigate TLIF using an acid-etched, roughened titanium cage that upregulates osteogenesis to see if similar fusion rates to those cited for ICBG, rhBMP, and PEEK cages could be safely achieved with minimal morbidity and complications. Materials and methods A radiographic fusion study of 82 patients who underwent TLIF using an acid-etched, roughened titanium cage with demineralized cancellous bone graft was conducted. Fusion was assessed and graded by an independent radiologist using computed tomography scan with sagittal and coronal reconstructions. Results Fusion rates at 6 months were 41 of 44 (93.2%) and at 12 months were 37 of 38 (97.4%). There were no radiographic device-related complications. Conclusions TLIF with an acid-etched, roughened titanium cage filled with a decalcified bone graft achieved similar fusion rates to historical controls using ICBG, rhBMP, and PEEK. PMID:25580378

  20. Short-Term Results of Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using Pedicle Screw with Cortical Bone Trajectory Compared with Conventional Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Kudo, Daisuke; Shimada, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case-control study. Purpose To evaluate clinical and radiological results of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) performed with cortical bone trajectory (CBT) pedicle screw insertion with those of TLIF using 'conventional' or percutaneous pedicle screw insertion. Overview of Literature CBT is a new trajectory for pedicle screw insertion in the lumbar spine; clinical and radiological results of TLIF using pedicle screws inserted with CBT are unclear. Methods In total, 26 patients (11 males, 15 females) were enrolled in this retrospective study and divided into three groups: TLIF with pedicle screw insertion by conventional minimally invasive methods via the Wiltse approach (M-TLIF, n=10), TLIF with percutaneous pedicle screw insertion (P-TLIF, n=6), and TLIF with pedicle screw insertion with CBT (CBT-TLIF, n=10). Surgical results and preand postoperative radiological findings were evaluated and compared. Results Intraoperative blood loss was significantly less with CBT-TLIF (p=0.03) than with M-TLIF. Postoperative lordotic angles did not differ significantly among the three groups. Complete fusions were obtained in 10 of 12 levels (83%) with M-TLIF, in seven levels (100%) with P-TLIF, and in 10 of 11 levels (91%) with CBT-TLIF. On postoperative computed tomography, correct positioning was seen in 84.1% of M-TLIF screws, 88.5% of P-TLIF screws, and 90% of CBT-TLIF screws. Conclusions CBT-TLIF resulted in less blood loss and a shorter operative duration than M-TLIF or P-TLIF. Postoperative rates of bone union, maintenance of lordotic angles, and accuracy of pedicle screw positions were similar among the three groups. PMID:26097661

  1. Approach-Related Complications of Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a Combined Spine and Vascular Surgical Team.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Phan, Kevin; Daly, Daniel; Rao, Prashanth J; Lennox, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected cohort data. Objective Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a commonly performed procedure for the treatment of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine. Detailed and comprehensive descriptions of intra- and postoperative complications of ALIF are surprisingly limited in the literature. In this report, we describe our experience with a team model for ALIF and report all complications occurring in our patient series. Methods Patients were prospectively enrolled between January 2009 and January 2013 by a combined spine surgeon and vascular surgeon team. All patients underwent an open ALIF using an anterior approach to the lumbosacral spine. Results From the 227 ALIF cases, mean operative blood loss was 103 mL, ranging from 30 to 900 mL. Mean operative time was 78 minutes. The average length of stay was 5.2 days. Intraoperative vascular injury requiring primary repair with suturing occurred in 15 patients (6.6%). There were 2 cases of postoperative retroperitoneal hematoma. Three patients (1.3%) had incisional hernia requiring revision surgery; 7 (3.1%) patients had prolonged ileus (>7 days) managed conservatively. Four patients described retrograde ejaculation. Sympathetic dysfunction occurred in 15 (6.6%) patients. There were 5 (2.2%) cases of superficial wound infection treated with oral antibiotics, with no deep wound infections requiring reoperation or intravenous therapy. There were no mortalities in this series. Conclusions ALIF is a safe procedure when performed by a combined vascular surgeon and spine surgeon team with acceptably low complication rates. Our series confirms that the team approach results in short operative times and length of stay, with rapid control of intraoperative vessel injury and low overall blood loss. PMID:26933616

  2. Approach-Related Complications of Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a Combined Spine and Vascular Surgical Team

    PubMed Central

    Mobbs, Ralph J.; Phan, Kevin; Daly, Daniel; Rao, Prashanth J.; Lennox, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected cohort data. Objective Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a commonly performed procedure for the treatment of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine. Detailed and comprehensive descriptions of intra- and postoperative complications of ALIF are surprisingly limited in the literature. In this report, we describe our experience with a team model for ALIF and report all complications occurring in our patient series. Methods Patients were prospectively enrolled between January 2009 and January 2013 by a combined spine surgeon and vascular surgeon team. All patients underwent an open ALIF using an anterior approach to the lumbosacral spine. Results From the 227 ALIF cases, mean operative blood loss was 103 mL, ranging from 30 to 900 mL. Mean operative time was 78 minutes. The average length of stay was 5.2 days. Intraoperative vascular injury requiring primary repair with suturing occurred in 15 patients (6.6%). There were 2 cases of postoperative retroperitoneal hematoma. Three patients (1.3%) had incisional hernia requiring revision surgery; 7 (3.1%) patients had prolonged ileus (>7 days) managed conservatively. Four patients described retrograde ejaculation. Sympathetic dysfunction occurred in 15 (6.6%) patients. There were 5 (2.2%) cases of superficial wound infection treated with oral antibiotics, with no deep wound infections requiring reoperation or intravenous therapy. There were no mortalities in this series. Conclusions ALIF is a safe procedure when performed by a combined vascular surgeon and spine surgeon team with acceptably low complication rates. Our series confirms that the team approach results in short operative times and length of stay, with rapid control of intraoperative vessel injury and low overall blood loss. PMID:26933616

  3. Perioperative Surgical Complications and Learning Curve Associated with Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Single-Institute Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Bin; Seok, Sang Ok; Jo, Byung Woo; Ha, Joong Won

    2015-01-01

    Background As surgical complications tend to occur more frequently in the beginning stages of a surgeon's career, knowledge of perioperative complications is important to perform a safe procedure, especially if the surgeon is a novice. We sought to identify and describe perioperative complications and their management in connection with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of our first 124 patients who underwent minimally invasive TLIF. The primary outcome measure was adverse events during the perioperative period, including neurovascular injury, implant-related complications, and wound infection. Pseudarthroses and adjacent segment pathologies were not included in this review. Adverse events that were not specifically related to spinal surgery and did not affect recovery were also excluded. Results Perioperative complications occurred in 9% of patients (11/124); including three cases of temporary postoperative neuralgia, two deep wound infections, two pedicle screw misplacements, two cage migrations, one dural tear, and one grafted bone extrusion. No neurologic deficits were reported. Eight complications occurred in the first one-third of the series and only 3 complications occurred in the last two-thirds of the series. Additional surgeries were performed in 6% of patients (7/124); including four reoperations (two for cage migrations, one for a misplaced screw, and one for an extruded graft bone fragment) and three hardware removals (one for a misplaced screw and two for infected cages). Conclusions We found perioperative complications occurred more often in the early period of a surgeon's experience with minimally invasive TLIF. Implant-related complications were common and successfully managed by additional surgeries in this series. We suggest greater caution should be exercised to avoid the potential complications, especially when surgeon is a novice to this procedure. PMID:25729524

  4. Biomechanical Analysis of a Newly Developed Shape Memory Alloy Hook in a Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF) In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Xu, Jing; Zhu, Yuexing; Li, Jiukun; Zhou, Si; Tian, Shunliang; Xiang, Yucheng; Liu, Xingmo; Zheng, Ying; Pan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this biomechanical study was to evaluate the stability provided by a newly developed shape memory alloy hook (SMAH) in a cadaveric transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) model. Methods Six human cadaveric spines (L1-S2) were tested in an in vitro flexibility experiment by applying pure moments of ±8 Nm in flexion/extension, left/right lateral bending, and left/right axial rotation. After intact testing, a TLIF was performed at L4-5. Each specimen was tested for the following constructs: unilateral SMAH (USMAH); bilateral SMAH (BSMAH); unilateral pedicle screws and rods (UPS); and bilateral pedicle screws and rods (BPS). The L3–L4, L4–L5, and L5-S1 range of motion (ROM) were recorded by a Motion Analysis System. Results Compared to the other constructs, the BPS provided the most stability. The UPS significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion and lateral bending; the BSMAH significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion, lateral bending, and axial rotation; and the USMAH significantly reduced the ROM in flexion and left lateral bending compared with the intact spine (p<0.05). The USMAH slightly reduced the ROM in extension, right lateral bending and axial rotation (p>0.05). Stability provided by the USMAH compared with the UPS was not significantly different. ROMs of adjacent segments increased in all fixed constructs (p>0.05). Conclusions Bilateral SMAH fixation can achieve immediate stability after L4–5 TLIF in vitro. Further studies are required to determine whether the SMAH can achieve fusion in vivo and alleviate adjacent segment degeneration. PMID:25474112

  5. Perioperative outcomes and adverse events of minimally invasive versus open posterior lumbar fusion: meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Christina L; Macwan, Kevin; Sundararajan, Kala; Rampersaud, Y Raja

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to determine the clinical comparative effectiveness and adverse event rates of posterior minimally invasive surgery (MIS) compared with open transforaminal or posterior lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF/PLIF). METHODS A systematic review of the Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases was performed. A hand search of reference lists was conducted. Studies were reviewed by 2 independent assessors to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or comparative cohort studies including at least 10 patients undergoing MIS or open TLIF/PLIF for degenerative lumbar spinal disorders and reporting at least 1 of the following: clinical outcome measure, perioperative clinical or process measure, radiographic outcome, or adverse events. Study quality was assessed using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) protocol. When appropriate, a meta-analysis of outcomes data was conducted. RESULTS The systematic review and reference list search identified 3301 articles, with 26 meeting study inclusion criteria. All studies, including 1 RCT, were of low or very low quality. No significant difference regarding age, sex, surgical levels, or diagnosis was identified between the 2 cohorts (856 patients in the MIS cohort, 806 patients in the open cohort). The meta-analysis revealed changes in the perioperative outcomes of mean estimated blood loss, time to ambulation, and length of stay favoring an MIS approach by 260 ml (p < 0.00001), 3.5 days (p = 0.0006), and 2.9 days (p < 0.00001), respectively. Operative time was not significantly different between the surgical techniques (p = 0.78). There was no significant difference in surgical adverse events (p = 0.97), but MIS cases were significantly less likely to experience medical adverse events (risk ratio [MIS vs open] = 0.39, 95% confidence interval 0.23-0.69, p = 0.001). No difference in nonunion (p = 0.97) or reoperation rates (p = 0.97) was observed. Mean Oswestry Disability Index scores were slightly better in the patients undergoing MIS (n = 346) versus open TLIF/PLIF (n = 346) at a median follow-up time of 24 months (mean difference [MIS - open] = 3.32, p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS The result of this quantitative systematic review of clinical comparative effectiveness research examining MIS versus open TLIF/PLIF for degenerative lumbar pathology suggests equipoise in patient-reported clinical outcomes. Furthermore, a meta-analysis of adverse event data suggests equivalent rates of surgical complications with lower rates of medical complications in patients undergoing minimally invasive TLIF/PLIF compared with open surgery. The quality of the current comparative evidence is low to very low, with significant inherent bias. PMID:26565767

  6. Miniopen Oblique Lateral L5-S1 Interbody Fusion: A Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Keijiro; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) has been widely used for minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), but an approach to L5-S1 is difficult because of the iliac crest. In the current study, we present 2 cases using minimally invasive oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) of L5-S1. The patients showed foraminal stenosis between L5 and S1 and severe low back and leg pain. The patients were placed in a lateral decubitus position and underwent OLIF surgery (using a cage and bone graft from the iliac crest) without posterior decompression. Posterior screws were used in the patients. Pain scores significantly improved after surgery. There was no spinal nerve, major vessel, peritoneal, or urinary injury. OLIF surgery was minimally invasive and produced good surgical results without complications. PMID:25400963

  7. Systematic Review of Thigh Symptoms after Lateral Transpsoas Interbody Fusion for Adult Patients with Degenerative Lumbar Spine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gammal, Isaac D.; Bendo, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) is a minimally invasive technique for achieving lumbar spinal fusion. While it has many advantages over open techniques it carries with it a distinct set of risks, most commonly post-operative ipsilateral thigh pain, weakness and sensory disturbances. It is vital for both the surgeon and patient to understand the risks for and outcomes of injury associated with this procedure. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the incidence, risks, and long-term clinical outcomes of post-operative thigh symptoms in patients treated with LTIF. Methods We conducted a search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane Collaboration Library, using keywords and MeSH terms, for English-language literature published through September 2014, as well as reference lists from key articles. Studies were then manually filtered to retrieve articles that met inclusion criteria. We were interested in studies that reported postoperative lower extremity symptoms after LTIF, such as pain, weakness and changes in sensation. The strength of evidence was determined based on precepts outlined by the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group (GRADE). Results A total of 392 articles were initially retrieved, with 24 ultimately meeting criteria for inclusion. The incidence of any post-operative thigh symptom varied, ranging as high as 60.7%, with 9.3% of patients experiencing a motor deficit related to direct nerve injury. Several studies reported cases of persistent symptoms at 6 months follow up. Additionally, inclusion of the L4-5 disc space and a longer duration of surgery were both identified as risks for developing postoperative thigh symptoms. Conclusion The risk of postoperative thigh symptoms after LTIF is high. Thigh pain, paresthesias and weakness were the most commonly reported symptoms. While most patients’ symptoms resolved by 6 months follow up, several studies reported patients with symptoms persistent as far as 12 months removed from surgery. Surgery at the L4-5 disc space and longer surgical duration place the patient at greater risk for developing postoperative and long-term thigh symptoms. PMID:26767154

  8. [Anterior and posterior stabilization of the lumbosacral spine with the usage of interbody cages in the operational treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis].

    PubMed

    Pankowski, Rafa?; Smoczy?ski, Andrzej; Smoczy?ski, Maciej; Luczkiewicz, Piotr; Piotrowski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    In the following work results of the operational treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis by the posterior stabilization and anterior lumbosacral interbody fusion with the use of interbody implants--cages was taken under evaluation. The test group consisted of 21 patients (13 male and 8 male). The follow up period exceeded 2 years. The objective clinical outcome assessment was based on Oswestry disability questionnaire. Subjective clinical evaluation was done by the visual analog pain score and two questions concerning the evaluation of success of the operative treatment and a possible agreement to a following operation if necessary. The radiological results were done upon evaluation of the degree of the spondylolisthesis, the angle of the lumbosacral lordosis, the height of the interbody space and intervertebral foramen and the evaluation of the spinal fusion. The conclusion was that the usage of the distraction of the lumbosacral spine in the operational treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis result in the reduction of the slippage and the dynamic decompression of the compressed neural roots. The usage of the interbody cages prevented the loss of slippage correction, permanently reconstructed the anatomical conditions in the area of the operated spinal segment and helped to achieve good and very good clinical results in over 95% of patients. The fusion rate was 100%. The restoration of the correct height of the intervertebral foramen in the slip segment caused an improvement of the neurologic state. The usage of two level stabilization in the operative treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis prevented the initiation of the secondary degenerative changes adjacent to the fusion. PMID:17128767

  9. Stability and Load Sharing Characteristics of a Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Device

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel J.; Yeager, Matthew S.; Thampi, Shankar S.; Whiting, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar interbody fusion is a common treatment for a variety of spinal pathologies. It has been hypothesized that insufficient mechanical loading of the interbody graft can prevent proper fusion of the joint. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical stability and anterior column loading sharing characteristics of a posterior dynamic system compared to titanium rods in an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model. Methods Range of motion, interpedicular kinematics and interbody graft loading were measured in human cadaveric lumbar segments tested under a pure moment flexibility testing protocol. Results Both systems provided significant fixation compared to the intact condition and to an interbody spacer alone in flexion extension and lateral bending. No significant differences in fixation were detected between the devices. A significant decrease in graft loading was detected in flexion for the titanium rod treatment compared to spacer alone. No significant differences in graft loading were detected between the spacer alone and posterior dynamic system or between the posterior dynamic system and the titanium rod. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that the posterior dynamic system provides similar fixation compared to that of a titanium rod, however, studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of fixation in a cadaver model may not be sufficiently powered to establish differences in load sharing using the techniques described here. PMID:26131403

  10. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after depletive lumbar puncture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a rare entity. Its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. Case presentation We report the case of a 69-year-old White European woman who presented complete and proportional right hemiplegia, confusion, deviation of her head and eyes to the right, cortical blindness, and generalized tonic-clonic seizure 12 hours following a depletive lumbar puncture. Emergency cerebral magnetic resonance imaging showed bioccipital and left-side basal ganglia hyperintensities in the fluid attenuated inversion recovery and the diffusion-weighted images suggesting a radiological diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Conclusions The diagnosis is established on clinical and radiological signs. This is the first report of this kind in the literature. We present a case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after depletive lumbar puncture and we discuss the pathophysiology. PMID:25063365

  11. Midline Lumbar Fusion with Cortical Bone Trajectory Screw

    PubMed Central

    MIZUNO, Masaki; KURAISHI, Keita; UMEDA, Yasuyuki; SANO, Takanori; TSUJI, Masanori; SUZUKI, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    A novel cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw technique provides an alternative fixation technique for lumbar spine. Trajectory of CBT screw creates a caudo-cephalad path in sagittal plane and a medio-lateral path in axial plane, and engages cortical bone in the pedicle. The theoretical advantage is that it provides enhanced screw grip and interface strength. Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF) is composed of posterior mid-line approach, microsurgical laminectomy, and CBT screw fixation. We adopted the MIDLF technique for lumbar spondylolisthesis. Advantages of this technique include that decompression and fusion are available in the same field, and it minimizes approach-related damages. To determine whether MIDLF with CBT screw is as effective as traditional approach and it is minimum invasive technique, we studied the clinical and radiological outcomes of MIDLF. Our results indicate that MIDLF is effective and minimum invasive technique. Evidence of effectiveness of MIDLF is that patients had good recovery score, and that CBT screw technique was safety in clinical and stable in radiological. MIDLF with CBT screw provides the surgeon with additional options for fixation. This technique is most likely to be useful for treating lumbar spondylolisthesis in combination with midline decompression and insertion of an interbody graft, such as the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion or posterior lumbar interbody fusion techniques. PMID:25169139

  12. Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial of The Stabilis Stand Alone Cage (SAC) Versus Bagby and Kuslich (BAK) Implants for Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, William; McLain, Robert F.; Rufo-Smith, Candace; Gurd, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Degenerative disc disease is common and debilitating for many patients. If conservative extensive care fails, anterior lumbar interbody fusion has proven to be an alternative form of surgical management. The Stabilis Stand Alone Cage(SAC) was introduced as a method to obtain stability and fusion. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Stabilis Stand Alone Cage (SAC) is comparable in safety and efficacy to the Bagby and Kuslich (BAK) device. Methods As part of a prospective, randomized, controlled FDA trial, 73 patients underwent anterior interbody fusion using either the SAC(56%) or the BAK device (44%). Results Background characteristics were similar between the two groups. There was no significant difference between the SAC and BAK groups in mean operative time or mean blood loss during surgery. Adverse event rates did not differ between the groups. Assessment of plain radiographs could not confirm solid fusion in 63% of control and 71% of study patients. Functional scores from Owestry and SF-36 improved in both groups by the two-year follow-up. There were no significant differences between the SAC and BAK patients with respect to outcome. Conclusions Both the Stabilis Stand Alone Cage and the BAK Cage provided satisfactory improvement in function and pain relief, despite less than expected radiographic fusion rates. The apparent incongruency between fusion rates and functional outcomes suggests that either radiographs underestimate the true incidence of fusion, or that patients are obtaining good pain relief and improved function despite a lower rate of fusion than previously reported. This was a Level III study. PMID:25694930

  13. Lumbar Disc Herniation Combined with Posterior Apophyseal Ring Separation in a Young Child: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Pius; Kim, Seok Won; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2015-09-01

    Lumbar disc herniation in children aged 10 years or less is extremely uncommon and posterior apophyseal ring separation is not a common injury that usually occurs in adolescents or young adults after a sports-related microtraumatism. The authors report an unique case of 10-year-old boy who presented with low back pain and radiating pain on both legs. The boy received conservative treatment, which included anti-inflammatory medication, muscle relaxants, and physical therapy, but symptoms were not improved. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a huge central disc herniation combined with posterior apophyseal ring separation. Microscopic lumbar discectomy with the removal of apophyseal ring separation was performed due to the intractable pain. At six months after surgery, the child was symptom free. PMID:26512269

  14. Clinical Use of 3D Printing Guide Plate in Posterior Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongliang; Wu, Dongying; Yang, Huilin; Guo, Kaijin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of use of a 3D printing guide plate in posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 43 patients receiving posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. The experimental group underwent 3D printing guide plate-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation, while the control group underwent traditional x-ray-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. After surgery, CT scanning was done to evaluate the accuracy of screw placement according to the Richter standard. RESULTS All patients were followed up for 1 month. The mean time of placement for each screw and the amount of hemorrhage was 4.92.1 min and 8.011.1 mL in the experimental group while 6.52.2 min and 59.913.0 mL in the control group, respectively, with significant differences (p<0.05). The fluoroscopy times of each screw placement was 0.50.4 in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group 1.20.7 (p<0.05). The excellent and good screw placement rate was 100% in the experimental group and 98.4% in the control group, without any statistical difference (P>0.05). No obvious complications were reported in either group. CONCLUSIONS Compared with the traditional treatment methods, the intra-operative application of 3D printing guide plate can shorten the operation time and reduce the amount of hemorrhage. It can also reduce the fluoroscopy times compared with the traditional fluoroscopy, which cannot improve the accuracy rate of screw placement. PMID:26681388

  15. Clinical Use of 3D Printing Guide Plate in Posterior Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongliang; Wu, Dongying; Yang, Huilin; Guo, Kaijin

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of use of a 3D printing guide plate in posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. Material/Methods We enrolled 43 patients receiving posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. The experimental group underwent 3D printing guide plate-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation, while the control group underwent traditional x-ray-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. After surgery, CT scanning was done to evaluate the accuracy of screw placement according to the Richter standard. Results All patients were followed up for 1 month. The mean time of placement for each screw and the amount of hemorrhage was 4.9±2.1 min and 8.0±11.1 mL in the experimental group while 6.5±2.2 min and 59.9±13.0 mL in the control group, respectively, with significant differences (p<0.05). The fluoroscopy times of each screw placement was 0.5±0.4 in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group 1.2±0.7 (p<0.05). The excellent and good screw placement rate was 100% in the experimental group and 98.4% in the control group, without any statistical difference (P>0.05). No obvious complications were reported in either group. Conclusions Compared with the traditional treatment methods, the intra-operative application of 3D printing guide plate can shorten the operation time and reduce the amount of hemorrhage. It can also reduce the fluoroscopy times compared with the traditional fluoroscopy, which cannot improve the accuracy rate of screw placement. PMID:26681388

  16. Surgical Data and Early Postoperative Outcomes after Minimally Invasive Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a Prospective, Multicenter, Observational Data-Monitored Study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Paulo; Buzek, David; Franke, Jörg; Senker, Wolfgang; Kosmala, Arkadiusz; Hubbe, Ulrich; Manson, Neil; Rosenberg, Wout; Assietti, Roberto; Martens, Frederic; Barbanti Brodano, Giovanni; Scheufler, Kai-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion (MILIF) offers potential for reduced operative morbidity and earlier recovery compared with open procedures for patients with degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD). Firm conclusions about advantages of MILIF over open procedures cannot be made because of limited number of large studies of MILIF in a real-world setting. Clinical effectiveness of MILIF in a large, unselected real-world patient population was assessed in this Prospective, monitored, international, multicenter, observational study. Objective: To observe and document short-term recovery after minimally invasive interbody fusion for DLD. Materials and Methods: In a predefined 4-week analysis from this study, experienced surgeons (≥30 MILIF surgeries pre-study) treated patients with DLD by one- or two-level MILIF. The primary study objective was to document patients’ short-term post-interventional recovery (primary objective) including back/leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS]), disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]), health status (EQ-5D) and Patient satisfaction. Results: At 4 weeks, 249 of 252 patients were remaining in the study; the majority received one-level MILIF (83%) and TLIF was the preferred approach (94.8%). For one-level (and two-level) procedures, surgery duration was 128 (182) min, fluoroscopy time 115 (154) sec, and blood-loss 164 (233) mL. Time to first ambulation was 1.3 days and time to study-defined surgery recovery was 3.2 days. Patients reported significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced back pain (VAS: 2.9 vs 6.2), leg pain (VAS: 2.5 vs 5.9), and disability (ODI: 34.5% vs 45.5%), and a significantly (P < 0.0001) improved health status (EQ-5D index: 0.61 vs 0.34; EQ VAS: 65.4 vs 52.9) 4 weeks postoperatively. One adverse event was classified as related to the minimally invasive surgical approach. No deep site infections or deaths were reported. Conclusions: For experienced surgeons, MILIF for DLD demonstrated early benefits (short time to first ambulation, early recovery, high patient satisfaction and improved patient-reported outcomes) and low major perioperative morbidity at 4 weeks postoperatively. PMID:25811615

  17. Posterior-Only Circumferential Decompression and Reconstruction in the Surgical Management of Lumbar Vertebral Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z.; Caridi, John; Cho, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?The purpose of this report is to discuss the surgical management of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and present a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with instrumentation using an expandable titanium cage and without segmental nerve root sacrifice as an option in the treatment of this disease process. Methods?We report a 42-year-old man who presented with 3 days of low back pain and chills who rapidly decompensated with severe sepsis following admission. Magnetic resonance imaging of his lumbosacral spine revealed intramuscular abscesses of the left paraspinal musculature and iliopsoas with SEA and L4 vertebral body involvement. The patient failed maximal medical treatment, which necessitated surgical treatment as a last resort for infectious source control. He underwent a previously undescribed procedure in the setting of SEA: a single-stage, posterior-only approach for circumferential decompression and reconstruction of the L4 vertebral body with posterior segmental instrumented fixation. Results?After the surgery, the patient's condition gradually improved; however, he suffered a wound dehiscence necessitating a surgical exploration and deep wound debridement. Six months after the surgery, the patient underwent a revision surgery for adjacent-level pseudarthrosis. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and off narcotic pain medication and had returned to full activity. Conclusion?This patient is the first reported case of lumbar osteomyelitis with SEA treated surgically with a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with posterior instrumentation. Although this approach is more technically challenging, it presents another viable option for the treatment of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis that may reduce the morbidity associated with an anterior approach.

  18. Posterior-Only Circumferential Decompression and Reconstruction in the Surgical Management of Lumbar Vertebral Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Caridi, John; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?The purpose of this report is to discuss the surgical management of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and present a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with instrumentation using an expandable titanium cage and without segmental nerve root sacrifice as an option in the treatment of this disease process. Methods?We report a 42-year-old man who presented with 3 days of low back pain and chills who rapidly decompensated with severe sepsis following admission. Magnetic resonance imaging of his lumbosacral spine revealed intramuscular abscesses of the left paraspinal musculature and iliopsoas with SEA and L4 vertebral body involvement. The patient failed maximal medical treatment, which necessitated surgical treatment as a last resort for infectious source control. He underwent a previously undescribed procedure in the setting of SEA: a single-stage, posterior-only approach for circumferential decompression and reconstruction of the L4 vertebral body with posterior segmental instrumented fixation. Results?After the surgery, the patient's condition gradually improved; however, he suffered a wound dehiscence necessitating a surgical exploration and deep wound debridement. Six months after the surgery, the patient underwent a revision surgery for adjacent-level pseudarthrosis. At 1-year follow-up, the patient was pain-free and off narcotic pain medication and had returned to full activity. Conclusion?This patient is the first reported case of lumbar osteomyelitis with SEA treated surgically with a single-stage, posterior-only circumferential decompression and reconstruction with posterior instrumentation. Although this approach is more technically challenging, it presents another viable option for the treatment of lumbar vertebral osteomyelitis that may reduce the morbidity associated with an anterior approach. PMID:26835214

  19. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery: Let's tell someone

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In a recent study entitled: “More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery, especially extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF): A review”, Epstein documented that more nerve root injuries occurred utilizing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) versus open lumbar surgery for diskectomy, decompression of stenosis (laminectomy), and/or fusion for instability. Methods: In large multicenter Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial reviews performed by Desai et al., nerve root injury with open diskectomy occurred in 0.13–0.25% of cases, occurred in 0% of laminectomy/stenosis with/without fusion cases, and just 2% for open laminectomy/stenosis/degenerative spondylolisthesis with/without fusion. Results: In another MIS series performed largely for disc disease (often contained nonsurgical disc herniations, therefore unnecessary procedures) or spondylolisthesis, the risk of root injury was 2% for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus 7.8% for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Furthermore, the high frequencies of radiculitis/nerve root/plexus injuries incurring during anterior lumbar interbody fusions (ALIF: 15.8%) versus extreme lumbar interbody fusions (XLIF: 23.8%), addressing disc disease, failed back surgery, and spondylolisthesis, were far from acceptable. Conclusions: The incidence of nerve root injuries following any of the multiple MIS lumbar surgical techniques (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF) resulted in more nerve root injuries when compared with open conventional lumbar surgical techniques. Considering the majority of these procedures are unnecessarily being performed for degenerative disc disease alone, spine surgeons should be increasingly asked why they are offering these operations to their patients? PMID:26904373

  20. The SNAP trial: a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial of a silicon nitride versus a PEEK cage in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages have been widely used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disc disorders, and show good clinical results. Still, complications such as subsidence and migration of the cage are frequently seen. A lack of osteointegration and fibrous tissues surrounding PEEK cages are held responsible. Ceramic implants made of silicon nitride show better biocompatible and osteoconductive qualities, and therefore are expected to lower complication rates and allow for better fusion. Purpose of this study is to show that fusion with the silicon nitride cage produces non-inferior results in outcome of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire at all follow-up time points as compared to the same procedure with PEEK cages. Methods/Design This study is designed as a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial with repeated measures analysis. 100 patients (18–75 years) presenting with symptomatic lumbar degenerative disorders unresponsive to at least 6 months of conservative treatment are included. Patients will be randomly assigned to a PEEK cage or a silicon nitride cage, and will undergo a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation. Primary outcome measure is the functional improvement measured by the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Secondary outcome parameters are the VAS leg, VAS back, SF-36, Likert scale, neurological outcome and radiographic assessment of fusion. After 1 year the fusion rate will be measured by radiograms and CT. Follow-up will be continued for 2 years. Patients and clinical observers who will perform the follow-up visits will be blinded for type of cage used during follow-up. Analyses of radiograms and CT will be performed independently by two experienced radiologists. Discussion In this study a PEEK cage will be compared with a silicon nitride cage in the treatment of symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled trial in which the silicon nitride cage is compared with the PEEK cage in patients with symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders. Trial registration NCT01557829 PMID:24568365

  1. Dynamic stabilization for L4-5 spondylolisthesis: comparison with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with more than 2 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Cheng, Henrich; Huang, Wen-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In the past decade, dynamic stabilization has been an emerging option of surgical treatment for lumbar spondylosis. However, the application of this dynamic construct for mild spondylolisthesis and its clinical outcomes remain uncertain. This study aimed to compare the outcomes of Dynesys dynamic stabilization (DDS) with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for the management of single-level spondylolisthesis at L4-5. METHODS This study retrospectively reviewed 91 consecutive patients with Meyerding Grade I spondylolisthesis at L4-5 who were managed with surgery. Patients were divided into 2 groups: DDS and MI-TLIF. The DDS group was composed of patients who underwent standard laminectomy and the DDS system. The MI-TLIF group was composed of patients who underwent MI-TLIF. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by visual analog scale for back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores at each time point of evaluation. Evaluations included radiographs and CT scans for every patient for 2 years after surgery. RESULTS A total of 86 patients with L4-5 spondylolisthesis completed the follow-up of more than 2 years and were included in the analysis (follow-up rate of 94.5%). There were 64 patients in the DDS group and 22 patients in the MI-TLIF group, and the overall mean follow-up was 32.7 months. Between the 2 groups, there were no differences in demographic data (e.g., age, sex, and body mass index) or preoperative clinical evaluations (e.g., visual analog scale back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores). The mean estimated blood loss of the MI-TLIF group was lower, whereas the operation time was longer compared with the DDS group (both p < 0.001). For both groups, clinical outcomes were significantly improved at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after surgery compared with preoperative clinical status. Moreover, there were no differences between the 2 groups in clinical outcomes at each evaluation time point. Radiological evaluations were also similar and the complication rates were equally low in both groups. CONCLUSIONS At 32.7 months postoperation, the clinical and radiological outcomes of DDS were similar to those of MI-TLIF for Grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis at L4-5. DDS might be an alternative to standard arthrodesis in mild lumbar spondylolisthesis. However, unlike fusion, dynamic implants have issues of wearing and loosening in the long term. Thus, the comparable results between the 2 groups in this study require longer follow-up to corroborate. PMID:26721577

  2. Sponge-induced granuloma ("gauzoma") as a complication of posterior lumbar surgery.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Mehmet; Akyz, Orhan; Ozsunar, Yelda; Kacar, Fruzan

    2005-04-01

    A 45-year-old woman presented with complaints of low back pain and sciatica on the left persisting for 2 years. She had undergone left hemilaminectomy and discectomy for L4-5 intervertebral disc herniation at another medical center. Spinal computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a mass lesion in the posterior paravertebral region. The mass was hypointense with ring enhancement on the T(1)-weighted images and hyperintense on the T(2)-weighted images. Surgery found a retained sponge within the paraspinal mass cavity which was removed totally. Foreign-body granuloma ("gauzoma") induced by forgotten sponge material is not an unusual complication of posterior lumbar surgery and should be considered as a potential cause in cases of surgical wound infections. MR imaging is essential to achieve the correct differential diagnosis. PMID:15849460

  3. A biomechanical comparison of 3 different posterior fixation techniques for 2-level lumbar spinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fubing; Feng, Zhenzhou; Liu, Tianze; Fei, Qinming; Jiang, Chun; Li, Yuanchao; Jiang, Xiaoxing; Dong, Jian

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT This study sought to make a biomechanical comparison of 3 different posterior fixation techniques for 2-level lumbar spinal disorders. METHODS Eight fresh-frozen human cadaver lumbar spines (4 from L-1 to L-5, 4 from L-1 to S-1) were tested by applying pure moments of ± 8 Nm. Each specimen was first tested intact, and then the left facetectomies of L3-4 and L4-5 were performed to establish an unstable condition without removal of discs. Three instrumentation systems were then tested randomly: unilateral pedicle screw (UPS), UPS with contralateral translaminar facet screw (UPSFS), and bilateral pedicle screw (BPS). The range of motion (ROM) and the neutral zone (NZ) of L3-5 were measured. RESULTS All fixation types could reduce the ROM of L3-5 significantly in flexion, extension, and lateral bending, compared with the intact state. In axial torsion, only BPS reduced the ROM significantly, compared with the intact state. The UPSFS technique provided intermediate stability, which was superior to the UPS in flexion-extension and lateral bending, and inferior to the BPS in lateral bending. Compared with the intact state, the NZs decreased significantly for UPS, UPSFS, and BPS in flexion-extension, while not significantly in lateral bending and axial torsion. CONCLUSIONS In this study, among the 3 fixation techniques, BPS offered the highest stability, UPSFS provided intermediate stability, and UPS was the least stable for 2-level lumbar spinal disorders. UPSFS appeared to be able to offer a less invasive choice than BPS in well-selected patients with 2-level lumbar spinal disorders. PMID:26637067

  4. Continuous Femoral Versus Posterior Lumbar Plexus Nerve Blocks for Analgesia After Hip Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Ilfeld, Brian M.; Mariano, Edward R.; Madison, Sarah J.; Loland, Vanessa J.; Sandhu, NavParkash S.; Suresh, Preetham J.; Bishop, Michael L.; Kim, T. Edward; Donohue, Michael C.; Kulidjian, Anna A.; Ball, Scott T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hip arthroplasty frequently requires potent postoperative analgesia, often provided with an epidural or posterior lumbar plexus local anesthetic infusion. However, American Society of Regional Anesthesia guidelines now recommend against epidural and continuous posterior lumbar plexus blocks during administration of various perioperative anticoagulants often administered after hip arthroplasty. A continuous femoral nerve block is a possible analgesic alternative, but whether it provides comparable analgesia to a continuous posterior lumbar plexus block after hip arthroplasty remains unclear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that differing the catheter insertion site (femoral versus posterior lumbar plexus) after hip arthroplasty has no impact on postoperative analgesia. METHODS Preoperatively, subjects undergoing hip arthroplasty were randomly assigned to receive either a femoral or posterior lumbar plexus stimulating catheter inserted 5 to 15 cm or 0 to 1 cm past the needletip, respectively. Postoperatively, patients received perineural ropivacaine, 0.2% (basal 6 mL/hour, bolus 4 mL, 30 min lockout) for at least two days. The primary end point was the average daily pain scores as measured with a numeric rating scale (010) recorded in the 24-h period beginning at 07:30 the morning after surgery, excluding twice-daily physical therapy sessions. Secondary end points included pain during physical therapy, ambulatory distance, and supplemental analgesic requirements during the same 24-h period, as well as satisfaction with analgesia during hospitalization. RESULTS The mean (SD) pain scores for subjects receiving a femoral infusion (n = 25) were 3.6 (1.8) versus 3.5 (1.8) for patients receiving a posterior lumbar plexus infusion (n = 22) resulting in a group difference of 0.1 (95% confidence interval ?0.9 to 1.2; P = 0.78). Because the confidence interval was within a prespecified ?1.6 to 1.6 range, we conclude that the effect of the two analgesic techniques on postoperative pain was equivalent. Similarly, we detected no differences between the two treatments with respect to the secondary end points, with one exception: subjects with a femoral catheter ambulated a median (10th90th percentiles) 2 (017) m the morning after surgery, compared with 11 (031) m for subjects with a posterior lumbar plexus catheter (data nonparametric; P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS After hip arthroplasty, a continuous femoral nerve block is an acceptable analgesic alternative to a continuous posterior lumbar plexus block when using a stimulating perineural catheter. However, early ambulatory ability suffers with a femoral infusion. PMID:21467563

  5. Posterior Laminoplastic Laminotomy Combined with a Paraspinal Transmuscular Approach for Removing a Lumbar Dumbbell-shaped Schwannoma: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    NGERAGEZA, Japhet Gideon; ITO, Kiyoshi; AOYAMA, Tatsuro; MURATA, Takahiro; HORIUCHI, Tetsuyoshi; HONGO, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The surgical strategies and methods used to treat dumbbell-shaped tumors located in the lumbar-foraminal region are controversial. Although a total facetectomy and combined intra- and extraspinal canal approach provide a wide operative field, facet fusion is required, which can be rather invasive. Here, we report a successful removal of a lumbar dumbbell-shaped schwannoma using a combined laminoplastic laminotomy with Wiltses paraspinal surgical approach. This was performed under an operating microscope without a complete facetectomy, fusion, and posterior fixation. Briefly, we treated two patients with lumbar foraminal tumors, both dumbbell-shaped schwannomas located in the intra- and extradural portion. After a laminoplastic laminotomy, the intradural tumor was removed. The tumor located at the extracanalicular site was removed after drilling the pars interarticularis of the lamina, which was performed to enlarge the intervertebral foramen via Wiltses paraspinal surgical approach. During surgery, facetectomy with posterior fixation was not needed to remove the intraforaminal component. There was no lumbar instability or complication after surgery. Our results suggest that a combined posterior laminoplastic laminotomy and Wiltses paraspinal surgical approach is useful and less invasive for treating patients with lumbar foraminal tumors. PMID:26345670

  6. Therapy for thoracic lumbar and sacral vertebrae tumors using total spondylectomy and spine reconstruction through posterior or combined anterior-posterior approaches

    PubMed Central

    YANG, PINGLIN; HE, XIJING; LI, HAOPENG; ZANG, QUANJIN; WANG, GUOYU

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to analyze the indications, feasibility, safety and clinical effects of total spondylectomy and spine reconstruction through posterior or combined anterior-posterior approaches for thoracic lumbar and sacral vertebrae tumors. Between December 2009 and May 2012, 10 patients with thoracic lumbar and sacral vertebrae tumors were retrospectively analyzed. Different surgical indications and approaches were used according to the affected segments, the extent of lesion involvement and the specific pathology results. One-stage posterior or combined anterior-posterior total spondylectomy and reconstruction was used for the treatment of complicated thoracic lumbar and sacral vertebral malignant tumors and invasive benign tumors. The duration of surgery, levels of intraoperative blood loss and transfusions, and the clinical effects were observed. The average surgical duration was 6.8 h (range, 4.8–12 h), with an average blood loss level of 3,200 ml (range, 1,500–10,000 ml) and an average transfusion level of 2,500 ml. During the average 15 months (range, 3–29 months) follow up, two patients succumbed and one patient experienced tumor recurrence. Neither tumor reoccurrence nor metastasis was observed in all other patients. Personalized surgical indications and approaches according to the affected segments, the extent of lesion involvement and the specific pathology results would aid in the reduction of pain, the improvement of nerve function and the reduction of tumor recurrence.

  7. Sleep apnoea adversely affects the outcome in patients who undergo posterior lumbar fusion: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Stundner, O; Chiu, Y-L; Sun, X; Ramachandran, S-K; Gerner, P; Vougioukas, V; Mazumdar, M; Memtsoudis, S G

    2014-02-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of sleep apnoea, little information is available regarding its impact on the peri-operative outcome of patients undergoing posterior lumbar fusion. Using a national database, patients who underwent lumbar fusion between 2006 and 2010 were identified, sub-grouped by diagnosis of sleep apnoea and compared. The impact of sleep apnoea on various outcome measures was assessed by regression analysis. The records of 84,655 patients undergoing posterior lumbar fusion were identified and 7.28% (n = 6163) also had a diagnostic code for sleep apnoea. Compared with patients without sleep apnoea, these patients were older, more frequently female, had a higher comorbidity burden and higher rates of peri-operative complications, post-operative mechanical ventilation, blood product transfusion and intensive care. Patients with sleep apnoea also had longer and more costly periods of hospitalisation. In the regression analysis, sleep apnoea emerged as an independent risk factor for the development of peri-operative complications (odds ratio (OR) 1.50, confidence interval (CI) 1.38;1.62), blood product transfusions (OR 1.12, CI 1.03;1.23), mechanical ventilation (OR 6.97, CI 5.90;8.23), critical care services (OR 1.86, CI 1.71;2.03), prolonged hospitalisation and increased cost (OR 1.28, CI 1.19;1.37; OR 1.10, CI 1.03;1.18). Patients with sleep apnoea who undergo posterior lumbar fusion pose significant challenges to clinicians. PMID:24493191

  8. Synovial cyst in a posterior lumbar joint associated with sacralization at L5. Description of a case.

    PubMed

    Mariconda, M; Lotti, G; Ammendolia, A; Milano, A

    2001-01-01

    Synovial cysts may occasionally be localized in the facet joints of the lumbar spine. These lesions are usually secondary to interapophyseal arthritis or trauma, that may cause hypermobility of the facet joints. Given the frequent association with arthrosis, synovial cysts are more often observed at L4-L5, which represents the level of greater mobility in the lumbar spine, in subjects aged over 50 years. A rare case of synovial cyst of the posterior joint of L5-S1 associated with sacralization of L5, a congenital anomaly that determines considerable segmental mechanical stability, is described. PMID:12025105

  9. Transiliac lengthening with posterior lumbar-iliac percutaneous fusion in sacral hemiagenesis.

    PubMed

    Mesa, Pedro Antonio Sánchez

    2011-08-01

    Sacral agenesis is a term that applies to a wide range of developmental disorders of the lower portions of the spine and pelvis. Hemisacrum patients with all sacral segments present on one side of the spine, and decompensated lumbar rotoscoliosis, whit instability torac-pelvic that had transiliac lengthening of the lower extremity, accomplished by an innominate osteotomy with interposition of a rectangular iliac-bone graft in the osteotomy site, besides a posterior lumbar-iliac percutaneous fusion. We reported 5 adolescent patients, 2 men and 3 women, treated from 2000 to 2009, associated with average pelvic imbalance of 3.2 cm (2.5-4.5 cm) without other associated congenital anomalies. Patients classified as Vergara (Acta Ortop Mex 19:6-12, 2005) type IB unilateral partial agenesis of the sacrum, asymmetry of the pelvic ring there's a torac-pelvic cifoscoliotic deformity. Mean age was 12.2 years-old (range from 8.2 to 13.7). The mean follow-up was 7.2 years (from 2 to 8). The consolidation process of the osteotomy site was in an average of 6.4 (5-8.7 weeks) (P = 0.036). None of the patients presented family medical history of diabetes on their mothers. None residual femoral nerve palsy. The procedure offers postural correction at the level of the pelvis, low morbidity and no additional operations were required to achieve the surgical objective. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic study: Case series (no, or historical, control group), Prospective: The study was started before the first patient was enrolled. PMID:21785911

  10. Change of Lumbar Motion after Multi-Level Posterior Dynamic Stabilization with Bioflex System : 1 Year Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hunho; Cho, Bo Young; Park, Jeong Yoon

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study examined the change of range of motion (ROM) at the segments within the dynamic posterior stabilization, segments above and below the system, the clinical course and analyzed the factors influencing them. Methods This study included a consecutive 27 patients who underwent one-level to three-level dynamic stabilization with Bioflex system at our institute. All of these patients with degenerative disc disease underwent decompressive laminectomy with/without discectomy and dynamic stabilization with Bioflex system at the laminectomy level without fusion. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for back and leg pain, whole lumbar lordosis (from L1 to S1), ROMs from preoperative, immediate postoperative, 1.5, 3, 6, 12 months at whole lumbar (from L1 to S1), each instrumented levels, and one segment above and below this instrumentation were evaluated. Results VAS scores for leg and back pain decreased significantly throughout the whole study period. Whole lumbar lordosis remained within preoperative range, ROM of whole lumbar and instrumented levels showed a significant decrease. ROM of one level upper and lower to the instrumentation increased, but statistically invalid. There were also 5 cases of complications related with the fixation system. Conclusion Bioflex posterior dynamic stabilization system supports operation-induced unstable, destroyed segments and assists in physiological motion and stabilization at the instrumented level, decrease back and leg pain, maintain preoperative lumbar lordotic angle and reduce ROM of whole lumbar and instrumented segments. Prevention of adjacent segment degeneration and complication rates are something to be reconsidered through longer follow up period. PMID:19893714

  11. Conservative management of psoas haematoma following complex lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lakkol, Sandesh; Sarda, Praveen; Karpe, Prasad; Krishna, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    We report psoas hematoma communicating with extradural hematoma and compressing on lumbar nerve roots during the postoperative period in a patient who underwent L3/4 level dynamic stabilization and L4/5 and L5/S1 posterior lumbar interbody fusion. Persistent radicular symptoms occurring soon after posterior lumbar surgery are not an unknown entity. However, psoas hematoma communicating with the extradural hematoma and compressing on L4 and L5 nerve roots soon after surgery, leading to radicular symptoms has not been reported. In addition to the conservative approach in managing such cases, this case report also emphasizes the importance of clinical evaluation and utilization of necessary imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to diagnose the cause of persistent severe radicular pain in the postoperative period. PMID:24600073

  12. Current concepts on spinal arthrodesis in degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Lykissas, Marios G; Aichmair, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Back pain is a common chronic disorder that represents a large burden for the health care system. There is a broad spectrum of available treatment options for patients suffering from chronic lower back pain in the setting of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, including both conservative and operative approaches. Lumbar arthrodesis techniques can be divided into sub-categories based on the part of the vertebral column that is addressed (anterior vs posterior). Furthermore, one has to differentiate between approaches aiming at a solid fusion in contrast to motion-sparing techniques with the proposed advantage of a reduced risk of developing adjacent disc disease. However, the field of application and long-term outcomes of these novel motion-preserving surgical techniques, including facet arthroplasty, nucleus replacement, and lumbar disc arthroplasty, need to be more precisely evaluated in long-term prospective studies. Innovative surgical treatment strategies involving minimally invasive techniques, such as lateral lumbar interbody fusion or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, as well as percutaneous implantation of transpedicular or transfacet screws, have been established with the reported advantages of reduced tissue invasiveness, decreased collateral damage, reduced blood loss, and decreased risk of infection. The aim of this study was to review well-established procedures for lumbar spinal fusion with the main focus on current concepts on spinal arthrodesis and motion-sparing techniques in degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. PMID:24303453

  13. Adjacent level disease following lumbar spine surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instrumented lumbar spine surgery is associated with an increased risk of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Multiple studies have explored the various risk factors contributing to ASD that include; fusion length (especially, three or more levels), sagittal malalignment, facet injury, advanced age, and prior cephalad degenerative disease. Methods: In this selective review of ASD, following predominantly instrumented fusions for lumbar degenerative disease, patients typically underwent open versus minimally invasive surgery (MIS), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusions (TLIFs), posterior lumbar interbody fusions (PLIFs), or rarely posterolateral lumbar instrumented or noninstrumented fusions (posterolateral lumbar fusion). Results: The incidence of ASD, following open or MI lumbar instrumented fusions, ranged up to 30%; notably, the addition of instrumentation in different series did not correlate with improved outcomes. Alternatively, in one series, at 164 postoperative months, noninstrumented lumbar fusions reduced the incidence of ASD to 5.6% versus 18.5% for ASD performed with instrumentation. Of interest, dynamic instrumented/stabilization techniques did not protect patients from ASD. Furthermore, in a series of 513 MIS TLIF, there was a 15.6% incidence of perioperative complications that included; a 5.1% frequency of durotomy and a 2.3% instrumentation failure rate. Conclusions: The incidence of postoperative ASD (up to 30%) is greater following either open or MIS instrumented lumbar fusions (e.g., TLIF/PLIF), while decompressions with noninstrumented fusions led to a much smaller 5.6% risk of ASD. Other findings included: MIS instrumented fusions contributed to higher perioperative complication rates, and dynamic stabilization did not protect against ASD. PMID:26693387

  14. Percutaneous Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (pTLIF) with a Posterolateral Approach for the Treatment of Degenerative Disk Disease: Feasibility and Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Interbody fusion by open discectomy is the usual treatment for degenerative disk disease but requires a relatively long recovery period. The transforaminal posterolateral approach is a well-known standard in endoscopic spine surgery that allows direct access to the disk with progressive tissue dilation. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of percutaneous transforaminal interbody fusion (pTLIF) with insertion of an expandable or a standard rigid interbody implant for patients with degenerative disk disease with or without spondylolisthesis and for revision surgery. Methods Between 2009 and 2014, the pTLIF procedure was performed in 30 patients. Ten patients underwent insertion of a rigid implant (group A) and the remaining 20 underwent insertion of an expandable titanium interbody implant as the initial procedure (n = 10) (group B) or after failed back surgery (n = 10) (group C). Patient outcomes were scored with visual analogic scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI) and modified Macnab criteria. Results The mean follow-up period was 38 (17) (range 11 to 67) months. The outcome was excellent in 18, good in 10 and fair in 2. No poor results and no major complications were reported. No differences in VAS and ODI scores according to the study group were found. Median postoperative time until hospital discharge was 26 hours (20 to 68 hours). Postoperative values for VAS and ODI scores improved significantly (p<0.05) compared to preoperative data in all study groups. Conclusions These preliminary results have shown the feasibility and efficacy of the pTLIF procedure using a posterolateral approach for the treatment of degenerative disk disease with or without spondylolisthesis up to grade 2 and in revision surgery. No significant differences in outcome were observed between an expandable and a rigid cage. Median postoperative time until hospital discharge was faster compared to standard TLIF (26 hours vs. 9.3 days). PMID:26484004

  15. Do experienced physiotherapists and final year physiotherapy trainees apply similar force during posterior-to-anterior lumbar mobilization techniques?

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Dany H; Longtin, Christian; Berbiche, Djamal; Gaudreault, Nathaly

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to quantify the force applied during posterior-to-anterior lumbar vertebrae mobilizations of different grades (I to IV) and compare that force between experienced physiotherapists and final year physiotherapy students. Four experienced physiotherapists and four final year physiotherapy students participated in this study along with five healthy asymptomatic individuals. A manual therapy table positioned over three force plates allowed for measurements of the force oscillation frequency and intensity applied during grade I, II, III and IV posterior-to-anterior (PA) mobilizations at two lumbar vertebral levels (L2 and L4). Mixed model ANOVAs were used to compare the force applied between the experienced physiotherapists and students, and between the various grades. The results showed that the mean oscillation frequency was similar between the groups for all grades. Grade I and grade IV PA mobilizations showed similar mean oscillation frequency as did grade II and III PA mobilizations. The minimum and maximum force applied was higher for the physiotherapists than for the students for all mobilization grades (p values<0.05). Similar mean maximum force values were recorded for PA mobilizations between grade I and II and between grade III and grade IV. Grade III and IV PA mobilizations yielded higher mean maximum force values than those recorded during grade I and grade II PA mobilizations. The method used in this study allowed for quantification of the force applied during lumbar PA mobilizations. Experienced physiotherapists apply greater force than physiotherapy students across all grades, despite similar oscillation frequency. PMID:26033263

  16. Multilevel extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) and osteotomies for 3-dimensional severe deformity: 25 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    McAfee, Paul C.; Shucosky, Erin; Chotikul, Liana; Salari, Ben; Chen, Lun; Jerrems, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Background This is a retrospective review of 25 patients with severe lumbar nerve root compression undergoing multilevel anterior retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation for deformity. The objective is to analyze the outcomes and clinical results from anterior interbody fusions performed through a lateral approach and compare these with traditional surgical procedures. Methods A consecutive series of 25 patients (78 extreme lateral interbody fusion [XLIF] levels) was identified to illustrate the primary advantages of XLIF in correcting the most extreme of the 3-dimensional deformities that fulfilled the following criteria: (1) a minimum of 40 of scoliosis; (2) 2 or more levels of translation, anterior spondylolisthesis, and lateral subluxation (subluxation in 2 planes), causing symptomatic neurogenic claudication and severe spinal stenosis; and (3) lumbar hypokyphosis or flat-back syndrome. In addition, the majority had trunks that were out of balance (central sacral vertical line ?2 cm from vertical plumb line) or had sagittal imbalance, defined by a distance between the sagittal vertical line and S1 of greater than 3 cm. There were 25 patients who had severe enough deformities fulfilling these criteria that required supplementation of the lateral XLIF with posterior osteotomies and pedicle screw instrumentation. Results In our database, with a mean follow-up of 24 months, 85% of patients showed evidence of solid arthrodesis and no subsidence on computed tomography and flexion/extension radiographs. The complication rate remained low, with a perioperative rate of 2.4% and postoperative rate of 12.2%. The lateral listhesis and anterior spondylolisthetic subluxation were anatomically reduced with minimally invasive XLIF. The main finding in these 25 cases was our isolation of the major indication for supplemental posterior surgery: truncal decompensation in patients who are out of balance by 2 cm or more, in whom posterior spinal osteotomies and segmental pedicle screw instrumentation were required at follow up. No patients were out of sagittal balance (sagittal vertical line <3 cm from S1) postoperatively. Segmental instrumentation with osteotomies was also more effective for restoration of physiologic lumbar lordosis compared with anterior stand-alone procedures. Conclusions This retrospective study supports the finding that clinical outcomes (coronal/sagittal alignment) improve postoperatively after minimally invasive surgery with multilevel XLIF procedures and are improved compared with larger extensile thoracoabdominal anterior scoliosis procedures. PMID:25694908

  17. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome: Temporary Visual Loss After Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kueper, Janina; Loftus, Michael L; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba; Lebl, Darren

    2015-11-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare cause of temporary postoperative visual loss (POVL) after spinal deformity surgery. We report on 2 patients diagnosed with PRES after spinal deformity surgery, who were closely examined postoperatively. A 78-year-old woman with severe disability due to degenerative lumbar spondylosis after laminectomy was treated with transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion from L1 to L4 and posterior spinal fusion from T10 to pelvis. She developed confusion and bilateral visual loss on postoperative day 7. A second patient, a 51-year-old woman with progressive pain and decompensation caused by adult scoliosis, was treated with posterior spinal fusion from T3 to pelvis and interbody fusion from L4 to S1 via a presacral interbody fusion approach. She developed bilateral visual loss on postoperative day 15. Both patients achieved a complete recovery of their vision after medical management of PRES. Timely diagnosis of PRES and prompt intervention allow for a good patient prognosis and complete recovery of eyesight. PMID:26566564

  18. Posterior lumbar dynamic stabilization instead of arthrodesis for symptomatic adjacent-segment degenerative stenosis: description of a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Mashaly, Hazem; Paschel, Erin E; Khattar, Nicolas K; Goldschmidt, Ezequiel; Gerszten, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The development of symptomatic adjacent-segment disease (ASD) is a well-recognized consequence of lumbar fusion surgery. Extension of a fusion to a diseased segment may only lead to subsequent adjacent-segment degeneration. The authors report the use of a novel technique that uses dynamic stabilization instead of arthrodesis for the surgical treatment of symptomatic ASD following a prior lumbar instrumented fusion. METHODS A cohort of 28 consecutive patients was evaluated who developed symptomatic stenosis immediately adjacent to a previous lumbar instrumented fusion. All patients had symptoms of neurogenic claudication refractory to nonsurgical treatment and were surgically treated with decompression and dynamic stabilization instead of extending the fusion construct using a posterior lumbar dynamic stabilization system. Preoperative symptoms, visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, and perioperative complications were recorded. Clinical outcome was gauged by comparing VAS scores prior to surgery and at the time of last follow-up. RESULTS The mean follow-up duration was 52 months (range 17-94 months). The mean interval from the time of primary fusion surgery to the dynamic stabilization surgery was 40 months (range 10-96 months). The mean patient age was 51 years (range 29-76 years). There were 19 (68%) men and 9 (32%) women. Twenty-three patients (82%) presented with low-back pain at time of surgery, whereas 24 patients (86%) presented with lower-extremity symptoms only. Twenty-four patients (86%) underwent operations that were performed using single-level dynamic stabilization, 3 patients (11%) were treated at 2 levels, and 1 patient underwent 3-level decompression and dynamic stabilization. The most commonly affected and treated level (46%) was L3-4. The mean preoperative VAS pain score was 8, whereas the mean postoperative score was 3. No patient required surgery for symptomatic degeneration rostral to the level of dynamic stabilization during the follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS The use of posterior lumbar dynamic stabilization may offer a valid and safe option for the management of patients who develop ASD rostral to a previously instrumented arthrodesis. The technique may serve as an alternative to multilevel arthrodesis in this patient population. By implanting a dynamic stabilization device instead of an extension of a rigid construct, this might translate into a reduction in the development of yet another level of ASD. PMID:26721579

  19. Congenital Posterior Spinal Agenesis Leads to L2-L3 Instability: a Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Samadian, Mohammad; Hosseinzadeh Bakhtevari, Mehrdad; Jahangiri Babadi, Armin; Nabizadeh, Naveed; Rezaei, Omidvar

    2015-12-01

    Congenital absence of posterior elements of the lumbar column is an extremely uncommon anomaly and we found no any reported cases of incomplete congenital absence of the posterior elements of lumbar vertebra in the literature. Here, we present a case with congenital absence of posterior elements of lumbar vertebra. The patient was a 51-year-old man with a history of 20 years of back pain. Imaging of the lumbar spine revealed instability in L2 and L3 and there was evidence of retrolisthesis, agenesis of pars interarticularis, spinous processes, lamina, transverse processes and facets at L2 and L3. The patient underwent lumbar discectomy and posterior spinal fixation and instrumentation was then done using pedicle screw fixation. Four pedicle screws, two rods, and one cross link were employed to bilaterally fix the L2 and L3 and then we used autograft and allograft bone for interbody fusion, substitutes from iliac crest for posterior fusion. There were no postoperative complications, and at 6, 12 and 24 months of follow-up, his leg and back pain had improved, and the patient did not need any analgesic for pain relief. Complete congenital absence of the lumbar posterior element has been rarely reported in the literature. Patients whose congenital anomalies lead to segmental instability are surgical fusion candidates, but if these anomalies occur in pars interarticularis such as spondylolysis isthmus, fixation and inter segmental fusion techniques are useful. PMID:26621021

  20. Time-sequential changes of differentially expressed miRNAs during the process of anterior lumbar interbody fusion using equine bone protein extract, rhBMP-2 and autograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da-Fu; Zhou, Zhi-Yu; Dai, Xue-Jun; Gao, Man-Man; Huang, Bao-Ding; Liang, Tang-Zhao; Shi, Rui; Zou, Li-Jin; Li, Hai-Sheng; Bünger, Cody; Tian, Wei; Zou, Xue-Nong

    2014-03-01

    The precise mechanism of bone regeneration in different bone graft substitutes has been well studied in recent researches. However, miRNAs regulation of the bone formation has been always mysterious. We developed the anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model in pigs using equine bone protein extract (BPE), recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS), and autograft as bone graft substitute, respectively. The miRNA and gene expression profiles of different bone graft materials were examined using microarray technology and data analysis, including self-organizing maps, KEGG pathway and Biological process GO analyses. We then jointly analyzed miRNA and mRNA profiles of the bone fusion tissue at different time points respectively. Results showed that miRNAs, including let-7, miR-129, miR-21, miR-133, miR-140, miR-146, miR-184, and miR-224, were involved in the regulation of the immune and inflammation response, which provided suitable inflammatory microenvironment for bone formation. At late stage, several miRNAs directly regulate SMAD4, Estrogen receptor 1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C for bone formation. It can be concluded that miRNAs play important roles in balancing the inflammation and bone formation.

  1. Adult lumbar scoliosis. Treatment with combined anterior-posterior spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Gaehle, K E; Moore, S; Weindel, J; Steiner, L A; Lenke, L G

    1991-09-01

    Innovative surgical approaches to current adult lumbar scoliosis result in faster recovery time and greater satisfaction regarding patient abilities after surgery. Combined ASF/PSF requires expert surgical team coordination throughout the perioperative period to achieve positive patient results. PMID:1952886

  2. 100 Consecutive Cases of Degenerative Lumbar Conditions Using a Non-Threaded Locking Screw System With a 90-Degree Locking Cap

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Bryan W.; Tortolani, P. Justin; Fedder, Ira L.; Sefter, John C.; Davis, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Background This prospective study analyzes the perioperative outcomes and long-term fusion success of 100 consecutive lumbar degenerative cases. The cases were managed using a non-threaded locking screw system, in conjunction with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages, for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedures. These 100 cases were compared to another prospective study treating patients with the same inclusion and exclusion criteria using conventional plate-based pedicle screw spinal instrumentation augmented with carbon fiber interbody cages. Methods A total of 167 operative levels were treated in 100 patients (51 single-level, 39 two-level and 10 three-level cases). Eleven cases were revisions and 67 patients received interbody fusion cages. Patients had an average of 22.8 ± 4.0 months followup. Results: There was one instrumentation failure but no significant subsidence at the interbody fusion level. The disc space height was restored as part of the surgical procedure at the interbody cage levels: from 7.5 ± 2.3 mm preoperative to 9.0 ± 2.1 mm postoperative. There were 2 cases of pseudarthrosis (2 / 100 = 2%). The average operative time for 1-level cases was 111 ± 25 minutes; for 2-level cases it was 132.4 ± 21.8 minutes; and for 3-level cases it was 162.6 ± 33 minutes. Blood loss averaged 800 ± 473 cc for 1-level cases, 1055 ± 408 cc for 2 levels, and 1155 ± 714 cc for 3 levels. The length of stay was similar between the 3 groups (4.4 ± 1.2 days for single-level cases, 4.7 ± 1.1 for 2 levels, and 5.0 ± 1.1 for 3 levels; P > .05). There were 3 incidental durotomies, and 4 other patients developed infections postoperatively that required reoperation. Conclusion The disc and foraminal heights can be restored and maintained with a unilateral cage and pedicle screw construct. Unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using a PEEK cage combined with a non-threaded locking pedicle screw and rod system results in similar fusion rates to those achieved using the bilateral Brantigan interbody fusion cage or a single BAK Vista implant. When compared to the bilateral Brantigan cages, decreased operative time (P < .001), decreased blood loss (P < .001) and reduced incidence of dural tears (P < .001) are advantages of using a non-threaded locking screw system and single PEEK interbody cage for lumbar degenerative conditions without compromising subsequent fusion rates. PMID:25802623

  3. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Keith L; Hire, Justin M; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Key, Charles C; DeVine, John G

    2015-06-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  4. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Keith L.; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Key, Charles C.; DeVine, John G.

    2015-01-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  5. Impact of total disc arthroplasty on the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease: Analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2000 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Awe, Olatilewa O.; Maltenfort, Mitchel G.; Prasad, Srinivas; Harrop, James S.; Ratliff, John K

    2011-01-01

    Background: Spinal fusion is the most rapidly increasing type of lumbar spine surgery for various lumbar degenerative pathologies. The surgical treatment of lumbar spine degenerative disc disease may involve decompression, stabilization, or arthroplasty procedures. Lumbar disc athroplasty is a recent technological advance in the field of lumbar surgery. This study seeks to determine the clinical impact of anterior lumbar disc replacement on the surgical treatment of lumbar spine degenerative pathology. This is a retrospective assessment of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Methods: The NIS was searched for ICD-9 codes for lumbar and lumbosacral fusion (81.06), anterior lumbar interbody fusion (81.07), and posterolateral lumbar fusion (81.08), as well as for procedure codes for revision fusion surgery in the lumbar and lumbosacral spine (81.36, 81.37, and 81.38). To assess lumbar arthroplasty, procedure codes for the insertion or replacement of lumbar artificial discs (84.60, 84.65, and 84.68) were queried. Results were assayed from 2000 through 2008, the last year with available data. Analysis was done using the lme4 package in the R programming language for statistical computing. Results: A total of nearly 300,000 lumbar spine fusion procedures were reported in the NIS database from 2000 to 2008; assuming a representative cross-section of the US health care market, this models approximately 1.5 million procedures performed over this time period. In 2005, the first year of its widespread use, there were 911 lumbar arthroplasty procedures performed, representing 3% of posterolateral fusions performed in this year. Since introduction, the number of lumbar spine arthroplasty procedures has consistently declined, to 653 total procedures recorded in the NIS in 2008. From 2005 to 2008, lumbar arthroplasties comprised approximately 2% of lumbar posterolateral fusions. Arthroplasty patients were younger than posterior lumbar fusion patients (42.8 11.5 vs. 55.9 15.1 years, P < 0.0000001). The distribution of arthroplasty procedures was even between academic and private urban facilities (48.5% and 48.9%, respectively). While rates of posterolateral lumbar spine fusion steadily grew during the period (OR 1.06, 95% CI: 1.05-1.06, P < 0.0000001), rates of revision surgery and anterior spinal fusion remained static. Conclusions: The impact of lumbar arthroplasty procedures has been minimal. Measured as a percentage of more common lumbar posterior arthrodesis procedures, lumbar arthroplasty comprises only approximately 2% of lumbar spine surgeries performed in the United States. Over the first 4 years following the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, the frequency of lumbar disc arthroplasty has decreased while the number of all lumbar spinal fusions has increased. PMID:22059134

  6. Combined transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with posterolateral instrumented fusion for degenerative disc disease can be a safe and effective treatment for lower back pain

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J; Cianciabella, Augusto J; Cutright, Jason; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lumbar fusion is a proven treatment for chronic lower back pain (LBP) in the setting of symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis; however, fusion is controversial when the primary diagnosis is degenerative disc disease (DDD). Our objective was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of lumbar fusion in the treatment of LBP due to DDD. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred and five consecutive patients with single or multi-level DDD underwent lumbar decompression and instrumented fusion for the treatment of chronic LBP between the years of 2008 and 2011. The primary outcome measures in this study were back and leg pain visual analogue scale (VAS), patient reported % resolution of preoperative back pain and leg pain, reoperation rate, perioperative complications, blood loss and hospital length of stay (LOS). Results: The average resolution of preoperative back pain per patient was 84% (n = 205) while the average resolution of preoperative leg pain was 90% (n = 190) while a mean follow-up period of 528 days (1.5 years). Average VAS for combined back and leg pain significantly improved from a preoperative value of 9.0 to a postoperative value of 1.1 (P ≤ 0.0001), a change of 7.9 points for the cohort. The average number of lumbar disc levels fused per patient was 2.3 (range 1-4). Median postoperative LOS in the hospital was 1.2 days. Average blood loss was 108 ml perfused level. Complications occurred in 5% of patients (n = 11) and the rate of reoperation for symptomatic adjacent segment disease was 2% (n = 4). Complications included reoperation at index level for symptomatic pseudoarthrosis with hardware failure (n = 3); surgical site infection (n = 7); repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak (n = 1), and one patient death at home 3 days after discharge. Conclusion: Lumbar fusion for symptomatic DDD can be a safe and effective treatment for medically refractory LBP with or without leg pain. PMID:26692696

  7. Segmental Stiffness Achieved by Three Types of Fixation for Unstable Lumbar Spondylolytic Motion Segments

    PubMed Central

    Choma, Theodore; Pfeiffer, Ferris; Vallurupalli, Santaram; Mannering, Irene; Pak, Youngju

    2012-01-01

    Objective?The objective of this study was to compare the relative stability in lumbar spondylolysis (SP) of a rigid anterior plate (with a novel compression slot) versus traditional posterior pedicle screw (PS) fixation. Summary of Background Data?Arthrodesis has been a mainstay of treatment for symptomatic isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults. Posterior PS fixation has become a commonly used adjunct. Some have advocated anterior lumbar interbody fixation (ALIF) plate as an alternative. The relative stability afforded by ALIF in SP has not been well characterized, nor has the contribution afforded by a compression screw slot in an ALIF plate. Methods?Calf spine segments were characterized in the normal state, after sectioning the pars (SP model), then after reconstruction with an interbody spacer and either PS/rods, or an ALIF plate, or both. Results?ALIF plate conferred stability on the spondylolytic segment only comparable to that of the normal functional spinal unit (FSU). Posterior fixation was more stable than anterior fixation in all testing modes. Addition of an ALIF plate conferred a significant additional stability in those that already had posterior fixation. The utilization of an anterior compression screw conferred additional stability in extension testing only. Conclusions?ALIF plate reconstruction in the setting of SP may not confer enough segmental stability to predictably encourage fusion beyond that of the uninstrumented intact FSU. The utilization of an integral compression screw in an ALIF plate may not confer clinically significant additional construct stability in SP. PMID:24353951

  8. Older literature review of increased risk of adjacent segment degeneration with instrumented lumbar fusions

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) following lumbar spine surgery occurs in up to 30% of cases, and descriptions of such changes are not new. Here, we review some of the older literature concerning the rate of ASD, typically more severe cephalad than caudad, and highly correlated with instrumented fusions. Therefore, for degenerative lumbar disease without frank instability, ASD would be markedly reduced by avoiding instrumented fusions. Methods: In a prior review, the newer literature regarding the frequency of ASD following lumbar instrumented fusions (e.g., transforaminal or posterior lumbar interbody fusions [TLIF/PLIF] fusions or occasionally, posterolateral fusions [PLFs]) was presented. Some studies cited an up to an 18.5% incidence of ASD following instrumented versus noninstrumented fusions/decompressions alone (5.6%). A review of the older literature similarly documents a higher rate of ASD following instrumented fusions performed for degenerative lumbar disease alone. Results: More frequent and more severe ASD follows instrumented lumbar fusions performed for degenerative lumbar disease without instability. Alternatively, this entity should be treated with decompressions alone or with noninstrumented fusions, without the addition of instrumentation. Conclusions: Too many studies assume that TLIF, PLIF, and even PLF instrumented fusions are the “gold standard of care” for dealing with degenerative disease of the lumbar spine without documented instability. It is time to correct that assumption, and reassess the older literature along with the new to confirm that decompression alone and noninstrumented fusion avoid significant morbidity and even potentially mortality attributed to unnecessary instrumentation. PMID:26904370

  9. Lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas interbody fusion in a patient with achondroplastic dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Staub, Blake N; Holman, Paul J

    2015-02-01

    The authors present the first reported use of the lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach for interbody arthrodesis in a patient with achondroplastic dwarfism. The inherent anatomical abnormalities of the spine present in achondroplastic dwarfism predispose these patients to an increased incidence of spinal deformity as well as neurogenic claudication and potential radicular symptoms. The risks associated with prolonged general anesthesia and intolerance of significant blood loss in these patients makes them ideal candidates for minimally invasive spinal surgery. The patient in this case was a 51-year-old man with achondroplastic dwarfism who had a history of progressive claudication and radicular pain despite previous extensive lumbar laminectomies. The lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach was used for placement of interbody cages at L1/2, L2/3, L3/4, and L4/5, followed by posterior decompression and pedicle screw instrumentation. The patient tolerated the procedure well with no complications. Postoperatively his claudicatory and radicular symptoms resolved and a CT scan revealed solid arthrodesis with no periimplant lucencies. PMID:25415482

  10. Lumbar interbody fusion with porous biphasic calcium phosphate enhanced by recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-2/silk fibroin sustained-released microsphere: an experimental study on sheep model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Liu, Hai-Long; Gu, Yong; Feng, Yu; Yang, Hui-Lin

    2015-03-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) has been investigated extensively as a bone substitute nowadays. However, the bone formation capacity of BCP is limited owing to lack of osteoinduction. Silk fibroin (SF) has a structure similar to type I collagen, and could be developed to a microsphere for the sustained-release of rhBMP-2. In our previous report, bioactivity of BCP could be enhanced by rhBMP-2/SF microsphere (containing 0.5 g rhBMP-2) in vitro. However, the bone regeneration performance of the composite in vivo was not investigated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of BCP/rhBMP-2/SF in a sheep lumbar fusion model. A BCP and rhBMP-2/SF microsphere was developed, and then was integrated into a BCP/rhBMP-2/SF composite. BCP, BCP/rhBMP-2 and BCP/rhBMP-2/SF were implanted randomly into the disc spaces of 30 sheep at the levels of L1/2, L3/4 and L5/6. After sacrificed, the fusion segments were evaluated by manual palpation, CT scan, biomechanical testing and histology at 3 and 6 months, respectively. The composite demonstrated a burst-release of rhBMP-2 (39.1 2.8 %) on the initial 4 days and a sustained-release (accumulative 81.3 4.9 %) for more than 28 days. The fusion rates, semi-quantitative CT scores, fusion stiffness in bending in all directions and histologic scores of BCP/rhBMP-2/SF were significantly greater than BCP and BCP/rhBMP-2 at each time point, respectively (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that the SF microspheres containing a very low dose of rhBMP-2 improve fusion in sheep using BCP constructs. PMID:25690620

  11. The VariLift® Interbody Fusion System: expandable, standalone interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Emstad, Erik; del Monaco, Diana Cardenas; Fielding, Louis C; Block, Jon E

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral fusion cages have been in clinical use since the 1990s. Cages offer the benefits of bone graft containment, restored intervertebral and foraminal height, and a more repeatable, stable procedure compared to interbody fusion with graft material alone. Due to concerns regarding postoperative stability, loss of lordosis, and subsidence or migration of the implant, interbody cages are commonly used with supplemental fixation such as pedicle screw systems or anterior plates. While providing additional stability, supplemental fixation techniques increase operative time, exposure, cost, and morbidity. The VariLift® Interbody Fusion System (VariLift® system) has been developed as a standalone solution to provide the benefits of intervertebral fusion cages without the requirement of supplemental fixation. The VariLift® system, FDA-cleared for standalone use in both the cervical and lumbar spine, is implanted in a minimal profile and then expanded in situ to provide segmental stability, restored lordosis, and a large graft chamber. Preclinical testing and analyses have found that the VariLift® System is durable, and reduces stresses that may contribute to subsidence and migration of other standalone interbody cages. Fifteen years of clinical development with the VariLift® system have demonstrated positive clinical outcomes, continued patient maintenance of segmental stability and lordosis, and no evidence of implant migration. The purpose of this report is to describe the VariLift® system, including implant characteristics, principles of operation, indications for use, patient selection criteria, surgical technique, postoperative care, preclinical testing, and clinical experience. The VariLift® System represents an improved surgical option for a stable interbody fusion without requiring supplemental fixation. PMID:26060414

  12. Retrospective, Demographic, and Clinical Investigation of the Causes of Postoperative Infection in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Who Underwent Posterior Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Yaldiz, Can; Yaldiz, Mahizer; Ceylan, Nehir; Kacira, Ozlem Kitiki; Ceylan, Davut; Kacira, Tibet; Kizilcay, Gokhan; Tanriverdi, Taner

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Owing to the increasing population of elderly patients, a large number of patients with degenerative spondylosis are currently being surgically treated. Although basic measures for decreasing postoperative surgical infections (PSIs) are considered, it still remains among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this retrospective analysis is to present possible causes leading to PSI in patients who underwent surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylosis and highlight how it can be avoided to decrease morbidity and mortality. The study included 540 patients who underwent posterior stabilization due to degenerative lumbar stenosis between January 2013 and January 2014. The data before and after surgery was retrieved from the hospital charts. Patients with degenerative lumbar stenosis who were operated upon in this study had >2 levels of laminectomy and facetectomy. For this reason, posterior stabilization was performed for all the patients included in this study. Determining the causes of postoperative infection (PI) following spinal surgeries performed with instrumentation is a struggle. Seventeen different parameters that may be related to PI were evaluated in this study. The presence of systemic diseases, unknown glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions were among the parameters that increased the prevalence of PI. Alternatively, prolene sutures, double-layered gloves, and the use of rifampicin Sv (RIS) decreased the incidence of PI. Although the presence of systemic diseases, unnoticed glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions increased PIs, prolene suture material, double-layered gloves, and the use of RIS decreased PIs. PMID:26200620

  13. Posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic thoracolumbar/lumbar scoliosis: clinical outcomes and predictive radiological factors for extension of fusion distal to caudal end vertebra.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S B; Tsirikos, A I; Subramanian, A S

    2014-08-01

    Clinical, radiological, and Scoliosis Research Society-22 questionnaire data were reviewed pre-operatively and two years post-operatively for patients with thoracolumbar/lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated by posterior spinal fusion using a unilateral convex segmental pedicle screw technique. A total of 72 patients were included (67 female, 5 male; mean age at surgery 16.7 years (13 to 23)) and divided into groups: group 1 included 53 patients who underwent fusion between the vertebrae at the limit of the curve (proximal and distal end vertebrae); group 2 included 19 patients who underwent extension of the fusion distally beyond the caudal end vertebra. A mean scoliosis correction of 80% (45% to 100%) was achieved. The mean post-operative lowest instrumented vertebra angle, apical vertebra translation and trunk shift were less than in previous studies. A total of five pre-operative radiological parameters differed significantly between the groups and correlated with the extension of the fusion distally: the size of the thoracolumbar/lumbar curve, the lowest instrumented vertebra angle, apical vertebra translation, the Cobb angle on lumbar convex bending and the size of the compensatory thoracic curve. Regression analysis allowed an equation incorporating these parameters to be developed which had a positive predictive value of 81% in determining whether the lowest instrumented vertebra should be at the caudal end vertebra or one or two levels more distal. There were no differences in the Scoliosis Research Society-22 outcome scores between the two groups (p = 0.17). In conclusion, thoracolumbar/lumbar curves in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis may be effectively treated by posterior spinal fusion using a unilateral segmental pedicle screw technique. Five radiological parameters correlate with the need for distal extension of the fusion, and an equation incorporating these parameters reliably informs selection of the lowest instrumented vertebra. PMID:25086125

  14. Posterior Transpedicular Dynamic Stabilization versus Total Disc Replacement in the Treatment of Lumbar Painful Degenerative Disc Disease: A Comparison of Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Oktenoglu, Tunc; Ozer, Ali Fahir; Sasani, Mehdi; Ataker, Yaprak; Gomleksiz, Cengiz; Celebi, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Prospective clinical study. Objective. This study compares the clinical results of anterior lumbar total disc replacement and posterior transpedicular dynamic stabilization in the treatment of degenerative disc disease. Summary and Background Data. Over the last two decades, both techniques have emerged as alternative treatment options to fusion surgery. Methods. This study was conducted between 2004 and 2010 with a total of 50 patients (25 in each group). The mean age of the patients in total disc prosthesis group was 37,32 years. The mean age of the patients in posterior dynamic transpedicular stabilization was 43,08. Clinical (VAS and Oswestry) and radiological evaluations (lumbar lordosis and segmental lordosis angles) of the patients were carried out prior to the operation and 3, 12, and 24 months after the operation. We compared the average duration of surgery, blood loss during the surgery and the length of hospital stay of both groups. Results. Both techniques offered significant improvements in clinical parameters. There was no significant change in radiologic evaluations after the surgery for both techniques. Conclusion. Both dynamic systems provided spine stability. However, the posterior dynamic system had a slight advantage over anterior disc prosthesis because of its convenient application and fewer possible complications. PMID:23401784

  15. Anatomic basis of minimal anterior extraperitoneal approach to the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Lazennec, J Y; Pouzet, B; Ramare, S; Mora, N; Hansen, S; Trabelsi, R; Guérin-Surville, H; Saillant, G

    1999-01-01

    Anterior lumbar spine approaches may be indicated for fusion in degenerative lumbar spine disorders or to fill discal and bone gaps after fracture reduction. We present an anterior extraperitoneal approach applicable to any discal and vertebral levels from T12 to S1. The anatomic study, based on 25 cadavers, highlights retroperitoneal dissection principles for easy kidney and duodenopancreatic mobilisation and direct left anterior access to the entire lumbar spine. We established a precise description of the lumbar veins and the anastomoses between the left renal vein and hemiazygos system, in order to define different topographic and anatomic factors related to safe and easily reproducible approaches for cage or graft implementation. Independent of the level and previous intraperitoneal surgery, lumbar spine access with this approach safeguards the kidney, ureter, spleen, hypogastric plexus and duodenopancreatic system. Regarding operating time, blood-loss and possibilities for freshening and grafting, this technique seems an effective counterbalance to the difficulties and complex technology of endoscopic approaches. The clinical study includes our first 42 cases in traumatic and degenerative lesions. Avoiding the neurologic or hemorrhagic risk inherent in classical posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) techniques, it can be considered as a reasonable and valid alternative. This technique could be used in the near future for mini invasive discal prosthesis insertion. PMID:10370987

  16. Minimally Invasive Versus Open Lumbar Fusion: A Comparison of Blood Loss, Surgical Complications, and Hospital Course

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Amar A.; Zfass-Mendez, Matthew; Lebwohl, Nathan H.; Wang, Michael Y.; Green, Barth A.; Levi, Allan D.; Vanni, Steven; Williams, Seth K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Perioperative blood loss is a frequent concern in spine surgery and often necessitates the use of allogeneic transfusion. Minimally invasive technique (MIS) is an option that minimizes surgical trauma and therefore intra-operative bleeding. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the blood loss, surgical complications, and duration of inpatient hospitalization in patients undergoing open posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF), open posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with PLF, or MIS transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF). Methods Operative reports and perioperative data of patients undergoing single-level, primary open PLF (n=41), open PLIF/PLF (n=42), and MIS TLIF (n=71) were retrospectively evaluated. Patient demographics, operative blood loss, use of transfusion products, complications, and length of stay were tabulated. Patient data was controlled for age, BMI, and gender for statistical analysis. Results Patients undergoing open PLF and open PLIF/PLF respectively experienced a significantly higher blood loss (p<0.001), higher volume of blood transfusion (p<0.001), higher volume of cell saver transfusion (p<0.001), and more surgical complications (dural injury, wound infections, screw malposition) (p=0.02) than those undergoing MIS TLIF. There was no statistically significant difference in duration of hospital stay (p=0.11). Conclusions MIS TLIF provides interbody fusion with less intraoperative blood loss and subsequently a lower transfusion rate compared to open techniques, but this did not influence length of hospital stay. MIS TLIF is at least as safe as open techniques with respect to dural tear, wound infection, and screw placement. Level of Evidence Level III, Therapeutic PMID:26361455

  17. Efficacy of post-operative analgesia after posterior lumbar instrumented fusion for degenerative disc disease: a prospective randomized comparison of epidural catheter and intravenous administration of analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Kluba, Torsten; Hofmann, Fabian; Bredanger, Sabine; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Niemeyer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to compare the efficacy of epidural (EDA) versus intravenous (PCA) application of analgesics after lumbar fusion. Fifty-two patients scheduled for elective posterior instrumented lumbar fusion were randomized into two groups. EDA patients received an epidural catheter intraoperatively, and administration of ropivacain and sulfentanil was started after a normal postoperative wake-up test in the recovery room area. PCA patients received intravenous opioids in the post-operative period. Differences between EDA and PCA groups in terms of patient satisfaction with respect to pain relief were not significant. Nevertheless, EDA patients reported less pain on the third day after surgery. There were significantly more side effects in the EDA group, including complete reversible loss of sensory function and motor weakness. There were no major side effects, such as infection or persisting neurological deficits, in either group. The routine use of epidural anesthesia for lumbar spine surgery has too many risks and offers very little advantage over PCA. PMID:21808704

  18. Iatrogenic neurologic deficit after lumbar spine surgery: A review.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, George M; Williams, Kim A; Arnold, Paul; Fehlings, Michael; Harrop, James S

    2015-12-01

    Iatrogenic neurologic deficits after lumbar spine surgery are rare complications, but important to recognize and manage. Complications such as radiculopathy, spinal cord compression, motor deficits (i.e. foot drop with L5 radiculopathy), and new onset radiculitis, while uncommon do occur. Attempts at mitigating these complications with the use of neuromonitoring have been successful. Guidance in the literature as to the true rate of iatrogenic neurologic deficit is limited to several case studies and retrospective designed studies describing the management, prevention and treatment of these deficits. The authors review the lumbar spinal surgery literature to examine the incidence of iatrogenic neurologic deficit in the lumbar spinal surgery literature. An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 14th, 2015 from January 1, 2004 through May 14, 2015, using the following MeSH search terms "postoperative complications," then subterms "lumbar vertebrae," treatment outcome," "spinal fusion," and "radiculopathy" were included together with "postoperative complications" in a single search. Postoperative complications including radiculopathy, weakness, and spinal cord compression were included. The definition of iatrogenic neurologic complication was limited to post-operative radiculopathy, motor weakness or new onset pain/radiculitis. An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 14th, 2015 using all of the above terms together yielded 21 results. After careful evaluation, 11 manuscripts were excluded and 10 were carefully reviewed. The most common indications for surgery were degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylosis, scoliosis, and lumbar stenosis. In 2783 patients in 12 total studies, there were 56 patients who had reported a postoperative neurologic deficit for a rate of 5.7. The rates of deficits ranged from 0.46% to 17% in the studies used. The average rate of reported neurologic complications within these papers was 9% (range 0.46-24%). Thirty patients of a total of 731 (4.1%) had a new onset neurologic injury after anterior lumber interbody fusion or lateral lumber interbody fusion. Thirty-seven out of 2052 (1.9%) patients had a neurologic injury after posterior decompression and fusion. Screw malposition was responsible for 11 deficits. Spinal surgery for lumbar degenerative disease carries a low but definite rate of neurologic deficits. Despite the introduction of neuromonitoring, these complications still occur. Interpretation of neurologic injury rates for lumbar surgery is limited by the few prospective and cohort-matched controlled studies. Likewise, most injuries were associated with the placement of instrumentation despite the type of approach. PMID:26386902

  19. Operative treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis with posterior stabilization and ALIF. Cages versus autogenous bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Pankowski, Rafal; Smoczynski, Andrzej; Roclawski, Marek; Ceynowa, Marcin; Kloc, Wojciech; Wasilewski, Wojciech; Jende, Piotr; Liczbik, Wieslaw; Beldzinski, Piotr; Libionka, Witold; Pierzak, Olaf; Adamski, Stanislaw; Niedbala, Miroslaw

    2012-01-01

    In the following study the use of cages and autogenous bone grafts were compared in the operative treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis with the posterior stabilization and Anterior Lumbosacral Interbody Fusion (ALIF). 55 patients were divided into two groups. Autogenous bone grafts were used in the first group (34 patients) and titanium interbody implants (cages) in the second group (21 patients). The mean follow up period in the first group was 8.6 years and 3.4 years in the second group. The radiological outcome was based upon the evaluation of the degree of spondylolisthesis, the angle of the lumbar lordosis, the height of the interbody space and intervertebral foramen and the evaluation of the spinal fusion. The objective clinical outcome assessment was based on Oswestry Disability Index. Subjective clinical evaluation was performed with the use of Visual Analog Pain Score (VAS) and the two questions concerning the evaluation of success of the operative treatment and a possible agreement to the following operation if necessary. The use of autogenous bone grafts alone in ALIF was related to the significant loss of achieved segmental spine anatomy restoration. The implantation of the cages prevented the loss of slippage correction, permanently reconstructed the anatomical conditions in the area of the operated spinal segment. PMID:22744517

  20. Stage I posterior osteotomy and instrumentation and stage II anterior debridement and bone grafting for lumbar spinal tuberculosis with severe kyphosis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Qiang; Zhang, Yalou; Sheng, Weibin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of stage I posterior osteotomy and instrumentation followed by stage II anterior debridement and bone grafting in patients with lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) with severe kyphosis. The records of patients with lumbar spinal TB and severe kyphosis treated with 2-stage surgery at our hospital from 2005 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Outcome measures were kyphosis correction rate, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores, and American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) spinal cord injury and sensation function scores. A total of 53 patients (34 male, 19 female; mean age 32 years) were included. The number of involved kyphosis segments ranged from 7 to 14, and the average preoperative kyphosis angle was 107.3 ± 18.1°. All procedures were performed without serious complications. The average follow-up time was 42 months. Bone fusion occurred at a range of 6 to 9 months after surgery, and none of the patients had internal fixation failure, position change, or pseudoarthrosis. The mean postoperative kyphosis angle was 29.4 ± 12.4°, with a mean improvement of 77.9°, and the correction rate was 72.6% (P < 0.001). At final follow-up, average correction loss was 1.35°. The mean postoperative VAS pain score was 2.4 ± 0.8, and the change from the preoperative value was significant (P < 0.001). ASIA spinal injury scores were increased postoperatively. Stage I posterior osteotomy and instrumentation followed by stage II anterior debridement and bone grafting can achieve good results in patients with lumbar TB and severe kyphosis. PMID:26885015

  1. Repeated microendoscopic discectomy for recurrent lumbar disk herniation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Tianyong; Zhou, Qiang; Dai, Fei; Luo, Fei; He, Qingyi; Zhang, Jinsong; Xu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the microendoscopic discectomy technique and inclusion criteria for the treatment of recurrent lumbar disc herniation and to supply feasible criteria and technical notes to avoid complications and to increase the therapeutic effect. METHODS: A consecutive series of 25 patients who underwent posterior microendoscopic discectomy for recurrent lumbar disc herniation were included. The inclusion criteria were as follows: no severe pain in the lumbar region, no lumbar instability observed by flexion-extension radiography and no intervertebral discitis or endplate damage observed by magnetic resonance imaging. All patients were diagnosed by clinical manifestations and imaging examinations. RESULTS: Follow-up visits were carried out in all cases. Complications, such as nerve injuries, were not observed. The follow-up outcomes were graded using the MacNab criteria. A grade of excellent was given to 12 patients, good to 12 patients and fair to 1 patient. A grade of excellent or good occurred in 96% of cases. One patient relapsed 3 months after surgery and then underwent lumbar interbody fusion and inner fixation. The numerical rating scale of preoperative leg pain was 7.4 1.5, whereas it decreased to 2.10.8 at 7 days after surgery. The preoperative Oswestry disability index of lumbar function was 57.510.0, whereas it was 26.08.5 at 7 days after surgery. CONCLUSION: In these cases, microendoscopic discectomy was able to achieve satisfactory clinical results. Furthermore, it has advantages over other methods because of its smaller incision, reduced bleeding and more efficient recovery. PMID:25789521

  2. Global and segmental kinematic changes following sequential resection of posterior osteoligamentous structures in the lumbar spine: An in vitro biomechanical investigation using pure moment testing protocols.

    PubMed

    Chamoli, Uphar; Korkusuz, Mert H; Sabnis, Ashutosh B; Manolescu, Andrei R; Tsafnat, Naomi; Diwan, Ashish D

    2015-11-01

    Lumbar spinal surgeries may compromise the integrity of posterior osteoligamentous structures implicating mechanical stability. Circumstances necessitating a concomitant surgery to achieve restabilisation are not well understood. The main objective of this in vitro study was to quantify global and segmental (index and adjacent levels) kinematic changes in the lumbar spine following sequential resection of the posterior osteoligamentous structures using pure moment testing protocols. Six fresh frozen cadaveric kangaroo lumbar spines (T12-S1) were tested under a bending moment in flexion-extension, bilateral bending, and axial torsion in a 6-degree-of-freedom Kinematic Spine Simulator. Specimens were tested in the following order: intact state (D0), after interspinous and supraspinous ligaments transection between L4 and L5 (D1), further after a total bilateral facetectomy between L4 and L5 (D2). Segmental motions at the cephalad, damaged, and caudal levels were recorded using an infrared-based motion tracking device. Following D1, no significant change in the global range of motion was observed in any of the bending planes. Following D2, a significant increase in the global range of motion from the baseline (D0) was observed in axial torsion (median normalised change +20%). At the damaged level, D2 resulted in a significant increase in the segmental range of motion in flexion-extension (+77%) and axial torsion (+492%). Additionally, a significant decrease in the segmental range of motion in axial torsion (-35%) was observed at the caudal level following D2. These results suggest that a multi-segment lumbar spine acts as a mechanism for transmitting motions, and that a compromised joint may significantly alter motion transfer to adjacent segments. We conclude that the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments play a modest role in restricting global spinal motions within physiologic limits. Following interspinous and supraspinous ligaments transection, a total bilateral facetectomy resulted in a significant increase in axial torsion motion, both at global and damaged levels, accompanied with a compensatory decrease in motion at the caudal level. PMID:26503842

  3. Interobserver agreement using computed tomography to assess radiographic fusion criteria with a unique titanium interbody device.

    PubMed

    Slosar, Paul J; Kaiser, Jay; Marrero, Luis; Sacco, Damon

    2015-02-01

    The accuracy of using computed tomography (CT) to assess interbody fusion in patients with titanium implants has been questioned in the past. Radiologists have reported difficulty assessing fusion bone quality because of metal artifact and small graft windows. A new titanium interbody implant with a large footprint and a wide graft aperture has been developed. We conducted a study to determine the interobserver reliability of using CT to assess radiographic fusion variables with the new titanium interbody device. Patients underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion with the same titanium interbody implant. Reconstructed CT images were obtained randomly at 6, 9, or 12 months. Two independent radiologists reviewed the scans. Interobserver reliability was calculated using the ? statistic. Fifty-six spinal fusion levels (33 patients) were analyzed. The radiologists agreed on 345 of the 392 fusion data points reviewed (? = .88). Agreement for solid fusion formation was 0.77. This interbody device demonstrated minimal artifact and minimal subsidence, and trabecular bone was easily identified throughout the implant in the vast majority of cases reviewed. High interobserver agreement was noted across all radiographic variables assessed. PMID:25658078

  4. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods

    PubMed Central

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK®-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA® polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones. PMID:26981285

  5. The anatomic rationale for transforaminal endoscopic interbody fusion: a cadaveric analysis.

    PubMed

    Hardenbrook, Mitchell; Lombardo, Sergio; Wilson, Miles C; Telfeian, Albert E

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors describe a cadaveric analysis to determine the ideal dimensions and trajectory for considering endoscopic transforaminal interbody implantation. METHODS The soft tissues of 8 human cadavers were removed from L-1 to the sacrum, exposing the posterior bony elements. Facetectomies were performed bilaterally at each lumbar level with resection of the pars interarticularis, revealing the pedicles, nerve roots, and interbody disc space. Each level was digitally photographed with a marker for scale and evaluated with digital analysis software. The traversing and exiting nerve roots and pedicle margins were identified, and the distances between these structures and their relationships to the surrounding structures were documented. RESULTS The dimensions of 2 areas were measured: the working triangle and safe zone. The working triangle is the triangle between the exiting and traversing nerve roots above the superior margin of the inferior pedicle. The safe zone is the trapezoid bounded by the widths of the superior and inferior pedicles between the exiting and traversing nerve roots. The mean surface area for the working triangle was 1.83 cm(2), with L5-S1 having the largest area at 2.19 cm(2). The mean surface area of the safe zone was 1.19 cm(2), with L5-S1 having the largest area at 1.26 cm(2). At the medial border of the pedicle extending superiorly, there were no nerve structures within 1.19 cm at any level. On the lateral border of the pedicle, the exiting nerve root was closer superiorly, with the closest being 0.3 cm. CONCLUSIONS The working triangle is a relatively large area. The safe zone, just superior to the pedicle, is free of nerve structures. By utilizing the superior border of the pedicle, the disc space can be accessed within this safe zone without risk of injury to the nerves. A thorough understanding of foraminal anatomy is fundamental for considering how to safely access the disc space, thereby utilizing less invasive endoscopic techniques, and is an important first step in considering what shapes and sizes of interbody implants and retractors are feasible for use in the foramen. PMID:26828881

  6. Surgical treatment of low lumbar osteoporotic vertebral collapse: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Uchida, Kenzo; Honjoh, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Takumi; Kitade, Makoto; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Low lumbar osteoporotic vertebral collapse (OVC) has not been well documented compared with OVC of the thoracolumbar spine. The differences between low lumbar and thoracolumbar lesions should be studied to provide better treatment. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical and imaging features as well as outcomes of low lumbar OVC and to discuss the appropriate surgical treatment. METHODS Thirty patients (10 men; 20 women; mean age 79.3 4.7 years [range 70-88 years]) with low lumbar OVC affecting levels below L-3 underwent surgical treatment. The clinical symptoms, morphological features of affected vertebra, sagittal spinopelvic alignment, neurological status before and after surgery, and surgical procedures were reviewed at a mean follow-up period of 2.4 years. RESULTS The main clinical symptom was radicular leg pain. Most patients had old compression fractures at the thoracolumbar level. The affected vertebra was flat-type and concave or H-shaped type, not wedge type as often found in thoracolumbar OVC. There were mismatches between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis on plain radiographs. On CT and MR images, foraminal stenosis was seen in 18 patients (60%) and canal stenosis in 24 patients (80%). Decompression with short fusion using a posterior approach was performed. Augmentations of vertebroplasty, posterolateral fusion, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion were performed based on the presence/absence of local kyphosis of lumbar spine, cleft formation, and/or intervertebral instability. Although the neurological and visual analog scale scores improved postoperatively, 8 patients (26.7%) developed postoperative complications mainly related to instrumentation failure. In patients with postoperative complications, lumbar spine bone mineral density was significantly low, but the spinopelvic alignment showed no correlation when compared with those without complications. CONCLUSIONS The main types of low lumbar OVC were flat-type and concave type, which resulted in neurological symptoms by retropulsed bony fragments generating foraminal stenosis and/or canal stenosis. For patients with low lumbar OVC, decompression of the foraminal and canal stenosis with short fusion surgery via posterior approach can improve neurological symptoms. Since these patients are elderly with poor bone quality and other complications, treatments for both OVC and osteoporosis should be provided to achieve good clinical outcome. PMID:26384132

  7. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Rods in Lumbar Spine Degenerative Disease: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Ormond, David Ryan; Albert, Ladislau; Das, Kaushik

    2012-10-16

    STUDY DESIGN:: Retrospective Case Series. OBJECTIVE:: The purpose of our study was to retrospectively review the results of posterior lumbar fusion using PEEK rods. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:: Pedicle screw and rod instrumentation has become the preferred technique for performing stabilization and fusion in the lumbar spine for degenerative disease. Rigid fixation with titanium (Ti) rods leads to high fusion rates but may also contribute to stress shielding and adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). Thus, some have advocated using semirigid rods made of polyetherether ketone (PEEK). Although the biomechanical properties of PEEK rods have shown improved stress shielding characteristics and anterior load sharing properties, there are very few clinical studies evaluating their application in the lumbar spine. METHODS:: We evaluated a retrospective cohort of 42 patients who underwent posterior lumbar fusion from 2007 to 2009 for the treatment of lumbar spine degenerative disease using PEEK rods. Reoperation rate was the primary outcome evaluated. Fusion rate was also evaluated. RESULTS:: 8 of the 42 patients with PEEK rods required reoperation. Reasons for reoperation mainly included ASD (5/8) and non-union with cage migration (3/8). Radiographically documented fusion rate was 86%. Mean follow up was 31.4 months. No statistical differences were found in fusion rates or reoperation between age over 55 and younger than 55 (P=1.00), male and female (P=0.110), single or multilevel fusion (P=0.67), and fusion with and without and interbody graft (P=0.69). Smokers showed a trend towards increased risk of reoperation for ASD or instrumentation failure (P=0.056). CONCLUSIONS:: PEEK rods demonstrate a similar fusion and reoperation rate in comparison with other instrumentation modalities in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spine disease. PMID:23075859

  8. A new lumbar posterior fixation system, the memory metal spinal system: an in-vitro mechanical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection devices (for example: DePuy Spines Titanium Moss Miami Spinal System). The Memory Metal Spinal System of this study consists of a single square spinal rod made of a nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) used in conjunction with connecting transverse bridges and pedicle screws made of Ti-alloy. Nitinol is best known for its shape memory effect, but is also characterized by its higher flexibility when compared to either stainless steel or titanium. A higher fusion rate with less degeneration of adjacent segments may result because of the elastic properties of the memory metal. In addition, the use of a single, unilateral rod may be of great value for a TLIF procedure. Our objective is to evaluate the mechanical properties of the new Memory Metal Spinal System compared to the Titanium Moss Miami Spinal System. Methods An in-vitro mechanical evaluation of the lumbar Memory Metal Spinal System was conducted. The test protocol followed ASTM Standard F1717-96, Standard Test Methods for Static and Fatigue for Spinal Implant Constructs in a Corpectomy Model. 1. Static axial testing in a load to failure mode in compression bending, 2. Static testing in a load to failure mode in torsion, 3. Cyclical testing to estimate the maximum run out load value at 5.0 x 10^6cycles. Results In the biomechanical testing for static axial compression bending there was no statistical difference between the 2% yield strength and the stiffness of the two types of spinal constructs. In axial compression bending fatigue testing, the Memory Metal Spinal System construct showed a 50% increase in fatigue life compared to the Titanium Moss Miami Spinal System. In static torsional testing the Memory Metal Spinal System constructs showed an average 220% increase in torsional yield strength, and an average 30% increase in torsional stiffness. Conclusions The in-vitro mechanical evaluation of the lumbar Memory Metal Spinal System showed good results when compared to a currently available spinal implant system. Throughout testing, the Memory Metal Spinal System showed no failures in static and dynamic fatigue. PMID:24047109

  9. Multi-scale finite element modelling at the posterior lumbar vertebra: analysis of pedicle stresses due to pars fracture.

    PubMed

    Inceo?lu, Serkan; Mageswaran, Prasath

    2014-05-01

    Multi-scale finite element (FE) model is a cost-effective way to analyse stress response of micro-level structures to the changes in loading at macro-level. This study deals with the development of a multi-scale model of a human vertebra and stress changes in the pedicle at high resolution after a gross fracture at the posterior neural arch. Spondylolysis (pars fracture) is a painful condition occurring in the vertebral neural arch and common especially among the athletic young population. The fracture of the pars significantly alters load distribution and load transfer characteristics at the neural arch. Structural changes in the posterior vertebra due to the new loading patterns can trigger secondary complications. Clinical reports have shown the association of pedicle hypertrophy or pedicle fracture with unilateral pars fractures. However, the biomechanical consequences of pars fracture and its effect on the pedicle have never been studied in detail. Therefore, we prepared a multi-scale model of posterior vertebra with continuum laminar complex model combined with micro-FE model of a pedicle section. The results showed that stress at the contralateral pars and pedicle increased after unilateral pars fracture simulation. High-stress regions were found around the outer boundaries of the pedicle. This model and information are helpful in understanding the stress changes in the pedicle and can be used for adaptive remodelling studies. PMID:22963179

  10. Staged treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hao; Zhang, Yupeng; Shen, Xiongjie; Luo, Chengke; Xu, Zhengquan; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Xiangyang; Wang, Xiyang

    2015-01-01

    The study was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of posterior-only approach combining with puncture drainage under CT-guide in staged treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess. We retrospectively analyzed 15 patients (came from 72 cases with thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis) with flow injection abscesses underwent surgery from January 2007 to February 2009, and evaluated the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scoring system of nerve function, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), abscess absorption time and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), preoperatively and postoperatively. 15 patients were followed up for 13-37 months, no recurrence of tuberculosis, no fixation loosening and neurologic symptoms aggravated. The flow injection abscesses are absorbed within 3-6 months postoperative operation. In final follow-up, ESR went down to 5.2±2.1 mm/h from preoperative 79.6±14.8 mm/h, CRP decreased from preoperative 49.3±7.5 mg/L to 1.8±0.7 mg/L, ODI changed from 75.13±20.15 to 16.72±8.62, all of them changed significantly (P<0.05). In conclusions, one-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion, pedicle screw fixation and two-stage CT-guided interventional therapy were safe and effective in treatment of the thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with flow injection abscess. PMID:26770442

  11. Magnetoneurographic registration of propagating magnetic fields in the lumbar spine after stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Anita; van Leeuwen, Peter; Hoormann, Jrg; Grnemeyer, Dietrich

    2006-06-01

    Stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve has been associated with different somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) recorded along the spine and thorax. The aim of this study was to register and describe the magnetic fields corresponding to different components of spinal SEP after stimulation of tibial nerves. In nine healthy subjects, right and left posterior tibial nerves were transcutaneously electrostimulated at the ankles. Neuromagnetic fields were registered over a circular 800 cm2 area of the lumbosacral spine using a 61-channel biomagnetometer. Magnetic field maps were constructed and examined visually for dipolar patterns. Equivalent current dipoles (ECD) were calculated for each somatosensory evoked field (SEF) using a least-squares fit in a spherical model. In seven subjects dipolar SEF were detected over the lower back at two separate latencies and locations and propagating ECD could be localized. Both the first and second components found agreed anatomically and functionally with respect to propagation in the underlying nerve fibers. It was possible to record and identify SEF which correspond to the SEP described in the literature. Dipole localization based on an equivalent current dipole model allowed a basic evaluation of the plausibility of the measurements with respect to the processes being examined.

  12. [The comparison of the use of cages with the use of autogenous bone grafts in the operative treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis by the posterior stabilisation and ALIF].

    PubMed

    Pankowski, Rafa?; Smoczy?ski, Andrzej; Jasklski, Dawid; Roc?awski, Marek; Samson, Lucjan; Piotrowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    In the following study the use of cages and autogenous bone grafts were comparised in the operative treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis by the posterior stabilization and anterior lumbosacral interbody fusion. 55 patients were divided into two groups. Patients underwent ALIF with the use of autogenous bone grafts in the first group (34) and with the use of titanium interbody implants (cages) in the second group (21). The mean follow up period in the first group was 8.6 years and in the second group was 3.4 years. The objective clinical outcome assessment was based on Oswestry disability questionnaire. Subjective clinical evaluation was conducted with the use of visual analog pain score and two questions concerning the evaluation of success of the operative treatment and a possible agreement to the following operation if necessary. The radiological results were based upon the evaluation of the degree of spondylolisthesis, the angle of the lumbar lordosis, the height of the interbody space and intervertebral foramen and the evaluation of the spinal fusion. The usage of autogenous bone grafts alone in ALIF was related to the significant loss of achieved segmental spine anatomy restoration. The implantation of the cages prevented the loss of slippage correction, permanently reconstructed the anatomical conditions in the area of the operated spinal segment. PMID:19514478

  13. The Extended Posterior Circumferential Decompression Technique in the Management of Tubercular Spondylitis with and without Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Rathinavelu, Barani; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Amritanand, Rohit; Sundararaj, Gabriel David

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective clinical series. Purpose To study the clinical, functional and radiological results of patients with tuberculous spondylitis with and without paraplegia, treated surgically using the "Extended Posterior Circumferential Decompression (EPCD)" technique. Overview of Literature With the increasing possibility of addressing all three columns by a single approach, posterior and posterolateral approaches are gaining acceptance. A single exposure for cases with neurological deficit and kyphotic deformity requiring circumferential decompression, anterior column reconstruction and posterior instrumentation is helpful. Methods Forty-one patients with dorsal/dorsolumbar/lumbar tubercular spondylitis who were operated using the EPCD approach between 2006 to 2009 were included. Postoperatively, patients were started on nine-month anti-tuberculous treatment. They were serially followed up to thirty-six months and both clinical measures (including pain, neurological status and ambulatory status) and radiological measures (including kyphotic angle correction, loss of correction and healing status) were used for assessment. Results Disease-healing with bony fusion (interbody fusion) was seen in 97.5% of cases. Average deformity (kyphosis) correction was 54.6% in dorsal spine and 207.3% in lumbar spine. Corresponding loss of correction was 3.6 degrees in dorsal spine and 1.9 degrees in the lumbar spine. Neurological recovery in Frankel B and C paraplegia was 85.7% and 62.5%, respectively. Conclusions The EPCD approach permits all the advantages of a single or dual session anterior and posterior surgery, with significant benefits in terms of decreased operative time, reduced hospital stay and better kyphotic angle correction. PMID:25558312

  14. Anterior corpectomy via the mini-open, extreme lateral, transpsoas approach combined with short-segment posterior fixation for single-level traumatic lumbar burst fractures: analysis of health-related quality of life outcomes and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Theologis, Alexander A; Tabaraee, Ehsan; Toogood, Paul; Kennedy, Abbey; Birk, Harjus; McClellan, R Trigg; Pekmezci, Murat

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The authors present clinical outcome data and satisfaction of patients who underwent minimally invasive vertebral body corpectomy and cage placement via a mini-open, extreme lateral, transpsoas approach and posterior short-segment instrumentation for lumbar burst fractures. METHODS Patients with unstable lumbar burst fractures who underwent corpectomy and anterior column reconstruction via a mini-open, extreme lateral, transpsoas approach with short-segment posterior fixation were reviewed retrospectively. Demographic information, operative parameters, perioperative radiographic measurements, and complications were analyzed. Patient-reported outcome instruments (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], 12-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-12]) and an anterior scar-specific patient satisfaction questionnaire were recorded at the latest follow-up. RESULTS Twelve patients (7 men, 5 women, average age 42 years, range 22-68 years) met the inclusion criteria. Lumbar corpectomies with anterior column support were performed (L-1, n = 8; L-2, n = 2; L-3, n = 2) and supplemented with short-segment posterior instrumentation (4 open, 8 percutaneous). Four patients had preoperative neurological deficits, all of which improved after surgery. No new neurological complications were noted. The anterior incision on average was 6.4 cm (range 5-8 cm) in length, caused mild pain and disability, and was aesthetically acceptable to the large majority of patients. Three patients required chest tube placement for pleural violation, and 1 patient required reoperation for cage subsidence/hardware failure. Average clinical follow-up was 38 months (range 16-68 months), and average radiographic follow-up was 37 months (range 6-68 months). Preoperative lumbar lordosis and focal lordosis were significantly improved/maintained after surgery. Patients were satisfied with their outcomes, had minimal/moderate disability (average ODI score 20, range 0-52), and had good physical (SF-12 physical component score 41.7% 10.4%) and mental health outcomes (SF-12 mental component score 50.2% 11.6%) after surgery. CONCLUSIONS Anterior corpectomy and cage placement via a mini-open, extreme lateral, transpsoas approach supplemented by short-segment posterior instrumentation is a safe, effective alternative to conventional approaches in the treatment of single-level unstable burst fractures and is associated with excellent functional outcomes and patient satisfaction. PMID:26431072

  15. PEEK-Halo effect in interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Hogan, Jarred A; Assem, Yusuf; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2016-02-01

    Recent developments have seen poly[aryl-ether-ether-ketone] (PEEK) being increasingly used in vertebral body fusion. More novel approaches to improve PEEK have included the introduction of titanium-PEEK (Ti-PEEK) composites and coatings. This paper aims to describe a potential complication of PEEK based implants relating to poorer integration with the surrounding bone, producing a "PEEK-Halo" effect which is not seen in Ti-PEEK composite implants. We present images from two patients undergoing anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). The first patient underwent an L5/S1 ALIF using a PEEK implant whilst the second patient underwent L4/L5 ALIF using a Ti-PEEK composite implant. Evidence of osseointegration was sought using CT imaging and confirmed using histological preparations of a sheep tibia model. The PEEK-Halo effect is demonstrated by a halo effect between the PEEK implant and the bone graft on CT imaging. This phenomenon is secondary to poor osseointegration of PEEK implants. The PEEK-Halo effect was not demonstrated in the second patient who received a Ti-PEEK composite graft. Histological analysis of graft/bone interface surfaces in PEEK versus Ti-PEEK implants in a sheep model further confirmed poorer osseointegration of the PEEK implant. In conclusion, the PEEK-Halo effect is seen secondary to minimal osseointegration of PEEK at the adjacent vertebral endplate following a PEEK implant insertion. This effect is not seen with Ti-PEEK implants, and may support the role of titanium in improving the bone-implant interface of PEEK substrates. PMID:26474500

  16. Randomized trial demonstrates that extended-release epidural morphine may provide safe pain control for lumbar surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Offley, Sarah C.; Coyne, Ellen; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Rubery, Paul T.; Zeidman, Seth M; Rechtine, Glenn R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Safe and effective postoperative pain control remains an issue in complex spine surgery. Spinal narcotics have been used for decades but have not become commonplace because of safety or re-dosing concerns. An extended release epidural morphine (EREM) preparation has been used successfully in obstetric, abdominal, thoracic, and extremity surgery done with epidural anesthesia. This has not been studied in open spinal surgery. Methods: Ninety-eight patients having complex posterior lumbar surgery were enrolled in a partially randomized clinical trial (PRCT) of low to moderate doses of EREM. Surgery included levels from L3 to S1 with procedures involving combinations of decompression, instrumented arthrodesis, and interbody grafting. The patients were randomized to receive either 10 or 15 mg of EREM through an epidural catheter placed under direct vision at the conclusion of surgery. Multiple safety measures were employed to prevent or detect respiratory depression. Postoperative pain scores, narcotic utilization, and adverse events were recorded. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups as to supplemental narcotic requirements, pain scores, or adverse events. There were no cases of respiratory depression. The epidural narcotic effect persisted from 3 to 36 hours after the injection. Conclusion: By utilizing appropriate safety measures, EREM can be used safely for postoperative pain control in lumbar surgery patients. As there was no apparent advantage to the use of 15 mg, the lower 10 mg dose should be used. PMID:23646274

  17. Perioperative complications of minimally invasive surgery (MIS): comparison of MIS and open interbody fusion techniques.

    PubMed

    Bagan, Bradley; Patel, Nimesh; Deutsch, Harel; Harrop, James; Sharan, Ashwini; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Ratliff, John K

    2008-01-01

    The risk of perioperative complications while adopting minimally invasive spine surgery techniques may slow the acceptance of this technology. We assess the perioperative complication rate with minimally invasive single- and two-level interbody fusions and compare this incidence with a contemporaneous cohort of open single- and two-level open interbody fusions, with all procedures completed by a single surgeon in a single practice group. We compiled all open and MIS interbody fusion cases completed during the study period. Sofamor-Danek X-Tube and Stryker Luxor minimally invasive systems were used on all patients. Medical records were reviewed to assess any adverse events occurring in the perioperative period. Care was taken to include all medical and surgical adverse events and complications occurring within 30 days of surgery. Over the study period, 28 minimally invasive lumbar fusions were identified: 24 single- and 4 two-level cases. Both TLIF and PLIF techniques were used. This cohort was compared with a group of 19 single- and two-level open interbody fusion cases completed over the same period. The complication rate for the MIS cohort was 18%, with 7 complications occurring in 5 patients. In the open group, 8 complications occurred in 7 patients, an incidence of 37%. A standard distribution of complications occurred, and the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. Limiting our analysis to severe complications yielded rates of 7% and 21% for the two groups, also not significantly divergent. Perioperative complications are not more common in well-selected MIS patients. Allowing for proper patient selection, MIS techniques have a favorable complication profile. PMID:18802914

  18. Diagnosis of Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis using Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ohtori, Seiji; Suzuki, Munetaka; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Hajime; Tamai, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of lumbar foraminal stenosis remains difficult. Here, we report on a case in which bilateral lumbar foraminal stenosis was difficult to diagnose, and in which diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was useful. The patient was a 52-year-old woman with low back pain and pain in both legs that was dominant on the right. Right lumbosacral nerve compression due to a massive uterine myoma was apparent, but the leg pain continued after a myomectomy was performed. No abnormalities were observed during nerve conduction studies. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated bilateral L5 lumbar foraminal stenosis. DTI imaging was done. The extraforaminal values were decreased and tractography was interrupted in the foraminal region. Bilateral L5 vertebral foraminal stenosis was treated by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and the pain in both legs disappeared. The case indicates the value of DTI for diagnosing vertebral foraminal stenosis. PMID:26949473

  19. Surgical Management of 3-Level Lumbar Spondylolyses

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Baogan; Li, Duanming; Pang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Three-level lumbar spondylolyses are extremely rare. So far, only 11 cases were reported in the literature. Treatment of multilevel spondylolyses has not been consistent. Conservative treatment is commonly considered first in most patients, but those who remain symptomatic may benefit from operative treatment. We report here 3 cases of 3-level lumbar spondylolyses that were treated successfully with direct isthmic repair in 2 cases and a combined surgery of isthmic repair and interbody fusion in 1 case. Our clinical results indicated that direct defect repair using the screwhook technique is a simple and safe procedure for the motion segment with normal disc. If the involved disc shows degenerative change, fusion surgery should be considered Surgical treatment of multilevel spondylolyses varies between fusion, direct isthmic repair, and combined management associating 2 procedures at different levels. The success of management of the 3 patients with 3-level spondylolyses depends on the choice of appropriate treatment for every patient. PMID:26166116

  20. ISASS Policy Statement - Cervical Interbody

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kern; Qureshi, Sheeraz

    2014-01-01

    Morgan Lorio, MD, FACS, Chair, ISASS Task Force on Coding & Reimbursement In 2011, CPT code 22551 was revised to combine or bundle CPT codes 63075 and 22554 when both procedures were performed at the same site/same surgical session. The add on code +22552 is used to report each additional interspace. 2014 heralded a downward pressure on this now prime target code (for non-coverage?) 22551 through an egregious insurer attempt to redefine cervical arthrodesis, effectively removing spine surgeon choice and altering best practice without clinical evidence. Currently, spine surgeons are equally split on the use of allograft versus cages for cervical arthrodesis. Structural allograft, CPT code 20931, is reported once per same surgical session, regardless of the number of allografts used. CPT code 22851 which is designated solely for cage use, has a higher reimbursement than structural allograft, and may be reported for each inner space. Hence, the rationale behind why some payers wrongly consider spine cages NOT medically necessary for cervical fusion. A timely consensus paper summarizing spine surgeon purview on the logical progressive evolution of cervical interbody fusion for ISASS/IASP membership was strategically identified as an advocacy focus by the ISASS Task Force. ISASS appreciates the authors charge with gratitude. This article has both teeth and transparent clinical real-world merit. PMID:25694945

  1. Titanium mesh cage fracture after lumbar reconstruction surgery: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Jin; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Wu, De-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Titanium mesh cage (TMC) was introduced recently to provide anterior structural support and interbody fusion without the need to harvest bone from the iliac crest. Because of its good mechanical behavior and satisfactory clinical outcomes, TMC is commonly used for lumbar burst fractures. Here, we present a female patient who underwent a posterior-anterior L4 corpectomy with TMC placement and developed a cage fracture after 42 months. The patient refused the revision surgery and asked for conservative treatment. At the 3-month follow-up, she reported doing well, with no complaints of back pain or leg pain. There were three cases of TMC fracture have been previously reported in the literature. Only one patient performed a revision surgery with an expandable titanium cage, and all this three patients experienced a good outcome during the follow-up period. TMC fracture is a rare complication of spinal surgery. Close observation or surgical treatment should be considered to improve patient outcomes. Although cage placement, instability, subsidence, and both stress shielding and necrotic bone in the cage appear to play key roles in the pathogenesis of this rare complication, the exact mechanism of this condition remains undetermined. PMID:26131138

  2. Complications of pedicle screws in lumbar and lumbosacral fusions in 105 consecutive primary operations.

    PubMed

    Jutte, P C; Castelein, R M

    2002-12-01

    Pedicle screw fixation is technically demanding and associated with high complication rates. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify the pedicle screw-related complications in 105 consecutive operations. We retrospectively analysed 105 consecutive primary operations. We found complications of varying severity in 54% of the patients. Deep infections were found in 4.7%, all successfully cured by debridement and antibiotics. There were no permanent neurological complications related to the screws. One serious neurological sequela, a T10 paraplegia, was unrelated to screw placement between L3 and S1. Screw misplacement was found in 6.5% of the screws. Screw breakage occurred in 12.4% of the patients, inevitably leading to loss of correction. Reduced spondylolisthesis L5-S1 without anterior support was found to be especially prone to screw breakage. The study confirmed that pedicle screw placement is a technically demanding procedure with a high complication rate. Fortunately, most complications are not severe. Infections can be dealt with by thorough debridement and parenteral antibiotics. Neurological sequelae can be minimised by careful tactile technique. To avoid screw breakage and subsequent loss of correction, anterior support should be provided, through either posterior or anterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF or ALIF) techniques, in reduced spondylolisthesis L5-S1. PMID:12522719

  3. The efficacy and complications of posterior hemivertebra resection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianguo; Shengru, Wang; Qiu, Guixing; Yu, Bin; Yipeng, Wang; Luk, Keith D K

    2011-10-01

    There have been several reports on hemivertebra resection via a posterior-only procedure. However, the number of reported cases is small, and various types of instrumentation have been used. In our study, we retrospectively investigated 56 consecutive cases of congenital scoliosis that were treated by posterior hemivertebra resection with transpedicular instrumentation. Radiographs were reviewed to determine the type and location of the hemivertebra, the coronal curve magnitude and the sagittal alignment pre-operatively, post-operatively and at the latest follow-up. Radiographs were also used to assess implant failure and inter-body fusion. Surgical reports and patient charts were reviewed to record any peri-operative complications. Fifty-eight posterior hemivertebrae resections from 56 patients aged 1.5-17 years with fully segmented non-incarcerated hemivertebra were evaluated. The average age at surgery was 9.9 years (1.5-17 years). The average follow-up was 32.9 months (24-58 months). The mean fusion level was 5.0 segments (2-11 segments). There was a mean improvement of 72.9% in the segmental scoliosis, from 42.4° before surgery to 12.3° at the time of the latest follow-up, and there was a mean improvement of 70% in segmental kyphosis from 42.0° to 14.5° over the same time period. The thoracic kyphosis (T5-T12) averaged 10.8° before surgery and 23.9° at the latest follow-up. The lumbar lordosis (L1-S1) averaged -52.8° before surgery and -51.6° at the latest follow-up. Two cases with neurological claudications had complete recovery immediately after the surgery. There was one case of delayed wound healing, two fractures of the pedicle at the instrumented level, two rod breakages and one proximal junction kyphosis that required revision. There were no neurological complications. Radiolucent gaps were found in the residual space after resection on the lateral view in five cases, without any sign of implant failure or correction loss. Our results show that one-stage posterior hemivertebra resection with transpedicular instrumentation can achieve excellent correction, 360° decompression and short fusion without neurological complications. Pedicle cutting still remains a challenge in younger children when using bisegmental instrumentation. In addition, the radiolucent gaps in the residual space require further investigation. PMID:21318279

  4. A novel approach to the lumbar sympathetic chain: lateral access.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Shaun D; Engler, John A; Perin, Noel L

    2013-07-01

    Plantar hyperhydrosis is a disabling condition of excessive, symmetric, focal sweating of the feet with social, psychological, and medical implications. Treatment options include topical agents, iontophoresis, botulinum toxin injection, and surgical disruption of the lumbar sympathetic chain. Surgical corridors include transperitoneal and retroperitoneal approaches. We report our technique with a novel minimally invasive lateral retroperitoneal approach commonly used for lateral interbody fusions. The lateral approach for sectioning of the sympathetic chain in the treatment of hyperhydrosis appears safe. The approach may be advantageous for the patient and surgeons familiar with lateral interbody fusion. Further studies may elucidate the long term efficacy and safety of the lateral approach. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/Q82SGpmAXng. PMID:23829842

  5. The First Clinical Trial of Beta-Calcium Pyrophosphate as a Novel Bone Graft Extender in Instrumented Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Jeung, Ul-Oh; Park, Kun-Woo; Kim, Min-Seok; Lee, Choon-Ki

    2011-01-01

    Background Porous β-calcium pyrophosphate (β-CPP) was developed to improve the fusion success of posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF). The possibility of accomplishing PLF using a mixture of porous β-CPP and iliac bone was studied. This paper reports the radiologic results of PLF using the β-CPP plus autograft for lumbar degenerative disease as a bone graft extender. Methods A prospective, case-matched, radiographic study evaluating the results of short segment lumbar fusion using a β-CPP plus autograft was performed to compare the efficacy of β-CPP plus autograft with that of an autograft alone for short segment lumbar fusion. Thirty one consecutive patients (46 levels) underwent posterolateral fusion with pedicle screw fixation and additional posterior lumbar interbody fusion. In all patients, 3 mL of β-CPP plus 3 mL of autogenous bone graft was placed randomly in one side of a posterolateral gutter, and 6 mL of autogenous iliac bone graft was placed on the other. The fusion rates, volumes of fusion masses, and bone absorption percentage were evaluated postoperatively using simple radiographs and 3 dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scans. Results The control sides treated with an autograft showed significantly better Lenke scores than the study sides treated with β-CPP at 3 and 6 months postoperatively, but there was no difference between the two sides at 12 months. The fusion rates (confirmed by 3D-CT) were 87.0% in the β-CPP group and 89.1% in the autograft group, which were not significantly different. The fusion mass volumes and bone absorption percentage at 12 months postoperatively were 2.49 mL (58.4%) and 1.89 mL (69.5%) for the β-CPP and autograft groups, respectively, and mean fusion mass volume was significantly higher in the β-CPP group. Conclusions β-CPP combined with an autograft is as effective as autologous bone for grafting during instrumented posterolateral spinal fusion. These findings suggest that β-CPP bone chips can be used as a novel bone graft extender for short-segment posterolateral spinal fusion. PMID:21909472

  6. Migration of a broken scalpel into the heart after spine surgery.

    PubMed

    De Praetere, Herbert; Vanden Eycken, Caroline; Meuris, Bart; Herijgers, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Iatrogenic vascular problems during posterior lumbar interbody fusion are a rare entity. Migration of a broken scalpel towards the heart has, to our knowledge, never been reported. We present the successful surgical retrieval of a broken scalpel from the heart after posterior lumbar interbody fusion without the use of a cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:24435837

  7. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Eismont, Frank J; Norton, Robert P; Hirsch, Brandon P

    2014-04-01

    Lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) is a common cause of low back pain, radiculopathy, and/or neurogenic claudication. Treatment begins with a trial of nonsurgical methods, including physical therapy, NSAIDs, and epidural corticosteroid injections. Surgical treatment with decompression and fusion is recommended for patients who do not respond to this initial regimen. Although much has been published in the past two decades on the surgical management of DS, the optimal method remains controversial. Interbody fusion may improve arthrodesis rates and can be performed via numerous surgical approaches. Minimally invasive techniques continue to be developed. Particular attention to surgical management of DS in the elderly is warranted given the increasing numbers of elderly persons. Healthcare utilization in the future must take into account evidence-based medicine that establishes clinically effective practices while simultaneously being cost effective. PMID:24668350

  8. Anterior column realignment following lateral interbody fusion for sagittal deformity correction.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Luiz; Fortti, Fernanda; Oliveira, Leonardo; Marchi, Luis; Jensen, Rubens; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Amaral, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    Degenerative and iatrogenic diseases may lead to loss of lordosis or even kyphotic thoracolumbar deformity and sagittal misalignment. Traditional surgery with three-column osteotomies is associated with important neurologic risks and postoperative morbidity. In a novel technique, the lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) is complemented with the sacrifice of the anterior longitudinal ligament and anterior portion of the annulus followed by the insertion of a hyperlordotic interbody cage. This is a less invasive lateral technique named anterior column realignment (ACR) and aims to correct sagittal misalignment in adult spinal deformity (ASD), with or without the addition of minor posterior osteotomies. In this article, we provide an account of the evolution to the ACR technique, the literature, and the Brazilian experience in the treatment of adult spinal deformity with this novel advanced application of LTIF. In the presence of ASD, the risk-to-benefit ratio of a surgical correction must be evaluated. Less invasive surgical strategies can be alternatives to treat the deformity and provide better quality of life to the patient. ACR is an advanced application of lateral transpsoas approach, up to date has shown to be reliable and effective when used for ASD, and may minimize complications and morbidity from traditional surgical procedures. Long-term follow-up and comparative studies are needed to evaluate real benefit. PMID:25971442

  9. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePLUS

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  10. Dynamic stabilization of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Balkan; Richter, Marcus; Huch, Klaus; Puhl, Wolfhart; Schmidt, Ren

    2006-08-01

    This study analyzed the outcome of patients treated with total disk replacement and posterior dynamic stabilization. For pathologies of different origin, dynamic stabilization of the lumbar spine is a novel alternative to fusion surgery. Although a physiological reconstruction of the sagittal profile was not always achieved, improvement was seen in all subscales of the clinical outcome measures in both treatment groups. Posterior dynamic stabilization and total disk replacement are promising alternatives to fusion with acceptable morbidity for strictly defined indications. PMID:16924866

  11. A 10-year follow-up of transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or intervertebral B-Twin system in failed back surgery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; Lorente, Francisco de Asis; Gomez, Joaquin; Eiras, Jose; Agrawal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: The spine surgeons have been combining anterior and posterolateral fusion (circumferential fusion) as the final solution to treat spinal disorders and many have been using it to treat failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). In present study, we analyzed and compared the clinical and radiological outcomes in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral B-Twin system for FBSS with a follow-up period of 10 years after the surgery. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective case study performed on 55 patients with FBSS. Clinical and radiological changes were compared between the two groups of patients on the basis of improvement of back pain, radicular pain, and work capacity. Outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year from before surgery until 2012. We analyzed the evolution of 55 cases of FBSS those underwent segmental circumferential posterior fusions from June 2001 to February 2003, operated by a single surgeon and followed up during 10 years until February 2012. The patients were divided into 2 groups: In 25 patients, posterolateral fusions with Legacy (Medtronic, Inc. NYSE: MDT) screws and intersomatic autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft was performed, and, in 30 patients, posterolateral fusions with the same screws and intersomatic fusion B-Twin (Biomet Spain Orthopaedics, S.L.) system was performed. In all cases, we used posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF)/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) approach for intervertebral graft, and the artrodesis was supplemented at intertransverse level with Autologus Growth Factor (AGF-MBA INCORPORADO, S.A.). The outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year and compared from before surgery to the final follow-up visit. Preoperative and postoperative scores were available for all patients. Results: The average age of these patients was comparable in both groups (mean age 42.6 versus 50.2 years). The average follow-up period was 200.6 months in the first group (screws and intersomatic bone) and 184.4 months in the second group (screws and B-Twin). In the autologus bone graft group, the CT scan and Rx study revealed loss of height of intervertebral space between 25% and 45% of 24 h postoperative height of intervertebral operated disc, and the patients continued to lose the height until 20 months after the surgery. In the B Twin group, the CT scan and Rx study revealed a loss of height of the intervertebral level of 8-12% over a period of 9 months follow-up, followed by stability. A total of 31 patients (55%) had improved Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index >40% of the total possible points, although this did not reflect in PSI or return to work rate. Conclusions: The patients with rigid fixation do well in terms of correction of lumbar lordosis, but they do not do well in terms of recurrence of pain. Furthermore, they need some kind of intervention to control pain after the first year after surgery. In patients in whom bone graft is used, although they do not maintain and sustain the lumbar lordosis in the long term, they have less recurrence of pain with less chances of intervention for pain control. PMID:25972934

  12. Lumbar pseudarthrosis: a review of current diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chun, Danielle S; Baker, Kevin C; Hsu, Wellington K

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Failed solid bony fusion, or pseudarthrosis, is a well-known complication of lumbar arthrodesis. Recent advances in radiographic technology, biologics, instrumentation, surgical technique, and understanding of the local biology have all aided in the prevention and treatment of pseudarthrosis. Here, the current literature on the diagnosis and management of lumbar pseudarthroses is reviewed. METHODS A systematic literature review was conducted using the MEDLINE and Embase databases in order to search for the current radiographie diagnosis and surgical treatment methods published in the literature (1985 to present). Inclusion criteria included: 1) published in English; 2) level of evidence I-III; 3) diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spine conditions and/or history of lumbar spine fusion surgery; and 4) comparative studies of 2 different surgical techniques or comparative studies of imaging modality versus surgical exploration. RESULTS Seven studies met the inclusion criteria for current radiographie imaging used to diagnose lumbar pseudarthrosis. Plain radiographs and thin-cut CT scans were the most common method for radiographie diagnosis. PET has been shown to be a valid imaging modality for monitoring in vivo active bone formation. Eight studies compared the surgical techniques for managing and preventing failed lumbar fusion. The success rates for the treatment of pseudarthrosis are enhanced with the use of rigid instrumentation. CONCLUSIONS Spinal fusion rates have improved secondary to advances in biologies, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and understanding of local biology. Treatment of lumbar pseudarthrosis includes a variety of surgical options such as replacing loose instrumentation, use of more potent biologies, and interbody fusion techniques. Prevention and recognition are important tenets in the algorithm for the management of spinal pseudarthrosis. PMID:26424334

  13. Biomechanical properties of lumbar endplates and their correlation with MRI findings of lumbar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junhui; Hao, Lu; Suyou, Letu; Shan, Zhi; Maiwulanjiang, Mamuti; Li, Shengyun; Wang, Chongyan; Fan, Shunwu; Zhao, Fengdong

    2016-02-29

    How stiffness and strength of the human lumbar endplate vary with location, spinal level, and its correlation with MRI findings of lumbar degeneration, has not been reported in detail. 27 lumbar spines (16 male, 11 female, 31-49yrs) were harvested from cadavers without history of lumbar lesion or trauma. Disc and endplate degeneration was evaluated from MRI. Micro-CT was used to evaluate endplate microstructure. Indentation tests were performed to quantify stiffness and strength at 23 sites on each endplate from load-displacement graphs. Results showed that stiffness and strength increased from the centre of the endplate towards its periphery. There was no general age-related reduction in endplate stiffness or strength, although strength decreased slightly with age opposite the inner annulus. Disc degeneration was associated with a 39-46% decrease in stiffness, and a 21-30% decrease in strength, with effects being greatest near the endplate periphery. The presence of Modic changes had a similar effect. Strength and stiffness consistently increased at lower spinal levels, and were consistently greater in the inferior endplate (relative to the vertebra). Gender had little influence, although stiffness in the peripheral endplate was greater in males. BV/TV, SMI, Tb.Th and BMD were positively correlated with strength. We conclude that endplate properties reflect compressive stresses within adjacent intervertebral discs. Weaker and softer endplates may indicate reduced mechanical loading in decompressed discs that are stress-shielded by the neural arch. Preoperative MRI evaluation of endplate integrity could reduce the risk of implant subsidence following inter-body fusion. PMID:26892896

  14. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Akhaddar, Ali; Boulahroud, Omar; Elasri, Abad; Elmostarchid, Brahim; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2010-07-01

    Intraradicular lumbar disc herniation is a rare complication of disc disease that is generally diagnosed only during surgery. The mechanism for herniated disc penetration into the intradural space is not known with certainty, but adhesion between the radicular dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament was suggested as the most important condition. The authors report the first case of an intraradicular lumbar disc herniation without subdural penetration; the disc hernia was lodged between the two radicular dura layers. The patient, a 34-year-old soldier, was admitted with a 12-month history of low back pain and episodic left sciatica. Neurologic examination showed a positive straight leg raising test on the left side without sensory, motor or sphincter disturbances. Spinal CT scan and MRI exploration revealed a left posterolateral osteophyte formation at the L5-S1 level with an irregular large disc herniation, which migrated superiorly. An intradural extension was suspected. A left L5 hemilaminectomy and S1 foraminotomy were performed. The exploration revealed a large fragment of disc material located between the inner and outer layers of the left S1 radicular dura. The mass was extirpated without cerebrospinal fluid outflow. The postoperative course was uneventful. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation should be suspected when a swollen, hard and immobile nerve root is present intraoperatively. PMID:19888608

  15. Acquired lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Deasy, JoAnn

    2015-04-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most frequent reason for spinal surgery in patients over age 65 years. In this condition, narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal and nerve root canals leads to painful, debilitating compression of spinal nerves and blood vessels. As the population ages, an increasing number of patients will be diagnosed and treated for lumbar spinal stenosis by primary care providers. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of lumbar spinal stenosis in adults over age 50 years. PMID:25763664

  16. Biomechanical effects of polyaxial pedicle screw fixation on the lumbosacral segments with an anterior interbody cage support

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Mo Lin, Ruey; Chen, Hsiang-Ho; Tsai, Kai-Jow

    2007-01-01

    Background Lumbosacral fusion is a relatively common procedure that is used in the management of an unstable spine. The anterior interbody cage has been involved to enhance the stability of a pedicle screw construct used at the lumbosacral junction. Biomechanical differences between polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws linked with various rod contours were investigated to analyze the respective effects on overall construct stiffness, cage strain, rod strain, and contact ratios at the vertebra-cage junction. Methods A synthetic model composed of two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene blocks was used with four titanium pedicle screws (two in each block) and two rods fixation to build the spinal construct along with an anterior interbody cage support. For each pair of the construct fixed with polyaxial or monoaxial screws, the linked rods were set at four configurations to simulate 0, 7, 14, and 21 lordosis on the sagittal plane, and a compressive load of 300 N was applied. Strain gauges were attached to the posterior surface of the cage and to the central area of the left connecting rod. Also, the contact area between the block and the cage was measured using prescale Fuji super low pressure film for compression, flexion, lateral bending and torsion tests. Results Our main findings in the experiments with an anterior interbody cage support are as follows: 1) large segmental lordosis can decrease the stiffness of monoaxial pedicle screws constructs; 2) polyaxial screws rather than monoaxial screws combined with the cage fixation provide higher compression and flexion stiffness in 21 segmental lordosis; 3) polyaxial screws enhance the contact surface of the cage in 21 segmental lordosis. Conclusion Polyaxial screws system used in conjunction with anterior cage support yields higher contact ratio, compression and flexion stiffness of spinal constructs than monoaxial screws system does in the same model when the spinal segment is set at large lordotic angles. Polyaxial pedicle screw fixation performs nearly equal percentages of vertebra-cage contact among all constructs with different sagittal alignments, therefore enhances the stabilization effect of interbody cages in the lumbosacral area. PMID:17349057

  17. Early experience with endoscopic revision of lumbar spinal fusions.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Lynn B; Madhavan, Karthik; Chieng, Lee Onn; Wang, Michael Y; Hofstetter, Christoph P

    2016-02-01

    Approximately half a million spinal fusion procedures are performed annually in the US. It is estimated that up to one-third of arthrodesis constructs require revision surgeries. In this study the authors present endoscopic treatment strategies targeting 3 types of complications following arthrodesis surgery: 1) adjacent-level foraminal stenosis; 2) foraminal stenosis at an arthrodesis segment; and 3) stenosis caused by a displaced interbody cage. A retrospective chart review of 11 patients with a mean age of 68 15 years was performed (continuous variables are shown as the mean SEM). All patients had a history of lumbar arthrodesis surgery and suffered from unilateral radiculopathy. Endoscopic revision surgeries were done as outpatient procedures, and there were no intraoperative or perioperative complications. The cohort included 3 patients with foraminal stenosis at the level of previous arthrodesis. They presented with unilateral radicular leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS] score: 7.3 2.1) and were severely disabled, as evidenced by an Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) of 46 4.9. Transforaminal endoscopic foraminotomies were performed, and at a mean follow-up time of 9.0 2.5 months VAS was reduced by an average of 6.3. The cohort also includes 7 patients suffering unilateral radiculopathy due to adjacent-level foraminal stenosis. Preoperative VAS for leg pain of the symptomatic side was 6.0 1.6, VAS for back pain was 5.2 1.7, and ODI was 40 6.33. Endoscopic decompression led to reduction of the ipsilateral leg VAS score by an average of 5, resulting in leg pain of 1 0.5 at an average of 8 months of follow-up. The severity of back pain remained stable (VAS 4.2 1.4). Two of these patients required revision surgery for recurrent symptoms. Finally, this study includes 1 patient who presented with weakness and pain due to retropulsion of an L5/S1 interbody spacer. The patient underwent an endoscopic interlaminar approach with partial resection of the interbody cage, which resulted in complete resolution of her radicular symptoms. Endoscopic surgery may be a useful adjunct for management of certain arthrodesis-related complications. Endoscopic foraminal decompression of previously fused segments and resection of displaced interbody cages appears to have excellent outcomes, whereas decompression of adjacent segments remains challenging and requires further investigation. PMID:26828879

  18. [Forensic identification for 16 cases with lumbar sacralization and lumbarization].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei-xiang; Zhang, Ling-li

    2006-02-01

    Lumbar sacralization and lumbarization are congenital spine malformation. 16 cases with lumbar sacralization or lumbarization were reviewed. Through studying the etiopathogenisis and clinical manifestation we analyze the relationship between injury and disease. 6 cases of 16 have lumbar sacralization. 10 cases are attributed to lumbarization. Most of this cases have backleg pain more or less. As a forensic doctor we suggest that pay more attention to this problem in our identify practice and locate the sequence of vertebral body more exactly. PMID:16524192

  19. PEEK Cages in Lumbar Fusion: Mid-term Clinical Outcome and Radiological Fusion.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Janneke J P; Poeschmann, Marcel S; Horsting, Phillip P; Schnfeld, Dirk H W; van Limbeek, Jacques; Pavlov, Paul W

    2012-08-18

    STUDY DESIGN:: Historical cohort analysis. OBJECTIVE:: Evaluation of mid-term clinical outcome and radiological fusion in patients treated with a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:: Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF) can be a good alternative in chronic low back pain when conservative treatment fails. Although titanium alloy cages give good fusion rates, disadvantages are the subsidence of the cage in the adjacent vertebrae and problematic radiological evaluation of fusion. PEEK cages, such as the Synfix-LR cage (Synthes, Switzerland) should overcome this. METHODS:: From December 2004 until August 2007 a total of 95 patients (21 double-level, 74 single-level) with degenerative disc disease from L3-S1 were operated by a single surgeon. The number of reoperations was counted. Radiological fusion on CT-scan was scored with a new scoring system by an independent skeletal radiologist and orthopaedic surgeon. Intra-observer agreement and specificity were assessed. Clinical improvement was measured by the ODI score. The median duration of clinical follow-up was 47.7 months (range 29.9-61.6 months). RESULTS:: In total 26 patients were reoperated after a median of 17.6 months (range 6.7-46.9) of the initial surgery. In total 23 patients (18 single-level, 5 double-level) were reoperated for symptomatic pseudarthrosis. A moderate agreement (?=0.36) and a specificity of 70% and 37% for the radiologist and orthopaedic surgeon, respectively, were found for scoring bony bridging. The ODI score improved after initial surgery, but reoperated patients reported a significantly lower improvement. CONCLUSIONS:: A high number of reoperations after an ALIF-procedure with the Synfix-LR cage was found, mainly due to symptomatic pseudarthrosis. The absence of posterior fixation in combination with lower stiffness and the hydrophobic characteristics of PEEK probably leads to insufficient initial stability, creating suboptimal conditions for bony bridging, and thus solid fusion. The proposed ease of the evaluation of radiological fusion could not be supported. Clinicians should be alert on pseudarthrosis when patients treated with the Synfix-LR cage presented with persisted or aggravated complaints. PMID:22907069

  20. A Clinical Investigation of Contralateral Neurological Symptom after Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF)

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jiayue; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yapeng; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze treatment outcomes and morbidity of contralateral neurological symptom in patients after TLIF surgery and to explore its possible causes. Material/Methods A retrospective study was conducted involving a total of 476 patients who underwent TILF from 2009 to 2012 in our hospital. These cases were divided into a symptomatic group (Group S) and a non-symptomatic group. The differences in contralateral foramen area and disc-height index(DHI) before and after surgery were compared between Group S and a random sample of 40 cases of non-symptomatic group patients (group N). In addition, according to whether the patient underwent second surgery, Group S patients were further divided into a transient neurologic symptoms group (Group T) and an operations exploration group (Group O). The time of symptom appearance, duration, and symptomatic severity (JOA VAS score) were compared between Group T and O. Results Among the 476 patients, 18 had postoperative contralateral neurological symptoms; thus, the morbidity was 3.7815%. The indicators in Group S were lower than in Group N in the differences in contralateral foramen area and disc-height index(DHI) before and after surgery (p<0.05). Five patients (Group O) in Group S had second surgery because of invalid conservative treatment. The surgical exploration rate was 1.0504%. Compared with Group T, the symptoms of Group O patients appeared earlier, persisted longer, and were more serious (p<0.05). Conclusions Contralateral neurological symptom is a potential complication after TLIF, and its causes are diverse. Surgical explorations should be conducted early for those patients with the complication who present with obvious nerve damage. PMID:26109143

  1. Lumbar septic arthritis and psoas abscess due to Aggregatibacter aphrophilus

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Fanny; Rossi, Pascal; Lagier, Jean Christophe; Craighero, Fabien; Frances, Yves; Granel, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Invasive infections due to Aggregatibacter aphrophilus mainly include negative blood culture endocarditis and osteoarticular infections. The authors present herein a rare case of posterior septic arthritis related to A aphrophilus involving lumbar spine with contiguous abscesses of psoas and paravertebral muscles. The infection likely originated from oral cavity. A good outcome was observed after a prolonged and targeted antibiotherapy. PMID:22696632

  2. Complication with Removal of a Lumbar Spinal Locking Plate

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Brooke; Lenarz, Christopher; Watson, J. Tracy; Alander, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The use of locking plate technology for anterior lumbar spinal fusion has increased stability of the vertebral fusion mass over traditional nonconstrained screw and plate systems. This case report outlines a complication due to the use of this construct. Case. A patient with a history of L2 corpectomy and anterior spinal fusion presented with discitis at the L4/5 level and underwent an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) supplemented with a locking plate placed anterolaterally for stability. Fifteen months after the ALIF procedure, he returned with a hardware infection. He underwent debridement of the infection site and removal of hardware. Results. Once hardware was exposed, removal of the locking plate screws was only successful in one out of four screws using a reverse thread screw removal device. Three of the reverse thread screw removal devices broke in attempt to remove the subsequent screws. A metal cutting drill was then used to break hoop stresses associated with the locking device and the plate was removed. Conclusion. Anterior locking plates add significant stability to an anterior spinal fusion mass. However, removal of this hardware can be complicated by the inherent properties of the design with significant risk of major vascular injury. PMID:25838956

  3. Is Hydronephrosis a Complication after Anterior Lumbar Surgery?

    PubMed

    Parks, Ruth M; Behrbalk, Eyal; Mosharraf, Syed; Mller, Roger M; Boszczyk, Bronek M

    2015-12-01

    Study Design?Prospective follow-up design. Objective?Ureteral injury is a recognized complication following gynecologic surgery and can result in hydronephrosis. Anterior lumbar surgery includes procedures like anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and total disk replacement (TDR). Anterior approaches to the spine require mobilization of the great vessels and visceral organs. The vascular supply to the ureter arising from the iliac arteries may be compromised during midline retraction of the ureter, which could theoretically lead to ureter ischemia and stricture with subsequent hydronephrosis formation. Methods?Potential candidates with previous ALIF or TDR via anterior retroperitoneal access between January 2008 and March 2012 were chosen from those operated on by a single surgeon in a university hospital setting (n?=?85). Renal ultrasound evaluation of hydronephrosis was performed on all participants. Simple descriptive and inferential statistics were used to generate results. Results?A total of 37 voluntary participants were recruited (23 male, 14 female subjects; average age 51.8 years). The prevalence of hydronephrosis in our population was 0.0% (95% confidence interval 0 to 8.1%). Conclusions?Retraction of the ureter across the midline in ALIF and TDR does not result in an increase in hydronephrosis and appears to be a safe surgical technique. PMID:26682096

  4. Is Hydronephrosis a Complication after Anterior Lumbar Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Ruth M.; Behrbalk, Eyal; Mosharraf, Syed; Mller, Roger M.; Boszczyk, Bronek M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Prospective follow-up design. Objective?Ureteral injury is a recognized complication following gynecologic surgery and can result in hydronephrosis. Anterior lumbar surgery includes procedures like anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and total disk replacement (TDR). Anterior approaches to the spine require mobilization of the great vessels and visceral organs. The vascular supply to the ureter arising from the iliac arteries may be compromised during midline retraction of the ureter, which could theoretically lead to ureter ischemia and stricture with subsequent hydronephrosis formation. Methods?Potential candidates with previous ALIF or TDR via anterior retroperitoneal access between January 2008 and March 2012 were chosen from those operated on by a single surgeon in a university hospital setting (n?=?85). Renal ultrasound evaluation of hydronephrosis was performed on all participants. Simple descriptive and inferential statistics were used to generate results. Results?A total of 37 voluntary participants were recruited (23 male, 14 female subjects; average age 51.8 years). The prevalence of hydronephrosis in our population was 0.0% (95% confidence interval 0 to 8.1%). Conclusions?Retraction of the ureter across the midline in ALIF and TDR does not result in an increase in hydronephrosis and appears to be a safe surgical technique. PMID:26682096

  5. Paraplegia with lumbar artery compression by the diaphragmatic crus.

    PubMed

    Batt, Michel; Rogopoulos, Andr; Benchimol, Daniel; Chapot, Ren; Jean-Baptiste, Elixne; Baque, Patrick

    2008-10-01

    The authors report three cases of transient and recurrent paraplegia due to compression of the second right lumbar artery by the diaphragmatic crus. Circumstances of appearance are suggestive when paraplegia occurs in dorsolumbar hyperlordosis and low cardiac output is an associated hemodynamic risk factor. Selective medullary arteriography is indispensable for diagnosis and can demonstrate three signs: an anterior spinal dorsolumbar artery (artery of Adamkiewicz) that does not descend to the conus medullaris; posterior spinal arteries arising from the second lumbar arteries that vascularize the conus medullaris; existence of a tight stenosis on the second right lumbar artery that is aggravated during dynamic maneuvers. Section of the right diaphragmatic crus and release of the second right lumbar artery from the aorta to the fibrous arcade of the psoas permits definitive cure of symptoms. PMID:18586436

  6. Useful Points of Geometry and Topography of the Lumbar Triangle for Transversus Abdominis Plane Block

    PubMed Central

    Ziętek, Zbigniew; Starczewski, Kamil; Sulikowski, Tadeusz; Iwan-Ziętek, Iza; Żukowski, Maciej; Kamiński, Marek; Ziętek-Czeszak, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Background A new look at the topography of the lumbar triangle becomes a challenge for modern anesthesia. The aim of this study was to redefine the topography of the lumbar triangle for transverse abdominis plane block. Material/Methods We explored 74 lumbar regions in 37 preserved cadavers (17 F and 20 M). Results The lumbar triangle was identified in 66 (89%) out of all explored cadavers’ lumbar regions. The predominant triangle was the acute-angled shaped. It was identified in 39 (59%) out of all explored lumbar regions. The second type of dissected triangles had the obtuse-angled shaped. Most triangles of acute-angled shaped and obtuse-angled shaped (36) had medium surface (range from 3 cm2 to 6 cm2), which accounted for 55% of all dissected lumbar triangles. The mean surface of the lumbar triangle was 3.6±2.2 cm2. Based on other measurements, we demonstrated that the majority of the lumbar triangles (62 triangles) were beyond the posterior axillary line. Conclusions According to the obtained results, the randomized searching for lumbar triangle should be limited to the area situated beyond of the posterior axillary line. The region situated anteriorly to the midaxillary line was defined in the study as the critical area for finding the lumbar triangle. Outcomes from the study revealed that the size and the location of the lumbar triangle as the gate for the transverse abdominal plane block may be responsible for difficulties encountered by anesthetists. Thus, establishing the area with the highest probability of localization of the lumbar triangle can improve both safety and efficiency of transversus abdominis plane block. PMID:26714659

  7. Spinaplasty following lumbar laminectomy for multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis to prevent iatrogenic instability

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Surendra Mohan; Kapoor, Varun; Jain, Anil K; Jain, Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Iatrogenic instability following laminectomy occurs in patients with degenerative lumbar canal stenosis. Long segment fusions to obviate postoperative instability result in loss of motion of lumbar spine and predisposes to adjacent level degeneration. The best alternative would be an adequate decompressive laminectomy with a nonfusion technique of preserving the posterior ligament complex integrity. We report a retrospective analysis of multilevel lumbar canal stenosis that were operated for posterior decompression and underwent spinaplasty to preserve posterior ligament complex integrity for outcome of decompression and iatrogenic instability. Materials and Methods: 610 patients of degenerative lumbar canal stenosis (n=520) and development spinal canal stenosis (n=90), with a mean age 58 years (3385 years), underwent multilevel laminectomies and spinaplasty procedure. At followup, changes in the posture while walking, increase in the walking distance, improvement in the dysesthesia in lower limb, the motor power, capability to negotiate stairs and sphincter function were assessed. Forward excursion of vertebrae more than 4 mm in flexionextension lateral X-ray of the spine as compared to the preoperative movements was considered as the iatrogenic instability. Clinical assessment was done in standing posture regarding active flexionextension movement, lateral bending and rotations Results: All patients were followed up from 3 to 10 years. None of the patients had neurological deterioration or pain or catch while movement. Walking distance improved by 510 times, with marked relief (7090%) in neurogenic claudication and preoperative stooping posture, with improvement in sensation and motor power. There was no significant difference in the sagittal alignment as well as anterior translation. Two patients with concomitant scoliosis and one with cauda equine syndrome had incomplete recovery. Two patients who developed disc protrusion, underwent a second operation for a symptomatic disc prolapse. Conclusion: Spinaplasty following posterior decompression for multilevel lumbar canal stenosis is a simple operation, without any serious complications, retaining median structures, maintaining the tension band and the strength with least disturbance of kinematics, mobility, stability and lordosis of the lumbar spine. PMID:21886919

  8. Minimally invasive posterior stabilization for treating spinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rigotti, S; Boriani, L; Luzi, C A; Marocco, S; Angheben, A; Gasbarrini, A; Zorzi, C

    2013-06-01

    We describe a case of dorsal-lumbar vertebral tuberculosis (Pott's disease) first treated with antibiotic therapy, bed rest, and cast. After 2months of treatment patient's symptoms worsened. Minimally invasive posterior vertebral stabilization was carried out, with excellent clinic and radiographic results. PMID:22358780

  9. Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Carolynne M; Forbes, Raeburn B

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture is one of the most commonly performed invasive tests in clinical medicine. Evaluation of an acute headache and investigation of inflammatory or infectious disease of the nervous system are the most common indications. Serious complications are rare, and correct technique will minimise diagnostic error and maximise patient comfort. We review the technique of diagnostic Lumbar Puncture including anatomy, needle selection, needle insertion, measurement of opening pressure, Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) specimen handling and after care. We also make some quality improvement suggestions for those designing services incorporating diagnostic Lumbar Puncture. PMID:25075138

  10. Structural and mechanical evaluations of a topology optimized titanium interbody fusion cage fabricated by selective laser melting process.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ying; Wirtz, Tobias; LaMarca, Frank; Hollister, Scott J

    2007-11-01

    A topology optimized lumbar interbody fusion cage was made of Ti-Al6-V4 alloy by the rapid prototyping process of selective laser melting (SLM) to reproduce designed microstructure features. Radiographic characterizations and the mechanical properties were investigated to determine how the structural characteristics of the fabricated cage were reproduced from design characteristics using micro-computed tomography scanning. The mechanical modulus of the designed cage was also measured to compare with tantalum, a widely used porous metal. The designed microstructures can be clearly seen in the micrographs of the micro-CT and scanning electron microscopy examinations, showing the SLM process can reproduce intricate microscopic features from the original designs. No imaging artifacts from micro-CT were found. The average compressive modulus of the tested caged was 2.97+/-0.90 GPa, which is comparable with the reported porous tantalum modulus of 3 GPa and falls between that of cortical bone (15 GPa) and trabecular bone (0.1-0.5 GPa). The new porous Ti-6Al-4V optimal-structure cage fabricated by SLM process gave consistent mechanical properties without artifactual distortion in the imaging modalities and thus it can be a promising alternative as a porous implant for spine fusion. PMID:17415762

  11. Do obese patients have worse outcomes after direct lateral interbody fusion compared to non-obese patients?

    PubMed

    Adogwa, Owoicho; Farber, S Harrison; Fatemi, Parastou; Desai, Rupen; Elsamadicy, Aladine; Cheng, Joseph; Bagley, Carlos; Gottfried, Oren; Isaacs, Robert E

    2016-03-01

    Obese patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery are a challenge to the operating surgeon. Direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) has been performed for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine with good outcomes; nevertheless, how obese patients fare compared to non-obese patients after DLIF remains unknown. The primary aim of this study is to compare rates of postoperative complications and long-term outcomes between obese and non-obese patients undergoing DLIF. Sixty-three patients (obese: 29, non-obese: 34) undergoing index DLIF for degenerative disease of the spine between 2010 and 2012 at our institution were retrospectively enrolled. We analyzed data on demographics, postoperative complications, back and leg pain, and functional disability over 2years. Patients completed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) back and leg pain numerical rating scores before surgery, then at 12 and 24months after surgery. Outcomes and complication rates were compared between the cohorts. The cohorts were similar at baseline. Postoperative complications rates were similar between obese and non-obese patients. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of durotomy (p=0.91), anterior thigh numbness (p=0.60), cerebrospinal fluid leak (p=0.91), postoperative infection (p=0.37), or bleeding requiring transfusion (p=0.16). No patient experienced a nerve injury or psoas hematoma. Both cohorts had similar 2year improvement in VAS for back pain, leg pain, and ODI. Our study demonstrates that obese and non-obese patients undergoing DLIF have similar complication profiles; hence, a patient's weight should not be a contraindication to DLIF. PMID:26549673

  12. Facet joint changes after application of lumbar nonfusion dynamic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects on adjacent-segment pathology after nonfusion dynamic stabilization is unclear, and, in particular, changes at the adjacent facet joints have not been reported in a clinical study. This study aims to compare changes in the adjacent facet joints after lumbar spinal surgery. METHODS Patients who underwent monosegmental surgery at L4-5 with nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system (Dynesys group) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation (fusion group) were retrospectively compared. Facet joint degeneration was evaluated at each segment using the CT grading system. RESULTS The Dynesys group included 15 patients, while the fusion group included 22 patients. The preoperative facet joint degeneration CT grades were not different between the 2 groups. Compared with the preoperative CT grades, 1 side of the facet joints at L3-4 and L4-5 had significantly more degeneration in the Dynesys group. In the fusion group, significant facet joint degeneration developed on both sides at L2-3, L3-4, and L5-S1. The subjective back and leg pain scores were not different between the 2 groups during follow-up, but functional outcome based on the Oswestry Disability Index improved less in the fusion group than in the Dynesys group. CONCLUSIONS Nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system had a greater preventative effect on facet joint degeneration in comparison with that obtained using fusion surgery. The Dynesys system, however, resulted in facet joint degeneration at the instrumented segments and above. An improved physiological nonfusion dynamic stabilization system for lumbar spinal surgery should be developed. PMID:26721580

  13. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... positions "open" the lumbar canal and take the pressure off the nerves that go to the legs. In severe cases, stenosis can cause partial or complete bowel or bladder incontinence Diagnosis & Tests ...

  14. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 50. A herniated lumbar disc may also cause back pain, although back pain alone (without leg pain) can have many causes ... 90% success); surgery is less effective in relieving back pain. Nonsurgical treatment Your doctor may prescribe nonsurgical treatments ...

  15. Theoretical model of a piezoelectric composite spinal fusion interbody implant.

    PubMed

    Tobaben, Nicholas E; Domann, John P; Arnold, Paul M; Friis, Elizabeth A

    2014-04-01

    Failure rates of spinal fusion are high in smokers and diabetics. The authors are investigating the development of a piezoelectric composite biomaterial and interbody device design that could generate clinically relevant levels of electrical stimulation to help improve the rate of fusion for these patients. A lumped parameter model of the piezoelectric composite implant was developed based on a model that has been utilized to successfully predict power generation for piezoceramics. Seven variables (fiber material, matrix material, fiber volume fraction, fiber aspect ratio, implant cross-sectional area, implant thickness, and electrical load resistance) were parametrically analyzed to determine their effects on power generation within reasonable implant constraints. Influences of implant geometry and fiber aspect ratio were independent of material parameters. For a cyclic force of constant magnitude, implant thickness was directly and cross-sectional area inversely proportional to power generation potential. Fiber aspect ratios above 30 yielded maximum power generation potential while volume fractions above 15% showed superior performance. This investigation demonstrates the feasibility of using composite piezoelectric biomaterials in medical implants to generate therapeutic levels of direct current electrical stimulation. The piezoelectric spinal fusion interbody implant shows promise for helping increase success rates of spinal fusion. PMID:23589373

  16. Crossed-screw fixation of the unstable thoracic and lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Benzel, E C; Baldwin, N G

    1995-01-01

    An ideal spinal construct should immobilize only the unstable spinal segments, and thus only the segments fused. Pedicle fixation techniques have provided operative stabilization with the instrumentation of a minimal number of spinal segments; however, some failures have been observed with pedicle instrumentation. These failures are primarily related to excessive preload forces and limitations caused by the size and orientation of the pedicles. To circumvent these problems, a new technique, the crossed-screw fixation method, was developed and is described in this report. This technique facilitates short-segment spinal fixation and uses a lateral extracavitary approach, which provides generous exposure for spinal decompression and interbody fusion. The technique employs two large transverse vertebral body screws (6.5 to 8.5 mm in diameter) to bear axial loads, and two unilateral pedicle screws (placed on the side of the exposure) to restrict flexion and extension deformation around the transverse screws and to provide three-dimensional deformity correction. The horizontal vertebral body and the pedicle screws are connected to rods and then to each other via rigid crosslinking. The transverse vertebral body screws are unloaded during insertion by placing the construct in a compression mode after the interbody bone graft is placed, thus optimizing the advantage gained by the significant "toe-in" configuration provided and further decreasing the chance for instrumentation failure. The initial results of this technique are reported in a series of 10 consecutively treated patients, in whom correction of the deformity was facilitated. Follow-up examination (average 10.1 months after surgery) demonstrated negligible angulation. Chronic pain was minimal. The crossed-screw fixation technique is biomechanically sound and offers a rapid and safe form of short-segment three-dimensional deformity correction and solid fixation when utilized in conjunction with the lateral extracavitary approach to the unstable thoracic and lumbar spine. This approach also facilitates the secure placement of an interbody bone graft. PMID:7815111

  17. Clinical comparison of Zero-profile interbody fusion device and anterior cervical plate interbody fusion in treating cervical spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Bin; Nie, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: the aim of the study was to compare the clinical effect of Zero-profile interbody fusion device (Zero-P) with anterior cervical plate interbody fusion system (PCB) in treating cervical spondylosis. Methods: a total of 98 patients with cervical spondylosis (110 segments) in February 2011 to January 2013 were included in our hospital. All participants were randomly divided into observation group and control group with 49 cases in each group. The observation group was treated with Zero-P, while the control group received PCB treatment. Comparison of the two groups in neurological function score (JOA), pain visual analogue scale (VAS), the neck disability index (NDI), quality of life score (SF-36) and cervical curvature (Cobb angle) change were recorded and analyzed before and after treatment. Results: The observation group was found with 90% excellent and good rate, which was higher than that of the control group (80%). Dysphagia rate in observational group was 16.33% (8/49), which was significantly less than that in control group (46.94%). Operation time and bleeding volume in the observation group was less than those in control group. Postoperative improvements of JOA score, VAS score, and NDI in observational group were also significantly better than that in control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: The clinical effect of Zero-P and PCB for the treatment of cervical spondylosis was quite fair, but Zero-P showed a better therapeutic effect with improvement of life quality. PMID:26550337

  18. Endoscopic minimally invasive transforaminal interbody fusion without general anesthesia: initial clinical experience with 1-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wang, Michael Y; Grossman, Jay

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE One of the principal goals of minimally invasive surgery has been to speed postoperative recovery. In this case series, the authors used an endoscopic technique for interbody fusion combined with percutaneous screw fixation to obviate the need for general anesthesia. METHODS The first 10 consecutive patients treated with a minimum of 1 year's follow-up were included in this series. The patients were all treated using endoscopic access through Kambin's triangle to allow for neural decompression, discectomy, endplate preparation, and interbody fusion. This was followed by percutaneous pedicle screw and connecting rod placement using liposomal bupivacaine for long-acting analgesia. No narcotics or regional anesthetics were used during surgery. RESULTS All patients underwent the procedure successfully without conversion to open surgery. The patients' average age was 62.2 ± 9.0 years (range 52-78 years). All patients had severe disc height collapse, and 60% had a Grade I spondylolisthesis. The mean operative time was 113.5 ± 6.3 minutes (range 105-120 minutes), and blood loss was 65 ± 38 ml (range 30-190 ml). The mean length of hospital stay was 1.4 ± 1.3 nights. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Comparison of preoperative and final clinical metrics demonstrated that the Oswestry Disability Index improved from 42 ± 11.8 to 13.3 ± 15.1; the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) Physical Component Summary improved from 47.6 ± 3.8 to 49.7 ± 5.4; the SF-36 Mental Component Summary decreased from 47 ± 3.9 to 46.7 ± 3.4; and the EQ-5D improved from 10.7 ± 9.5 to 14.2 ± 1.6. There were no cases of nonunion identified radiographically on follow-up imaging. CONCLUSIONS Endoscopic fusion under conscious sedation may represent a feasible alternative to traditional lumbar spine fusion in select patients. Larger clinical series are necessary to validate that clinical improvements are sustained and that arthrodesis rates are successful when compared with open surgery. This initial experience demonstrates the possible utility of this procedure. PMID:26828882

  19. [XLIF--a new technique of the lumbar vertebra disc replacement: initial experience].

    PubMed

    Hrablek, L; Wanek, T; Adamus, M

    2010-12-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) is a novel technique for the anterior disc replacement. The aim of this report was description of the surgical technique of XLIF. Based on our experience with first eleven patients we report advantages and drawbacks of this method. Patients who presented with symptomatic degenerative disc disease or failed back surgery syndrome were considered candidates for this surgery. The patient was placed in a true right lateral decubitus position and small (6 cm) left lateral skin incision was performed. Access to the lumbar spine was achieved by approach that passes through the retroperitoneally fat and psoas major muscle, using peroperative fluoroscopy. Expandable retractor was inserted, discectomy and replacement by Oracle (Synthes, USA) cage (with synthetic cancellous bone graft) to the interbody space was performed. XLIF represents save surgical method with maximally careful approach and spacious working portal. The new benefit of XLIF is based on the minimally invasive spine surgery technique through retroperitoneal space. The lateral access to the disc avoids the major vessels and nerves and implant placement in the anterior and bilateral position provides sagital and coronal plane imbalance correction. PMID:21404522

  20. Acute cauda equina syndrome secondary to a lumbar synovial cyst.

    PubMed

    Muir, Jeffery J; Pingree, Matthew J; Moeschler, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Cauda equina syndrome is a well described state of neurologic compromise due to lumbosacral root compression. In most cases, it is due to a herniated disc, tumor, infection, or hematoma. We report a case of rapid lumbar synovial cyst expansion leading to acute cauda equina syndrome and compare it to similar cases in the literature. The patient is a 49-year-old woman with a history of chronic low back pain who developed cauda equina syndrome. Serial lumbar magnetic resonance imaging studies demonstrated a significant increase in the size of a lumbar synovial cyst over a 2 week interval. After an unsuccessful attempt to relieve her acute symptoms with computed tomography-guided cyst aspiration, an L4-5 posterior spinal decompression with excision of the synovial cyst was performed. Postoperatively the patient's perineal numbness, bladder incontinence, and associated pain complaints resolved. The only residual symptom at one month follow-up was continued numbness in the right lower limb in an L5 distribution. This report adds to 6 other well described similar cases found in the literature by illustrating several important points. First, a lumbar synovial cyst is a rare but possible cause of acute cauda equina syndrome. Second, magnetic resonance imaging is the test of choice to diagnose and characterize lumbar synovial cysts; serial imaging can detect fluctuations in cyst size. Third, percutaneous treatment of lumbar synovial cysts is variable in efficacy and proved to be unsuccessful in our patient. Finally, surgical management has shown high success rates for symptomatic cysts. Specifically, in the setting of acute cauda equina syndrome secondary to a lumbar synovial cyst, urgent surgical decompression has led to resolution of neurologic symptoms in most reported cases. A lumbar synovial cyst is an uncommon cause of acute cauda equina syndrome. Prompt diagnosis and treatment may lead to reduced morbidity associated with this condition. PMID:22996855

  1. A Short History of Posterior Dynamic Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Gomleksiz, Cengiz; Sasani, Mehdi; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Ozer, Ali Fahir

    2012-01-01

    Interspinous spacers were developed to treat local deformities such as degenerative spondylolisthesis. To treat patients with chronic instability, posterior pedicle fixation and rod-based dynamic stabilization systems were developed as alternatives to fusion surgeries. Dynamic stabilization is the future of spinal surgery, and in the near future, we will be able to see the development of new devices and surgical techniques to stabilize the spine. It is important to follow the development of these technologies and to gain experience using them. In this paper, we review the literature and discuss the dynamic systems, both past and present, used in the market to treat lumbar degeneration. PMID:23326674

  2. Current strategies for the restoration of adequate lordosis during lumbar fusion

    PubMed Central

    Barrey, Cédric; Darnis, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Not restoring the adequate lumbar lordosis during lumbar fusion surgery may result in mechanical low back pain, sagittal unbalance and adjacent segment degeneration. The objective of this work is to describe the current strategies and concepts for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. Theoretical lordosis can be evaluated from the measurement of the pelvic incidence and from the analysis of spatial organization of the lumbar spine with 2/3 of the lordosis given by the L4-S1 segment and 85% by the L3-S1 segment. Technical aspects involve patient positioning on the operating table, release maneuvers, type of instrumentation used (rod, screw-rod connection, interbody cages), surgical sequence and the overall surgical strategy. Spinal osteotomies may be required in case of fixed kyphotic spine. AP combined surgery is particularly efficient in restoring lordosis at L5-S1 level and should be recommended. Finally, not one but several strategies may be used to achieve the need for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. PMID:25621216

  3. Lumbar Lordosis of Spinal Stenosis Patients during Intraoperative Prone Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su-Keon; Song, Kyung-Sub; Park, Byung-Moon; Lim, Sang-Youn; Jang, Geun; Lee, Beom-Seok; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of spondylolisthesis on lumbar lordosis on the OSI (Jackson; Orthopaedic Systems Inc.) frame. Restoration of lumbar lordosis is important for maintaining sagittal balance. Physiologic lumbar lordosis has to be gained by intraoperative prone positioning with a hip extension and posterior instrumentation technique. There are some debates about changing lumbar lordosis on the OSI frame after an intraoperative prone position. We evaluated the effect of spondylolisthesis on lumbar lordosis after an intraoperative prone position. Methods Sixty-seven patients, who underwent spinal fusion at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of Gwangmyeong Sungae Hospital between May 2007 and February 2012, were included in this study. The study compared lumbar lordosis on preoperative upright, intraoperative prone and postoperative upright lateral X-rays between the simple stenosis (SS) group and spondylolisthesis group. The average age of patients was 67.86 years old. The average preoperative lordosis was 43.5° (± 14.9°), average intraoperative lordosis was 48.8° (± 13.2°), average postoperative lordosis was 46.5° (± 16.1°) and the average change on the frame was 5.3° (± 10.6°). Results Among all patients, 24 patients were diagnosed with simple spinal stenosis, 43 patients with spondylolisthesis (29 degenerative spondylolisthesis and 14 isthmic spondylolisthesis). Between the SS group and spondylolisthesis group, preoperative lordosis, intraoperative lordosis and postoperative lordosis were significantly larger in the spondylolisthesis group. The ratio of patients with increased lordosis on the OSI frame compared to preoperative lordosis was significantly higher in the spondylolisthesis group. The risk of increased lordosis on frame was significantly higher in the spondylolisthesis group (odds ratio, 3.325; 95% confidence interval, 1.101 to 10.039; p = 0.033). Conclusions Intraoperative lumbar lordosis on the OSI frame with a prone position was larger in the SS patients than the spondylolisthesis patients, which also produced a larger postoperative lordosis angle after posterior spinal fusion surgery. An increase in lumbar lordosis on the OSI frame should be considered during posterior spinal fusion surgery, especially in spondylolisthesis patients. PMID:26929801

  4. Effect of lumbar orthosis on intervertebral mobility. A roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, P; Johnsson, R; Strömqvist, B

    1992-06-01

    To determine the stabilizing effect of external lumbar supports on the intervertebral mobility in the lower lumbar spine, seven patients with a posterolateral lumbosacral fusion without internal fixation were examined by roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis in supine and erect positions 1 month after surgery, that is, after soft tissue healing but before fusion consolidation. Each patient was examined without lumbar support, with a molded, rigid orthosis and with a canvas corset with molded, plastic posterior support. Neither of the two types of lumbar support had any stabilizing effect on the sagittal, vertical, or transverse intervertebral translations. This study using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis confirms that lumbosacral orthosis has effect by restricting gross motions of the trunk rather than intervertebral mobility in the lumbar spine. PMID:1626301

  5. Posterior fossa tumor

    MedlinePLUS

    Posterior fossa tumor is a type of brain tumor located in or near the bottom of the skull. ... The posterior fossa is a small space in the skull, found near the brainstem and cerebellum. The cerebellum is the part ...

  6. Septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint: Detection with bone SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Swayne, L.C.; Dorsky, S.; Caruana, V.; Kaplan, I.L. )

    1989-08-01

    We present a rare case of septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint with an associated epidural abscess resulting from Staphylococcus aureus. The infection was initially detected with planar bone scintigraphy and precisely localized with single photon emission computed tomography bone scintigraphy, despite an initially negative radiologic evaluation that included radiographs of the lumbar spine, lumbar myelography, and a postmyelography x-ray computed tomography scan. In the appropriate clinical setting, a bone scan demonstrating unilateral increased activity within the spine should raise the suspicion of inflammatory involvement of the posterior elements.

  7. Retrolisthesis as a Compensatory Mechanism in Degenerative Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ikchan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Posterior vertebral translation as a type of spondylolisthesis, retrolisthesis is observed commonly in patients with degenerative spinal problems. Nevertheless, there is insufficient literature on retrolisthesis compared to anterolisthesis. The purpose of this study is to clarify the clinical features of retrolisthesis, and its developmental mechanism associated with a compensatory role in sagittal imbalance of the lumbar spine. Methods From 2003 to 2012, 230 Korean patients who underwent spinal surgery in our department under the impression of degenerative lumbar spinal disease were enrolled. All participants were divided into four groups : 35 patients with retrolisthesis (group R), 32 patients with simultaneous retrolisthesis and anterolisthesis (group R+A), 76 patients with anterolisthesis (group A), and 87 patients with non-translation (group N). The clinical features and the sagittal parameters related to retrolisthesis were retrospectively analyzed based on the patients' medical records. Results There were different clinical features and developmental mechanisms between retrolisthesis and anterolisthesis. The location of retrolisthesis was affected by the presence of simultaneous anterolisthesis, even though it predominantly manifest in L3. The relative lower pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, and lumbar lordosis compared to anterolisthesis were related to the generation of retrolisthesis, with the opposite observations of patients with anterolisthesis. Conclusion Retrolisthesis acts as a compensatory mechanism for moving the gravity axis posteriorly for sagittal imbalance in the lumbar spine under low pelvic incidence and insufficient intra-spinal compensation. PMID:25810857

  8. Lumbar disc replacement: update.

    PubMed

    Heider, F C; Mayer, H M; Siepe, C J

    2015-06-01

    Over the last decades, fusion of lumbar spinal motion segments has represented the mainstay of treatment of lumbar degenerative conditions which failed to respond adequately to conservative therapy. Increasing demands and expectations from patients as well as the necessity to avoid fusion related negative side effects such as adjacent level disc degeneration, considerable complication and reoperation rates, cranial facet joint violations, pseudarthrosis and others led to the development of motion preserving technologies such as total lumbar disc replacement (TDR). The first and rudimentary attempts to preserve motion of lumbar motion segments can be dated back to the early 1950s. Over the past two to three decades, a variety of new implants with different motion characteristics have been developed and introduced into the market. Despite of the extensive knowledge which has been gained in this field of research, insurers in the United States have refused to reimburse surgeons due to fear of late complications and reoperations as well as unknown secondary costs, which led to a global decline in the numbers of TDR procedures. The current literature review intends to provide a concise summary of the adequate indications for TDR as well as outcome determining factors and delineate the role of TDR in the currently available armamentarium for the treatment of low back pain (LBP) resulting from degenerative disc disease (DDD) without instabilities or deformities. PMID:25649068

  9. Computational analyses of different intervertebral cages for lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Bashkuev, Maxim; Checa, Sara; Postigo, Sergio; Duda, Georg; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2015-09-18

    Lumbar spinal fusion is the most common approach for treating spinal disorders such as degeneration or instability. Although this procedure has been performed for many years, there are still important challenges that must be overcome and questions that need to be addressed regarding the high rates of non-union. The present finite element model study aimed to investigate the influence of different cage designs on the fusion process. An axisymmetric finite element model of a spinal segment with an interbody fusion cage was used. The fusion process was based on an existing mechano-regulation algorithm for tissue formation. With this model, the following principal concepts of cage design were investigated: (1) different cage geometries with constant compressive stiffness and (2) cage designs optimized to provide the ideal mechanical stimulus for bone formation, first at the beginning of fusion and then throughout the entire fusion process. The cage geometry substantially influenced the fusion outcome. A cage that created an optimized initial mechanical stimulus did not necessarily lead to accelerated fusion, but rather resulted in delayed fusion or non-union. In contrast, a cage made of a degradable material produced a significantly higher amount of bone and resulted in higher segmental stiffness. However, different compressive loads (250, 500 and 1000 N) substantially affected the amount of newly formed bone tissue. The results of the present study suggest that aiming for an optimal initial mechanical stimulus may be misleading because the initial mechanical environment is not preserved throughout the bone modeling process. PMID:26162547

  10. Lumbar Corsets Can Decrease Lumbar Motion in Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Koji; Miyamoto, Kei; Yanagawa, Takashi; Hattori, Ryo; Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Toshio; Ohno, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K.), full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC), with a soft corset (SC), and with a hard corset (HC), with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity) in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt) were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38) or HC (28) than under WOC (44) conditions (p < 0.05). The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94/sec) than under SC (177/sec) and WOC (191 /sec) conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC. Key points Rotational and extension forces on the lumbar spine may cause golf-related low back pain Wearing lumbar corsets during a golf swing can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles and angular velocity. Wearing lumbar corsets increased the rotational motion of the hip joint while reducing the rotation of the lumbar spine. PMID:24149729

  11. [Topography, relations and transformation of lumbar lymphatic sacs].

    PubMed

    Sharkus, Ye A

    2015-01-01

    The peculiarities of the structure, skeletotopy, and syntopy of the lumbar lymphatic collector were studied on 20 5-8 week-old embryos and on 80 9-36 week-old fetuses using a complex macro-microscopic method. It is found that the lumbar lymphatic collector in fetuses at 9-10 weeks was represented by retroperitoneal and retroaortic lymphatic sacs that had a fusion mode of formation and were interconnected. Retroperitoneal sac was located in the projection of L(I)-L(IV) and was in contact with the anterior surface of the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava, aortic lumbar paraganglia, abdominal aortic plexus and ganglia of sympathetic trunk. Retroaortic sack at L(I)-L(II) was adjacent to posterior surface of the aorta, the lumbar vertebrae and the medial crus of the diaphragm. These topical relations were preserved throughout the whole fetal period. However, in fetuses of 11-13 weeks lymphatic sacs formed the lymphatic plexuses, while in fetuses of 14-36 weeks they formed lumbar lymph nodes and their interconnecting vessels. PMID:25958724

  12. Single transverse-orientation cage via MIS-TLIF approach for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease: a technical note

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Jin; Han, Ying-Chao; Pan, Fu-Min; Ma, Bin; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Single transverse cage placed in the anterior vertebral column can better maintain lumbar lordosis and sagittal alignment and is frequently used via the lateral transpsoas approach. However, there is no clear description in the literature of the steps required to place the single transverse cage during the instrumented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) procedure for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease. The objective of this study is to describe the technique using single transverse-orientation cage when performing TLIF procedures. Materials and methods: We present 18 illustrative cases in which single transverse-orientation cage was placed according to a step-by-step technique that can be used during the TLIF procedure. Information acquired included procedure time, intraoperative blood loss and postoperative complications. The preoperative and postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were recorded. Changes in disc height and segmental lordosis were measured at radiographs. Results: The single transverse-orientation cage was successfully placed in 18 patients in a stepwise technique to achieve lumbar fusion. Using this technique, the patients significantly improved clinically and radiographically at postoperative visits. Conclusions: This is the first report demonstrating the safety and efficacy of instrumented TLIF with single transverse-orientation cage for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease. Single transverse-orientation cage via MIS-TLIF approach can maintain greater lumbar lordosis and avoid the unique complications of lateral transpsoas approach. Understanding the options for cage placement is important for surgeons considering the use of this technique. PMID:26550387

  13. Correlation of thoracic and lumbar vertebral failure loads with in situ vs. ex situ dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Brklein, D; Lochmller, E; Kuhn, V; Grimm, J; Barkmann, R; Mller, R; Eckstein, F

    2001-05-01

    In this study we explore the hypothesis that estimates of failure loads in the thoracic spine by lumbar dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) are compromised of skeletal heterogeneity throughout the spine and artifacts of spinal DXA. We studied the correlation between mechanical failure loads of thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, and that of in situ vs. ex situ lumbar DXA with thoracic and lumbar fracture loads, respectively. One hundred and nineteen subjects (76 female, age 82+/-9yr; 43 male, age 77+/-11yr) were examined under in situ conditions (anterior-posterior direction), the scans being repeated ex situ (lateral projection) in 68 cases. The failure loads of thoracic vertebrae (T) 6 and 10, and lumbar vertebra (L) 3 were determined in axial compression, using a functional 3-segment unit. The correlation between thoracic failure loads (T6 vs. T10) was significantly (p<0.01) higher (r=0.85) than those between thoracic and lumbar vertebrae (r=0.68 and 0.61, respectively). Lateral ex situ DXA displayed a significantly higher correlation (p<0.05) with lumbar vertebral fracture loads than in situ anterior-posterior DXA (r=0.85 vs. 0.71), but the correlation of thoracic failure loads with lateral ex situ lumbar DXA was similar to that obtained in situ in anterior-posterior direction (r=0.69 vs. 0.69 for T10, and r=0.61 vs. 0.65 for T6). The correlation between fracture loads of different spinal segments, and between DXA and failure loads was not significantly different between men and women. The results demonstrate a substantial heterogeneity of mechanical competence throughout the spine in elderly individuals. Because of the high incidence of fractures in the thoracic spine, these findings suggest that, clinically, lateral DXA involves no relevant advantage over anterior-posterior measurements of the lumbar spine. PMID:11311698

  14. MRI Evaluation of Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rupal; Mehta, Chetan; Patel, Narrotam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lower back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease is a condition that affects young to middle-aged persons with peak incidence at approximately 40 y. MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. Aims and Objective: To evaluate the characterization, extent, and changes associated with the degenerative lumbar disc disease by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Study Design: Cross-sectional and observational study. Materials and Methods: A total 109 patients of the lumbar disc degeneration with age group between 17 to 80 y were diagnosed & studied on 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine. MRI findings like lumbar lordosis, Schmorls nodes, decreased disc height, disc annular tear, disc herniation, disc bulge, disc protrusion and disc extrusion were observed. Narrowing of the spinal canal, lateral recess and neural foramen with compression of nerve roots observed. Ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was observed. Result: Males were more commonly affected in Degenerative Spinal Disease & most of the patients show loss of lumbar lordosis. Decreased disc height was common at L5-S1 level. More than one disc involvement was seen per person. L4 L5 disc was the most commonly involved. Annular disc tear, disc herniation, disc extrusion, narrowing of spinal canal, narrowing of lateral recess, compression of neural foramen, ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was common at the L4 L5 disc level. Disc buldge was common at L3 L4 & L4 L5 disc level. Posterior osteophytes are common at L3 - L4 & L5 S1 disc level. L1- L2 disc involvement and spondylolisthesis are less common. Conclusion: Lumbar disc degeneration is the most common cause of low back pain. Plain radiograph can be helpful in visualizing gross anatomic changes in the intervertebral disc. But, MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. PMID:26023617

  15. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term.

  16. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ciricillo, S F; Weinstein, P R

    1993-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis, the results of congenital and degenerative constriction of the neural canal and foramina leading to lumbosacral nerve root or cauda equina compression, is a common cause of disability in middle-aged and elderly patients. Advanced neuroradiologic imaging techniques have improved our ability to localize the site of nerve root entrapment in patients presenting with neurogenic claudication or painful radiculopathy. Although conservative medical management may be successful initially, surgical decompression by wide laminectomy or an intralaminar approach should be done in patients with serious or progressive pain or neurologic dysfunction. Because the early diagnosis and treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis may prevent intractable pain and the permanent neurologic sequelae of chronic nerve root entrapment, all physicians should be aware of the different neurologic presentations and the treatment options for patients with spinal stenosis. Images PMID:8434469

  17. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chad, David A

    2007-05-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis may be congenital or acquired. A classic clinical presentation is described as neurogenic claudication. Physical signs of sensory loss, weakness, and attenuation of reflexes often are mild and limited in distribution. Neuroimaging of the lumbosacral spine with MRI and electrodiagnostic (electromyographic [EMG]) tests are the most informative diagnostic modalities. Conservative management often is successful, but surgical decompression may be indicated in refractory cases. PMID:17445736

  18. Efficacy of percutaneous laser disc decompression on lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Longxi; Han, Zhengfeng; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Tongtong; Yin, Jian; Liang, Xibin; Guo, Han; Zeng, Yanjun

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study is to observe the effect of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) on lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Thirty-two LSS patients were treated using pulsed Nd: YAG laser, of which 21 cases (11 males and 10 females with an average age of 64 years old) were followed up for 2 years. All of the 21 patients had intermittent claudication with negative straight leg raising test results. Fifteen patients suffered from anterior central disc herniation which often compressed the cauda equina but seldom compressed the posterior part; six patients suffered from posterior ligamentum flavum hypertrophy which often compressed the cauda equina but seldom compressed the anterior part. The efficacy was evaluated 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery on 21 patients using the performance evaluation criteria of the lumbago treatment by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA 29 scores). The fineness (i.e. excellent and good treatment outcome) rate 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after the operation were 46.7%, 66.7%, 66.7%, 66.7% and 66.7%, respectively, in patients with severe anterior compression and 16.7%, 33.3%, 33.3%, 33.3% and 33.3%, respectively, in patients with severe posterior compression. PLDD had certain positive efficacy on the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis, which was more significant on LSS dominated by the anterior compression than that by the posterior compression. PMID:23996073

  19. Effects on inadvertent endplate fracture following lateral cage placement on range of motion and indirect spine decompression in lumbar spine fusion constructs: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Brandon G.; Alexander, Gerald E.; Nayak, Aniruddh; Cabezas, Andres; Marulanda, German A.; Murtagh, Ryan; Castellvi, Antonio E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The lateral transpsoas approach to interbody fusion is gaining popularity. Existing literature suggests that perioperative vertebra-related complications include endplate breach owing to aggressive enedplate preparation and poor bone quality. The acute effects of cage subsidence on stabilization and indirect decompression at the affected level are unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the kinematics and radiographic metrics of indirect decompression in lumbar spines instrumented with laterally placed cages in the presence of inadvertent endplate fracture, which was determined radiographically, to specimens instrumented with lateral cages with intact endplates. Methods Five levels in 5 specimens sustained endplate fracture during lateral cage implantation followed by supplementary fixation (pedicle screw/rod [PSR]: n = 1; anterolateral plate [ALP]: n = 4), as part of a larger laboratory-based study. Range of motion (ROM) in these specimens was compared with 13 instrumented specimens with intact endplates. All specimens were scanned using computed tomography (CT) in the intact, noninstrumented condition and after 2-level cage placement with internal fixation under a 400-N follower load. Changes in disc height, foraminal area, and canal area were measured and compared between specimens with intact endplates and fractured endplates. Results Subsidence in the single PSR specimen and 4 ALP specimens was 6.5 mm and 4.3 2.7 mm (range: 2.28.3 mm), respectively. ROM was increased in the PSR and ALP specimens with endplate fracture when compared with instrumented specimens with intact endplates. In 3 ALP specimens with endplate fracture, ROM in some motion planes increased relative to the intact, noninstrumented spine. These increases in ROM were paralleled by increase in cage translations during cyclic loading (up to 3.3 mm) and an unpredictable radiographic outcome with increases or decreases in posterior disc height, foraminal area, and canal area when compared with instrumented specimens with intact endplates. Conclusions Endplate fracture and cage subsidence noted radiographically intraoperatively or in the early postoperative period may be indicative of biomechanical instability at the affected level concomitant with a lack of neurologic decompression, which may require revision surgery. PMID:25694896

  20. Perioperative and short-term advantages of mini-open approach for lumbar spinal fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vela, J.; Joven-Aliaga, E.; Herrera, A.; Vicente, J.; Suñén, E.; Loste, A.; Tabuenca, A.

    2009-01-01

    It has been widely reported a vascular and neurologic damage of the lumbar muscles produced in the classic posterior approach for lumbar spinal fusions. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a better clinical and functional outcome in the postoperative and short term in patients undergoing minimal invasive surgery (“mini-open”) for this lumbar spinal arthrodesis. We designed a prospective study with a 30 individuals cohort randomized in two groups, depending on the approach performed to get a instrumented lumbar circumferential arthrodesis: “classic posterior” (CL group) or “mini-open” approach (MO group). Several clinical and functional parameters were assessed, including blood loss, postoperative pain, analgesic requirements and daily life activities during hospital stay and at the 3-month follow-up. Patients of the “mini-open approach” group had a significant lower blood loss and hospital stay during admission. They also had significant lower analgesic requirements and faster recovery of daily life activities (specially moderate efforts) when compared to the patients of the “classic posterior approach” group. No significant differences were found between two groups in surgery timing, X-rays exposure or sciatic postoperative pain. This study, inline with previous investigations, reinforces the concept of minimizing the muscular lumbar damage with a mini-open approach for a faster and better recovery of patients’ disability in the short term. Further investigations are necessary to confirm these findings in the long term, and to verify the achievement of a stable lumbar spinal fusion. PMID:19399538

  1. Using Provocative Discography and Computed Tomography to Select Patients with Refractory Discogenic Low Back Pain for Lumbar Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Henry C; Fahim, Daniel K; Perez-Cruet, Mick

    2016-01-01

    Background Context Controversy remains over the use of provocative discography in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) to locate symptomatic intervertebral discs in patients with chronic, low back pain (LBP). The current study explores the relationship between discogenic pain and disc morphology using discography and CT, respectively, and investigates the efficacy of this combined method in identifying surgical candidates for lumbar fusion by evaluating outcomes. Methods 43 consecutive patients between 2006 and 2013 who presented with refractory low back pain and underwent discography and CT were enrolled in the study. For this study, "refractory LBP" was defined as pain symptoms that persisted or worsened after 6 months of non-operative treatments. Concordant pain was defined as discography-provoked LBP of similar character and location with an intensity of ≥ 8/10. Fusion candidates demonstrated positive-level discography and concordant annular tears on CT at no more than two contiguous levels, and at least one negative control disc with intact annulus. Surgical outcomes were statistically analyzed using Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form-36 (SF-36) for back-related pain and disability preoperatively, and 2 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Results Annular tears were found in 87 discs. Concordant pain was reported by 9 (20.9%) patients at L3-L4, 21 (50.0%) at L4-L5, and 34 (82.9%) at L5-S1; pain occurred significantly more often in discs with annular tears than those without (p<0.001). Painless discs were independent of annulus status (p=0.90). 18 (42%) of the original 43 patients underwent lumbar fusion at L3-L4 (n=1(6%)), L4-L5 (n=6 (33%)), L5-S1 (n=5 (28%)), and two-level L4-S1 (n=6 (33%)) via a minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MITLIF) approach with the aim to replace the nucleus pulposus with bone graft material. Median follow-up time was 18 months (range: 12–78 months). VAS, ODI, and SF-36 scores demonstrated significant improvements at 10 out of 12 postoperative time points compared with preoperative baseline. Conclusions Lumbar discography with post-discography CT can be an effective method to evaluate patients with discogenic back pain refractory to non-operative treatments. Those patients with one- or two-level high concordant pain scores with associated annular tears and negative control disc represent good surgical candidates for lumbar interbody spinal fusion.

  2. [Fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine].

    PubMed

    Gonschorek, O; Hauck, S; Wei, T; Bhren, V

    2015-09-01

    Fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine result from high velocity trauma, assuming bone density is normal. The main location of fractures is the thoracolumbar junction. Most injuries can be treated conservatively; however, patients transferred to hospitals and spine centers represent a preselection with more severe trauma and a higher incidence of operative treatment. There is a large variety of operative techniques that can be used, which can be principally differentiated by the approach: posterior or anterior. Dorsal approaches are differentiated by the instrumentation for spondylodesis as open or percutaneous techniques. Minimally invasive options are favored more and more. For osteoporotic bone, cement augmented solutions may be used. Correct reduction of mainly kyphotic malalignment is crucial for the long-term outcome. Biomechanically stable reconstruction of the anterior spinal column is important mainly for the thoracolumbar junction. PMID:26307631

  3. Single-stage posterior-only approach treating single-segment thoracic tubercular spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiongjie; Liu, Hongzhe; Wang, Guoping; Liu, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    There are quite a few controversies on surgical management of single-segment thoracic spinal tuberculosis (STB) with neurological deficits. The present study was to compare single-stage posterior-only transpedicular debridement, interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation (posterior-only surgery) with a combined posterior-anterior surgical approach for treatment of single-segment thoracic STB with neurological deficits and to determinethe clinical feasibility and effectiveness of posterior-only surgical treatment. Sixty patients with single-segment thoracic STB with neurological deficits were treated with one of two surgical procedures in our center from January 2003 to January 2013. Thirty patients were treated with posterior-only surgery (Group A) andthirty were treated with combined posterior-anterior surgery (Group B). The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) score system to evaluate the neurological deficits, thevisual analogue scale (VAS) to assess the degree of pain, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) to judge the activity of tuberculosis (TB), surgery duration, intraoperative blood loss, length of hospitalization, bonyfusion rates, and kyphosis correction of the two groups were compared. The average follow-up period was 36.5 9.2 months for Group A and 34.6 10.2 months for Group B. Under the ASIA score system, all patients improved with treatment. STB was completely cured and grafted bones were fused within 5-11 months in allpatients. There were no persistent or recurrent infections orobvious differences in radiological results between thegroups. The kyphosis deformity was significantly corrected after surgical management. The average operative duration, blood loss, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complication rateof Group A were lower than those of Group B. In conclusions, posterior-only surgery is feasible and effective, resulting in better clinical outcomes than combined posterior-anterior surgeries, especially in surgical time, blood loss, hospital stay, and complications. PMID:26617823

  4. The lumbar arteries and veins: Quantification of variable anatomical positioning with application to retroperitoneal surgery.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Tyler S; Power, Adam; Johnson, Marjorie; Power, Nicholas E; Allman, Brian L

    2015-07-01

    The lumbar arteries and veins are segmentally arranged vessels in the abdomen that supply the vertebrae and posterior abdominal/paravertebral muscles. Recent studies have indicated that these vessels have a tendency to vary from the classical description of bilateral pairing. The objective of this study was to more accurately characterize the anatomy of the lumbar vessels through the dissection of 22 cadaveric specimens and examination of 41 patients' computed tomography angiography scans. The positions of the lumbar vessels were measured in reference to the bifurcation/confluence of the common iliac arteries/veins. In 22 cadaveric specimens, the course of the lumbar veins was dissected to the psoas major muscle to characterize venous tributaries. Our results indicate that the lumbar veins were rarely paired, segmentally diverged closer to the iliocaval confluence, and preferentially drained into the left side of the IVC. Several types of lumbar veins were additionally characterized based on their consistent coursing patterns. In contrast, the lumbar arteries exhibited pairing, and these successive pairs were found to be equally spaced along the length of the infrarenal abdominal aorta. In specimens where the median sacral artery and 4th lumbar artery pair arose from a trifurcating common trunk, the positions of the 3rd and 4th lumbar arteries were significantly inferior (P < 0.05) compared to those with independent median sacral arteries. Clinically, proper management of the anatomical patterns described in this study may be pivotal in reducing the incidence of intraoperative damage to the lumbar vessels, and may help in the treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:25644404

  5. Bilateral congenital lumbar hernias in a patient with central core disease - A case report.

    PubMed

    Lazier, Joanna; Mah, Jean K; Nikolic, Ana; Wei, Xing-Chang; Samedi, Veronica; Fajardo, Carlos; Brindle, Mary; Perrier, Renee; Thomas, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lumbar hernias are rare malformations caused by defects in the development of the posterior abdominal wall. A known association exists with lumbocostovertebral syndrome; however other associated anomalies, including one case with arthrogryposis, have been previously reported. We present an infant girl with bilateral congenital lumbar hernias, multiple joint contractures, decreased muscle bulk and symptoms of malignant hyperthermia. Molecular testing revealed an R4861C mutation in the ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) gene, known to be associated with central core disease. This is the first reported case of the co-occurrence of congenital lumbar hernias and central core disease. We hypothesize that ryanodine receptor 1 mutations may interrupt muscle differentiation and development. Further, this case suggests an expansion of the ryanodine receptor 1-related myopathy phenotype to include congenital lumbar hernias. PMID:26684984

  6. PRIMARY LIPOSARCOMA OF THE LUMBAR SPINE: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Cardoso, André Luiz Passos; Tristão, Newton Antônio; Pimenta, Wilson Eloy; Daher, Sérgio; de Souza Carneiro, Siderley; Barbosa, Nathalia Parrode Machado; de Lima Malta, Nayanne; Ribeiro, Noara Barros

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of primary bone liposarcoma of the lumbar spine, for which only one case has been reported. A female patient, 60 years of age, with lumbar pain and left sciatalgy for six months. In the imaging exams, a destructive tumor was found in the L4 vertebral body, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a tumoral lesion with T1 hiposignal and T2 hypersignal. Histological diagnosis was difficult, and immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis. Surgical treatment was performed with wide ressection, spinal cord decompression, and anterior and posterior fusion of L3 to L5 complemented by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. After three years, a computed tomography (CT) scan evidenced an expansive injury in the lung. Despite its rarity, liposarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sciatica and primary tumors of the spine.

  7. Surgical management of Giant Lumbar Extradural Schwannoma: Report of 3 cases

    PubMed Central

    Srikantha, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Standard surgical approach for extradural paraspinal tumours has been through a unilateral facetectomy, inter-transverse or retroperitoneal approach. Some of these approaches destabilise the spine and consequently require a fusion procedure. Access to these tumours through a minimal access route can decrease tissue damage, fasten post-operative recovery and obviate the need for a concomitant fusion procedure. However, proper case selection and adequate pre-operative planning are important in choosing cases for a minimally invasive approach. We discuss three cases of giant extradural, paraspinal schwannomas. One case that was associated with listhesis along with the tumour situated more anteriorly and embedded in the psoas muscle was managed by lateral retroperitoneal route with simultaneous interbody graft followed by posterior interspinous stabilising device. The other two cases were managed by minimal access route using a 22mm fixed tubular retractor, one by a paramedian approach and one by far lateral approach. The technique and merits of the procedure are discussed. PMID:26114087

  8. Ossified Posterior Longitudinal Ligament With Massive Ossification of the Anterior Longitudinal Ligament Causing Dysphagia in a Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis Patient.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Shinichi; Tachibana, Toshiya; Maruo, Keishi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Tsuji, Shotaro; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2015-08-01

    Descriptive case report.To report a case of a diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) patient with both massive ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament (OALL) leading to severe dysphagia as well as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) causing mild cervical myelopathy, warranting not only an anterior approach but also a posterior one.Although DISH can cause massive OALL in the cervical spine, severe dysphagia resulting from DISH is a rare occurrence. OALLs are frequently associated with OPLL. Treatment for a DISH patient with OPLL in setting of OALL-caused dysphagia is largely unknown.A 70-year-old man presented with severe dysphagia with mild cervical myelopathy. Neurological examination showed mild spastic paralysis and hyper reflex in his lower extremities. Plane radiographs and computed tomography of the cervical spine revealed a discontinuous massive OALL at C4-5 and continuous type OPLL at C2-6. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed pronounced spinal cord compression due to OPLL at C4-5. Esophagram demonstrated extrinsic compression secondary to OALL at C4-5.We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. Severe dysphagia markedly improved without any complications.We considered that this patient not only required osteophytectomy and fusion by the anterior approach but also required decompression and spinal fusion by the posterior approach to prevent both deterioration of cervical myelopathy and recurrence of OALL after surgery. PMID:26266365

  9. Ossified Posterior Longitudinal Ligament With Massive Ossification of the Anterior Longitudinal Ligament Causing Dysphagia in a Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Shinichi; Tachibana, Toshiya; Maruo, Keishi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Tsuji, Shotaro; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Descriptive case report. To report a case of a diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) patient with both massive ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament (OALL) leading to severe dysphagia as well as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) causing mild cervical myelopathy, warranting not only an anterior approach but also a posterior one. Although DISH can cause massive OALL in the cervical spine, severe dysphagia resulting from DISH is a rare occurrence. OALLs are frequently associated with OPLL. Treatment for a DISH patient with OPLL in setting of OALL-caused dysphagia is largely unknown. A 70-year-old man presented with severe dysphagia with mild cervical myelopathy. Neurological examination showed mild spastic paralysis and hyper reflex in his lower extremities. Plane radiographs and computed tomography of the cervical spine revealed a discontinuous massive OALL at C4-5 and continuous type OPLL at C2-6. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed pronounced spinal cord compression due to OPLL at C4-5. Esophagram demonstrated extrinsic compression secondary to OALL at C4-5. We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. Severe dysphagia markedly improved without any complications. We considered that this patient not only required osteophytectomy and fusion by the anterior approach but also required decompression and spinal fusion by the posterior approach to prevent both deterioration of cervical myelopathy and recurrence of OALL after surgery. PMID:26266365

  10. Early postoperative dislocation of the anterior Maverick lumbar disc prosthesis: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Seex, Kevin A; Eisermann, Lukas G; Claydon, Matthew H; Malham, Gregory M

    2013-08-01

    The authors report on 2 cases of anterior dislocation of the Maverick lumbar disc prosthesis, both occurring in the early postoperative period. These cases developed after experience with more than 50 uneventful cases and were therefore thought to be unrelated to the surgeon's learning curve. No similar complications have been previously reported. The anterior Maverick device has a ball-and-socket design made of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum metal plates covered with hydroxyapatite. The superior and inferior endplates have keels to resist translation forces. The patient in Case 1 was a 52-year-old man with severe L4-5 discogenic pain; and in Case 2, a 42-year-old woman with disabling L4-5 and L5-S1 discogenic back pain. Both patients were without medical comorbidities and were nonsmokers with no risk factors for osteoporosis. Both had undergone uneventful retroperitoneal approaches performed by a vascular access surgeon. Computed tomography studies on postoperative Day 2 confirmed excellent prosthesis placement. Initial recoveries were uneventful. Two weeks postoperatively, after stretching (extension or hyperextension) in bed at home, each patient suffered the sudden onset of severe abdominal pain with anterior dislocation of the Maverick prosthesis. The patients were returned to the operating room and underwent surgery performed by the same spinal and vascular surgeons. Removal of the Maverick prosthesis and anterior interbody fusion with a separate cage and plate were performed. Both patients had recovered well with good clinical and radiological recovery at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Possible causes of the anterior dislocation of the Maverick prosthesis include the following: 1) surgeon error: In both cases the keel cuts were neat, and early postoperative CT confirmed good placement of the prosthesis; 2) equipment problem: The keel cuts may have been too large because the cutters were worn, which led to an inadequate press fit of the implants; 3) prosthesis fault: Both plates of the dislocated implants looked normal and manufacturer analysis reported no fault; 4) patient factors: Both dislocations happened early in the postoperative period, after hyperextension of the spine while the patient was supine in bed. Bracing would not have reduced hyperextension. Dislocation of a lumbar spinal implant represents a life-threatening complication and should therefore be considered and recognized early. Radiographic and CT studies of both the lumbar spine (for prosthesis) and the abdomen (for hematoma) should be performed, as should CT angiography (for vessel damage or occlusion). Any anterior lumbar revision surgery is hazardous, and it is strongly advisable to have a vascular surgeon scrubbed. In cases of dislocation or extrusion of a lumbar interbody prosthesis, the salvage revision strategy is fusing the segment via the same anterior approach. Surgeons should be aware of the risk of anterior dislocation of the Maverick prosthesis. Keel cutters should be regularly checked for sharpness, as they may be implicated in the loosening of implants. Patients and their physical therapists should also avoid lumbar hyperextension in the early postoperative period. PMID:23768025

  11. Changes in Neuroforaminal Height with 2 Level Axial Presacral Lumbar Interbody Fusion at L4-S1

    PubMed Central

    Marawar, Satyajit; Jung, Jin; Sun, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective was to examine the changes in neuroforaminal height at L4-L5 and L5-S1 after insertion and graduated foraminal distraction using the 2 level transsacral implant in a cadaveric model. Methods Discectomy and transsacral instrumentation was performed in six fresh human cadavers at L4-S1. The neuroforaminal height was measured at L4-L5 and L5-S1 before and after insertion of the implant and then at each stage of manual distraction. Results Mean L4-5 neuroforaminal height increased from 18.2 3.1mm to 20.3 2.9mm (11%) on the left and from 18.82.8mm to 20.6 2.3mm (12%) on the right (P<0.05). Mean L5-S1 neuroforaminal height increased from 15.73.0mm to 18.4 2.8mm (17%) on the left and from 15.6 2.1mm to 18.3 1.8mm (17%) on the right (P<0.05). When the neuroforaminal height was plotted against amount of rotation of the screw driver it was found that the neuroforaminal height at L5-S1 increased by 1mm on average for every complete revolution of the screw driver. At least 2 full rotations of the screw driver were achieved in all cadavers. Conclusions The transsacral screw construct distracted the disc space and neuroforaminal height in a cadaveric spine model without soft tissue envelope. During the initial process, manual control of disc space distraction predictably correlated with the increase in the neuroforaminal height to a maximum. However, further research is needed to look at variables affecting disc space pliability, implant subsidence, in vivo application, and clinical benefit of this procedure. PMID:25694937

  12. Surgical Management for Thoracic Spinal Tuberculosis Posterior Only versus Anterior Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Weiye; Xiong, Guangzhong; Wang, Bing; Dai, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A comparable retrospective study. Object To compare the clinical outcomes of surgical treatment by posterior only and anterior video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic spinal tuberculosis (TSTB). Method 145 patients with TSTB treated by two different surgical procedures in our institution from June 2001 to June 2014 were studied. All cases were retrospectively analyzed and divided into two groups according to the given treatments: 75 cases (32F/43M) in group A performed single-stage posterior debridement, transforaminal thoracic interbody fusion and instrumentation, and 70 cases (30F/40M) in group B underwent anterior video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Clinical and radiographic results in the two groups were analyzed and compared. Results Patients in group A and B were followed up for an average of 4.6±1.8, 4.4±1.2 years, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between groups in terms of the operation time, blood loss, bony fusion, neurological recovery and the correction angle of kyphotic deformity (P>0.05). Fewer pulmonary complications were observed in group A. Good clinical outcomes were achieved in both groups. Conclusions Both the anterior VATS and posterior approaches can effectively treat thoracic tuberculosis. Nevertheless, the posterior approach procedure obtained less morbidity and complications than the other. PMID:25781165

  13. Lumbar spinal surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of lumbar spine problems include: pain that ... The bone that curves around and covers the spinal cord (lamina) is removed (laminectomy) and the tissue that ...

  14. Use of autologous growth factors in lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Lowery, G L; Kulkarni, S; Pennisi, A E

    1999-08-01

    The results of spinal fusion, especially posteriorly above the lumbosacral junction, have been mixed. Autologous growth factor concentrate (AGF) prepared by ultraconcentration of platelets contains multiple growth factors having a chemotactic and mitogenic effect on mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts and may play a role in initiating bone healing. The purpose of this retrospective study is to review our results with AGF in lumbar spinal fusions. To date, AGF has been used in 39 patients having lumbar spinal fusion. The study group consisted of the first 19 consecutive cases to allow at least 6 months follow-up. The average follow-up was 13 months (range 6 to 18 months). Follow-up compliance was 91%. There were 7 men and 12 women. Average age was 52 years (range 30-72 years). Nine patients had prior back surgery. There were 8 smokers. AGF was used in posterior (n = 15) or anterior intradiscal (n = 4) fusions. AGF was used with autograft and coraline hydroxyapatite in all posterior fusions, and autograft, coral, and intradiscal spacer (carbon fiber spinal fusion cages or Synthes femoral ring) in intradiscal fusions. Posterior stabilization was used in all cases. Eight cases were single-level fusions, 6 were two-level, and 1 was a three-level fusion. Autologous iliac crest bone graft was taken in 14 cases and local autograft used in 5 cases. Posteriorly, a total of 23 levels were fused; of these, nine were at L5-S1, eight at L4-L5, five at L3-L4, and one at L2-L3. No impending pseudoarthroses were noted on plain radiographic examination at last follow-up visit. Solid fusion was confirmed in 3 patients having routine hardware removal, and in 2 patients who had surgery at an adjacent level. There was one posterior wound infection, which was managed without sequelae. When used as an adjunct to autograft, AGF offers theoretical advantages that need to be examined in controlled studies. Further study is necessary to determine whether coralline hydroxyapatite used as a bone graft extender in lumbar spinal fusion may help to obviate the need for secondary site graft harvesting. PMID:10458274

  15. Intraspinal arachnoiditis and hydrocephalus after lumbar myelography using methylglucamine iocarmate.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, T S; Hein, O

    1978-01-01

    A 35 year old woman developed a severe meningeal reaction after lumbar myelography using the water-soluble contrast medium methylglucamine iocarmate. Three months after myelography the findings were a transverse spinal cord syndrome corresponding to the middle thoracic segments resulting from well developed leptomeningeal adhesions. This was combined with a noncommunicating hydrocephalus, probably the result of leptomeningeal fibrosis in the posterior fossa. After treatment with a ventriculoatrial shunt the patient is almost free of symptoms. A possible pathogenetic relationship between the contrast medium, the chronic leptomeningeal changes, and the symptoms of our patient is discussed on the basis of the literature. Images PMID:305466

  16. The effects of pelvic movement on lumbar lordosis in the standing position.

    PubMed

    Levine, D; Whittle, M W

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the maneuver of altering the angle of pelvic tilt when standing is effective in changing the angle of lumbar lordosis. The importance of the study was to establish a scientific basis for a common clinical assumption. Pelvic tilt and lumbar lordosis were measured during three conditions: with subjects in a normal standing posture, with subjects assuming a maximal anterior pelvic tilt posture, and with subject assuming a maximal posterior pelvic tilt posture. Measurements of pelvic tilt and lumbar lordosis were obtained using a television/computer system that obtained the three-dimensional coordinates of markers on the pelvis and spine at 20-msec intervals. Each measurement was made three times, and all were found to be reliable, with intraclass correlation coefficients (3,1) ranging from 0.78 to 0.95 (p < 0.001). Adopting a maximal anterior pelvic tilt changed the pelvic attitude relative to the horizontal by an average fo 11.4 degrees (p < 0.001) and increased the lumbar lordosis by an average of 10.8 degrees (p < 0.001). Adopting a maximal posterior pelvic tilt changed the pelvic attitude by an average of 8.7 degrees (p < 0.001) and decreased the lumbar lordosis by an average of 9.0 degrees (p < 0.001). The results of this study demonstrate that altering the pelvic tilt significantly changes the angle of lumbar lordosis. This lends support to the use of pelvic tilting exercises to increase or decrease the degree of lumbar lordosis, at least for the duration of the exercise. PMID:8866271

  17. Recurrent lumbar disc herniation: A prospective comparative study of three surgical management procedures

    PubMed Central

    El Shazly, Ayman A.; El Wardany, Mohammed A.; Morsi, Ahmad M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: The optimal surgical treatment of recurrent lumbar disc herniation is controversial. Aim: To compare prospectively the clinical outcomes of surgical treatment of recurrent lumbar disc herniation by three different methods; discectomy alone, discectomy with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), and diecectomy with posterolateral fusion (PLF), regardless of the postoperative radiological findings. Study Design: This is a prospective, randomized, comparative study. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective, randomized, comparative study on 45 patients with first time recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Patients were evaluated clinically by using the criteria of the Japanese Orthopedic Association's evaluation system for low back pain syndrome (JOA score). The patients were classified into three groups: Group A; patients who had revision discectomy alone, group B; patients who had revision discectomy with TLIF, and group C; patients who had revision discectomy with PLF. The mean follow-up period was 37 (±7.85 STD) months. Results: The mean overall recovery rate was 87.2% (±19.26 STD) and the satisfactory rate was 88.9%. Comparison between the three groups showed no significant difference with regard to the mean total postoperative JOA score, recovery rate, and satisfactory rate. However, the postoperative low back pain was significantly higher in group A than that of group B and C. Two patients in group A required further revision surgery. The incidences of dural tear and postoperative neurological deficit were higher in group A. The intraoperative blood loss and length of operation were significantly less in group A. The total cost of the procedure was significantly different between the three groups, being least in group A and highest in group B. There was no significant difference between the three groups with regard to the length of postoperative hospital stay. Conclusion: Revision discectomy is effective in patients with recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Fusion with revision discectomy improves the postoperative low back pain, decreases the intraoperative risk of dural tear or neural damage and decreases the postoperative incidence of mechanical instability or re-recurrence. TLIF and PLF have comparable results when used with revision discectomy, but PLF has significantly less total cost than TLIF. PMID:24403956

  18. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore; Tarantino, Umberto; Nano, Giovanni; Iundusi, Riccardo; Fiori, Roberto Da Ros, Valerio Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  19. Factors predicting change in pelvic posterior tilt after THA.

    PubMed

    Kyo, Takayuki; Nakahara, Ichiro; Miki, Hidenobu

    2013-06-01

    In total hip arthroplasty, steep cup inclination should be avoided because it increases the risk of edge loading. Pelvic posterior tilt should be carefully monitored because it increases cup inclination and anteversion, leading to edge loading or impingement. The authors evaluated how much the pelvic tilt angle changes from the supine position referenced in planning for cup orientation preoperatively to the standing position 1 year after total hip arthroplasty (?ref). The pelvic tilt angle was measured in 124 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty due to osteoarthritis, and the mean ?ref was -9.55.3 (range, -23 to 5). Preoperative compression fractures, spondylolisthesis, and disk-space narrowing were predictive of increased pelvic posterior tilt after total hip arthroplasty. The authors mathematically calculated how much change in pelvic posterior tilt was clinically possible with the original cup alignment, which ranged from 40 to 45 of radiographic inclination and 0 to 30 radiographic anteversion to more than 50 of inclination. Even if the maximum posterior tilt (23) occurred, no edge loading would occur in almost half of those original cups. Surgeons should aim for 40 of inclination. When the original cup inclination was 40, edge loading was prevented. Edge loading caused by steep cup inclination can be prevented by adjusting the cup orientation to account for predicted pelvic tilting, but spinal alignment must also be considered because lumbar kyphosis can increase postoperative pelvic posterior tilt. PMID:23746037

  20. A comparison of radiostereometric analysis and computed tomography for the assessment of lumbar spinal fusion in a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Humadi, Ali; Freeman, Brian J C; Moore, Rob J; Callary, Stuart; Halldin, Klas; David, Vikram; Maclaurin, William; Tauro, Paul; Schoenwaelder, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Study Design?Prospective animal study. Objective?The aim of this animal study is to evaluate the accuracy of radiostereometric analysis (RSA) compared with computed tomographic (CT) scan in the assessment of spinal fusion after anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) using histology as a gold standard. Methods?Three non-adjacent ALIFs (L1-L2, L3-L4, and L5-L6) were performed in nine sheep. The sheep were divided into three groups of three sheep. All the animals were humanely killed immediately after having the last scheduled RSA. The lumbar spine was removed and in vitro fine cut CT and histopathology were performed. Results?Using histological assessment as the gold standard for assessing fusion, RSA demonstrated better results (100% sensitivity and 66.7% specificity; positive predictive value [PPV]?=?27.3%, negative predictive value [NPV] =100.0%) compared with CT (66.7% sensitivity and 60.0% specificity [PPV?=?16.7%, NPV?=?93.8%]). Conclusions?RSA demonstrated higher sensitivity and specificity when compared with CT. Furthermore, RSA has the advantage of much lower radiation exposure compared with fine cut CT. Further studies are required to see if RSA remains superior to CT scan for the assessment spinal fusion in the clinical setting. [Table: see text]. PMID:24436705

  1. Spontaneous healing of retroperitoneal chylous leakage following anterior lumbar spinal surgery: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Su, I-Chang; Chen, Chang-Mu

    2007-12-01

    Cisterna chyli is prone to injury in any retroperitoneal surgery. However, retroperitoneal chylous leakage is a rare complication after anterior spinal surgery. To the best of our knowledge, only ten cases have been reported in the English literature. We present a case of a 49-year-old man who had lumbar metastasis and associated radiculopathy. He had transient retroperitoneal chylous leakage after anterior tumor decompression, interbody bony fusion, and instrumental fixation from L2 to L4. The leakage stopped spontaneously after we temporarily clamped the drain tube. Intraperitoneal ascites accumulation developed thereafter due to nutritional loss and impaired hepatic reserves. We gathered ten reported cases of chylous leak after anterior thoracolumbar or lumbar spinal surgery, and categorized all these cases into two groups, depending on the integrity of diaphragm. Six patients received anterior spinal surgery without diaphragm splitting. Postoperative chylous leak stopped after conservative treatment. Another five cases received diaphragm splitting in the interim of anterior spinal surgery. Chylous leakage stopped spontaneously in four patients. The remaining one had a chylothorax secondary to postop chyloretroperitoneum. It was resolved only after surgical intervention. In view of these cases, all the chylous leakage could be spontaneously closed without complications, except for one who had a secondary chylothorax and required thoracic duct ligation and chemopleurodesis. We conclude that intraoperative diaphragm splitting or incision does not increase the risk of secondary chylothorax if it was closed tightly at the end of the surgery and the chest tube drainage properly done. PMID:17273839

  2. Pedicle-Screw-Based Dynamic Systems and Degenerative Lumbar Diseases: Biomechanical and Clinical Experiences of Dynamic Fusion with Isobar TTL

    PubMed Central

    Barrey, Cédric; Perrin, Gilles; Champain, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic systems in the lumbar spine are believed to reduce main fusion drawbacks such as pseudarthrosis, bone rarefaction, and mechanical failure. Compared to fusion achieved with rigid constructs, biomechanical studies underlined some advantages of dynamic instrumentation including increased load sharing between the instrumentation and interbody bone graft and stresses reduction at bone-to-screw interface. These advantages may result in increased fusion rates, limitation of bone rarefaction, and reduction of mechanical complications with the ultimate objective to reduce reoperations rates. However published clinical evidence for dynamic systems remains limited. In addition to providing biomechanical evaluation of a pedicle-screw-based dynamic system, the present study offers a long-term (average 10.2 years) insight view of the clinical outcomes of 18 patients treated by fusion with dynamic systems for degenerative lumbar spine diseases. The findings outline significant and stable symptoms relief, absence of implant-related complications, no revision surgery, and few adjacent segment degenerative changes. In spite of sample limitations, this is the first long-term report of outcomes of dynamic fusion that opens an interesting perspective for clinical outcomes of dynamic systems that need to be explored at larger scale. PMID:25031874

  3. Arterio-venous fistula following a lumbar disc surgery.

    PubMed

    Mulaudzi, Thanyani V; Sikhosana, Mbokeleng H

    2011-11-01

    Vascular complications during posterior lumbar disc surgery are rare and its presentation with varicose veins is even rarer. A 23 year-old male patient presented with large varicose veins in right lower limb. He underwent a posterior lumbar spine discectomy surgery. He noticed mild swelling of the distal third right lower limb 3 months after index surgery and reported 6 months later when he developed varicose veins. Duplex Doppler confirmed varicose veins of the long saphenous vein and its tributaries with a patent deep venous system. A digital subtraction angiogram demonstrated a large right common iliac artery (CIA) false aneurysm with an arteriovenous fistula between right common iliac vessels. He had a right CIA covered stent insertion with good results. Varicose veins were later managed with sapheno-femoral junction ligation and a below knee long saphenous vein stripping. At six month follow-up the lower limb swelling had completely recovered and duplex ultrasound did not show any recurrence of varicose veins. PMID:22144752

  4. Persistent occiput posterior.

    PubMed

    Barth, William H

    2015-03-01

    Persistent occiput posterior (OP) is associated with increased rates of maternal and newborn morbidity. Its diagnosis by physical examination is challenging but is improved with bedside ultrasonography. Occiput posterior discovered in the active phase or early second stage of labor usually resolves spontaneously. When it does not, prophylactic manual rotation may decrease persistent OP and its associated complications. When delivery is indicated for arrest of descent in the setting of persistent OP, a pragmatic approach is suggested. Suspected fetal macrosomia, a biparietal diameter above the pelvic inlet or a maternal pelvis with android features should prompt cesarean delivery. Nonrotational operative vaginal delivery is appropriate when the maternal pelvis has a narrow anterior segment but ample room posteriorly, like with anthropoid features. When all other conditions are met and the fetal head arrests in an OP position in a patient with gynecoid pelvic features and ample room anteriorly, options include cesarean delivery, nonrotational operative vaginal delivery, and rotational procedures, either manual or with the use of rotational forceps. Recent literature suggests that maternal and fetal outcomes with rotational forceps are better than those reported in older series. Although not without significant challenges, a role remains for teaching and practicing selected rotational forceps operations in contemporary obstetrics. PMID:25730235

  5. Lumbar hernia: anatomical route assessed by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Guillem, P; Czarnecki, E; Duval, G; Bounoua, F; Fontaine, C

    2002-02-01

    Lumbar hernia is classically described as arising from the superior (Grynfeltt's) lumbar triangle or the inferior (Jean-Louis Petit's) lumbar triangle. The present anatomical study based on a computed tomography examination performed in a patient with lumbar hernia, has led to the suggestion that lumbar hernias cross the lumbar wall through a musculoaponeurotic tunnel, whose deep and superficial openings are the superior and inferior lumbar triangles, respectively. PMID:12197011

  6. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  7. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  8. Posterior Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  9. Posterior tibial tendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, Manuel; Maceira, Ernesto

    2015-03-01

    The posterior tibial tendon (PTT) helps the triceps surae to work more efficiently during ambulation. Disorders of the PTT include tenosynovitis, acute rupture, degenerative tears, dislocation, instability, enthesopathies, and chronic tendinopathy with dysfunction and flat foot deformity. Open surgery of the PTT has been the conventional approach to deal with these disorders. However, tendoscopy has become a useful technique to diagnose and treat PTT disorders. This article focuses on PTT tendoscopy and tries to provide an understanding of the pathomechanics of the tendon, indications for surgery, surgical technique, advantages, complications, and limitations of this procedure. PMID:25726479

  10. Chylothorax following anterior thoraco-lumbar spine exposure. A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mora de Sambricio, A; Garrido Stratenwerth, E

    2015-01-01

    Pleural effusion is a possible complication of the thoraco-abdominal approach to the spine. It is more commonly a reactive effusion, but it also may be caused by hemothorax, empyema or, less commonly, a chylothorax. The case of a chylothorax is reported as a late onset complication of a double anterior and posterior instrumented fusion of the lumbar spine. Its management and clinical outcome, and a review of the literature is presented. PMID:24794096

  11. Clinical outcome of stand-alone ALIF compared to posterior instrumentation for degenerative disc disease: A pilot study and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Udby, Peter M; Bech-Azeddine, Rachid

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the article was to: a) present results from a case cohort pilot study comparing stand-alone ALIF and TLIF and, b) review the literature on studies comparing the clinical outcome of stand-alone ALIF with posterior instrumentation including TLIF or PLIF, in patients with disabling low back pain resulting from degenerative disc disease. ALIF surgery has previously been linked with certain high risk complications and unfavorable long term fusion results. Newer studies suggest that stand-alone ALIF can possibly be advantageous compared to other types of posterior instrumented interbody fusion for a selected group of DDD patients. The methods and material consisted of a cohort pilot study of patients, with DDD treated with stand-alone ALIF or TLIF followed by a literature review conducted through a comprehensive PubMed database search of the English literature. Studies comparing stand-alone ALIF with posterior instrumented interbody fusion were selected and reviewed. Results from the pilot study, n = 21, showed a reduced perioperative blood loss, shorter operative time and a trend towards better pain reduction and decreased use of opioid analgesics in patients undergoing stand-alone ALIF compared to posterior instrumented fusion with TLIF. The literature review included three studies, n = 630. All three studies were retrospective cohort studies. The average patient follow-up was 2-years but with heterogeneous selected outcomes. Two of three articles documented significant advantages when using stand-alone ALIF on outcomes such as ODI, VAS, surgical time, blood loss and patient satisfaction. No study found stand-alone ALIF inferior in chosen outcomes including fusion. In conclusion the pilot study and the literature review, finds similar clinical outcomes and fusion rates after stand-alone ALIF and posterior interbody fusion. Stand-alone ALIF was associated with a shorter duration of surgery, less perioperative blood loss and a faster improvement post-operatively. Therefore stand-alone ALIF is a viable and important surgical option, which could be considered first choice as surgical treatment. PMID:25855474

  12. Postoperative discitis following single-level lumbar discectomy: Our experience of 17 cases

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Saumyajit; Ghosh, Jay Deep; Malik, Farid H; Tikoo, Agnivesh

    2012-01-01

    Background: The established protocols of treatment of postoperative lumbar discitis have not been validated till date. We report a retrospective analysis of a series of patients with discitis following single level lumbar discectomy. We analyzed the outcome of conservative treatment of postoperative discitis with the objective to define when and what surgery was required when the conservative treatment failed. Materials and Methods: A total of 17 cases of postoperative discitis treated from 2002 to 2009 were followed up and evaluated clinically, radiologically and by laboratory investigations. All the patients were treated initially conservatively with rest and antibiotic therapy after diagnosis and those who did not respond to conservative treatment of at least 4 weeks were treated surgically. The cases were followed up with serial C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), X-ray, computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for at least 1 year. Results: The mean followup was 40.38 months (range 12-86 months). Four cases failed to respond to conservative therapy and were treated surgically. In three of these four cases, open debridement, transpedicular fixation and posterolateral fusion was performed, and in the fourth case percutaneous transpedicular fixation was done. In the former group, one case was diagnosed to be tubercular, in another case Staphylococcus aureus was cultured where as the third case culture was sterile. All operated patients showed evidence of interbody fusion at 1 year followup. Conclusions: Early detection and aggressive treatment are paramount in managing postoperative discitis and the majority do well with conservative treatment. Surgical management in the form of transpedicular fixation and debridement, when required, gives excellent results. PMID:22912518

  13. Perioperative outcomes in minimally invasive lumbar spine surgery: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Belton, Patrick; Zarzour, Hekmat; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare minimally invasive (MIS) and open techniques for MIS lumbar laminectomy, direct lateral and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) surgeries with respect to length of surgery, estimated blood loss (EBL), neurologic complications, perioperative transfusion, postoperative pain, postoperative narcotic use, and length of stay (LOS). METHODS: A systematic review of previously published studies accessible through PubMed was performed. Only articles in English journals or published with English language translations were included. Level of evidence of the selected articles was assessed. Statistical data was calculated with analysis of variance with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. RESULTS: A total of 11 pertinent laminectomy studies, 20 direct lateral studies, and 27 TLIF studies were found. For laminectomy, MIS techniques resulted in a significantly longer length of surgery (177.5 min vs 129.0 min, P = 0.04), shorter LOS (4.3 d vs 5.3 d, P = 0.01) and less perioperative pain (visual analog scale: 16 ± 17 vs 34 ± 31, P = 0.04). There is evidence of decreased narcotic use for MIS patients (postoperative intravenous morphine use: 9.3 mg vs 42.8 mg), however this difference is of unknown significance. Direct lateral approaches have insufficient comparative data to establish relative perioperative outcomes. MIS TLIF had superior EBL (352 mL vs 580 mL, P < 0.0001) and LOS (7.7 d vs 10.4 d, P < 0.0001) and limited data to suggest lower perioperative pain. CONCLUSION: Based on perioperative outcomes data, MIS approach is superior to open approach for TLIF. For laminectomy, MIS and open approaches can be chosen based on surgeon preference. For lateral approaches, there is insufficient evidence to find non-inferior perioperative outcomes at this time. PMID:26716097

  14. Management of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon; Tomkins-Lane, Christy

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200?000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality. PMID:26727925

  15. Activity of thoracic and lumbar epaxial extensors during postural responses in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, J. M.; Fung, J.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the role of trunk extensor muscles in the thoracic and lumbar regions during postural adjustments in the freely standing cat. The epaxial extensor muscles participate in the rapid postural responses evoked by horizontal translation of the support surface. The muscles segregate into two regional groups separated by a short transition zone, according to the spatial pattern of the electromyographic (EMG) responses. The upper thoracic muscles (T5-9) respond best to posteriorly directed translations, whereas the lumbar muscles (T13 to L7) respond best to anterior translations. The transition group muscles (T10-12) respond to almost all translations. Muscles group according to vertebral level rather than muscle species. The upper thoracic muscles change little in their response with changes in stance distance (fore-hindpaw separation) and may act to stabilize the intervertebral angles of the thoracic curvature. Activity in the lumbar muscles increases along with upward rotation of the pelvis (iliac crest) as stance distance decreases. Lumbar muscles appear to stabilize the pelvis with respect to the lumbar vertebrae (L7-sacral joint). The transition zone muscles display a change in spatial tuning with stance distance, responding to many directions of translation at short distances and focusing to respond best to contralateral translations at the long stance distance.

  16. Symptomatic lumbar disc protrusion causing progressive myelopathy in a low-lying cord.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Shreya; Shetty, Rohit; Collins, Iona

    2012-06-01

    Low-lying cord is an uncommon entity, and cord compression due lumbar disc disease is rarely encountered. We discuss our experience with a case of lumbar cord compression secondary to a large disc protrusion, which caused myelopathy in a low-lying/tethered cord. A 77-year-old woman with known spina bifida occulta presented with 6-week history of severe low back pain and progressive paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a low-lying tethered cord and a large disc prolapse at L2/3 causing cord compression with associated syringomyelia. Medical comorbidities precluded her from anterior decompression, and therefore a posterior decompression was performed. She recovered full motor power in her lower limbs and could eventually walk unaided. She had a deep wound infection, which was successfully treated with debridement, negative pressure therapy (vacuum-assisted closure pump), and antibiotics. Six months after surgery, her Oswestry Disability Index improved from 55% preoperatively to 20%. Posterior spinal cord decompression for this condition has been successful in our case, and we believe that the lumbar lordosis may have helped indirectly decompress the spinal cord by posterior decompression alone. PMID:24353956

  17. Lumbar spine disc heights and curvature: upright posture vs. supine compression harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Shi-Uk; Hargens, Alan R.; Fredericson, Michael; Lang, Philipp K.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spinal lengthening in microgravity is thought to cause back pain in astronauts. A spinal compression harness can compress the spine to eliminate lengthening but the loading condition with harness is different than physiologic conditions. Our purpose was to compare the effect of spine compression with a harness in supine position on disk height and spinal curvature in the lumbar spine to that of upright position as measured using a vertically open magnetic resonance imaging system. METHODS: Fifteen healthy subjects volunteered. On day 1, each subject lay supine for an hour and a baseline scan of the lumbar spine was performed. After applying a load of fifty percent of body weight with the harness for thirty minutes, the lumbar spine was scanned again. On day 2, after a baseline scan, a follow up scan was performed after kneeling for thirty minutes within the gap between two vertically oriented magnetic coils. Anterior and posterior disk heights, posterior disk bulging, and spinal curvature were measured from the baseline and follow up scans. RESULTS: Anterior disk heights increased and posterior disk heights decreased compared with baseline scans both after spinal compression with harness and upright posture. The spinal curvature increased by both loading conditions of the spine. DISCUSSION: The spinal compression with specially designed harness has the same effect as the physiologic loading of the spine in the kneeling upright position. The harness shows some promise as a tool to increase the diagnostic capabilities of a conventional MR system.

  18. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  19. The human lumbar dorsal rami.

    PubMed Central

    Bogduk, N; Wilson, A S; Tynan, W

    1982-01-01

    The L 1-4 dorsal rami tend to form three branches, medial, lateral, and intermediate, which are distributed, respectively, to multifidus, iliocostalis, and longissimus. The intertransversarii mediales are innervated by a branch of the dorsal ramus near the origin of the medial branch. The L 4 dorsal ramus regularly forms three branches while the L 1-3 levels the lateral and intermediate branches may, alternatively, arise from a short common stem. The L 5 dorsal ramus is much longer than the others and forms only a medial and an intermediate branch. Each lumbar medial branch innervates two adjacent zygapophysial joints and ramifies in multifidus, supplying only those fascicles which arise from the spinous process with the same segmental number as the nerve. The comparative anatomy of the lumbar dorsal rami is discussed and the applied anatomy with respect to 'rhizolysis', 'facet denervation' and diagnostic paraspinal electromyography is described. PMID:7076562

  20. Retroperitoneal laparoscopic bilateral lumbar sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Segers, B; Himpens, J; Barroy, J P

    2007-06-01

    The first retroperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy was performed in 1924 by Julio Diez. The classic procedure for sympathectomy is open surgery. We report a unilateral laparoscopic retroperitoneal approach to perform bilateral lumbar sympathectomy. This approach was performed for a 43-year-old man with distal arterial occlusive disease and no indication for direct revascularization. His predominant symptoms were intermittent claudication at 100 metres and cold legs. The patient was placed in a left lateral decubitus position. The optical system was placed first in an intra-abdominal position to check that the trocars were well positioned in the retroperitoneal space. The dissection of retroperitoneum was performed by CO2 insufflation. The inferior vena cava was reclined and the right sympathetic chain was individualized. Two ganglia (L3-L4) were removed by bipolar electro-coagulation. The aorta was isolated on a vessel loop and careful anterior traction allowed a retro-aortic pre-vertebral approach between the lumbar vessels. The left sympathetic chain was dissected. Two ganglia (L3-L4) were removed by bipolar electro-coagulation. PMID:17685269

  1. Lumbar lordosis of extinct hominins.

    PubMed

    Been, Ella; Gmez-Olivencia, Asier; Kramer, Patricia A

    2012-01-01

    The lordotic curvature of the lumbar spine (lumbar lordosis) in humans is a critical component in the ability to achieve upright posture and bipedal gait. Only general estimates of the lordotic angle (LA) of extinct hominins are currently available, most of which are based on the wedging of the vertebral bodies. Recently, a new method for calculating the LA in skeletal material has become available. This method is based on the relationship between the lordotic curvature and the orientation of the inferior articular processes relative to vertebral bodies in the lumbar spines of living primates. Using this relationship, we developed new regression models in order to calculate the LAs in hominins. The new models are based on primate group-means and were used to calculate the LAs in the spines of eight extinct hominins. The results were also compared with the LAs of modern humans and modern nonhuman apes. The lordotic angles of australopithecines (41 4), H. erectus (45) and fossil H. sapiens (54 14) are similar to those of modern humans (51 11). This analysis confirms the assumption that human-like lordotic curvature was a morphological change that took place during the acquisition of erect posture and bipedalism as the habitual form of locomotion. Neandertals have smaller lordotic angles (LA = 29 4) than modern humans, but higher angles than nonhuman apes (22 3). This suggests possible subtle differences in Neandertal posture and locomotion from that of modern humans. PMID:22052243

  2. [Anterior cervical fusion with tantalum interbody implants. Clinical and radiological results in a prospective study].

    PubMed

    Vicario, C; Lopez-Oliva, F; Snchez-Lorente, T; Zimmermann, M; Asenjo-Siguero, J J; Ladero, F; Ibarzbal, A

    2006-04-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) is a widely accepted surgical technique in the treatment of cervical disc disease. Tantalum cages have been recently introduced in spine surgery for interbody fusion because of the advantages of their mechanical properties. We present the results of a prospective clinical and radiological study on 24 consecutive patients who underwent an ACDF with tantalum cages. Clinical evaluation was assessed preoperatively and after surgery by a questionnaire that included a Visual Analogic Scale (VAS) of neck and arm pain, the Oswestry Disability Index and the Zung Depression Scale. Results were classified by Odom's criteria. Radiological evaluation included flexion-extension X-rays, and changes in distance between spinous processes and Cobb angle were measured. Postoperatively patients were reviewed 3 and 12 months after surgery. A statistical significative improvement in all clinical data was reported. According to Odom's criteria in 75% of patients the results were considered like excellent or good. Only one case of radiological and clinical pseudoarthrosis was confirmed. No significative differences were reported 3 and 12 months after surgery. Tantalum cages are a very promising and usefull alternative among implants available for ACDF. Compatibility with MRI postoperative studies and the unnecessariness of autograft are some of their advantages. PMID:16721480

  3. One-stage surgery through posterior approach-for L5-S1 spondyloptosis

    PubMed Central

    Suslu, Hikmet Turan; Celikoglu, Erhan; Borekc?, Ali; H?cdonmez, Tufan; Suslu, Hsn

    2011-01-01

    Grade 5 spondylolisthesis or spondyloptosis is a rare condition. Generally, the surgical management of spondyloptosis includes multi-staged procedures instead of one-staged procedures. One-stage treatment for spondyloptosis is very rare. A 15-year-old girl with L5-S1 spondyloptosis was admitted with severe low back pain. There was no history of trauma. The patient underwent L5 laminectomy, L5-S1 discectomy, resection of sacral dome, reduction, L3-L4-L5-S1 pedicular screw fixation, and interbody-posterolateral fusion through the posterior approach. The reduction was maintained with bilateral L5-S1 discectomy, resection of the sacral dome, and transpedicular instrumentation from L3 to S1. In this particular case, one-staged approach was adequate for the treatment of L5-S1 spondyloptosis. One-staged surgery using the posterior approach may be adequate for the treatment of L5-S1 spondyloptosis while avoiding the risks inherent in anterior approaches. PMID:23125496

  4. Assessment of spontaneous correction of lumbar curve after fusion of the main thoracic in Lenke 1 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis☆

    PubMed Central

    Mizusaki, Danilo; Gotfryd, Alberto Ofenhejm

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical and radiographic response of the lumbar curve after fusion of the main thoracic, in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis of Lenke type 1. Methods Forty-two patients with Lenke 1 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis who underwent operations via the posterior route with pedicle screws were prospectively evaluated. Clinical measurements (size of the hump and translation of the trunk in the coronal plane, by means of a plumb line) and radiographic measurements (Cobb angle, distal level of arthrodesis, translation of the lumbar apical vertebral and Risser) were made. The evaluations were performed preoperatively, immediately postoperatively and two years after surgery. Results The mean Cobb angle of the main thoracic curve was found to have been corrected by 68.9% and the lumbar curve by 57.1%. Eighty percent of the patients presented improved coronal trunk balance two years after surgery. In four patients, worsening of the plumb line measurements was observed, but there was no need for surgical intervention. Less satisfactory results were observed in patients with lumbar modifier B. Conclusions In Lenke 1 patients, fusion of the thoracic curve alone provided spontaneous correction of the lumbar curve and led to trunk balance. Less satisfactory results were observed in curves with lumbar modifier B, and this may be related to overcorrection of the main thoracic curve. PMID:26962505

  5. Narrowing of thoraco-lumbar spinal canal in achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, A; Ferrante, L; Acqui, M; Santoro, A; Mastronardi, L

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of neurological deficits in achondroplastic subject is by no means negligible. We considered the clinico-radiological and therapeutic data of 35 achondroplasic patients (5 personal cases and 30 published in the available literature) harbouring myelo-radicular deficits related to narrowing of thoraco-lumbar canal. There was no significant sex prevalence. The clinical symptoms appear most frequently in the III or IV decades of life. Actually morphological anomalies of the spinal canal are already present at birth in achondroplasic dwarfs, and signs of cervical cord involvement are not uncommon in achondroplasic children. The delayed occurrence of clinical symptoms related to narrow toracho-lumbar canal may be explained by the pathogenetic role of acquired cofactors as prolapse of intervertebral disks and for degenerative spondyloartrosis. The clinical history is usually of insidious onset. Most frequent symptoms are motor weakness of the lower limbs (82.8%) and low-back pain (77.1%). Sensory and/or sphincter disturbances appeared to be less frequent (about 40% of the examined subjects). Plain X-rays, myelography, CT, CT-myelography and MRI are the diagnostic examination of choice. Surgical treatment consists of anterior decompression with fusion, when thoraco-lumbar kyphosis is prevalent, and/or posterior decompression, when the symptoms are mainly caused by canal stenosis. From the prognostic point of view, two groups of patients are recognized, in relationship to the presence of marked dorsal kyphosis. Those with kyphosis showed almost invariably poor functional results. In the remaining ones the results were satisfactory, provided that the clinical history lasted less than 3 years and the symptomatology was not already too advanced. PMID:2677264

  6. The topographical anatomy of the lumbar epidural space.

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, I G; Harrison, G R

    1985-01-01

    Although clinically important, the lumbar epidural space is inconsistently described in textbooks of both anatomy and anaesthetics. This anatomical study of twelve cadavers was performed in an attempt to clarify the description of this region. The dura mater, which possesses a midline fold in a very few cases, is apposed to the walls of the vertebral canal, and attached to them by connective tissue, which is sufficient to allow for displacement of the dural sac during movement of the spine and venous engorgement. Between the dura mater and the vertebral canal is a thin layer of areolar tissue. This contains the internal vertebral venous plexus and a posterior deposit of fat which lies in a recess between the ligamenta flava. These findings are discussed in relation to previous studies in an attempt to arrive at a cohesive description of the epidural region. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:4077717

  7. Remote Cerebellar Hemorrhage after Revision Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Haller, Justin M; Calvert, Graham; Spiker, William R; Brodke, Darrel S; Lawrence, Brandon D

    2015-12-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?To report a case of remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) without intraoperative dural tear after revision lumbar spine surgery. RCH is a rare postoperative complication following spine surgery. RCH has previously been reported only in cases with intraoperative dural tear or durotomy. Methods?Case report and literature review. Results?A 58-year-old woman underwent removal of L4-S1 posterior spinal instrumented fusion (PSIF) implants and L3-L4 decompressive laminectomy with PSIF. There was no intraoperative dural tear. After doing well initially, the patient developed new neurologic symptoms and was found to have RCH. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large dural defect. After repair of the dura, the patient had dramatic improvement of her neurologic symptoms. At 1-year follow-up, the patient continued to have no neurologic sequelae. Conclusion?This report demonstrates that RCH can occur without intraoperative dural tear. Although rare, any patient with new onset of declining neurologic symptoms following spine surgery should have a brain MRI and should have RCH on the differential diagnosis. PMID:26682108

  8. Remote Cerebellar Hemorrhage after Revision Lumbar Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Justin M.; Calvert, Graham; Spiker, William R.; Brodke, Darrel S.; Lawrence, Brandon D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?To report a case of remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) without intraoperative dural tear after revision lumbar spine surgery. RCH is a rare postoperative complication following spine surgery. RCH has previously been reported only in cases with intraoperative dural tear or durotomy. Methods?Case report and literature review. Results?A 58-year-old woman underwent removal of L4S1 posterior spinal instrumented fusion (PSIF) implants and L3L4 decompressive laminectomy with PSIF. There was no intraoperative dural tear. After doing well initially, the patient developed new neurologic symptoms and was found to have RCH. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large dural defect. After repair of the dura, the patient had dramatic improvement of her neurologic symptoms. At 1-year follow-up, the patient continued to have no neurologic sequelae. Conclusion?This report demonstrates that RCH can occur without intraoperative dural tear. Although rare, any patient with new onset of declining neurologic symptoms following spine surgery should have a brain MRI and should have RCH on the differential diagnosis. PMID:26682108

  9. Automated quantification of lumbar vertebral kinematics from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon; Zhao, Kristin; Morel, Etienne; White, Dan; Magnuson, Dixon; Gay, Ralph; An, Kai-Nan; Robb, Richard

    2009-02-01

    We hypothesize that the vertebra-to-vertebra patterns of spinal flexion and extension motion of persons with lower back pain will differ from those of persons who are pain-free. Thus, it is our goal to measure the motion of individual lumbar vertebrae noninvasively from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences. Two-dimensional normalized mutual information-based image registration was used to track frame-to-frame motion. Software was developed that required the operator to identify each vertebra on the first frame of the sequence using a four-point "caliper" placed at the posterior and anterior edges of the inferior and superior end plates of the target vertebrae. The program then resolved the individual motions of each vertebra independently throughout the entire sequence. To validate the technique, 6 cadaveric lumbar spine specimens were potted in polymethylmethacrylate and instrumented with optoelectric sensors. The specimens were then placed in a custom dynamic spine simulator and moved through flexion-extension cycles while kinematic data and fluoroscopic sequences were simultaneously acquired. We found strong correlation between the absolute flexionextension range of motion of each vertebra as recorded by the optoelectric system and as determined from the fluoroscopic sequence via registration. We conclude that this method is a viable way of noninvasively assessing twodimensional vertebral motion.

  10. Pathological changes in the lumbar spine of pigs: gross findings.

    PubMed Central

    Doige, C E

    1979-01-01

    The lumbar vertebral columns from 60 sows and 30 slaughter weight pigs were examined grossly for pathological changes. Asymmetry of lumbar articular facets and minor periarticular osteophytes were seen in the slaughter weight group. Degeneration of intervertebral discs or vertebral osteophytes were not present. In contrast, 38% of 60 sows had vertebral osteophytes and 40% had degeneration of intervertebral discs. Extensive ankylosing spondylosis was present in two sows. Other vertebral lesions observed in sows include asymmetry and arthrosis of articular facets, fissures and areas of cavitation in the annulus fibrosus and vertebral end plate, and vertebral osteomyelitis and/or vertebral fracture. Extravertebral skeletal lesions, some of which could be related to a clinical history of lameness or posterior paralysis, include sacroiliac arthrosis, pelvic deformity, polyarthritis, femoral osteomyelitis, sacroiliac dislocation and epiphyseolysis involving the femoral head or tuber ischii. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. PMID:556197

  11. Total disc replacement surgery for symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disease: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    van den Eerenbeemt, Karin D.; van Royen, Barend J.; Peul, Wilco C.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of total disc replacement surgery compared with spinal fusion in patients with symptomatic lumbar disc degeneration. Low back pain (LBP), a major health problem in Western countries, can be caused by a variety of pathologies, one of which is degenerative disc disease (DDD). When conservative treatment fails, surgery might be considered. For a long time, lumbar fusion has been the “gold standard” of surgical treatment for DDD. Total disc replacement (TDR) has increased in popularity as an alternative for lumbar fusion. A comprehensive systematic literature search was performed up to October 2008. Two reviewers independently checked all retrieved titles and abstracts, and relevant full text articles for inclusion. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted relevant data and outcomes. Three randomized controlled trials and 16 prospective cohort studies were identified. In all three trials, the total disc replacement was compared with lumbar fusion techniques. The Charité trial (designed as a non-inferiority trail) was considered to have a low risk of bias for the 2-year follow up, but a high risk of bias for the 5-year follow up. The Charité artificial disc was non-inferior to the BAK® Interbody Fusion System on a composite outcome of “clinical success” (57.1 vs. 46.5%, for the 2-year follow up; 57.8 vs. 51.2% for the 5-year follow up). There were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Prodisc artificial disc (also designed as a non-inferiority trail) was found to be statistically significant more effective when compared with the lumbar circumferential fusion on the composite outcome of “clinical success” (53.4 vs. 40.8%), but the risk of bias of this study was high. Moreover, there were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Flexicore trial, with a high risk of bias, found no clinical relevant differences on pain and physical function when compared with circumferential spinal fusion at 2-year follow up. Because these are preliminary results, in addition to the high risk of bias, no conclusions can be drawn based on this study. In general, these results suggest that no clinical relevant differences between the total disc replacement and fusion techniques. The overall success rates in both treatment groups were small. Complications related to the surgical approach ranged from 2.1 to 18.7%, prosthesis related complications from 2.0 to 39.3%, treatment related complications from 1.9 to 62.0% and general complications from 1.0 to 14.0%. Reoperation at the index level was reported in 1.0 to 28.6% of the patients. In the three trials published, overall complication rates ranged from 7.3 to 29.1% in the TDR group and from 6.3 to 50.2% in the fusion group. The overall reoperation rate at index-level ranged from 3.7 to 11.4% in the TDR group and from 5.4 to 26.1% in the fusion group. In conclusion, there is low quality evidence that the Charité is non-inferior to the BAK cage at the 2-year follow up on the primary outcome measures. For the 5-year follow up, the same conclusion is supported only by very low quality evidence. For the ProDisc, there is very low quality evidence for contradictory results on the primary outcome measures when compared with anterior lumbar circumferential fusion. High quality randomized controlled trials with relevant control group and long-term follow-up is needed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of TDR. PMID:20508954

  12. The Great Imitator: Ocular Syphilis Presenting as Posterior Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Alan; Ziaee, Saba M.; Hosseini, Hamid; Voleti, Vinod; Schwartz, Steven D.; Kim, Nam U.; Ge, Phillip S.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 34 Final Diagnosis: Ocular syphilis Symptoms: Painful unilateral vision loss Medication: Benzylpenicillin Clinical Procedure: Lumbar puncture Specialty: Infectious Diseases Ophthalmology Objective: Rare disease Background: Syphilis is often known as the Great Imitator. The differential diagnosis of posterior uveitis is broad with ocular syphilis being particularly challenging to diagnose as it presents similarly to other ocular conditions such as acute retinal necrosis. Case Report: A 34-year-old woman with multiple sexual partners over the past few years presented with painful and progressively worsening unilateral vision loss for 2 weeks. Several months prior, she had reported non-specific symptoms of headache and diffuse skin rash. Despite treatment with oral acyclovir for 3 weeks, her vision progressively declined, and she was referred to the university ophthalmology clinic for further evaluation. On examination, there was concern for acute retinal necrosis and she was empirically treated with parenteral acyclovir while awaiting further infectious disease study results. Workup ultimately revealed ocular syphilis, and neurosyphilis was additionally confirmed with cerebrospinal fluid studies. Treatment with intravenous penicillin was promptly initiated with complete visual recovery. Conclusions: Ocular syphilis varies widely in presentation and should be considered in all patients with posterior uveitis, especially with a history of headache and skin rashes. However, given that acute retinal necrosis is a more common cause of posterior uveitis and can rapidly result in permanent vision loss, it should be empirically treated whenever it is suspected while simultaneous workup is conducted to evaluate for alternative diagnoses. PMID:26151369

  13. Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Up for Sports Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap) KidsHealth > For Parents > Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap) Print A A A Text Size What's in this article? What It Is Why It's Done Preparation The Procedure What to ...

  14. Lumbar laminectomy with segmental continuous epidural anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, Lakkam Vamsee; Radhika, Kusuma Srividhya; Parthasarathy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar laminectomies are usually performed under general anesthesia in the prone position. We report a case of lumbar laminectomy done under segmental continuous epidural anesthesia, so that direct visual intra-operative monitoring of the motor and sensory component of the lower extremities was possible. PMID:25886233

  15. Quantitative Assessment of Lumbar Paraspinal Muscle Endurance

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, John M.; Graves, James E.; Murray, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the reliability and variability of repeated measurements of dynamic and static lumbar muscle endurance. Design and Setting: Participants performed an isometric lumbar-extension strength test followed by 2 trials of 4 separate lumbar muscular-endurance tests (with a 24-hour rest period between tests). Data were collected at a university musculoskeletal research laboratory. Subjects: Eight healthy, physically active volunteers (5 men, 3 women; age = 25.9 ± 4.3 years; height = 169.0 ± 4.6 cm; mass = 73.9 ± 33.1 kg) participated in this investigation. Measurements: We initially tested each participant's isometric lumbar-extension peak torque on a lumbar-extension dynamometer. Static (holding time) and dynamic (repetitions) lumbar-endurance tests were subsequently performed on the lumbar-extension dynamometer and a horizontal roman chair. Results: Interclass reliability was high for all endurance tests completed (r = 0.91 to 0.96, P ≤ .05). Variability (expressed as total error) for the static-dynamometer and roman-chair tests was 18.3 and 11.6 seconds, respectively, with 2.8 and 1.6 repetitions for the dynamic-dynamometer and roman-chair tests, respectively. Conclusions: Lumbar muscle endurance can be reliably assessed by both static and dynamic protocols on high- and low-technology devices. PMID:14608437

  16. Sagittal plane rotation center of lower lumbar spine during a dynamic weight-lifting activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhan; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Wang, Shaobai; Wu, Minfei; Zhong, Weiye; Li, Jing-Sheng; Cha, Thomas; Wood, Kirk; Li, Guoan

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the center of rotation (COR) of the intervertebral segments of the lower lumbar spine (L4-L5 and L5-S1 segments) in sagittal plane during a weight-lifting (3.6kg in each hand) extension activity performed with the pelvis constrained. Seven healthy subjects were studied using a dual fluoroscopic imaging technique. Using the non-weightbearing, supine position during MRI scan as a reference, the average intervertebral flexion angles of the L4-L5 and L5-S1 were 6.6 and 5.3 at flexion position of the body, respectively, and were -1.8 and -3.5 at extension position of the body, respectively. The CORs of the lower lumbar spine were found segment-dependent and changed with the body postures. The CORs of the L4-L5 segment were at the location about 75% posterior from the anterior edge of the disc at flexion positions of the body, and moved to about 92% of the posterior portion of the disc at extension positions of the body. The CORs of the L5-S1 segment were at 95% posterior portion of the disc at flexion positions of the body, and moved outside of the posterior edge of the disc by about 12% of the disc length at extension positions of the body. These results could help understand the physiological motion characters of the lower lumbar spine. The data could also provide important insights for future improvement of artificial disc designs and surgical implantation of the discs that are aimed to reproduce normal spinal functions. PMID:26805460

  17. Posterior sampling with improved efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.

    1998-12-01

    The Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique provides a means to generate a random sequence of model realizations that sample the posterior probability distribution of a Bayesian analysis. That sequence may be used to make inferences about the model uncertainties that derive from measurement uncertainties. This paper presents an approach to improving the efficiency of the Metropolis approach to MCMC by incorporating an approximation to the covariance matrix of the posterior distribution. The covariance matrix is approximated using the update formula from the BFGS quasi-Newton optimization algorithm. Examples are given for uncorrelated and correlated multidimensional Gaussian posterior distributions.

  18. Estimation of stature from radiologic anthropometry of the lumbar vertebral dimensions in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kui; Chang, Yun-feng; Fan, Fei; Deng, Zhen-hua

    2015-11-01

    The recent study was to assess the relationship between the radiologic anthropometry of the lumbar vertebral dimensions and stature in Chinese and to develop regression formulae to estimate stature from these dimensions. A total of 412 normal, healthy volunteers, comprising 206 males and 206 females, were recruited. The linear regression analysis were performed to assess the correlation between the stature and lengths of various segments of the lumbar vertebral column. Among the regression equations created for single variable, the predictive value was greatest for the reconstruction of stature from the lumbar segment in both sexes and subgroup analysis. When individual vertebral body was used, the heights of posterior vertebral body of L3 gave the most accurate results for male group, the heights of central vertebral body of L1 provided the most accurate results for female group and female group with age above 45 years, the heights of central vertebral body of L3 gave the most accurate results for the groups with age from 20-45 years for both sexes and the male group with age above 45 years. The heights of anterior vertebral body of L5 gave the less accurate results except for the heights of anterior vertebral body of L4 provided the less accurate result for the male group with age above 45 years. As expected, multiple regression equations were more successful than equations derived from a single variable. The research observations suggest lumbar vertebral dimensions to be useful in stature estimation among Chinese population. PMID:26593994

  19. Investigation of biomechanical behavior of lumbar vertebral segments with dynamic stabilization device using finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deoghare, Ashish B.; Kashyap, Siddharth; Padole, Pramod M.

    2013-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease is a major source of lower back pain and significantly alters the biomechanics of the lumbar spine. Dynamic stabilization device is a remedial technique which uses flexible materials to stabilize the affected lumbar region while preserving the natural anatomy of the spine. The main objective of this research work is to investigate the stiffness variation of dynamic stabilization device under various loading conditions under compression, axial rotation and flexion. Three dimensional model of the two segment lumbar spine is developed using computed tomography (CT) scan images. The lumbar structure developed is analyzed in ANSYS workbench. Two types of dynamic stabilization are considered: one with stabilizing device as pedicle instrumentation and second with stabilization device inserted around the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis suggests that proper positioning of the dynamic stabilization device is of paramount significance prior to the surgery. Inserting the device in the posterior region indicates the adverse effects as it shows increase in the deformation of the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis executed by positioning stabilizing device around the inter-vertebral disc yields better result for various stiffness values under compression and other loadings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Posterior capsulorrhaphy for treatment of recurrent posterior glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Shin, Robert D; Polatsch, Daniel B; Rokito, Andrew S; Zuckerman, Joseph D

    2005-01-01

    The surgical treatment of recurrent posterior shoulder instability via a posterior approach has had a variable degree of success reported in the literature with recurrence rates ranging between 8% and 45%. The purpose of this study was to review the results of posterior capsulorrhaphy in a consecutive series of patients with recurrent posterior instability. Seventeen consecutive patients underwent operative management for posterior glenohumeral instability. The dominant shoulder was involved in ten patients. All patients were male with an average age of 28.1 years (range: 16 to 54 years). Ten patients had sustained a specific injury which precipitated the instability. Six patients reported dislocations requiring formal closed reduction maneuvers; the remainder described episodes of recurrent subluxation with spontaneous reduction. All patients underwent a posterior capsulorrhaphy using an infraspinatus splitting approach. Eight shoulders required repair of a posterior capsulolabral detachment. In addition, one patient required augmentation with a posterior bone block for significant glenoid rim deficiency. Outcome was assessed by personal interview, clinical assessment, and standardized radiographs. At an average follow-up of 3.9 years (range: 1.8 to 10.8 years) patients estimated their overall shoulder function to be 81% of the contralateral unaffected shoulder. The subjective result was excellent for eight patients, good for five patients, fair in two patients, and poor in two patients. One of the poor outcomes was in a patient with glenohumeral degenerative changes at the index procedure which progressed and eventually required a total shoulder arthroplasty. The other poor result was in a patient found to have a full-thickness rotator cuff tear 10.6 years after the index procedure. Two patients (12%) had recurrence of their instability. Both of these patients sustained a significant re-injury which precipitated their symptoms. Five patients complained of occasional night pain at the time of their last follow-up examination. Only one patient (who was re-injured) had to change professions as a result of shoulder symptoms. Posterior capsulorrhaphy for treatment of isolated posterior glenohumeral instability yields satisfactory clinical results. Recurrent instability in this series was associated with a specific re-injury and did not appear to increase with longer follow-up. PMID:16536210

  1. Does Vertebral Endplate Morphology Influence Outcomes in Lumbar Disc Arthroplasty? Part I: An Initial Assessment of a Novel Classification System of Lumbar Endplate Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Oetgen, Matthew E.; la Torre, Jorge J. Jaramillo-de; Bertagnoli, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Background The influence of lumbar endplate morphology on the clinical and radiographic outcomes of lumbar disc arthroplasty has not been evaluated to the best of our knowledge. Study Design and Objective In this observational study of 80 patients, the objective was to formulate a reproducible and valid lumbar endplate classification system to be used in evaluating lumbar total disc replacement patients. Methods A novel vertebral endplate morphology classification system was formulated after review of data related to 80 patients enrolled in a prospective, randomized clinical trial in conjunction with an application for a US Food and Drug Administration investigational device exemption. Intraobserver and interobserver analyses of the classification system were performed on the same 80 patients utilizing the classification system. Results The initial review of the radiographs revealed 5 types of endplates: Type I (n = 82) flat endplates; Type II (n = 26) posterior lip; Type III (n = 5) central concavity; Type IV (n = 4) anterior sloping endplate; and Type V (n = 2) combination of Types IIV. The intraobserver kappa was 0.66 and the interobserver kappa was 0.51. These kappa values indicate substantial to moderate reproducibility, respectively. Conclusions In this study, we propose a lumbar endplate classification system to be used in the preoperative assessment of patients undergoing lumbar disc arthroplasty. The classification can function as a basis for comparison and discussion among arthroplasty clinicians, and serve as a possible exclusionary screening tool for disc arthroplasty. Special consideration should be given to Type II endplates to optimize proper positioning and functioning of a total disc replacement (TDR) implant. Further outcome studies are warranted to assess the clinical significance of this classification system. The key points of our study are: (1) We present a novel lumbar vertebral endplate classification system; (2) Five types of endplates were identified and classified; (3) Intraobserver and interobserver reliability were classified as substantial and moderate, respectively; and (4) The classification system used may assist in the preoperative evaluation of patients for total disc replacement. Level of Evidence A systematic review of cohort studies (level 2a). PMID:25802597

  2. Interspinous posterior devices: What is the real surgical indication?

    PubMed

    Landi, Alessandro

    2014-09-16

    Interspinous posterior device (IPD) is a term used to identify a relatively recent group of implants used to treat lumbar spinal degenerative disease. This kind of device is classified as part of the group of the dynamic stabilization systems of the spine. The concept of dynamic stabilization has been replaced by that of dynamic neutralization of hypermobility, with the intention of clarifying that the primary aim of this kind of system is not the preservation of the movement, but the dynamic neutralization of the segmental hypermobility which is at the root of the pathological condition. The indications for the implantation of an IPD are spinal stenosis and neurogenic claudication, assuming that its function is the enlargement of the neural foramen and the decompression of the roots forming the cauda equina in the central part of the vertebral canal. In the last 10 years, use of these implants has been very common but to date, no long-term clinical follow-up regarding clinical and radiological aspects are available. The high rate of reoperation, recurrence of symptoms and progression of degenerative changes is evident in the literature. If these devices are effectively a miracle cure for lumbar spinal stenosis, why do the utilization and implantation of IPD remain extremely controversial and should they be investigated further? Excluding the problems related to the high cost of the device, the main problem remains the pathological substrate on which the device is explicit in its action: the degenerative pathology of the spine. PMID:25232541

  3. Interspinous posterior devices: What is the real surgical indication?

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Interspinous posterior device (IPD) is a term used to identify a relatively recent group of implants used to treat lumbar spinal degenerative disease. This kind of device is classified as part of the group of the dynamic stabilization systems of the spine. The concept of dynamic stabilization has been replaced by that of dynamic neutralization of hypermobility, with the intention of clarifying that the primary aim of this kind of system is not the preservation of the movement, but the dynamic neutralization of the segmental hypermobility which is at the root of the pathological condition. The indications for the implantation of an IPD are spinal stenosis and neurogenic claudication, assuming that its function is the enlargement of the neural foramen and the decompression of the roots forming the cauda equina in the central part of the vertebral canal. In the last 10 years, use of these implants has been very common but to date, no long-term clinical follow-up regarding clinical and radiological aspects are available. The high rate of reoperation, recurrence of symptoms and progression of degenerative changes is evident in the literature. If these devices are effectively a miracle cure for lumbar spinal stenosis, why do the utilization and implantation of IPD remain extremely controversial and should they be investigated further? Excluding the problems related to the high cost of the device, the main problem remains the pathological substrate on which the device is explicit in its action: the degenerative pathology of the spine. PMID:25232541

  4. Dynamic Stabilization for Challenging Lumbar Degenerative Diseases of the Spine: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kaner, Tuncay; Ozer, Ali Fahir

    2013-01-01

    Fusion and rigid instrumentation have been currently the mainstay for the surgical treatment of degenerative diseases of the spine over the last 4 decades. In all over the world the common experience was formed about fusion surgery. Satisfactory results of lumbar spinal fusion appeared completely incompatible and unfavorable within years. Rigid spinal implants along with fusion cause increased stresses of the adjacent segments and have some important disadvantages such as donor site morbidity including pain, wound problems, infections because of longer operating time, pseudarthrosis, and fatigue failure of implants. Alternative spinal implants were developed with time on unsatisfactory outcomes of rigid internal fixation along with fusion. Motion preservation devices which include both anterior and posterior dynamic stabilization are designed and used especially in the last two decades. This paper evaluates the dynamic stabilization of the lumbar spine and talks about chronologically some novel dynamic stabilization devices and thier efficacies. PMID:23662211

  5. [Dynamic instrumentation of the lumbar spine. Clinical and biomechanical analysis of success factors].

    PubMed

    Charles, Y P; Walter, A; Schuller, S; Steib, J-P

    2011-08-01

    Total disc replacement and posterior dynamic stabilization represent alternatives to lumbar spinal fusion which should reduce the risk of adjacent segment degeneration. Disc replacement is indicated for pure discopathy without facet joint degeneration. Spinopelvic balance influences the implant's biomechanics. Therefore pelvic incidence, sacral slope, segmental lordosis and the mean axis of rotation need to be considered. Dynamic stabilization is indicated in moderate discopathy and facet joint degeneration, in degenerative spondylolisthesis grade I with a hypermobile segment and in dynamic lumbar stenosis. The combination of caudal fusion and cranial dynamic stabilization allows a better maintenance of lordosis with multiple level instrumentation and prevents adjacent segment degeneration. If pelvic incidence and sacral slope are high, L5-S1 should be fused because of elevated shear forces. PMID:21681502

  6. Computed tomography of thoracic and lumbar spine fractures that have been treated with Harrington instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Golimbu, C.; Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Engler, G.; Delman, A.

    1984-06-01

    Twenty patients with fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine underwent computed tomography (CT) following Harrington distraction instrumentation and a spinal fusion. CT was done to search for a cause of persistent cord or nerve root compression in those patients who failed to improve and completely recover their partial neurologic deficit (14 cases). The most common abnormality was the presence of residual bone fragments originating in the burst fracture of a vertebral body displaced posteriorly, into the spinal canal. In patients with complications in the late recovery period, CT found exuberant callus indenting the canal or lack of fusion of the bone grafts placed in the anterolateral aspect of the vertebral bodies. This experience indicates that CT is the modality of choice for spinal canal evaluation in those patients who fail to have an optimal clinical course following fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine treated with Harrington rods.

  7. Advances in surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Silber, Jeff S; Anderson, D Greg; Hayes, Victor M; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2002-07-01

    The past several years have seen many advances in spine technology. Some of these advances have improved the quality of life of patients suffering from disabling low back pain from degenerative disk disease. Traditional fusion procedures are trending toward less invasive approaches with less iatrogenic soft-tissue morbidity. The diversity of bone graft substitutes is increasing with the potential for significant improvements in fusion success with the future introduction of several well tested bone morphogenic proteins to the spinal market. Biologic solutions to modify the natural history of disk degeneration are being investigated. Recently, electrothermal modulation of the posterior annulus fibrosis has been published as a semi-invasive technique to relieve low back pain generated by fissures in the outer annulus and ingrowing nociceptors (intradiskal electrothermal therapy, and intradiskal electrothermal annuloplasty). Initial results are promising, however, prospective randomized studies comparing this technique with conservative therapy are still lacking. The same is true for artificial nucleus pulposus replacement using hydrogel cushions implanted in the intervertebral space after removal of the nucleus pulposus posterior or through an anterior approach. Intervertebral disk prostheses are presently being studied in small prospective patient cohorts. As with all new developments, careful prospective, long-term trials are needed to fully define the role of these technologies in the management of symptomatic lumbar degenerative disk disease. PMID:12138967

  8. A Comparison of Radiostereometric Analysis and Computed Tomography for the Assessment of Lumbar Spinal Fusion in a Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Humadi, Ali; Freeman, Brian J. C.; Moore, Rob J.; Callary, Stuart; Halldin, Klas; David, Vikram; Maclaurin, William; Tauro, Paul; Schoenwaelder, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Study Design?Prospective animal study. Objective?The aim of this animal study is to evaluate the accuracy of radiostereometric analysis (RSA) compared with computed tomographic (CT) scan in the assessment of spinal fusion after anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) using histology as a gold standard. Methods?Three non-adjacent ALIFs (L1L2, L3L4, and L5L6) were performed in nine sheep. The sheep were divided into three groups of three sheep. All the animals were humanely killed immediately after having the last scheduled RSA. The lumbar spine was removed and in vitro fine cut CT and histopathology were performed. Results?Using histological assessment as the gold standard for assessing fusion, RSA demonstrated better results (100% sensitivity and 66.7% specificity; positive predictive value [PPV]?=?27.3%, negative predictive value [NPV] =100.0%) compared with CT (66.7% sensitivity and 60.0% specificity [PPV?=?16.7%, NPV?=?93.8%]). Conclusions?RSA demonstrated higher sensitivity and specificity when compared with CT. Furthermore, RSA has the advantage of much lower radiation exposure compared with fine cut CT. Further studies are required to see if RSA remains superior to CT scan for the assessment spinal fusion in the clinical setting. Assessment of Class of Evidence (CoE) for individual studies of diagnostic test evaluation Methodological principle Study design Prospective cohort design X Retrospective cohort design Casecontrol design Broad spectrum of patients with expected condition a Appropriate reference standard used X Adequate description of test and reference for replication X Blinded comparison with appropriate reference X Reference standard performed independently of test X Evidence level II Note: Blank box indicates criterion not met, could not be determined, or information not reported by author or was not reported. aThis study contained nine animal subjects. PMID:24436705

  9. Gonadal dose reduction in lumbar spine radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Moilanen, A.; Kokko, M.L.; Pitkaenen, M.

    1983-02-01

    Different ways to minimize the gonadal dose in lumbar spine radiography have been studied. Two hundred and fifty lumbar spine radiographs were reviewed to assess the clinical need for lateral L5/S1 projection. Modern film/screen combinations and gonadal shielding of externally scattered radiation play a major role in the reduction of the genetic dose. The number of exposures should be minimized. Our results show that two projections, anteroposterior (AP) and lateral, appear to be sufficient in routine radiography of the lumbar spine.

  10. ISASS Policy Statement – Lumbar Artificial Disc

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The primary goal of this Policy Statement is to educate patients, physicians, medical providers, reviewers, adjustors, case managers, insurers, and all others involved or affected by insurance coverage decisions regarding lumbar disc replacement surgery. Procedures This Policy Statement was developed by a panel of physicians selected by the Board of Directors of ISASS for their expertise and experience with lumbar TDR. The panel's recommendation was entirely based on the best evidence-based scientific research available regarding the safety and effectiveness of lumbar TDR. PMID:25785243

  11. Prevalence and Distribution of Thoracic and Lumbar Compressive Lesions in Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kodera, Ryuzo; Yoshiiwa, Toyomi; Kawano, Masanori; Kaku, Nobuhiro; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cross-sectional study. Purpose This study analyzed the prevalence and distribution of horacic and lumbar compressive lesions in cervical spondylotic myelopathy as well as their relationships with cervical developmental spinal canal stenosis (DCS) by using whole-spine postmyelographic computed tomography. Overview of Literature There are few studies on missed compressive lesions of the spinal cord or cauda equina at the thoracolumbar level in cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Furthermore, the relationships between DCS, and the prevalence and distribution of thoracic and lumbar compressive lesions are unknown. Methods Eighty patients with symptomatic cervical spondylotic myelopathy were evaluated. Preoperative image data were obtained. Patients were classified as DCS or non-DCS (n=40 each) if their spinal canal longitudinal diameter was <12 mm at any level or ?12 mm at all levels, respectively. Compressive lesions in the anterior and anteroposterior parts, ligamentum flavum ossification, posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, and spinal cord tumors at the thoracolumbar levels were analyzed. Results Compressive lesions in the anterior and anteroposterior parts were observed in 13 (16.3%) and 45 (56.3%) patients, respectively. Ligamentum flavum and posterior longitudinal ligament ossification were observed in 19 (23.8%) and 3 (3.8%) patients, respectively. No spinal cord tumors were observed. Thoracic and lumbar compressive lesions of various causes tended to be more common in DCS patients than non-DCS patients, although the difference was statistically insignificant. Conclusions Surveying compressive lesions and considering the thoracic and lumbar level in cervical spondylotic myelopathy in DCS patients are important for preventing unexpected neurological deterioration and predicting accurate neurological condition after cervical surgery. PMID:25901233

  12. A morphometric study of the lumbar spinous process in the Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Cai, B.; Ran, B.; Li, Q.; Li, Z.H.; Li, F.N.; Li, M.; Yan, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to analyze the anatomical parameters of the lumbar spine spinous process for an interspinous stabilization device designed for the Chinese population and to offer an anatomical basis for its clinical application. The posterior lumbar spines (T12-S1) of 52 adult cadavers were used for measuring the following: distance between two adjacent spinous processes (DB), distance across two adjacent spinous processes (DA), thickness of the central spinous processes (TC), thickness of the superior margin of the spinous processes (TS), thickness of the inferior margin of the spinous processes (TI), and height of the spinous processes (H). Variance and correlation analyses were conducted for these data, and the data met the normal distribution and homogeneity of variance. DB decreased gradually from L1-2 to L5-S1. DA increased from T12-L1 to L2-3 and then decreased from L2-3 to L4-5. The largest H in males was noted at L3 (25.45±5.96 mm), whereas for females the largest H was noted at L4 (18.71±4.50 mm). Usually, TS of the adjacent spinous process was lower than TI. Based on the anatomical parameters of the lumbar spinous processes obtained in this study, an “H”-shaped coronal plane (posterior view) was proposed as an interspinous stabilization device for the Chinese population. This study reports morphometric data of the lumbar spinous processes in the Chinese population, which provides an anatomical basis for future clinical applications. PMID:25493388

  13. Diffusion tensor imaging of lumbar spinal nerve in subjects with degenerative lumbar disorders.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Eguchi, Yawara; Inoue, Gen; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Orita, Sumihisa; Kamoda, Hiroto; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Go; Inage, Kazuhide; Saino, Takeshi; Sato, Hirotaka; Ando, Hiroki; Kojima, Masatoshi; Okumura, Kenichiro; Masuda, Yoshitada; Watanabe, Atsuya; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Recently several authors have reported that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) might provide a new understanding of sciatica. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical feasibility of DTI for the evaluation of lumbar spinal nerve of patients with sciatica associated with lumbar degenerative disorders. Thirty-four patients (25men, mean age63. 3years) with degenerated lumbar disease, 14 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis with foraminal stenosis, 12 with lumbar spinal stenosis without foraminal stenosis, five with lumbar disc herniation, two with discogenic low back pain, and one with spondylolysis who underwent 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and surgical treatment were included in the present study. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was calculated from an FA map, and tractography was investigated. In asymptomatic nerves, tractography showed all L3-S1 spinal nerve roots clearly. Abnormalities of tractography were classified into three types by shape; "Disrupted", "Narrowing", and "Tapering". More abnormalities of tractography were found in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis, and especially in patients with foraminal stenosis. The disrupted type was the most common. The mean FA of entrapped symptomatic nerves was less than seen on the intact side. This study demonstrates that tractography shows abnormal findings for nerve roots in lumbar spinal degeneration and that FA decreases in symptomatic roots. DTI may offer not only morphological evaluation, but also quantitative evaluation. We believe that DTI can be used as a tool for the diagnosis of lumbar spinal degenerative disease. PMID:25979227

  14. [Physiotherapy in lumbar disc herniation ].

    PubMed

    Stoll, T; Germann, D; Hagmann, H

    2001-08-01

    Physiotherapy is the treatment of choice in patients with symptoms caused by a lumbar disc herniation. In clinical practice a broad range of physiotherapeutic modalities has been revealed to be helpful. During the acute stage the efficacy of the McKenzie-concept, mobilisation therapies and traction has been demonstrated in randomized controlled trials with a blind assessor. In addition, pain reducing physical therapies such as cold or electrotherapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics and/or muscle relaxants are sensible initial accompanying treatments. The effectiveness of active physiotherapies such as training of local strength endurance of back and abdominal muscles has been proven in patients during the chronic stage. The indications for a in-patient rehabilitation programme, for surgery and the danger of developing chronic low back pain are discussed. PMID:11552355

  15. Termination zones of functionally characterized spinothalamic tract neurons within the primate posterior thalamus.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Steve; Zhang, Xijing; Khasabov, Sergey G; Simone, Donald A; Giesler, Glenn J

    2008-10-01

    The primate posterior thalamus has been proposed to contribute to pain sensation, but its precise role is unclear. This is in part because spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons that project to the posterior thalamus have received little attention. In this study, antidromic mapping was used to identify individual STT neurons with axons that projected specifically to the posterior thalamus in Macaca fascicularis. Each axon was located by antidromic activation at low stimulus amplitudes (<30 microA) and was then surrounded distally by a grid of stimulating points in which 500-microA stimuli were unable to activate the axon antidromically, thereby indicating the termination zone. Several nuclei within the posterior thalamus were targets of STT neurons: the posterior nucleus, suprageniculate nucleus, magnocellular part of the medial geniculate nucleus, and limitans nucleus. STT neurons projecting to the ventral posterior inferior nucleus were also studied. Twenty-five posterior thalamus-projecting STT neurons recorded in lumbar spinal cord were characterized by their responses to mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli. Sixteen of 25 neurons were recorded in the marginal zone and the balance was located within the deep dorsal horn. Thirteen neurons were classified as wide dynamic range and 12 as high threshold. One-third of STT neurons projecting to posterior thalamus responded to noxious heat (50 degrees C). Two-thirds of those tested responded to cooling. Seventy-one percent responded to an intradermal injection of capsaicin. These data indicate that the primate STT transmits noxious and innocuous mechanical, thermal, and chemical information to multiple posterior thalamic nuclei. PMID:18701750

  16. Catheter-Based Transepidural Approach to Cervical and Thoracic Posterior and Perineural Epidural Spaces: A Cadaveric Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Khan, Asif A.; Sohail, Amna; Saed, Aveen; Jadhav, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Approaching the cervical and high thoracic level epidural space through transepidural route from lumbar region represents a method to lower the occurrence of complications associated with direct approach. The authors performed a cadaveric pilot project to determine the feasibility of various catheter-based manipulation and cephalad advancement using the transepidural route. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Two cadavers were used to determine the following: 1. Ability to place a guide sheath over a guidewire using a percutaneous approach within the posterior lumbar epidural space; 2. The highest vertebral level catheter can be advanced within the posterior epidural space; 3. Ability to cross midline within the posterior epidural space; and 4. Ability to catheterize the perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. RESULTS We were able to advance the catheters up to the level of cervical vertebral level of C2 within the posterior epidural space under fluoroscopic guidance from a sheath inserted via oblique parasagittal approach at the lumbar L4L5 intervertebral space. We were able to cross midline within the posterior epidural space and catheterize multiple perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical vertebral level of C2, C3, and C4 on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. We also catheterized multiple epidural sheaths that surround the nerve roots exiting at the thoracic vertebral level on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. CONCLUSIONS We were able to advance a catheter or microcatheter up to the cervical vertebral level within the posterior epidural space and catheterize the perineural epidural sheath of the nerve root exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. Such observations support further exploration of percutaneous catheter based transepidural approach to cervical and thoracic dorsal epidural spaces for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26060530

  17. Allogenic versus autologous cancellous bone in lumbar segmental spondylodesis: a randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Putzier, Michael; Strube, Patrick; Funk, Julia F; Gross, Christian; Mnig, Hans-Joachim; Perka, Carsten; Pruss, Axel

    2009-05-01

    The current gold standard in lumbar fusion consists of transpedicular fixation in combination with an interbody interponate of autologous bone from iliac crest. Because of the limited availability of autologous bone as well as the still relevant donor site morbidity after iliac crest grafting the need exists for alternative grafts with a comparable outcome. Forty patients with degenerative spinal disease were treated with a monosegmental spondylodesis (ventrally, 1 PEEK-cage; dorsally, a screw and rod system), and randomly placed in two groups. In group 1, autogenous iliac crest cancellous bone was used as a cage filling. In group 2 the cages were filled with an allogenic cancellous bone graft. Following 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, the clinical outcome was determined on the basis of: the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire; patient satisfaction; patient willingness to undergo the operation again; and a visual analog scale for pain. The radiological outcome was based on both fusion rate (radiographs, computed tomography), and on the bone mineral density of the grafts. After 6 months, the X-rays of the patients in group 2 had a significantly lower rate of fusion. Aside from this, there were no further significant differences. After 12 months, radiological results showed a similar fusion rate in both groups. Donor site complications consisted of five patients with hematoma, and three patients with persistent pain in group 1. No implant complications were observed. If a bone bank is available for support and accepting the low risk of possible transmission of infectious diseases, freeze-dried allogenic cancellous bone can be used for monosegmental spondylodeses. The results demonstrated an equivalent clinical outcome, as well as similar fusion rates following a 12-month period. This is in despite of a delayed consolidation process. PMID:19148687

  18. Metabolic syndrome and lumbar spine fusion surgery: epidemiology and perioperative outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Memtsoudis, Stavros G.; Kirksey, Meghan; Ma, Yan; Chiu, Ya Lin; Mazumdar, Madhu; Pumberger, Matthias; Girardi, Federico P.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Analysis of the National Inpatient Sample database from 2000 to 2008. Objective To identify if metabolic syndrome is an independent risk factor for increased major perioperative complications, cost, length of stay and non-routine discharge. Summary of Background Data Metabolic syndrome is a combination of medical disorders that has been shown to increase the health risk of the general population. No study has analyzed its impact in the perioperative spine surgery setting. Methods We obtained the National Inpatient Sample from the Hospital Cost and Utilization Project for each year between 2000 and 2008. All patients undergoing primary posterior lumbar spine fusion were identified and separated into groups with and without metabolic syndrome. Patient demographics and health care system related parameters were compared. The outcomes of major complications, non-routine discharge, length of hospital stay and hospitalization charges were assessed for both groups. Regression analysis was performed to identify if the presence of metabolic syndrome was an independent risk factor for each outcome. Results An estimated 1,152,747 primary posterior lumbar spine fusion were performed between 2000 and 2008 in the US. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome as well as the comorbidities of the patients increased significantly over time. Patients with metabolic syndrome had significantly longer length of stay, higher hospital charges, higher rates of non-routine discharges and increased rates of major life-threatening complications compared to patients without metabolic syndrome. Conclusion Patients with metabolic syndrome undergoing primary posterior lumbar spinal fusion represent an increasing financial burden on the health care system. Clinicians should recognize that metabolic syndrome represents a risk factor for increased perioperative morbidity. PMID:22024892

  19. Rethinking "posterior" tongue-tie.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Currently, many clinicians who help with breastfeeding problems are diagnosing "posterior" tongue-tie in infants and performing or referring for frenotomy. In this "Speaking Out" article, I argue that the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie has successfully raised awareness of the importance of impaired tongue function in breastfeeding difficulty. However, the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie also applies a reductionist, medicalized theoretical frame to the complex problem of impaired tongue function, risking unintended outcomes. Impaired tongue function arises out of multiple interacting and co-evolving factors, including the interplay between social behaviors concerning breastfeeding and mother-infant biology. Consideration of theoretical frames is vital if we are to build an evidence base through efficient use of the scarce resources available for clinical breastfeeding research and minimize unintended outcomes. PMID:24143939

  20. Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuno, M.M.; Shu, G.J. )

    1990-03-01

    The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae.

  1. Microsurgical Posterior Fossa Vestibular Neurectomy

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Herbert; Norrell, Horace; Wanamaker, Hayes; Flanzer, John

    1991-01-01

    Between 1925 and 1945, Walter Dandy and Kenneth McKenzie performed more than 700 posterior fossa eighth nerve sections and vestibular neurectomies, treating the intractable vertigo accompanying Meniere's disease. During the past 10 years, using microsurgical techniques and reaching the posterior fossa through the temporal bone, vestibular neurectomy has enjoyed a resurgence of popularity. When hearing is to be preserved, vestibular neurectomy is the surgical treatment of choice, if the patient fails to undergo a remission of the vertigo of Meniere's disease. This report reviews 115 consecutive vestibular neurectomies performed for the treatment of Meniere's disease from 1978 to 1988. In 1978, the retrolabyrinthine vestibular neurectomy (RVN) was introduced, a procedure in which the posterior fossa is entered anterior to the sigmoid sinus and behind the labyrinth. During the last three years, the approach to the posterior fossa has been a small dural opening behind the sigmoid sinus, the combined retrolabyrinthine-retrosigmoid (R-R) approach. There have been no cases of facial paralysis and no serious complications. A high incidence of headache (75%) resulted when the posterior wall of the internal auditory canal was drilled away for better exposure. Transient cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks occurred in 7% of the patients having the RVN, the incidence was 3% when the combined R-R approach was used. In the RVN series, wound infection occurred in 20% of cases until perioperative antibiotics reduced the rate to 3%. The results in curing or improving vertigo have been excellent (94%), and hearing has been preserved to within 20 dB of the preoperative levels in 76%. Until a cure for Meniere's disease is found, microsurgical posterior fossa vestibular neurectomy remains the best treatment. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17170816

  2. The Comprehensive Biomechanics and Load-Sharing of Semirigid PEEK and Semirigid Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, D. K.; Bucklen, Brandon; McAfee, Paul C.; Nichols, Jeff; Angara, Raghavendra; Khalil, Saif

    2013-01-01

    Alternatives to conventional rigid fusion have been proposed for several conditions related to degenerative disc disease when nonoperative treatment has failed. Semirigid fixation, in the form of dynamic stabilization or PEEK rods, is expected to provide compression under loading as well as an intermediate level of stabilization. This study systematically examines both the load-sharing characteristics and kinematics of these two devices compared to the standard of internal rigid fixators. Load-sharing was studied by using digital pressure films inserted between an artificially machined disc and two loading fixtures. Rigid rods, PEEK rods, and the dynamic stabilization system were inserted posteriorly for stabilization. The kinematics were quantified on ten, human, cadaver lumbosacral spines (L3-S1) which were tested under a pure bending moment, in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The magnitude of load transmission through the anterior column was significantly greater with the dynamic device compared to PEEK rods and rigid rods. The contact pressures were distributed more uniformly, throughout the disc with the dynamic stabilization devices, and had smaller maximum point-loading (pressures) on any particular point within the disc. Kinematically, the motion was reduced by both semirigid devices similarly in all directions, with slight rigidity imparted by a lateral interbody device. PMID:23984077

  3. Unsuccessful outcomes after posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Oliver; Fisch, Margit

    2015-01-01

    Posterior urethroplasty is the most common strategy for the treatment of post-traumatic urethral injuries. Especially in younger patients, post-traumatic injuries are a common reason for urethral strictures caused by road traffic accidents, with pelvic fracture or direct trauma to the perineum. In many cases early endoscopic realignment is the first attempt to restore the junction between proximal and distal urethra, but in some cases primary realignment is not possible or not enough to treat the urethral injury. In these cases suprapubic cystostomy alone and delayed repair by stricture excision and posterior urethroplasty is an alternative procedure to minimise the risk of stricture recurrence. PMID:26019980

  4. Lumbar plexopathy as a complication of percutaneous nephrolithotomy in a horseshoe kidney

    PubMed Central

    Lantz, Andrea G.; Honey, R. John DA

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of nephrolithiasis in horseshoe kidneys can be challenging due to anomalies in renal position, collecting system anatomy and vascular supply. We report on a patient who was referred after a failed percutaneous nephrolithotomy for a left moiety staghorn calculus in a horseshoe kidney. Two punctures had been performed involving upper and middle posterior calyces. Both were very medially placed and inadvertently traversed the psoas muscle, resulting in lumbar plexopathy with permanent deficit. This complication presented postoperatively with left leg weakness, paresthesia, and pain which impaired independent ambulation. The patient went on to be successfully treated for her stone disease with robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyelolithotomy. PMID:25737767

  5. Lumbar plexopathy as a complication of percutaneous nephrolithotomy in a horseshoe kidney.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Andrea G; Honey, R John D'A

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of nephrolithiasis in horseshoe kidneys can be challenging due to anomalies in renal position, collecting system anatomy and vascular supply. We report on a patient who was referred after a failed percutaneous nephrolithotomy for a left moiety staghorn calculus in a horseshoe kidney. Two punctures had been performed involving upper and middle posterior calyces. Both were very medially placed and inadvertently traversed the psoas muscle, resulting in lumbar plexopathy with permanent deficit. This complication presented postoperatively with left leg weakness, paresthesia, and pain which impaired independent ambulation. The patient went on to be successfully treated for her stone disease with robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyelolithotomy. PMID:25737767

  6. Continuous posterior lumbar plexus and continuous parasacral and intubation with lighted stylet for ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo; Lucena, Neli

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is characterized by progressive ossification of the spinal column with resultant stiffness. Ankylosing spondylitis can present significant challenges to the anaesthetist as a consequence of the potential difficult airway and performing neuraxial blockade. We describe a case of intubation with lighted stylet, and use of the continuous lumbosacral plexus for THA and postoperative analgesia with an elastomeric pump. Key words: Airways difficult anticipated, anesthesia, ankoylosing spondylitis, arthroplasty, conduction, continuous lumbosacral plexus, hip, infusion pumps, intubation awake, replacement PMID:25886430

  7. Lumbar Interspinous Process Fixation and Fusion with Stand-Alone Interlaminar Lumbar Instrumented Fusion Implant in Patients with Degenerative Spondylolisthesis Undergoing Decompression for Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Postacchini, Franco; Menchetti, Pier Paolo Maria; Sessa, Pasquale; Paolino, Michela; Cinotti, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To assess the ability of a stand-alone lumbar interspinous implant (interspinous/interlaminar lumbar instrumented fusion, ILIF) associated with bone grafting to promote posterior spine fusion in degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) with vertebral instability. Overview of Literature A few studies, using bilateral laminotomy (BL) or bilateral decompression by unilateral laminotomy (BDUL), found satisfactory results in stenotic patients with decompression alone, but others reported increased olisthesis, or subsequent need for fusion in DS with or without dynamic instability. Methods Twenty-five patients with Grade I DS, leg pain and chronic low back pain underwent BL or BDUL and ILIF implant. Olisthesis was 13% to 21%. Follow-up evaluations were performed at 4 to 12 months up to 25 to 44 months (mean, 34.4). Outcome measures were numerical rating scale (NRS) for back and leg pain, Oswestry disability index (ODI) and short-form 36 health survey (SF-36) of body pain and function. Results Fusion occurred in 21 patients (84%). None had increased olisthesis or instability postoperatively. Four types of fusion were identified. In Type I, the posterior part of the spinous processes were fused. In Type II, fusion extended to the base of the processes. In Type III, bone was present also around the polyetheretherketone plate of ILIF. In Type IV, even the facet joints were fused. The mean NRS score for back and leg pain decreased by 64% and 80%, respectively. The mean ODI score was decreased by 52%. SF-36 bodily pain and physical function mean scores increased by 53% and 58%, respectively. Computed tomography revealed failed fusion in four patients, all of whom still had vertebral instability postoperatively. Conclusions Stand-alone ILIF with interspinous bone grafting promotes vertebral fusion in most patients with lumbar stenosis and unstable Grade I DS undergoing BL or BDUL. PMID:26949455

  8. The Importance of Proximal Fusion Level Selection for Outcomes of Multi-Level Lumbar Posterolateral Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Woo Dong

    2015-01-01

    Background There are few studies about risk factors for poor outcomes from multi-level lumbar posterolateral fusion limited to three or four level lumbar posterolateral fusions. The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcomes of multi-level lumbar posterolateral fusion and to search for possible risk factors for poor surgical outcomes. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 37 consecutive patients who underwent multi-level lumbar or lumbosacral posterolateral fusion with posterior instrumentation. The outcomes were deemed either 'good' or 'bad' based on clinical and radiological results. Many demographic and radiological factors were analyzed to examine potential risk factors for poor outcomes. Student t-test, Fisher exact test, and the chi-square test were used based on the nature of the variables. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to exclude confounding factors. Results Twenty cases showed a good outcome (group A, 54.1%) and 17 cases showed a bad outcome (group B, 45.9%). The overall fusion rate was 70.3%. The revision procedures (group A: 1/20, 5.0%; group B: 4/17, 23.5%), proximal fusion to L2 (group A: 5/20, 25.0%; group B: 10/17, 58.8%), and severity of stenosis (group A: 12/19, 63.3%; group B: 3/11, 27.3%) were adopted as possible related factors to the outcome in univariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that only the proximal fusion level (superior instrumented vertebra, SIV) was a significant risk factor. The cases in which SIV was L2 showed inferior outcomes than those in which SIV was L3. The odds ratio was 6.562 (95% confidence interval, 1.259 to 34.203). Conclusions The overall outcome of multi-level lumbar or lumbosacral posterolateral fusion was not as high as we had hoped it would be. Whether the SIV was L2 or L3 was the only significant risk factor identified for poor outcomes in multi-level lumbar or lumbosacral posterolateral fusion in the current study. Thus, the authors recommend that proximal fusion levels be carefully determined when multi-level lumbar fusions are considered. PMID:25729522

  9. An update on the management of chronic lumbar discogenic pain.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-09-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease without disc herniation, also known as discogenic pain, is an elusive diagnosis of chronic low back pain. Lumbar provocation discography and fusion surgery have been frequently utilized for several decades as the gold standards for the diagnosis and treatment of symptomatic lumbar discogenic pain, though controversial, based on conjecture, rather than evidence. In addition to lumbar fusion, various other operative and nonoperative modalities of treatments are available in managing chronic lumbar discogenic pain. This review provides an updated assessment of the management of chronic lumbar discogenic pain with a critical look at the many modalities of treatments that are currently available. PMID:26255722

  10. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) Text Size ... the arch, and an inward rolling of the ankle. As the condition progresses, the symptoms will change. ...

  11. Children's Understanding of Posterior Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girotto, Vittorio; Gonzalez, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Do young children have a basic intuition of posterior probability? Do they update their decisions and judgments in the light of new evidence? We hypothesized that they can do so extensionally, by considering and counting the various ways in which an event may or may not occur. The results reported in this paper showed that from the age of five,

  12. Stereolithography for Posterior Fossa Cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Celso; Dujovny, Manuel; Evenhouse, Raymond; Charbel, Fady T.; Sadler, Lewis

    1998-01-01

    Posterior fossa cranioplasty has been suggested for improvement of neurological symptoms following craniectomy. However, there is no particular recommendation in the literature about techniques for prosthesis manufacture and implantation. We report our experience using rapid prototyping technology and stereolithography for pre-surgical implant design and production of cranioplasties. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171056

  13. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-Yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  14. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  15. Arthroscopic discectomy and interbody fusion of the thoracic spine: A report of ipsilateral 2-portal approach

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Said G.; Schwartz, Jeremy A.; Marsolais, E. B.

    2012-01-01

    Background The standard approach to the thoracic disc is through thoracotomy. The video-assisted thoracoscopic approach has been used as an alternative to the open approach for nearly 20 years, and more recently, extracavitary, posterolateral approaches have been introduced. Both the transthoracic procedures involve deflating the lung for access to the spine, and postoperative thoracic drainage is necessary; postoperative morbidity can be significant. The retropleural procedures are in their infancy, but the published results are promising. The purpose of this study is to introduce the posterolateral arthroscopic thoracic decompression and fusion procedure, which is extrapleural, less disruptive to normal anatomy, and cost-effective. Methods Fifteen consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic decompression and interbody fusion of the thoracic spine were prospectively studied according to the hospital's institutional review board protocol. The Short Form 36 and visual analog scale questionnaires were completed preoperatively and postoperatively. Paired t tests were used for statistical analysis. The patient was placed in the prone position on a radiolucent table, and instrumentation was performed under fluoroscopic control. Two portals were developed ipsilaterally (one for the arthroscope and the other for instruments) on the side of disc herniation, and a single portal was used on the contralateral side. Various instruments were used for disc excision and exploration of the spinal canal. Fusion was accomplished with bilateral corticocancellous dowels obtained from the iliac crests. Infiltration of the access channel and facet injections of the contiguous joints were performed with bupivacaine, for immediate postoperative pain control. Results Fifteen patients with a mean age of 54 years were followed up for 28 months postoperatively. The overall back pain score decreased from 7.2 (SD, 1.5) to 3 (SD, 2) after the procedure (P < .005). Eleven patients were satisfied with their current lifestyle postoperatively as opposed to one preoperatively. Two patients had reoccurrences. Hospital stay averaged 18.5 hours. The operating room cost and the cost of hospital stay was 51.9% of the cost of anterior open discectomy. Conclusions The extrapleural, biportal, ipsilateral arthroscopic approach for the decompression and interbody fusion of the thoracic spine is feasible, cost-effective, less traumatic, and associated with minimal complications. The best results were obtained in patients with single-level thoracic disc herniation. The technique is applicable for most thoracic disc herniations. PMID:25694878

  16. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-16

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  17. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy - early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Takeda, Masaaki; Itoh, Yasunobu; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We report our early clinical experience with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in the lumbar spine. We introduced PELD to our clinical practice in June 2009. A total of 311 patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease were treated in our hospital up to August 2011. Thirty-seven patients with lumbar HNP were treated by PELD. PELD was carried out under local anesthesia, and the endoscope was continuously irrigated with saline. Twenty-eight patients were treated through the transforaminal approach, 5 were treated through the interlaminar approach, and 4 were treated through the extraforaminal approach. Surgery was discontinued due to uncontrollable intraoperative pain or anatomical inaccessibility in one case of the interlaminar approach and 2 cases of the extraforaminal approach. In the other 34 patients, the elapsed time of surgery was 34 to 103 minutes (mean 62.4 minutes). Extracorporeal blood loss was insignificant. Immediate symptom relief was achieved in all patients, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed sufficient removal of the HNP. The length of the postoperative hospital stay was 1 or 2 days in all patients. The surgical method of PELD is completely different from percutaneous nucleotomy, and the aim is to directly remove the HNP with minimum damage to the musculoskeletal structure. Although this study is based on our early clinical outcomes, PELD seemed to be a promising minimally invasive surgery for HNP in the lumbar spine. PMID:23006872

  18. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  19. Economic impact of minimally invasive lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Christoph P; Hofer, Anna S; Wang, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    Cost effectiveness has been demonstrated for traditional lumbar discectomy, lumbar laminectomy as well as for instrumented and noninstrumented arthrodesis. While emerging evidence suggests that minimally invasive spine surgery reduces morbidity, duration of hospitalization, and accelerates return to activites of daily living, data regarding cost effectiveness of these novel techniques is limited. The current study analyzes all available data on minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, decompression, short-segment fusion and deformity surgery. In general, minimally invasive spine procedures appear to hold promise in quicker patient recovery times and earlier return to work. Thus, minimally invasive lumbar spine surgery appears to have the potential to be a cost-effective intervention. Moreover, novel less invasive procedures are less destabilizing and may therefore be utilized in certain indications that traditionally required arthrodesis procedures. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing the economic impact of minimally invasive spine surgery. Future studies are necessary to confirm the durability and further define indications for minimally invasive lumbar spine procedures. PMID:25793159

  20. Predictable Factors for Dural Tears in Lumbar Burst Fractures with Vertical Laminar Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Kyu; Park, Jin-Woo; Sung, Joo-Kyung

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to determine the incidence of dural tears and predictable factors suggesting dural tears in patients who had lumbar burst fractures with vertical laminar fractures. Methods A retrospective review was done on thirty-one patients who underwent operative treatment for lumbar burst fractures with vertical laminar fractures between January 2003 and December 2008. All patients were divided into two groups according to existence of dural tears, which were surgically confirmed; 21 patients with dural tears and 10 patients without dural tears. Clinical and radiographic findings were analyzed for their association with dural tears. Results Among a total of 31 patients, dural tears were detected in 21 (67%) patients. A preoperative neurological deficits and mean separation distances of the edges in laminar fractures were found to be the reliable factors of dural tears (p=0.001 and 0.002, respectively). Decreased ratio of the central canal diameter and interpedicular distance were also the reliable factors suggesting dural tears (p=0.006 and 0.015, respectively). However, dural tears showed no significant association with age, sex, level of injury, absence of a posterior fat pad signal, the angle of retropulsed segment, or site of laminar fracture. Conclusion Our study of lumbar burst fracture combined laminar fracture revealed that dural tears should be ruled out in cases of a preoperative neurological deficits, wide separation of the laminar fracture, severe canal encroachment, and wider interpedicular distance. PMID:21892398

  1. Evaluation of Degenerative Lumbar Scoliosis After Short Segment Decompression and Fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Naiguo; Wang, Dachuan; Wang, Feng; Tan, Bingyi; Yuan, Zenong

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate short segment decompression of degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS) and the efficiency of fusion treatment.After DLS surgery, the patients were retrospectively reviewed using the VAS (visual analog scale) and ODI (Oswestry Disability Index) to assess clinical outcomes. All patients underwent posterior lumbar decompressive laminectomy, pedicle screw internal fixation, and posterolateral bone graft fusion surgery. Radiographic measurements included the scoliotic Cobb angle, the fused Cobb angle, the anterior intervertebral angle (AIA), the sagittal intervertebral angle (SIA), and lumbar lordosis angle. The relationships between these parameters were examined by bivariate Pearson analysis and linear regression analysis.Preoperatively, the Cobb angle at the scoliotic segment was 15.4, which decreased to 10.2 immediately following surgery (P?

  2. Grynfeltt Hernia: A Deceptive Lumbar Mass with a Lipoma-Like Presentation.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Jonathan R; Buicko, Jessica L; Patel, Chetan; Kozol, Robert; Lopez-Viego, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    The Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia is a rare posterior abdominal wall defect that allows for the herniation of retro- and intraperitoneal structures through the upper lumbar triangle. While this hernia may initially present as a small asymptomatic bulge, the defect typically enlarges over time and can become symptomatic with potentially serious complications. In order to avoid that outcome, it is advisable to electively repair Grynfeltt hernias in patients without significant contraindications to surgery. Due to the limited number of lumbar hernioplasties performed, there has not been a large study that definitively identifies the best repair technique. It is generally accepted that abdominal hernias such as these should be repaired by tension-free methods. Both laparoscopic and open techniques are described in modern literature with unique advantages and complications for each. We present the case of an unexpected Grynfeltt hernia diagnosed following an attempted lipoma resection. We chose to perform an open repair involving a combination of fascial approximation and dual-layer polypropylene mesh placement. The patient's recovery was uneventful and there has been no evidence of recurrence at over six months. Our goal herein is to increase awareness of upper lumbar hernias and to discuss approaches to their surgical management. PMID:26697256

  3. Grynfeltt Hernia: A Deceptive Lumbar Mass with a Lipoma-Like Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Zadeh, Jonathan R.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Patel, Chetan; Kozol, Robert; Lopez-Viego, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    The Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia is a rare posterior abdominal wall defect that allows for the herniation of retro- and intraperitoneal structures through the upper lumbar triangle. While this hernia may initially present as a small asymptomatic bulge, the defect typically enlarges over time and can become symptomatic with potentially serious complications. In order to avoid that outcome, it is advisable to electively repair Grynfeltt hernias in patients without significant contraindications to surgery. Due to the limited number of lumbar hernioplasties performed, there has not been a large study that definitively identifies the best repair technique. It is generally accepted that abdominal hernias such as these should be repaired by tension-free methods. Both laparoscopic and open techniques are described in modern literature with unique advantages and complications for each. We present the case of an unexpected Grynfeltt hernia diagnosed following an attempted lipoma resection. We chose to perform an open repair involving a combination of fascial approximation and dual-layer polypropylene mesh placement. The patient's recovery was uneventful and there has been no evidence of recurrence at over six months. Our goal herein is to increase awareness of upper lumbar hernias and to discuss approaches to their surgical management. PMID:26697256

  4. Intradural Migration of a Sequestrated Lumbar Disc Fragment Masquerading as a Spinal Intradural Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong-Suk; Park, Jung-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Intervertebral intradural lumbar disc herniation (ILDH) is a quite rare pathology, and isolated intradural lumbar disc herniation is even more rare. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not be able to reveal ILDHs, especially if MRI findings show an intact lumbar disc annulus and posterior longitudinal ligament. Here, we present an exceedingly rare case of an isolated IDLH that we initially misidentified as a spinal intradural tumor, in a 54-year-old man hospitalized with a 2-month history of back pain and right sciatica. Neurologic examination revealed a positive straight leg raise test on the right side, but he presented no other sensory, motor, or sphincter disturbances. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI revealed what we believed to be an intradural extramedullary tumor compressing the cauda equina leftward in the thecal sac, at the L2 vertebral level. The patient underwent total L2 laminectomy, and we extirpated the intradural mass under microscopic guidance. Histologic examination of the mass revealed a degenerated nucleus pulposus. PMID:23091677

  5. Anterior cervical interbody constructs: effect of a repetitive compressive force on the endplate.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Nathaniel R; Rim, Byeong Cheol; Tan, Rong; Hickman, Rebecca; Fayyazi, Amir H

    2012-04-01

    Graft subsidence following anterior cervical reconstruction can result in the loss of sagittal balance and recurring foraminal stenosis. This study examined the implant-endplate interface using a cyclic fatigue loading protocol in an attempt to model the subsidence seen in vivo. The superior endplate from 30 cervical vertebrae (C3 to T1) were harvested and biomechanically tested in axial compression with one of three implants: Fibular allograft; titanium mesh cage packed with cancellous chips; and trabecular metal. Each construct was cyclically loaded from 50 to 250?N for 10,000 cycles. Nondestructive cyclic loading of the cervical endplate-implant construct resulted in a stiffer construct independent of the type of the interbody implant tested. The trabecular metal construct demonstrated significantly more axial stability and significantly less subsidence in comparison to the titanium mesh construct. Although the allograft construct resulted in more subsidence than the trabecular metal construct, the difference was not significant and no difference was found when comparing axial stability. For all constructs, the majority of the subsidence during the cyclic testing occurred during the first 500 cycles and was followed by a more gradual settling in the remaining 9,500 cycles. PMID:22002745

  6. Anterolateral radical debridement and interbody bone grafting combined with transpedicle fixation in the treatment of thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhaohui; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Qixin; Wu, Yongchao; Guo, Xiaodong

    2015-04-01

    This retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes of radical anterolateral debridement and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting with transpedicle fixation for the treatment of thoracolumbar tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis operation aims to remove the lesions and necrotic tissues, remove spinal cord compression, and reconstruct spinal stability. However, traditional operation methods cannot effectively correct cyrtosis or stabilize the spine. In addition, the patient needs to stay in bed for a long time and may have many complications. So far, the best surgical method and fixation method for spinal tuberculosis remain controversial. There were a total of 43 patients, 16 involving spinal cord injury, from January 2004 to January 2011. The patients were surgically treated for radical anterolateral debridement via posterolateral incision and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting and single-stage transpedicle fixation. All the patients were followed up to determine the stages of intervertebral bone fusion and the corrections of spinal kyphosis with the restoration of neurological deficit. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of these patients decreased to normal levels for a mean of 2.8 months. The function of feeling, motion, and sphincter in 16 paraplegia cases gradually recovered after 1 week to 3 months postoperatively, and the American Spinal Injury Association scores significantly increased at the final follow-up. Intervertebral bone fusions were all achieved postoperatively. No internal fixation devices were loose, extracted, or broken. There was no correction degree loss during the follow-up. The method of radical anterolateral debridement and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting and single-stage transpedicle fixation was effective for the treatment of thoracolumbar tuberculosis, correcting kyphotic deformity, and reconstructing spinal stability, obtaining successful intervertebral bony fusion and promoting the recovery of paraplegia. These results showed satisfactory clinical outcomes. PMID:25860219

  7. Anterolateral Radical Debridement and Interbody Bone Grafting Combined With Transpedicle Fixation in the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhaohui; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Qixin; Wu, Yongchao; Guo, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes of radical anterolateral debridement and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting with transpedicle fixation for the treatment of thoracolumbar tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis operation aims to remove the lesions and necrotic tissues, remove spinal cord compression, and reconstruct spinal stability. However, traditional operation methods cannot effectively correct cyrtosis or stabilize the spine. In addition, the patient needs to stay in bed for a long time and may have many complications. So far, the best surgical method and fixation method for spinal tuberculosis remain controversial. There were a total of 43 patients, 16 involving spinal cord injury, from January 2004 to January 2011. The patients were surgically treated for radical anterolateral debridement via posterolateral incision and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting and single-stage transpedicle fixation. All the patients were followed up to determine the stages of intervertebral bone fusion and the corrections of spinal kyphosis with the restoration of neurological deficit. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of these patients decreased to normal levels for a mean of 2.8 months. The function of feeling, motion, and sphincter in 16 paraplegia cases gradually recovered after 1 week to 3 months postoperatively, and the American Spinal Injury Association scores significantly increased at the final follow-up. Intervertebral bone fusions were all achieved postoperatively. No internal fixation devices were loose, extracted, or broken. There was no correction degree loss during the follow-up. The method of radical anterolateral debridement and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting and single-stage transpedicle fixation was effective for the treatment of thoracolumbar tuberculosis, correcting kyphotic deformity, and reconstructing spinal stability, obtaining successful intervertebral bony fusion and promoting the recovery of paraplegia. These results showed satisfactory clinical outcomes. PMID:25860219

  8. [Posterior thoracotomy in ventral decubitus].

    PubMed

    Parshin, V D; Grigir'eva, S P; Parshin, V V; Khetagurov, M A; Dydykin, S S; Laptina, V I

    2013-01-01

    The rigidity of the chest wall, thank to its bone framework, determines the variety of operative access in thoracic surgery, both thoracoscopic and open. The posterior thoracotomy on the bed of the resected rib in ventral decubitus is traditionally but gratuitously rarely used access. The method permits comfortable access to trachea, bifurcation, main bronchi and thoracic esophagus. It can also be used in cases of foregoing thoracothomy. Authors own the experience of 111 cases with the use of posterior thoracotomy in ventral decubitus. The access proved to be preferable for the operations on the membranous part of the trachea and main bronchi, some localizations of thoracic tracheoesophageal fistula. The access suggests fast mobilization of the root of the lung without foregoing pneumolisis, which is important in cases of pleural cavity obliteration after tuberculosis or pleural empyem. PMID:23715388

  9. Pediatric Posterior Sternoclavicular Joint Injuries.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Posterior sternoclavicular joint injuries are increasingly diagnosed in children and young adults. Most of these injuries are the result of indirect mechanisms, typically lateral compression, with a posterior-to-anterior force applied to the shoulder during sports. Less frequently, these injuries are caused by direct impact on the medial clavicle, which can occur in rollover motor vehicle accidents, or may represent atraumatic instability. In patients younger than 25 years, physeal separation is more common than true dislocation. Theoretically, these patients have increased remodeling potential. Reduction is recommended to prevent and/or manage the compression of mediastinal structures, which can lead to life-threatening injury. Open surgical stabilization is the preferred treatment for acute and chronic retrosternal injuries. A thoracic or trauma surgeon should be available during stabilization in the rare event of potentially life-threatening hemorrhage after reduction. Outcomes have been largely successful, with pain-free, unrestricted range of motion and return to activity. PMID:26116848

  10. Nanotherapy for posterior eye diseases.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Indu Pal; Kakkar, Shilpa

    2014-11-10

    It is assumed that more than 50% of the most enfeebling ocular diseases have their origin in the posterior segment. Furthermore, most of these diseases lead to partial or complete blindness, if left untreated. After cancer, blindness is the second most dreaded disease world over. However, treatment of posterior eye diseases is more challenging than the anterior segment ailments due to a series of anatomical barriers and physiological constraints confronted for delivery to this segment. In this regard, nanostructured drug delivery systems are proposed to defy ocular barriers, target retina, and act as permeation enhancers in addition to providing a controlled release. Since an important step towards developing effective treatment strategies is to understand the course or a route a drug molecule needs to follow to reach the target site, the first part of the present review discusses various pathways available for effective delivery to and clearance from the posterior eye. Promise held by nanocarrier systems, viz. liposomes, nanoparticles, and nanoemulsion, for effective delivery and selective targeting is also discussed with illustrative examples, tables, and flowcharts. However, the applicability of these nanocarrier systems as self-administration ocular drops is still an unrealized dream which is in itself a huge technological challenge. PMID:24862316

  11. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY...-Year-Old Child 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and...

  12. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. 572.9 Section... Percentile Male 572.9 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist... minutes after the release. (d) When the abdomen is subjected to continuously applied force in...

  13. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY...-Year-Old Child 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and...

  14. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. 572.9 Section... Percentile Male 572.9 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist... minutes after the release. (d) When the abdomen is subjected to continuously applied force in...

  15. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY...-Year-Old Child 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and...

  16. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. 572.9 Section... Percentile Male 572.9 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist... minutes after the release. (d) When the abdomen is subjected to continuously applied force in...

  17. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. 572.9 Section... Percentile Male 572.9 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist... minutes after the release. (d) When the abdomen is subjected to continuously applied force in...

  18. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY...-Year-Old Child 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and...

  19. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section...-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis... component surfaces are clean, dry and untreated unless otherwise specified. (2) Attach the pelvis to...

  20. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. 572.9 Section... Percentile Male § 572.9 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist.... (2) Attach the rear mounting of the pelvis to the pelvic instrument cavity rear face at the four...

  1. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujin; Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-06-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  2. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  3. A study on difference and importance of sacral slope and pelvic sacral angle that affect lumbar curvature.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seyoung; Lee, Minsun; Kwon, Byongan

    2014-01-01

    Individual pelvic sacral angle was measured, compared and analyzed for the 6 male and female adults who were diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis, foraminal stenosis and mild spondylolisthesis in accordance with spinal parameters, pelvic parameters and occlusion state of sacroiliac joint presented by the author of this thesis based on the fact that the degree of lumbar excessive lordosis that was one of the causes for lumbar pain was determined by sacral slope. The measured values were compared with the standard values of the average normal range from 20 s to 40 s of normal Koreans stated in the study on the change in lumbar lordosis angle, lumbosacral angle and sacral slope in accordance with the age by Oh et al. [5] and sacral slope and pelvic sacral slope of each individual of the subjects for measurement were compared. Comparing the difference between the two tilt angles possessed by an individual is a comparison to determine how much the sacroiliac joint connecting pelvis and sacral vertebrae compensated and corrected the sacral vertebrae slope by pelvic tilt under the condition of synarthrodial joint.Under the condition that the location conforming to the line in which the sagittal line of gravity connects with pelvic ASIS and pubic pubic tuberele is the neutral location of pelvic tilt, sacral slope being greater than pelvic sacral slope means pelvic anterior tilting, whereas sacral slope being smaller than pelvic sacral slope means pelvic posterior tilting. On that account, male B, female A and female C had a pelvic posterior tilting of 16 degrees, 1 degree and 5 degrees respectively, whereas male A, male C and female B had a pelvic anterior tilting of 3 degrees, 9 degrees and 4 degrees respectively. In addition, the 6 patients the values of lumbar lordosis angle, lumbosacral angle and sacral slope that were almost twice as much as the normal standard values of Koreans. It is believed that this is because the pelvic sacral slope maintaining an angle that is slightly greater than the normal range by being located in the lowest end of spine considering that the compensation for pelvic tilt, in other words, pelvic limb is not much causes an excess of lumbar lordosis angle. The meaning of this study based on these results is to prove that PSA is one of the important factors that fundamentally determine lumbar curvature. And this is because it is definitely required to have a study on the guideline for appropriate posture and life habit to the maintenance and management of ideal PSA before the end of growth phase and also the exercise therapy and adjustment for the control of PSA. PMID:24704656

  4. Lateral Transpsoas Fusion: Indications and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vishal C.; Park, Daniel K.; Herkowitz, Harry N.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal fusion historically has been used extensively, and, recently, the lateral transpsoas approach to the thoracic and lumbar spine has become an increasingly common method to achieve fusion. Recent literature on this approach has elucidated its advantage over more traditional anterior and posterior approaches, which include a smaller tissue dissection, potentially lower blood loss, no need for an access surgeon, and a shorter hospital stay. Indications for the procedure have now expanded to include degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, degenerative scoliosis, nonunion, trauma, infection, and low-grade spondylolisthesis. Lateral interbody fusion has a similar if not lower rate of complications compared to traditional anterior and posterior approaches to interbody fusion. However, lateral interbody fusion has unique complications that include transient neurologic symptoms, motor deficits, and neural injuries that range from 1 to 60% in the literature. Additional studies are required to further evaluate and monitor the short- and long-term safety, efficacy, outcomes, and complications of lateral transpsoas procedures. PMID:23213303

  5. A Modified Approach of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy (PELD) for Far Lateral Disc Herniation at L5-S1 with Foot Drop.

    PubMed

    Chun, Eun Hee; Park, Hahck Soo

    2016-01-01

    Foraminal or extraforaminal Far Lateral Disc Herniations (FLDH) extending into or beyond the foraminal zone have been recognized as between 7-12% of all lumbosacral disc herniations. Conventional posterior laminectomy may not provide good access to a herniation that lies far lateral to the lateral margin of the pedicle. Use of the endoscopic technique through a percutaneous approach to treat such FLDH patients can decrease the surgical morbidity while achieving better outcomes. We made an effort to utilize the advantages of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and to determine the appropriate approach for FLDH at the level between the 5th Lumbar and first Sacral vertebrae(L5-S1). The authors present a case of an endoscopically resected lumbar extruded disc of the left extraforaminal zone with superior foraminal migration at the level of L5-S1, which had led to foot drop, while placing the endoscope in the anterior epidural space without facetectomy. PMID:26839673

  6. A Modified Approach of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy (PELD) for Far Lateral Disc Herniation at L5-S1 with Foot Drop

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Eun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Foraminal or extraforaminal Far Lateral Disc Herniations (FLDH) extending into or beyond the foraminal zone have been recognized as between 7-12% of all lumbosacral disc herniations. Conventional posterior laminectomy may not provide good access to a herniation that lies far lateral to the lateral margin of the pedicle. Use of the endoscopic technique through a percutaneous approach to treat such FLDH patients can decrease the surgical morbidity while achieving better outcomes. We made an effort to utilize the advantages of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and to determine the appropriate approach for FLDH at the level between the 5th Lumbar and first Sacral vertebrae(L5-S1). The authors present a case of an endoscopically resected lumbar extruded disc of the left extraforaminal zone with superior foraminal migration at the level of L5-S1, which had led to foot drop, while placing the endoscope in the anterior epidural space without facetectomy. PMID:26839673

  7. Computed tomography of the postoperative lumbar spine

    SciTech Connect

    Teplick, J.G.; Haskin, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    In the postoperative patient ordinary radiographs of the spine generally add very little information, revealing the usual postoperative bone changes and often postoperative narrowing of the intervertebral space. Myelography may sometimes be informative, showing evidence of focal arachnoiditis or a focal defect at the surgical site. However, the latter finding is difficult to interpret. As experience with high-resolution CT scanning of the lumbar spine has been increasing, it is becoming apparent that this noninvasive and easily performed study can give considerably more information about the postoperative spine than any of the other current imaging methods. About 750 patients with previous lumbar laminectomies had CT scanning within a 28 month period.

  8. Postoperative Epidural Hematomas in the Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Kurd, Mark F; Kepler, Christopher K; Arnold, Paul M; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Postoperative epidural hematomas are rare complications following lumbar spine surgery, but if they are not quickly identified and treated they can lead to permanent neurological deficits. Epidural hematomas occur in approximately 0.10%-0.24% of all spine surgeries, and despite the fact that multiple large studies have been performed attempting to identify risk factors for this complication, there is still significant debate about the effect of subfascial drains, postoperative anticoagulation, and antiplatelet medication on the incidence of postoperative hematoma. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of patients who develop a postoperative lumbar epidural hematoma. PMID:26484502

  9. [Lumbar disc herniation and andrological diseases].

    PubMed

    Jin, Bao-fang

    2015-10-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common male disease. In the past, More academic attention was directed to its relationship with lumbago and leg pain than to its association with andrological diseases. Studies show that central lumber intervertebral disc herniation may cause cauda equina injury and result in premature ejaculation, erectile dysfunction, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, priapism, and emission. This article presents an overview on the correlation between central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and andrological diseases, focusing on the aspects of etiology, pathology, and clinical progress, hoping to invite more attention from andrological and osteological clinicians. PMID:26665671

  10. Lumbar vertebral pedicles: radiologic anatomy and pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.P.; Kumar, R.; Kinkhabwala, M.; Wengrover, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    With the advancement of high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scanning the spine has added new knowledge to the various conditions affecting the pedicles. We wish to review the entire spectrum of pedicular lesions: the embryology, normal anatomy, normal variants, pitfalls, congenital anomalies, and pathological conditions are discussed. Different imaging modalities involving CT, isotope bone scanning, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are used to complement plain films of the lumbar spine. This subject review is an excellent source for future reference to lumbar pedicular lesions. 27 references.

  11. Successful operative management of an upper lumbar spinal canal stenosis resulting in multilevel lower nerve root radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Shearwood; Kim, Stefan S

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is a common disorder, usually characterized clinically by neurogenic claudication with or without lumbar/sacral radiculopathy corresponding to the level of stenosis. We present a case of lumbar stenosis manifesting as a multilevel radiculopathy inferior to the nerve roots at the level of the stenosis. A 55-year-old gentleman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain with neurogenic claudication in an L5/S1 distribution (posterior thigh, calf, into the foot) concomitant with dorsiflexion and plantarflexion weakness. Imaging revealed grade I spondylolisthesis of L3 on L4 with severe spinal canal stenosis at L3-L4, mild left L4-L5 disc herniation, no stenosis at L5-S1, and no instability. EMG revealed active and chronic L5 and S1 radiculopathy. The patient underwent bilateral L3-L4 hemilaminotomy with left L4-L5 microdiscectomy for treatment of his L3-L4 stenosis. Postoperatively, he exhibited significant improvement in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The L5-S1 level was not involved in the operative decompression. Patients with radiculopathy and normal imaging at the level corresponding to the radiculopathy should not be ruled out for operative intervention should they have imaging evidence of lumbar stenosis superior to the expected affected level. PMID:25552866

  12. Diagnostic value of the lumbar extension-loading test in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The gait-loading test is a well known, important test with which to assess the involved spinal level in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. The lumbar extension-loading test also functions as a diagnostic loading test in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis; however, its efficacy remains uncertain. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of the lumbar extension-loading test with that of the gait-loading test in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods A total of 116 consecutive patients (62 men and 54 women) diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis were included in this cross-sectional study of the lumbar extension-loading test. Subjective symptoms and objective neurological findings (motor, sensory, and reflex) were examined before and after the lumbar extension-loading and gait-loading tests. The efficacy of the lumbar extension-loading test for establishment of a correct diagnosis of the involved spinal level was assessed and compared with that of the gait-loading test. Results There were no significant differences between the lumbar extension-loading test and the gait-loading test in terms of subjective symptoms, objective neurological findings, or changes in the involved spinal level before and after each loading test. Conclusions The lumbar extension-loading test is useful for assessment of lumbar spinal stenosis pathology and is capable of accurately determining the involved spinal level. PMID:25080292

  13. How frequent is chronic lumbar arachnoiditis following intrathecal Myodil?

    PubMed

    Hughes, D G; Isherwood, I

    1992-09-01

    Chronic lumbar arachnoiditis has numerous causes, including the introduction of contrast media into the lumbar subarachnoid space. The oily contrast medium Myodil (iophendylate) is often cited but the true incidence of symptomatic lumbar arachnoiditis due solely to the presence of Myodil is unknown. A retrospective review of 98 patients in whom Myodil was introduced by ventriculography or cisternography, i.e. remote from the lumbar spine, revealed no cases of chronic lumbar arachnoiditis. All patients were monitored closely for periods ranging from 1 to 28 years. We conclude that, in these circumstances, it is rare for Myodil to produce symptomatic arachnoiditis. PMID:1393409

  14. Minimally invasive lumbar decompression for lumbar stenosis: review of clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Johans, S J; Amin, B Y; Mummaneni, P V

    2015-03-01

    Lumbar stenosis patients typically present with neurogenic claudication or radiculopathy. Studies have shown the benefit of surgical management of lumbar stenosis for patients who fail medical management. Surgical management traditionally involved an open laminectomy and foramenotomies. The emergence of minimally invasive spinal surgery has allowed for comparable clinical outcomes to open laminectomies, with the potential additional benefits of decreased blood loss, shorter hospital stay, decreased postoperative narcotic requirement, decreased rate of infection, and the potential benefit of decreasing the risk of postoperative instability. A shorter length of stay and faster return to work after minimally invasive lumbar decompression may result in the minimally invasive approach being more cost effective than an open approach. A literature review was performed to evaluate the clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness associated with minimally invasive decompression of lumbar stenosis. PMID:25370820

  15. Approaches to a posterior polar cataract

    PubMed Central

    Vasavada, Abhay R.; Vasavada, Viraj A.; Raj, Shetal M.

    2011-01-01

    Posterior polar cataracts present special challenges to the cataract surgeon. These are often associated with weakness/dehiscence of the posterior capsule and thus have a higher rate of intraoperative posterior capsule rupture. The surgeon needs to adhere to special surgical strategies to minimize the risk of a posterior capsule rupture. These include, adhering to the principles of closed chamber technique, avoiding hydrodissection instead performing inside-out hydrodelineation and using modest to low phaco parameters and reducing these stepwise. This article provides important pearls on how to approach a posterior polar cataract. PMID:23960968

  16. Lumbar spinal atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Aditi; Tekautz, Tanya; Recinos, Violette; Murphy, Erin; Prayson, Richard A; Ruggieri, Paul; Wolff, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    We describe a pediatric patient with an atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) exclusively of the lumbar spine, with a different presentation from the two previously reported pediatric lumbar AT/RT. AT/RT are rare pediatric tumors of the central nervous system, with a dismal prognosis. Although there is sufficient literature on brain AT/RT, spinal AT/RT continues to be a rare entity, with a lumbar location even less frequently reported. A 30-month-old African American boy with multiple comorbidities presented with the inability to ambulate, encopresis and urinary dribbling. The MRI showed an intradural extramedullary mass extending downwards from the L3-4 level. He underwent an L3-S2 laminoplasty. The surgically resected mass was marked by sheets of cells with large nuclei and prominent nucleoli. The tumor cells stained with antibodies to synaptophysin and CAM5.2, and showed no immunoreactivity to INI-1 antibody. He was diagnosed with a World Health Organization Grade IV AT/RT. There was no mutation detected in the SMARCB1 gene on a comprehensive analysis of his blood. The boy is currently being treated according to the Medical University of Vienna AT/RT protocol, with no evidence of tumor recurrence 8months after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the only report of a lumbar AT/RT in an African American child. PMID:26234633

  17. Partial Facetectomy for Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kevin; Rodriguez-Olaverri, Juan Carlos; Razi, Afshin; Farcy, Jean Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background. Several different techniques exist to address the pain and disability caused by isolated nerve root impingement. Failure to adequately decompress the lumbar foramen may lead to failed back surgery syndrome. However, aggressive treatment often causes spinal instability or may require fusion for satisfactory results. We describe a novel technique for decompression of the lumbar nerve root and demonstrate its effectiveness in relief of radicular symptoms. Methods. Partial facetectomy was performed by removal of the medial portion of the superior facet in patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis. 47 patients underwent the procedure from 2001 to 2010. Those who demonstrated neurogenic claudication without spinal instability or central canal stenosis and failed conservative management were eligible for the procedure. Functional level was recorded for each patient. These patients were followed for an average of 3.9 years to evaluate outcomes. Results. 27 of 47 patients (57%) reported no back pain and no functional limitations. Eight of 47 patients (17%) reported moderate pain, but had no limitations. Six of 47 patients (13%) continued to experience degenerative symptoms. Five of 47 patients (11%) required additional surgery. Conclusions. Partial facetectomy is an effective means to decompress the lumbar nerve root foramen without causing spinal instability. PMID:25110591

  18. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 2re Side Impact Crash...

  19. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES ES-2re Side Impact...

  20. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 2re Side Impact Crash...

  1. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES ES-2re Side Impact...

  2. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 2re Side Impact Crash...

  3. Lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Lotte, Romain; Popoff, M R; Degand, Nicolas; Lotte, Laurene; Bouvet, Philippe; Baudin, Guillaume; Cua, Eric; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Ruimy, Raymond

    2014-10-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens in an elderly patient that was treated with a combination of ?-lactams and clindamycin. Molecular analysis performed on the strain revealed an unusual toxin gene pattern. PMID:25056327

  4. Lumbar Discitis Caused by Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, M. R.; Degand, Nicolas; Lotte, Laurene; Bouvet, Philippe; Baudin, Guillaume; Cua, Eric; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Ruimy, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens in an elderly patient that was treated with a combination of ?-lactams and clindamycin. Molecular analysis performed on the strain revealed an unusual toxin gene pattern. PMID:25056327

  5. Lumbar spine anomalies in a pycnodysostosis case.

    PubMed

    Beguiristain, J L; Arriola, F J; Leyes, M

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of pycnodysostosis in which several clefts in the laminas, interarticular parts, and pedicles of the whole lumbar spine were revealed for the first time on CT. We review similar findings in the literature, and discuss their pathogenesis. PMID:8581536

  6. Partial facetectomy for lumbar foraminal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kevin; Rodriguez-Olaverri, Juan Carlos; Schwab, Frank; Hashem, Jenifer; Razi, Afshin; Farcy, Jean Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background. Several different techniques exist to address the pain and disability caused by isolated nerve root impingement. Failure to adequately decompress the lumbar foramen may lead to failed back surgery syndrome. However, aggressive treatment often causes spinal instability or may require fusion for satisfactory results. We describe a novel technique for decompression of the lumbar nerve root and demonstrate its effectiveness in relief of radicular symptoms. Methods. Partial facetectomy was performed by removal of the medial portion of the superior facet in patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis. 47 patients underwent the procedure from 2001 to 2010. Those who demonstrated neurogenic claudication without spinal instability or central canal stenosis and failed conservative management were eligible for the procedure. Functional level was recorded for each patient. These patients were followed for an average of 3.9 years to evaluate outcomes. Results. 27 of 47 patients (57%) reported no back pain and no functional limitations. Eight of 47 patients (17%) reported moderate pain, but had no limitations. Six of 47 patients (13%) continued to experience degenerative symptoms. Five of 47 patients (11%) required additional surgery. Conclusions. Partial facetectomy is an effective means to decompress the lumbar nerve root foramen without causing spinal instability. PMID:25110591

  7. Acute Sciatic Neuritis following Lumbar Laminectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hitchon, Patrick; Reddy, Chandan G.

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that the common cause of acute/chronic pain in the distribution of the lumbosacral nerve roots is the herniation of a lumbar intervertebral disc, unless proven otherwise. The surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation is successful in radicular pain and prevents or limits neurological damage in the majority of patients. Recurrence of sciatica after a successful disc surgery can be due to many possible etiologies. In the clinical setting we believe that the term sciatica might be associated with inflammation. We report a case of acute sciatic neuritis presented with significant persistent pain shortly after a successful disc surgery. The patient is a 59-year-old female with complaint of newly onset sciatica after complete pain resolution following a successful lumbar laminectomy for acute disc extrusion. In order to manage the patient's newly onset pain, the patient had multiple pain management visits which provided minimum relief. Persistent sciatica and consistent physical examination findings urged us to perform a pelvic MRI to visualize suspected pathology, which revealed right side sciatic neuritis. She responded to the electrical neuromodulation. Review of the literature on sciatic neuritis shows this is the first case report of sciatic neuritis subsequent to lumbar laminectomy. PMID:25024708

  8. [Synovial cysts and synovialomas of the lumbar spine. Histo-pathologic and neuro-surgical aspects apropos of 8 cases].

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, P; Durot, J F; Pluot, M; Bernard, M H; Scherpereel, B; Bazin, A; Peruzzi, P; Baudrillard, J C

    1989-01-01

    Based on 8 personal cases and a 81-cases review of literature, it's authors' opinion that cystic or solid masses issued form posterior lumbar articular process and called according to the cases synovial cyst, ganglion cyst, benign synovialoma, pigmented villonodular synovitis, are a single variety of benign degeneration of soft articular tissues. The cystic or solid feature of these masses depends upon the extent of their histiocytic granulomatous proliferation. They may be asymptomatic, accompany chronic lumbar pain or cause sciatica, seldom cauda equina syndrome. In case of sciatica, clinical picture rather consists of a narrow lateral recess than a discal protrusion. CT scan is the best investigation to get a right preoperative diagnosis. Postoperative prognosis is excellent and no anatomical recurrence has been reported. PMID:2654681

  9. An optimization study of the screw orientation on the interfacial strength of the anterior lumbar plate system using neurogenetic algorithms and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chian-Her; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Huy, Dinh Cong

    2014-11-01

    Anterior lumbar plate (ALP) systems have been widely used as an effective interbody fusion device for treating spinal cord compression. However, clinical complications, such as implant loosening and breakage, still occur. Past studies have investigated the effects of the screw orientation on the interfacial strength, but these studies were inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to identify an ALP system with excellent interfacial strength by varying the screw orientation. Three-dimensional finite element models of L4-L5 segments with an ALP system were first constructed. A neurogenetic algorithm, which combines artificial neural networks and genetic algorithms, was subsequently developed to discover the optimum plate design. Finally, biomechanical tests were conducted to validate the results of the finite element models and the engineering algorithm. The results indicated that the interfacial strength of the optimum plate design obtained using the neurogenetic algorithm was excellent compared with the other designs and that all of the locking screws should be inserted divergently. Both the numerical and experimental outcomes can provide clinical suggestions to surgeons and help them to understand the interfacial strength of ALP systems in terms of the screw orientation. PMID:25162521

  10. Huge interparietal posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele.

    PubMed

    Rosildo, Jorge Flix Companioni; Dos Santos, Manuel Filipe Dias; de Santa Barbara, Rita de Cassia

    2015-01-01

    Congenital encephalocele is a neural tube defect characterized by a sac-like protrusion of the brain, meninges, and other intracranial structures through the skull, which is caused by an embryonic development abnormality. The most common location is at the occipital bone, and its incidence varies according to different world regions. We report a case of an 1-month and 7-day-old male child with a huge interparietal-posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele, a rare occurrence. Physical examination and volumetric computed tomography were diagnostic. The encephalocele was surgically resected. Intradural and extradural approaches were performed; the bone defect was not primarily closed. Two days after surgery, the patient developed hydrocephaly requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The surgical treatment of the meningohydroencephalocele of the interparietal-posterior fontanel may be accompanied by technical challenges and followed by complications due to the presence of large blood vessels under the overlying skin. In these cases, huge sacs herniate through large bone defects including meninges, brain, and blood vessels. The latter present communication with the superior sagittal sinus and ventricular system. A favorable surgical outcome generally follows an accurate strategy taking into account individual features of the lesion. PMID:26484324

  11. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  12. Endoscopic inter laminar management of lumbar disease.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Kher, Yatin; Bhatele, Pushp Raj

    2016-01-01

    Discectomy for lumbar disc provides faster relief in acute attack than does conservative management. Long-term results of open, microscopy-, and endoscopy-assisted discectomy are same. Early results of endoscopy-assisted surgery are better as compared to that of open surgery in terms of better visualization, smaller incision, reduced hospital stay, better education, lower cost, less pain, early return to work, and rehabilitation. Although microscopic discectomy also has comparable advantages, endoscopic-assisted technique better addresses opposite side pathology. Inter laminar technique (ILT) and trans foraminal technique (TFT) are two main endoscopic approaches for lumbar pathologies. Endoscopy-assisted ILT can be performed in recurrent, migrated, and calcified discs. All lumbar levels including L5-S1 level, intracanalicular, foraminal disc, lumbar canal and lateral recess stenosis, multiple levels, and bilateral lesions can be managed by ILT. Migrated, calcified discs, L5-S1 pathology, lumbar canal, and lateral recess stenosis can be better approached by ILT than by TFT. Most spinal surgeons are familiar with anatomy of ILT. It can be safely performed in foramen stenosis and in uncooperative and anxious patients. There is less risk of exiting nerve root damage, especially in short pedicles and in presence of facet osteophytes as compared to TFT. On the other hand, ILT is more invasive than TFT with more chances of perforations of the dura matter, pseudomeningocele formation, and cerebrospinal fluid fistula in early learning curve. Obtaining microsurgical experience, attending workshops, and suitable patient selection can help shorten the learning curve. Once adequate skill is acquired, this procedure is safe and effective. The surgeon must be prepared to convert to an open procedure, especially in early learning curve. Spinal endoscopy is likely to achieve more roles in future. Endoscopy-assisted ILT is a safer alternative to the microscopic technique. PMID:26889271

  13. Endoscopic inter laminar management of lumbar disease

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Kher, Yatin; Bhatele, Pushp Raj

    2016-01-01

    Discectomy for lumbar disc provides faster relief in acute attack than does conservative management. Long-term results of open, microscopy-, and endoscopy-assisted discectomy are same. Early results of endoscopy-assisted surgery are better as compared to that of open surgery in terms of better visualization, smaller incision, reduced hospital stay, better education, lower cost, less pain, early return to work, and rehabilitation. Although microscopic discectomy also has comparable advantages, endoscopic-assisted technique better addresses opposite side pathology. Inter laminar technique (ILT) and trans foraminal technique (TFT) are two main endoscopic approaches for lumbar pathologies. Endoscopy-assisted ILT can be performed in recurrent, migrated, and calcified discs. All lumbar levels including L5-S1 level, intracanalicular, foraminal disc, lumbar canal and lateral recess stenosis, multiple levels, and bilateral lesions can be managed by ILT. Migrated, calcified discs, L5-S1 pathology, lumbar canal, and lateral recess stenosis can be better approached by ILT than by TFT. Most spinal surgeons are familiar with anatomy of ILT. It can be safely performed in foramen stenosis and in uncooperative and anxious patients. There is less risk of exiting nerve root damage, especially in short pedicles and in presence of facet osteophytes as compared to TFT. On the other hand, ILT is more invasive than TFT with more chances of perforations of the dura matter, pseudomeningocele formation, and cerebrospinal fluid fistula in early learning curve. Obtaining microsurgical experience, attending workshops, and suitable patient selection can help shorten the learning curve. Once adequate skill is acquired, this procedure is safe and effective. The surgeon must be prepared to convert to an open procedure, especially in early learning curve. Spinal endoscopy is likely to achieve more roles in future. Endoscopy-assisted ILT is a safer alternative to the microscopic technique. PMID:26889271

  14. Functional implications of variation in lumbar vertebral count among hominins.

    PubMed

    Whitcome, Katherine K

    2012-04-01

    As early as the 1970s, Robinson defined lumbar vertebrae according to their zygapophyseal orientation. He identified six lumbar elements in fossil Sts 14 Australopithecus africanus, one more than is commonly present in modern humans. It is now generally inferred that the modal number of lumbar vertebrae for australopiths and early Homo was six, from which the mode of five in later Homo is derived. The two central questions this study investigates are (1) to what extent do differences in human lumbar vertebral count affect lordotic shape and lumbar function, and (2) what does lumbar number variation imply about lumbar spine function in early hominins? To address these questions, I first outline a biomechanical model of lumbar number effect on lordotic function. I then identify relevant morphological differences in the human modal and extra-modal variants, which I use to test the model. These tests permit evaluation of the human L6 variant as a model for reconstructing early hominin modal number and spine function. Application of the biomechanical model in reconstructing australopith/early Homo lumbar spines highlights shared principles of Euler column strength and sagittal spine flexibility among early and modern hominins. Within modern humans, the extra-modal L6 variant has an extended series of three cranially positioned kyphotic vertebrae and strongly oblique zygapophyseal facets at the last lumbar level. Although they share the same radius and length of lumbar curvature, the L6 variant differs functionally from the L5 mode in its expanded range of sagittal flexion/extension and enhanced resistance to shear. Given the modal number of six lumbar vertebrae in australopiths and early Homo, lumbar spine mobility and strength would have been key properties of vertebral function in early bipeds whose upper and lower body segments were coupled by close approximation of the thorax and iliac crests. PMID:22425070

  15. Minimally invasive posterior hamstring harvest.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Trent J; Lubowitz, James H

    2013-01-01

    Autogenous hamstring harvesting for knee ligament reconstruction is a well-established standard. Minimally invasive posterior hamstring harvest is a simple, efficient, reproducible technique for harvest of the semitendinosus or gracilis tendon or both medial hamstring tendons. A 2- to 3-cm longitudinal incision from the popliteal crease proximally, in line with the semitendinosus tendon, is sufficient. The deep fascia is bluntly penetrated, and the tendon or tendons are identified. Adhesions are dissected. Then, an open tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons proximally; a closed, sharp tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons from the pes. Layered, absorbable skin closure is performed, and the skin is covered with a skin sealant, bolster dressing, and plastic adhesive bandage for 2 weeks. PMID:24266003

  16. Prevention of posterior capsular opacification.

    PubMed

    Nibourg, Lisanne M; Gelens, Edith; Kuijer, Roel; Hooymans, Johanna M M; van Kooten, Theo G; Koopmans, Steven A

    2015-07-01

    Posterior capsular opacification (PCO) is a common complication of cataract surgery. The development of PCO is due to a combination of the processes of proliferation, migration, and transdifferentiation of residual lens epithelial cells (LECs) on the lens capsule. In the past decades, various forms of PCO prevention have been examined, including adjustments of techniques and intraocular lens materials, pharmacological treatments, and prevention by interfering with biological processes in LECs. The only method so far that seems effective is the implantation of an intraocular lens with sharp edged optics to mechanically prevent PCO formation. In this review, current knowledge of the prevention of PCO will be described. We illustrate the biological pathways underlying PCO formation and the various approaches to interfere with the biological processes to prevent PCO. In this type of prevention, the use of nanotechnological advances can play a role. PMID:25783492

  17. Minimally Invasive Posterior Hamstring Harvest

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Trent J.; Lubowitz, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Autogenous hamstring harvesting for knee ligament reconstruction is a well-established standard. Minimally invasive posterior hamstring harvest is a simple, efficient, reproducible technique for harvest of the semitendinosus or gracilis tendon or both medial hamstring tendons. A 2- to 3-cm longitudinal incision from the popliteal crease proximally, in line with the semitendinosus tendon, is sufficient. The deep fascia is bluntly penetrated, and the tendon or tendons are identified. Adhesions are dissected. Then, an open tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons proximally; a closed, sharp tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons from the pes. Layered, absorbable skin closure is performed, and the skin is covered with a skin sealant, bolster dressing, and plastic adhesive bandage for 2 weeks. PMID:24266003

  18. [Osteoid osteoma of the posterior edge of the acetabular bone of the hip simulating a lumbo-radicular syndrome: a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Macario-Gioia, B; Sobrino, G

    1985-01-01

    The authors describe a clinic case regarding a 23 year-old man affected by an osteoid osteoma of the hip's posterior edge of the cotyloid cavity. The illness had been treated for two years as a lumbar disc syndrome. As any objective clinic sign missed at the hip's level and given the rarity of the location, only surgical removal was able to cure the patient. PMID:2952039

  19. [The height of intervertebral foramen in operative treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis].

    PubMed

    Smoczy?ski, Andrzej; Pankowski, Rafa?; Smoczy?ski, Maciej; ?uczkiewicz, Piotr; Debski, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    49 patients with spondylolisthesis isthmica were treated in the years 1991-2006. The age of patients varied between 21 and 65 years, 43.7 year on average. Two stages operative protocol consisted of reduction of the slip by pedicular implant and anterior interbody fusion with the cages was used. The evaluation was based on x-rays height of the lumbar intervertebral foramen and posterior disc height in the 2 distal lumbar vertebrae pre and post operatively. This results showed clearly a decrease of both these values on the level of the slip, demonstrating the lumbar intervertebral stenosis. Te operative procedure decomprssed the lumbar intervertebral foramen and increased both values evaluated Postoperatively in the neighbor vertebrae a height lumbar intervertebral foramen was increased but posterior disc height a unchanged. PMID:18847000

  20. Posterior mediastinal hyperfunctioning insular thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bellantone, Rocco; Lombardi, Celestino Pio; Bossola, Maurizio; Fadda, Guido; Salvatori, Massimo; Princi, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    A case is presented of a posterior mediastinal mass arising in a 57-year-old woman with severe compressive cervical symptoms and hyperthyroidism. Computed tomography showed intrathoracic thyroid tissue that displaced the trachea towards the front and the right and invaded the posterior mediastinum. Pathological examination showed features of a poorly differentiated (insular) thyroid carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a posterior mediastinal insular thyroid carcinoma with thyroid hyperfunction. PMID:16277105

  1. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercise on functional disability and lumbar lordosis angle in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Igsoo; Jeon, Chunbae; Lee, Sangyong; Lee, Daehee; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the functional disability and lumbar lordosis angles in patients with chronic low back pain. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 patients with chronic low back pain divided into a lumbar stabilization exercise group (n = 15) and a conservative treatment group (n = 15). [Methods] The lumbar stabilization exercise and conservative treatment groups performed an exercise program and conservative physical treatment, respectively. Both programs were performed 3 times a week for 6 weeks. The degree of functional disability was assessed by the Oswestry disability index, and lumbar lordosis angles were measured by plain radiography. [Results] The Oswestry disability index decreased significantly in the both groups; however, it was significantly lower in the lumbar stabilization exercise group. The lumbar lordosis angle increased significantly in the lumbar stabilization exercise group after treatment and was also significantly greater than that in the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] Lumbar stabilization exercise is more effective than conservative treatment for improving functional disability and lumbar lordosis angles. PMID:26180363

  2. Lumbar Cryptococcal Osteomyelitis Mimicking Metastatic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hyun Seok; Ha, Jung-Ki; Hwang, Chang Ju; Lee, Dong-Ho; Lee, Choon Sung

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus is an encapsulated, yeast-like fungus that rarely causes infection in immunocompetent patients. We present the case report of a 66-year-old female patient with a history of rectal cancer with an isolated lumbar vertebral cryptococcosis proven by biopsy performed during operation. The patient was not an immunocompromised host and did not have any other risk factors except the history of cured rectal cancer. The presumptive diagnosis based on imaging studies was metastatic spine cancer, so operation was performed. However, cryptococcal osteomyelitis was diagnosed in the pathologic examination. This case report emphasizes that we should be aware that lumbar cryptococcosis can be a rare cause of mimicking lesions with metastatic cancer. PMID:26435802

  3. Cervical and lumbar spinal arthroplasty: clinical review.

    PubMed

    Uschold, T D; Fusco, D; Germain, R; Tumialan, L M; Chang, S W

    2012-10-01

    In contrast to cervical and lumbar fusion procedures, the principal aim of disk arthroplasty is to recapitulate the normal kinematics and biomechanics of the spinal segment affected. Following decompression of the neural elements, disk arthroplasty allows restoration of disk height and maintenance of spinal alignment. Based on clinical observations and biomechanical testing, the anticipated advantage of arthroplasty over standard arthrodesis techniques has been a proposed reduction in the development of symptomatic ALD. In this review of cervical and lumbar disk arthroplasty, we highlight the clinical results and experience with standard fusion techniques, incidence of ALD in the population of patients with surgical fusion, and indications for arthroplasty, as well as the biomechanical and clinical outcomes following arthroplasty. In addition, we introduce the devices currently available and provide a critical appraisal of the clinical evidence regarding arthroplasty procedures. PMID:22033716

  4. Posterior muscle chain activity during various extension exercises: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Back extension exercises are often used in the rehabilitation of low back pain. However, at present it is not clear how the posterior muscles are recruited during different types of extension exercises. Therefore, the present study will evaluate the myoelectric activity of thoracic, lumbar and hip extensor muscles during different extension exercises in healthy persons. Based on these physiological observations we will make recommendations regarding the use of extensions exercises in clinical practice. Methods Fourteen healthy subjects performed four standardized extension exercises (dynamic trunk extension, dynamic-static trunk extension, dynamic leg extension, dynamic-static leg extension) in randomized order at an intensity of 60% of 1-RM (one repetition maximum). Surface EMG signals of Latissimus dorsi (LD), Longissimus thoracis pars thoracic (LTT) and lumborum (LTL), Iliocostalis lumborum pars thoracic (ILT) and lumborum (ILL), lumbar Multifidus (LM) and Gluteus Maximus (GM) were measured during the various exercises. Subsequently, EMG root mean square values were calculated and compared between trunk and leg extension exercises, as well as between a dynamic and dynamic-static performance using mixed model analysis. During the dynamic exercises a 2 second concentric contraction was followed by a 2 second eccentric contraction, whereas in the dynamic-static performance, a 5 second isometric interval was added in between the concentric and eccentric contraction phase. Results In general, the muscles of the posterior chain were recruited on a higher level during trunk extension (mean ± SD, 56.6 ± 30.8%MVC) compared to leg extension (47.4 ± 30.3%MVC) (p ≤ 0.001). No significant differences were found in mean muscle activity between dynamic and dynamic-static performances (p = 0.053). The thoracic muscles (LTT and ILT) were recruited more during trunk extension (64.9 ± 27.1%MVC) than during leg extension (54.2 ± 22.1%MVC) (p = 0.045) without significant differences in activity between both muscles (p = 0.138). There was no significant differences in thoracic muscle usage between the dynamic or dynamic-static performance of the extension exercises (p = 0.574). Lumbar muscle activity (LTT, ILL, LM) was higher during trunk extension (70.6 ± 22.2%MVC) compared to leg extension (61.7 ± 27.0%MVC) (p = 0.047). No differences in myoelectric activity between the lumbar muscles could be demonstrated during the extension exercises (p = 0.574). During each exercise the LD (19.2 ± 13.9%MVC) and GM (28.2 ± 14.6%MVC) were recruited significantly less than the thoracic and lumbar muscles. Conclusion The recruitment of the posterior muscle chain during different types of extension exercises was influenced by the moving body part, but not by the type of contraction. All muscle groups were activated at a higher degree during trunk extension compared to leg extension. Based on the recruitment level of the different muscles, all exercises can be used to improve the endurance capacity of thoracic muscles, however for improvement of lumbar muscle endurance leg extension exercises seem to be more appropriate. To train the endurance capacity of the LD and GM extension exercises are not appropriate. PMID:23834759

  5. Characteristics of PMHS Lumbar Motion Segments in Lateral Shear.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, Srini; Prasad, Priya; Rouhana, Stephen W; Demetropoulos, Constantine K; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Nolte, Lutz P

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of eighteen lumbar spine motion segments subjected to lateral shear forces under quasi-static (0.5 mm/s) and dynamic (500 mm/s) test conditions. The quasi-static test was also performed on the lumbar spine of a side impact anthropomorphic test device, the EuroSID-2 (ES-2). In the quasi-static tests, the maximum force before disc-endplate separation in the PMHS lumbar motion segments was 1850 +/- 612 N, while the average linear stiffness of PMHS lumbar motion segments was 323 +/- 126 N/mm. There was a statistically significant difference between the quasi-static (1850 +/- 612 N) and dynamic (2616 +/- 1151 N) maximum shear forces. The ES-2 lumbar spine (149 N/mm) was more compliant than the PMHS lumbar segments under the quasi-static test condition. PMID:17096282

  6. Congenitally absent lumbar pedicle: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Wortzman, G.; Steinhardt, M.I.

    1984-09-01

    Three patients who had a diagnosis of congenitally absent lumbar pedicle underwent CT examination. Findings showed that each patient had an aberrant hypoplastic pedicle plus a retroisthmic defect in their ipsilateral lamina rather than an absent pedicle. Axial CT was the diagnostic modality of choice; reformated images were of little value. The differential diagnosis to be considered from the findings of plain film radiography includes pediculate thinning, neoplastic disease, neurofibroma, mesodermal dysplasia associated with neurofibromatosis, and vascular anomalies.

  7. Lumbar nerve root: the enigmatic eponyms.

    PubMed

    Dyck, P

    1984-01-01

    Man's quest for recognition has not escaped the physician, whose contributions to medicine perpetuate his name in print. It is a final grasp for professional immortality, which for men like Imhotep and Hippocrates, has prevailed for millennia. This fervor was particularly evident in the latter 19th century, which created a flurry of eponyms, often two or more physicians publishing the same clinical observation. This article reviews the eponym epidemic as it relates to lumbar radiculopathy. PMID:6372123

  8. Linear Lumbar Localized Lysis of Elastic Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Tschen, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The absence or loss of elastic fibers in the skin is referred to as dermal elastolysis. Purpose: This paper describes a woman with a distinctive clinical presentation of mid-dermal elastolysis characterized morphologically by multiple horizontal raised bands on the lower back. Methods: A 20-year-old Filipino woman presented with multiple asymptomatic, flesh-colored, raised, firm, linear, cord-like bands on the lumbar area of her back. There were neither similar lesions elsewhere nor a family member with this condition. Results: Microscopic examination of the raised band showed nearly complete absence of elastic fibers in the mid dermis. In contrast, a biopsy of symmetrically located normal-appearing skin showed a uniform distribution of elastic fibers throughout the dermis. Linear lumbar localized elastolysis is a descriptive designation that accurately reflects a correlation of the clinical and pathological changes of this condition. Conclusion: The clinical differential of raised horizontal cord-like bands on the lower back (without a family history of an inherited elastic fiber disorder, a prior history of trauma, or a significant change in weight or exercise habit) includes linear focal elastosis and linear lumbar localized elastolysis. Microscopic evaluation of a Verhoeff-van Gieson stained lesion specimen (which may be accompanied by a biopsy of normal-appearing skin for comparison) will readily differentiate these conditions. The former is usually characterized by increased elastic fibers, whereas the latter, as in this patient, shows a paucity or absence of elastic fibers in the mid dermis. PMID:23882313

  9. Design concepts in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Chiara M.; Zweig, Thomas; Ferguson, Stephen; Raimondi, Manuela T.; Lamartina, Claudio; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Fornari, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The implantation of lumbar disc prostheses based on different design concepts is widely accepted. This paper reviews currently available literature studies on the biomechanics of TDA in the lumbar spine, and is targeted at the evaluation of possible relationships between the aims of TDA and the geometrical, mechanical and material properties of the various available disc prostheses. Both theoretical and experimental studies were analyzed, by a PUBMED search (performed in February 2007, revised in January 2008), focusing on single level TDA. Both semi-constrained and unconstrained lumbar discs seem to be able to restore nearly physiological IAR locations and ROM values. However, both increased and decreased ROM was stated in some papers, unrelated to the clinical outcome. Segmental lordosis alterations after TDA were reported in most cases, for both constrained and unconstrained disc prostheses. An increase in the load through the facet joints was documented, for both semi-constrained and unconstrained artificial discs, but with some contrasting results. Semi-constrained devices may be able to share a greater part of the load, thus protecting the surrounding biological structure from overloading and possible early degeneration, but may be more susceptible to wear. The next level of development will be the biomechanical integration of compression across the motion segment. All these findings need to be supported by long-term clinical outcome studies. PMID:18946684

  10. Lumbar lordosis in osteoporosis and in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Papadokostakis, Georgios; Stergiopoulos, Konstantinos; Kampanis, Nikos; Katonis, Pavlos

    2008-01-01

    The curvature of the lumbar spine and the risk of developing either osteoporosis (OP) or osteoarthritis (OA) are influenced by many common factors. The aim of this study is to determine whether lumbar lordosis is different between patients with either disease and healthy persons. A cross-sectional, blinded, controlled design was implemented. One hundred and twelve postmenopausal women were evaluated for bone mineral density as well as undergoing spinal radiography. Lordosis measurement was performed with Cobbs method. The sample was divided in four groups: patients with OP (n=34, L1L5=40.7, L1S1=54.1), patients with OA (n=29, L1L5=38, L1S1=52.3), patients with both diseases (n=20, L1L5=41.8, L1S1=52.3) and controls (n=29, L1L5=38.6, L1S1=51.8). For all participants age, height, weight, body mass index, physical activity level and basal metabolic rate were measured and recorded. The results revealed that although the four groups have significant constitutional differences, lumbar lordosis was comparable between them. The reasons for the lack of association are discussed. PMID:19089464

  11. Weightlifter Lumbar Physiology Health Influence Factor Analysis of Sports Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Chinese women's weightlifting project has been in the advanced world level, suggests that the Chinese coaches and athletes have many successful experience in the weight lifting training. Little weight lifting belongs to high-risk sports, however, to the lumbar spine injury, some young good athletes often due to lumbar trauma had to retire, and the national investment and athletes toil is regret things. This article from the perspective of sports medicine, weightlifting athletes training situation analysis and put forward Suggestions, aimed at avoiding lumbar injury, guarantee the health of athletes. In this paper, first of all to 50 professional women's weightlifting athletes doing investigation, found that 82% of the athletes suffer from lumbar disease symptoms, the reason is mainly composed of lumbar strain, intensity is too large, motion error caused by three factors. From the Angle of sports medicine and combined with the characteristics of the structure of human body skeleton athletes lumbar structural mechanics analysis, find out the lumbar force's two biggest technical movement, study, and regulate the action standard, so as to minimize lumbar force, for athletes to contribute to the health of the lumbar spine. PMID:26981162

  12. Consistently inconsistent, the posterior vaginal wall.

    PubMed

    Hale, Douglass S; Fenner, Dee

    2016-03-01

    Posterior vaginal wall prolapse is one of the most common prolapses encountered by gynecological surgeons. What appears to be a straightforward condition to diagnose and treat surgically for physicians has proven to be frustratingly unpredictable with regard to symptom relief for patients. Functional disorders such as dyssynergic defecation and constipation are often attributed to