Sample records for posterior lumbar interbody

  1. Instrumented Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Adult Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ching-Hsiao; Wang, Chen-Ti

    2008-01-01

    It is unclear whether using artificial cages increases fusion rates compared with use of bone chips alone in posterior lumbar interbody fusion for patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. We hypothesized artificial cages for posterior lumbar interbody fusion would provide better clinical and radiographic outcomes than bone chips alone. We assumed solid fusion would provide good clinical outcomes. We clinically and radiographically followed 34 patients with spondylolisthesis having posterior lumbar interbody fusion with mixed autogenous and allogeneic bone chips alone and 42 patients having posterior lumbar interbody fusion with implantation of artificial cages packed with morselized bone graft. Patients with the artificial cage had better functional improvement in the Oswestry disability index than those with bone chips alone, whereas pain score, patient satisfaction, and fusion rate were similar in the two groups. Postoperative disc height ratio, slip ratio, and segmental lordosis all decreased at final followup in the patients with bone chips alone but remained unchanged in the artificial cage group. The functional outcome correlated with radiographic fusion status. We conclude artificial cages provide better functional outcomes and radiographic improvement than bone chips alone in posterior lumbar interbody fusion for lumbar spondylolisthesis, although both techniques achieved comparable fusion rates. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18846411

  2. Posterior interbody fusion using laminectomy bone and transpedicular screw fixation in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    György I Csécsei; Álmos P Klekner; József Dobai; Attila Lajgut; Judit Sikula

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUNDLaminectomy bone is used widely in posterolateral lumbar fusion, but not interbody fusion. No prospective evaluation of interbody fusion using bone grafts from the posterior neural arch in spondylolisthesis has been found in the literature. We prospectively studied series of patients operated on for lumbar spondylolisthesis to evaluate clinical improvement and bony fusion.METHODSForty-six patients were operated on for lumbar spondylolisthesis

  3. Subsidence of metal interbody cage after posterior lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Ajiro, Yasumitsu; Umezawa, Natsuki

    2009-04-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion is considered to be an excellent fusion procedure to stabilize anterior support, correct alignment in the sagittal and coronal plane, and achieve foraminal decompression by lifting the disk height. The metal interbody cage in posterior lumbar interbody fusion is thought to be useful to prevent collapse of the graft bone and to correct and maintain disk height; however, some studies have noted a gradual decrease of disk height due to cage subsidence. Therefore, to investigate the significance of cage subsidence, 86 disk levels radiographically confirmed to have good union in 66 patients with posterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with pedicle screw fixation and a single metal cage for degenerative lumbar disease were retrospectively evaluated. The follow-up period ranged from 3 years to 10 years 3 months, with a mean of 7 years 9 months. Cage subsidence often showed a gradual increase over time. At final follow-up, subsidence averaged 4.0 mm on the cranial surface and 2.7 mm on the caudal surface. Although the average increase of disk height was 3.2 mm immediately postoperatively, the final disk height decreased by 4.2 mm on average from that time. The degree of cage subsidence and decrease of disk height were not correlated with the final clinical results. Subsidence was not correlated with bone mineral density in the vertebral body, body weight, or site of the insertion. On the other hand, the wedge shape of the cage and the thickness of the resected endplate had a significant influence on cage subsidence. PMID:19388615

  4. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using one diagonal fusion cage with transpedicular screw\\/rod fixation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jie Zhao; Tiesheng Hou; Xinwei Wang; Shengzhong Ma

    2003-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using threaded cages has gained wide popularity for lumbosacral spinal disease. Our biomechanical tests showed that PLIF using a single diagonal cage with unilateral facetectomy does add a little to spinal stability and provides equal or even higher postoperative stability than PLIF using two posterior cages with bilateral facetectomy. Studies also demonstrated that cages placed

  5. Complete cage migration/subsidence into the adjacent vertebral body after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Corniola, Marco V; Jägersberg, Max; Stienen, Martin N; Gautschi, Oliver P

    2015-03-01

    A variety of implant-related short and long-term complications after lumbar fusion surgery are recognized. Mid to long-term complications due to cage migration and/or cage subsidence are less frequently reported. Here, we report a patient with a complete cage migration into the superior adjacent vertebral body almost 20 years after the initial posterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure. In this patient, the cage migration/subsidence was clinically silent, but a selective decompression for adjacent segment degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis was performed. We discuss the risk factors for cage migration/subsidence in view of the current literature. PMID:25455736

  6. Large volume inside the cage leading incomplete interbody bone fusion and residual back pain after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Kamiya, Mitsuhiro; Wakao, Norimitsu; Hirasawa, Atsuhiko; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Osuka, Koji; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare intervertebral bone fusion and clinical outcomes in L4-5 posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using the same posterior instrumentation with four combinations of one of three types of interbody cage with one of two bone grafts, iliac and local or only local. In 67 patients who underwent L4-5 PLIF, 19 patients had the Brantigan cage and iliac and local bone graft, 18 with the TELAMON C cage and iliac and local bone graft, 16 with the TELAMON C cage and local bone graft (TL), and 14 with the OIC PEEK cage and local bone graft. Clinical assessments were based on Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores and on the visual analogue scale (VAS). The bone fusion assessments were based on radiography and CT scans according to the Brantigan, Steffee, and Fraser criteria. More than 2 years after surgery, these assessments were made. In the results, the fusion outcome for the group receiving TL was significantly less than those for the other three groups. In TL, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the inside volume of the cage of ?2.0 mL was the only significant factor for incomplete fusion. Moreover, the VAS (low back pain) score was significantly higher for TL than for the other three groups. In conclusions, we believe that the large volume inside the cage (?2.0 mL) with local bone graft may lead incomplete interbody bone fusion and residual postsurgical low back pain after PLIF. PMID:25666390

  7. Postoperative Flat Back: Contribution of Posterior Accessed Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Spinopelvic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Deok Ryeng; Kim, Joo Seung

    2014-01-01

    Objective Posterior accessed lumbar interbody fusion (PALIF) has a clear objective to restore disc height and spinal alignment but surgeons may occasionally face the converse situation and lose lumbar lordosis. We analyzed retrospective data for factors contributing to a postoperative flat back. Methods A total of 105 patients who underwent PALIF for spondylolisthesis and stenosis were enrolled. The patients were divided according to surgical type [posterior lumbar inter body fusion (PLIF) vs. unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF)], number of levels (single vs. multiple), and diagnosis (spondylolisthesis vs. stenosis). We measured perioperative index level lordosis, lumbar lordosis, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, pelvic incidence, and disc height in standing lateral radiographs. The change and variance in each parameter and comparative group were analyzed with the paired and Student t-test (p<0.05), correlation coefficient, and regression analysis. Results A significant perioperative reduction was observed in index-level lordosis following TLIF at the single level and in patients with spondylolisthesis (p=0.002, p=0.005). Pelvic tilt and sacral slope were significantly restored following PLIF multilevel surgery (p=0.009, p=0.003). Sacral slope variance was highly sensitive to perioperative variance of index level lordosis in high sacral sloped pelvis. Perioperative variance of index level lordosis was positively correlated with disc height variance (R2=0.286, p=0.0005). Conclusion Unilateral TLIF has the potential to cause postoperative flat back. PLIF is more reliable than unilateral TLIF to restore spinopelvic parameters following multilevel surgery and spondylolisthesis. A high sacral sloped pelvis is more vulnerable to PALIF in terms of a postoperative flat back. PMID:25371781

  8. Hybrid Biosynthetic Autograft Extender for Use in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Safety and Clinical Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chedid, Mokbel K; Tundo, Kelly M; Block, Jon E; Muir, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Autologous iliac crest bone graft is the preferred option for spinal fusion, but the morbidity associated with bone harvest and the need for graft augmentation in more demanding cases necessitates combining local bone with bone substitutes. The purpose of this study was to document the clinical effectiveness and safety of a novel hybrid biosynthetic scaffold material consisting of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, 75:25) combined by lyophilization with unmodified high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (10-12% wt:wt) as an extender for a broad range of spinal fusion procedures. We retrospectively evaluated all patients undergoing single- and multi-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion at an academic medical center over a 3-year period. A total of 108 patients underwent 109 procedures (245 individual vertebral levels). Patient-related outcomes included pain measured on a Visual Analog Scale. Radiographic outcomes were assessed at 6 weeks, 3-6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Radiographic fusion or progression of fusion was documented in 221 of 236 index levels (93.6%) at a mean (±SD) time to fusion of 10.2+4.1 months. Single and multi-level fusions were not associated with significantly different success rates. Mean pain scores (+SD) for all patients improved from 6.8+2.5 at baseline to 3.6+2.9 at approximately 12 months. Improvements in VAS were greatest in patients undergoing one- or two-level fusion, with patients undergoing multi-level fusion demonstrating lesser but still statistically significant improvements. Overall, stable fusion was observed in 64.8% of vertebral levels; partial fusion was demonstrated in 28.8% of vertebral levels. Only 15 of 236 levels (6.4%) were non-fused at final follow-up

  9. En Bloc Partial Laminectomy and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Foraminal Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Tae

    2009-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose An en bloc partial laminectomy and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) in spinal stenosis patients with severe foraminal narrowing has a shorter operation time, less neural manipulation and allows indirect decompression by restoring the interforaminal height compared to other procedures. This study investigated the efficacy of the procedure. Overview of Literature PLIF is one of the most popular surgery for degenerative spine such as foraminal spinal stenosis, instability spondylolisthesis and discogenic pain. Various techniques for PLIF have their own advantages and disadvantages. But in some severe cases, we need an efficient method of PLIF for decompression and fusion. Methods This study examined 61 patients, who had 85 levels treated with PLIF using an en bloc partial laminectomy and facetectomy, and could be followed up for more than 2 years. The mean age of the patients and mean follow up period was 66 years and 39 months, respectively. The clinical results were evaluated using the MacNab's criteria, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score, and Korea Version Oswestry Disability Index (KODI). The union of the intervertebral space was evaluated using Lenke's criteria. The intervertebral angle and height of the posterior intervertebral disc were also measured. Results Excellent and good results were obtained in 54 cases (89%) according to MacNab's criteria. The VAS and KODI scores were 8.1 and 34.6, preoperatively, and 3.4, and 14.1, postoperatively. Bone union was A and B grades according to Lenke's criteria in 57 cases. The mean segmental angle and mean height of the posterior disc were respectively, 7.4° and 6.5 mm preoperatively, 9.1° and 10.6 mm postoperatively, and 8.0° and 9.7 mm in the last follow-up. There were 5 cases of postoperative infection, 4 cases of junctional problems and 1 case of screw malposition. Conclusions En bloc partial laminectomy and PLIF is an effective method for treating severe spinal stenosis with foraminal narrowing. PMID:20404950

  10. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion: Analogous procedures in decreasing the index of disability in patients with spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Alijani, Babak; Emamhadi, Mohamahreza; Behzadnia, Hamid; Aramnia, Ali; Chabok, Shahrokh Yousefzadeh; Ramtinfar, Sara; Leili, Ehsan Kazemnejad; Golmohamadi, Shabnam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the disability in patients with spondylolisthesis who assigned either to posterolateral fusion (PLF) or posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and to compare it between two groups. Methods: In a prospective observational study, 102 surgical candidates with low-grade degenerative and isthmic spondylolisthesis enrolled from 2012 to 2014, and randomly assigned into two groups: PLF and PLIF. Evaluation of disability has been done by a questionnaire using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). The questionnaire was completed by all patients before the surgery, the day after surgery, after 6 months and after 1-year. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in terms of age and sex distribution and pre-operation ODI between groups (P > 0.05). Comparison of the mean ODI scores of two groups over the whole study period showed no significant statistical difference (P = 0.074). ODIs also showed no significant differences between two groups the day after surgery, 6th months and 1-year after surgery (P = 0.385, P = 0.093, P = 0.122 and P = 433) respectively. Analyzing the course of ODI over the study period, showed a significant descending pattern for either of groups (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Both surgical fusion techniques (PLF and PLIF) were efficient to lessen the disability of patients with spondylolisthesis, and none of the fusion techniques were related to a better outcome in terms of disability. PMID:25767584

  11. Effects of Lordotic Angle of a Cage on Sagittal Alignment and Clinical Outcome in One Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Ho; Lee, Dong-Oh; Lee, Jae Hyup; Shim, Hee Jong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the differences in the radiological and clinical results depending on the lordotic angles of the cage in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). We reviewed 185 segments which underwent PLIF using two different lordotic angles of 4° and 8° of a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage. The segmental lordosis and total lumbar lordosis of the 4° and 8° cage groups were compared preoperatively, as well as on the first postoperative day, 6th and 12th months postoperatively. Clinical assessment was performed using the ODI and the VAS of low back pain. The pre- and immediate postoperative segmental lordosis angles were 12.9° and 12.6° in the 4° group and 12° and 12.0° in the 8° group. Both groups exhibited no significant different segmental lordosis angle and total lumbar lordosis over period and time. However, the total lumbar lordosis significantly increased from six months postoperatively compared with the immediate postoperative day in the 8° group. The ODI and the VAS in both groups had no differences. Cages with different lordotic angles of 4° and 8° showed insignificant results clinically and radiologically in short-level PLIF surgery. Clinical improvements and sagittal alignment recovery were significantly observed in both groups. PMID:25685795

  12. Complications in patients undergoing combined transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation with deformity correction for degenerative scoliosis and spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Burneikiene, Sigita; Nelson, E. Lee; Mason, Alexander; Rajpal, Sharad; Serxner, Benjamin; Villavicencio, Alan T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Utilization of the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) approach for scoliosis offers the patients deformity correction and interbody fusion without the additional morbidity associated with more invasive reconstructive techniques. Published reports on complications associated with these surgical procedures are limited. The purpose of this study was to quantify the intra- and postoperative complications associated with the TLIF surgical approach in patients undergoing surgery for spinal stenosis and degenerative scoliosis correction. Methods: This study included patients undergoing TLIF for degenerative scoliosis with neurogenic claudication and painful lumbar degenerative disc disease. The TLIF technique was performed along with posterior pedicle screw instrumentation. The average follow-up time was 30 months (range, 15–47). Results: A total of 29 patients with an average age of 65.9 years (range, 49–83) were evaluated. TLIFs were performed at 2.2 levels on average (range, 1–4) in addition to 6.0 (range, 4–9) levels of posterolateral instrumented fusion. The preoperative mean lumbar lordosis was 37.6° (range, 16°–55°) compared to 40.5° (range, 26°–59.2°) postoperatively. The preoperative mean coronal Cobb angle was 32.3° (range, 15°–55°) compared to 15.4° (range, 1°–49°) postoperatively. The mean operative time was 528 min (range, 276–906), estimated blood loss was 1091.7 mL (range, 150–2500), and hospitalization time was 8.0 days (range, 3–28). A baseline mean Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score of 7.6 (range, 4–10) decreased to 3.6 (range, 0–8) postoperatively. There were a total of 14 (49%) hardware and/or surgical technique related complications, and 8 (28%) patients required additional surgeries. Five (17%) patients developed pseudoarthrosis. The systemic complications (31%) included death (1), cardiopulmonary arrest with resuscitation (1), myocardial infarction (1), pneumonia (5), and pulmonary embolism (1). Conclusion: This study suggests that although the TLIF approach is a feasible and effective method to treat degenerative adult scoliosis, it is associated with a high rate of intra- and postoperative complications and a long recovery process. PMID:22439116

  13. Compressive strength of interbody cages in the lumbar spine: the effect of cage shape, posterior instrumentation and bone density

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Jost; P. A. Cripton; T. Lund; T. R. Oxland; K. Lippuner; P. Jaeger; L.-P. Nolte

    1998-01-01

    One goal of interbody fusion is to increase the height of the degenerated disc space. Interbody cages in particular have\\u000a been promoted with the claim that they can maintain the disc space better than other methods. There are many factors that\\u000a can affect the disc height maintenance, including graft or cage design, the quality of the surrounding bone and the

  14. Mini-Open Anterior Retroperitoneal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Oblique Lateral Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Spinal Degeneration Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Toyone, Tomoaki; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Surgery for lumbar spinal degeneration disease is widely performed. While posterior decompression and fusion are popular, anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is also used for treatment. Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) is commonly used for noninvasive ALIF; however, several complications, such as spinal nerve and psoas muscle injury, have been reported. In the current study, we examined the clinical efficacy and complications of oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) for lumbar spinal degeneration disease. Materials and Methods Thirty-five patients with degenerated spondylolisthesis, discogenic pain, and kyphoscoliosis were examined. All patients underwent OLIF surgery (using a cage and bone graft from the iliac crest) with or without posterior decompression, without real-time electromyography monitoring. Posterior screws were used in all patients. Visual analog scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were evaluated before and 6 months after surgery. Surgical complications were also evaluated. Results Pain scores significantly improved after surgery, compared to those before surgery (p<0.05). There was no patient who underwent revision surgery. There was no spinal nerve, major vessel, peritoneal, or urinary injury. Few patients showed symptoms from psoas invasion. Conclusion OLIF surgery produced good surgical results without any major complication. PMID:26069130

  15. Failed anterior lumbar interbody fusion due to incomplete foraminal decompression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kyung-Chul Choi; Yong Ahn; Byung-Uk Kang; Joo-Hee Jang; Kyeong-Ki Kim; Yong Hwan Shin; Jong-Oh Choi; Sang-Ho Lee

    2011-01-01

    Background  Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) has gained widespread popularity for spinal disorders requiring fusion. The purpose\\u000a of this study was to analyze ALIF failures.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The medical records of 223 patients treated with ALIF between January 2007 and June 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients\\u000a with unfavorable outcomes, including subsequent posterior decompression at the index level or poor outcomes after ALIF were

  16. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jhala, Amit; Singh, Damandeep; Mistry, MS

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of minimally invasive surgical (MIS) techniques represents the most recent modification of methods used to achieve lumbar interbody fusion. The advantages of minimally invasive spinal instrumentation techniques are less soft tissue injury, reduced blood loss, less postoperative pain and shorter hospital stay while achieving clinical outcomes comparable with equivalent open procedure. The aim was to study the clinicoradiological outcome of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 23 patients, 17 females and 6 males, who underwent MIS-transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) followed up for a mean 15 months. The subjects were evaluated for clinical and radiological outcome who were manifested by back pain alone (n = 4) or back pain with leg pain (n = 19) associated with a primary diagnosis of degenerative spondylolisthesis, massive disc herniation, lumbar stenosis, recurrent disc herniation or degenerative disc disease. Paraspinal approach was used in all patients. The clinical outcome was assessed using the revised Oswestry disability index and Macnab criteria. Results: The mean age of subjects was 55.45 years. L4-L5 level was operated in 14 subjects, L5-S1 in 7 subjects; L3-L4 and double level was fixed in 1 patient each. L4-L5 degenerative listhesis was the most common indication (n = 12). Average operative time was 3 h. Fourteen patients had excellent results, a good result in 5 subjects, 2 subjects had fair results and 2 had poor results. Three patients had persistent back pain, 4 patients had residual numbness or radiculopathy. All patients had a radiological union except for 1 patient. Conclusion: The study demonstrates a good clinicoradiological outcome of minimally invasive TLIF. It is also superior in terms of postoperative back pain, blood loss, hospital stay, recovery time as well as medication use. PMID:25404767

  17. Biomechanical Characteristics of an Integrated Lumbar Interbody Fusion Device

    PubMed Central

    Voronov, Leonard I.; Vastardis, Georgios; Zelenakova, Julia; Carandang, Gerard; Havey, Robert M.; Waldorff, Erik I.; Zindrick, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We hypothesized that an Integrated Lumbar Interbody Fusion Device (PILLAR SA, Orthofix, Lewisville, TX) will function biomechanically similar to a traditional anterior interbody spacer (PILLAR AL, Orthofix, Lewisville, TX) plus posterior instrumentation (FIREBIRD, Orthofix, Lewisville, TX). Purpose of this study was to determine if an Integrated Interbody Fusion Device (PILLAR SA) can stabilize single motion segments as well as an anterior interbody spacer (PILLAR AL) + pedicle screw construct (FIREBIRD). Methods Eight cadaveric lumbar spines (age: 43.9±4.3 years) were used. Each specimen's range of motion was tested in flexion-extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR) under intact condition, after L4-L5 PILLAR SA with intervertebral screws and after L4-L5 360° fusion (PILLAR AL + Pedicle Screws and rods (FIREBIRD). Each specimen was tested in flexion (8Nm) and extension (6Nm) without preload (0 N) and under 400N of preload, in lateral bending (±6 Nm) and axial rotation (±5 Nm) without preload. Results Integrated fusion using the PILLAR SA device demonstrated statistically significant reductions in range of motion of the L4-L5 motion segment as compared to the intact condition for each test direction. PILLAR SA reduced ROM from 8.9±1.9 to 2.9±1.1° in FE with 400N follower preload (67.4%), 8.0±1.7 to 2.5±1.1° in LB, and 2.2±1.2 to 0.7±0.3° in AR. A comparison between the PILLAR SA integrated fusion device versus 360° fusion construct with spacer and bilateral pedicle screws was statistically significant in FE and LB. The 360° fusion yielded motion of 1.0±0.5° in FE, 1.0±0.8° in LB (p0.05). Conclusions The PILLAR SA resulted in motions of less than 3° in all modes of motion and was not as motion restricting as the traditional 360° using bilateral pedicle screws. The residual segmental motions compare very favorably with published biomechanical studies of other interbody integrated fusion devices. PMID:25694931

  18. Radiographic Comparison of Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion Versus Traditional Fusion Approaches: Analysis of Sagittal Contour Change

    PubMed Central

    Sembrano, Jonathan N.; Horazdovsky, Ryan D.; Santos, Edward Rainier G.; Polly, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lateral approach to lumbar fusion has been gaining popularity in recent years. With increasing awareness of the significance of sagittal balance restoration in spinal surgery, it is important to investigate the potential of this relatively new approach in correcting sagittal deformities in comparison to conventional approaches. The aim of this study was to evaluate sagittal contour changes seen in lateral lumbar interbody fusion and compare them with radiographic changes in traditional approaches to lumbar fusion. Methods Lumbar fusion procedures from January 2008 to December 2009 were reviewed. Four approaches were compared: anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF), transforaminal interbody fusion (TLIF) and posterior spinal fusion (PSF). Standing pre-operative and 6-week post-operative radiographs were measured in terms of operative level, suprajacent and subjacent level, and regional lumbar lordosis (L1-S1) as well as operative level anterior (ADH) and posterior disc heights (PDH). T-test was used to analyze differences between and within different approaches (?=0.05). Results A total of 147 patients underwent lumbar fusion at 212 levels. Mean operative level segmental lordosis change after each procedure is as follows: ALIF 3.8 ± 6.6° (p < 0.01); LLIF 3.2 ± 3.6° (p<0.01); TLIF 1.9 ± 3.9° (p<0.01); and PSF 0.7 ± 2.9° (p =0.13). Overall lumbar lordosis change after each procedure is as follows: ALIF 4.2 ± 5.8° (p < 0.01); LLIF 2.5 ± 4.1° (p<0.01); TLIF 2.1 ± 6.0 (p = 0.02); PSF -0.5 ± 6.2° (p = 0.66). There were no significant changes in the supradjcent and subjacent level lordosis in all approaches except in ALIF where a significant decrease in supradjecent level lordosis was seen. Mean ADH and PDH significantly increased for all approaches except in PSF where PDH decreased post-operatively. Conclusion LLIF has the ability to improve sagittal contour as well as other interbody approaches and is superior to posterioronly approach in disc height restoration. However, ALIF provides the greatest amount of segmental and overall lumbar lordosis correction. Level of Evidence This is a Level III study. Clinical Relevance Regional lordosis correction may be effectively achieved with LLIF. This approach is a good addition to a surgeon's armamentarium in maintenance or restoration of normal lumbar sagittal alignment. PMID:26114085

  19. Endoscopic Foraminal Decompression Preceding Oblique Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion To Decrease The Incidence Of Post Operative Dysaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Katzell, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Background Lumbar interbody fusion has become a well established method to diminish axial back pain as well as radiculopathy in patients with degenerative disc disease, stenosis, and instability. The concept of indirect decompression of the neural foramen and spinal canal while performing fusion became popular in the mid 1990’s with description of ALIF techniques. Morphometric analysis confirmed the extent of decompression of posterior elements with interbody height restoration. In an attempt to diminish potential complications associated with anterior or posterior approaches to the spine for interbody fusion, and with the hope of accomplishing fusion in a less invasive manner, lateral lumbar interbody fusion has become quite popular. This transpsoas approach to the disc space has been associated with a high incidence of neurologic complications. Even though this is the first technique to routinely recommend EMG monitoring to increase safety in the approach, neurologic injuries still occur. A newer oblique lateral lumbar interbody (OLLIF) approach has recently been described to lessen the incidence of neurologic injury. This technique also advocates use of EMG testing to lessen neurologic trauma. In spite of this precaution, neurologic insult has not been eliminated. In fact, even in patients whose electrical stimulation thresholds suggested a safe entry space into the disc, transient dysaesthesia continues to occur in 20-25 percent of cases. Purpose This pilot study reflects data and observations of a subset of patients treated with endoscopic foraminotomy preceding oblique lateral lumbar interbody fusion (OLLIF) to assess specifically potential improvements in dysaesthesia rates. Methods A select subset of patients undergoing OLLIF failed to meet electrodiagnostic criteria for safe disc access through Kambin’s triangle. These patients underwent an endoscopic foraminotomy and exiting nerve decompression prior to discectomy, endplate preparation and cage insertion. Results Dysaesthesia did not occur in these patients whom otherwise would have likely been at risk for neurologic deficit. Conclusions These findings suggest that patients at risk for neurologic insult during oblique lateral lumbar interbody fusion can be protected by foraminoplasty. PMID:25694923

  20. Comparison of Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Direct Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Clinical and Radiological Results

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Seok; Park, Seung Won; Chung, Chan

    2014-01-01

    Objective The use of direct lumbar interbody fusion (DLIF) has gradually increased; however, no studies have directly compared DLIF and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). We compared DLIF and TLIF on the basis of clinical and radiological outcomes. Methods A retrospective review was performed on the medical records and radiographs of 98 and 81 patients who underwent TLIF and DLIF between January 2011 and December 2012. Clinical outcomes were compared with a visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). The preoperative and postoperative disc heights, segmental sagittal/coronal angles, and lumbar lordosis were measured on radiographs. Fusion rates, operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), length of hospital stay, and complications were assessed. Results DLIF was superior to TLIF regarding its ability to restore disc height, foraminal height, and coronal balance (p<0.001). As the extent of surgical level increased, DLIF displayed significant advantages over TLIF considering the operative time and EBL. However, fusion rates at 12 months post-operation were lower for DLIF (87.8%) than for TLIF (98.1%) (p=0.007). The changes of VAS and ODI between the TLIF and DLIF were not significantly different (p>0.05). Conclusion Both DLIF and TLIF are less invasive and thus good surgical options for treating degenerative lumber diseases. DLIF has higher potential in increasing neural foramina and correcting coronal balance, and involves a shorter operative time and reduced EBL, in comparison with TLIF. However, DLIF displayed a lower fusion rate than TLIF, and caused complications related to the transpsoas approach. PMID:25628805

  1. Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion (XLIF): a novel surgical technique for anterior lumbar interbody fusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Burak M. Ozgur; Henry E. Aryan; Luiz Pimenta; William R. Taylor

    2006-01-01

    BackgroundMinimally disruptive approaches to the anterior lumbar spine continue to evolve in a quest to reduce approach-related morbidity. A lateral retroperitoneal, trans-psoas approach to the anterior disc space allows for complete discectomy, distraction, and interbody fusion without the need for an approach surgeon.

  2. The Significance of Removing Ruptured Intervertebral Discs for Interbody Fusion in Treating Thoracic or Lumbar Type B and C Spinal Injuries through a One-Stage Posterior Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian-Shi; Lü, Guo-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Bin; Li, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify the negative effect on treatment results of reserving damaged intervertebral discs when treating type B and type C spinal fracture-dislocations through a one-stage posterior approach. Methods This is a retrospective review of 53 consecutive patients who were treated in our spine surgery center from January 2005 to May 2012 due to severe thoracolumbar spinal fracture-dislocation. The patients in Group A (24 patients) underwent long-segment instrumentation laminectomy with pedicle screw-rod fixators for neural decompression. In Group B (29 patients), the patients underwent long-segment instrumentation laminectomy with pedicle screw-rod fixators for neural decompression evacuating of the ruptured disc and inserting of a bone graft into the evacuated disc space for interbody fusion. The mean time between injury and operation was 4.1 days (range 2–15 days). The clinical, radiologic and complication outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. Results Periodic follow-ups were carried out until an affirmative union or treatment failure took place. A progressive kyphosis angle larger than 10°, loss of disc height, pseudoarthrosis, recurrence of dislocation or subluxation, or instrument failure before fusion were considered treatment failures. Treatment failures were detected in 13 cases in Group A (failure rate was 54.2%). In Group B, there were 28 cases in which definitive bone fusion was demonstrated on CT scans, and CT scans of the other cases demonstrated undefined pseudoarthrosis without hardware failure. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups (p<0.001 chi-square test). The neurologic recoveries, assessed by the ASIA scoring system, were not satisfactory for the neural deficit patients in either group, indicating there was no significant difference with regard to neurologic recovery between the two groups (p>0.05 Fisher's exact test). Conclusion Intervertebral disc damage is a common characteristic in type B and C spinal fracture-dislocation injuries. The damaged intervertebral disc should be removed and substituted with a bone graft because reserving the damaged disc in situ increases the risk of treatment failure. PMID:24827733

  3. Development of a 4-axis load cell used for lumbar interbody load measurements.

    PubMed

    Demetropoulos, Constantine K; Morgan, Craig R; Sengupta, Dilip K; Herkowitz, Harry N

    2009-09-01

    Numerous studies have assessed lumbar interbody fusion, but little data from direct interbody load measurements exists. This manuscript describes an interbody fusion cage with integrated 4-axis load cell that can simulate implant heights of 13, 15, 17, 19 and 21 mm. The calibrated load cell was accurate to within 7.9% for point compressive loads over the central 8 mm x 8 mm region, but up to 26.8% for eccentric loads on the outer 16 mm x 16 mm rim of the device (although typically errors were less than half). Anterior-posterior shear and lateral shear loads did not affect compressive load measurement (<1.0% and <3.5%, respectively). Moments calculated from 4 load sensing corner pillars demonstrated errors below 2.3% in lateral bending and 2.1% in flexion-extension. Although this device does not have the accuracy of other much larger corpectomy implants, it incorporates four channels of load and simulates multiple implant heights, making for a favorable comparison in this restricted space. This device has immediate use in cadaveric testing, providing data previously not attainable, and serves as a novel technological step towards an implantable interbody device with multi-axis load sensing capability. As per the authors' knowledge, no such device has previously been described. PMID:19447666

  4. Lateral transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion: outcomes and deformity correction.

    PubMed

    Dahdaleh, Nader S; Smith, Zachary A; Snyder, Laura A; Graham, Randall B; Fessler, Richard G; Koski, Tyler R

    2014-04-01

    The lateral transpsoas approach for interbody fusion is a minimally invasive technique that has been gaining increasing popularity in the management of a variety of spinal degenerative disorders. Recently, there has been increasing utilization of this technique in the management of adult deformity. The authors present a review of the current evidence of using the lateral lumbar transpsoas approach in the correction of adult degenerative scoliosis. PMID:24703453

  5. Does Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Have Advantages over Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis?

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Takahito; Le, Hai; Schairer, William W; Berven, Sigurd H; Qamirani, Erion; Hu, Serena S

    2015-04-01

    Study Design?Retrospective cohort study. Objective?To compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in the treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods?This study compared 24 patients undergoing TLIF and 32 patients undergoing PLF with instrumentation. The clinical outcomes were assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) for low back pain and leg pain, physical component summary (PCS) of the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiographic parameters included slippage of the vertebra, local disk lordosis, the anterior and posterior disk height, lumbar lordosis, and pelvic parameters. Results?The improvement of VAS of leg pain was significantly greater in TLIF than in PLF unilaterally (3.4 versus 1.0; p?=?0.02). The improvement of VAS of low back pain was significantly greater in TLIF than in PLF (3.8 versus 2.2; p?=?0.02). However, there was no significant difference in improvement of ODI or PCS between TLIF and PLF. Reduction of slippage and the postoperative disk height was significantly greater in TLIF than in PLF. There was no significant difference in local disk lordosis, lumbar lordosis, or pelvic parameters. The fusion rate was 96% in TLIF and 84% in PLF (p?=?0.3). There was no significant difference in fusion rate, estimated blood loss, adjacent segmental degeneration, or complication rate. Conclusions?TLIF was superior to PLF in reduction of slippage and restoring disk height and might provide better improvement of leg pain. However, the health-related outcomes were not significantly different between the two procedures. PMID:25844282

  6. Lumbar Lateral Interbody Fusion (LLIF): Comparative Effectiveness and Safety versus PLIF/TLIF and Predictive Factors Affecting LLIF Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Barbagallo, Giuseppe M. V.; Albanese, Vincenzo; Raich, Annie L.; Dettori, Joseph R.; Sherry, Ned; Balsano, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Study Design?Systematic review. Study Rationale?The surgical treatment of adult degenerative lumbar conditions remains controversial. Conventional techniques include posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). A new direct approach known as lumbar lateral interbody fusion (LLIF), or extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF®) or direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF), has been introduced. Objectives?The objective of this article is to determine the comparative effectiveness and safety of LLIF, at one or more levels with or without instrumentation, versus PLIF or TLIF surgery in adults with lumbar degenerative conditions, and to determine which preoperative factors affect patient outcomes following LLIF surgery. Materials and Methods?A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed and bibliographies of key articles. Articles were reviewed by two independent reviewers based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Each article was evaluated using a predefined quality rating scheme. Results?The search yielded 258 citations and the following met our inclusion criteria: three retrospective cohort studies (all using historical cohorts) (class of evidence [CoE] III) examining the comparative effectiveness and safety of LLIF/XLIF®/DLIF versus PLIF or TLIF surgery, and one prospective cohort study (CoE II) and two retrospective cohort studies (CoE III) assessing factors affecting patient outcome following LLIF. Patients in the LLIF group experienced less estimated blood loss and a lower mortality risk compared with the PLIF group. The number of levels treated and the preoperative diagnosis were significant predictors of perioperative or early complications in two studies. Conclusion?There is insufficient evidence of the comparative effectiveness of LLIF versus PLIF/TLIF surgery. There is low-quality evidence suggesting that LLIF surgery results in fewer complications or reoperations than PLIF/TLIF surgery. And there is insufficient evidence that any preoperative factors exist that predict patient outcome after LLIF surgery. PMID:24715870

  7. Does anterior lumbar interbody fusion promote adjacent degeneration in degenerative disc disease? A finite element study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shujie Tang; Brandon J. Rebholz

    2011-01-01

    Background  The increase in the number of anterior lumbar interbody fusions being performed carries with it the potential for the long-term\\u000a complication of adjacent segmental degeneration. While its exact mechanism remains uncertain, adjacent segment degeneration\\u000a has become much more widespread. Using a nonlinear, three-dimensional finite element model to analyze and compare the biomechanical\\u000a influence of anterior lumbar interbody fusion and lumbar

  8. Clinical Results of a Single Central Interbody Fusion Cage and Transpedicle Screws Fixation for Recurrent Herniated Lumbar Disc and Low-Grade Spondylolisthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kuo-Feng Huang; Tzu-Yung Chen

    Background: The posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedure allows restoration of the weight-bearing capacity to a more physiological ventral position and maintenance of disc space height. However, the procedure can be technically difficult and may cause complications. It has always been performed bilater- ally with paired cages; a single central cage has not been commonly used. Methods: Twenty-eight patients who

  9. Mini-Open Approach for Direct Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sung-Soo; Pae, Young-Ryeol; Park, Se-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purposes To introduce the mini-open lateral approach for the anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), and to investigate the advantages, technical pitfalls and complications by providing basic knowledge on extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) or direct lumbar interbody fusion (DLIF). Overview of Literature Recently, minimally invasive lateral approach for the lumbar spine is revived and receiving popularity under the name of XLIF or DLIF by modification of mini-open method when using the sequential tubular dilator and special expandable retractor system. Methods Seventy-four patients who underwent surgery by the mini-open lateral approach from September 2000 to April 2008 with various disease entities were included. Blood losses, operation times, incision sizes, postoperative time to mobilization, length of hospital stays, technical problems and complications were all analyzed. Results The blood losses and operation times of patients who underwent simple ALIF were 61.2 mL and 86 minutes for one level, 107 mL and 106 minutes for two levels, 250 mL and 142.8 minutes for three levels, and 400 mL and 190 minutes for four levels of fusion. The incision sizes were on average 4.5 cm for one level, 6.3 cm for two levels, 8.5 cm for three levels and 10.0 cm for four levels of fusion. The complications were retroperitoneal hematoma (2 cases), pneumonia (1 case) and transient lumbosacral plexus palsy (3 cases). Conclusions Trials of mini-open lateral approach would be helpful before the trial of XLIF or DLIF. However, special attention is required for complications such as transient lumbosacral plexus palsy. PMID:25187867

  10. [Biomechanical research of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion model].

    PubMed

    Yan, Wentoa; Zhao, Gaiping; Fang, Xinguo; Guo, Haoxiang; Ma, Tong; Tu, Yihui

    2015-02-01

    Based on the surgical model using transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) to treat lumbar spondylolisthesis, this paper presents the investigations of the biomechanical characteristics of cage and pedicle screw in lumbar spinal fusion implant fixed system under different combinations with finite element method. Firstly, combining the CT images with finite element pretreatment software, we established three dimensional nonlinear finite element model of human lumbar L4-L5 segmental slight slippage and implant under different fixed combinations. We then made a comparison analysis between the biomechanical characteristics of lumbar motion range, stress distribution of cage and pedicle screw under six status of each model which were flexion, extension, left lateral bending, right lateral bending, left axial rotation and right axial rotation. The results showed that the motion ranges of this model under different operations were reduced above 84% compared with those of the intact model, and the stability of the former was improved significantly. The stress values of cage and pedicle screw were relatively larger when they were fixed by single fusion device additional unilateral pedicle screw, but there was no statistically significant difference. The above research results would provide reference and confirmation for further biomechanics research of TLIF extracorporal specimens, and finally provide biomechanical basis for the feasibility of unilateral internal fixed diagonal intervertebral fusion TLIF surgery. PMID:25997268

  11. Expandable Polyaryl-Ether-Ether-Ketone Spacers for Interbody Distraction in the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Alimi, Marjan; Shin, Benjamin; Macielak, Michael; Hofstetter, Christoph P.; Njoku, Innocent; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Elowitz, Eric; Härtl, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Retrospective case series. Objective?StaXx XD (Spine Wave, Inc., Shelton, CT, United States) is an expandable polyaryl-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) wafer implant utilized in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. PEEK implants have been successfully used as interbody devices. Few studies have focused on expandable PEEK devices. The aim of the current study is to determine the radiographic and clinical outcome of expandable PEEK cages utilized for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with lumbar degenerative diseases. Methods?Forty-nine patients who underwent lumbar interbody fusion with implantation of expandable PEEK cages and posterior instrumentation were included. The clinical outcome was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiographic parameters including disk height, foraminal height, listhesis, local disk angle of the index level/levels, regional lumbar lordosis, and graft subsidence were measured preoperatively, postoperatively, and at latest follow-up. Results?At an average follow-up of 19.3 months, the minimum clinically important difference for the ODI and VAS back, buttock, and leg were achieved in 64, 52, 58, and 52% of the patients, respectively. There was statistically significant improvement in VAS back (6.42 versus 3.11, p?

  12. Biomechanical comparison of two different concepts for stand alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Philipp; Gerlach, R; Schär, B; Cain, C M J; Achatz, W; Pflugmacher, R; Haas, N P; Kandziora, F

    2008-12-01

    Segmental instability in degenerative disc disease is often treated with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). Current techniques require an additional posterior approach to achieve sufficient stability. The test device is an implant which consists of a PEEK-body and an integrated anterior titanium plate hosting four diverging locking screws. The test device avoids posterior fixation by enhancing stability via the locking screws. The test device was compared to an already established stand alone interbody implant in a human cadaveric three-dimensional stiffness test. In the biomechanical test, the L4/5 motion segment of 16 human cadaveric lumbar spines were isolated and divided into two test groups. Tests were performed in flexion, extension, right and left lateral bending, right and left axial rotation. Each specimen was tested in native state first, then a discectomy was performed and either of the test implants was applied. Finite element analysis (FE) was also performed to investigate load and stress distribution within the implant in several loading conditions. The FE models simulated two load cases. These were flexion and extension with a moment of 5 Nm. The biomechanical testing revealed a greater stiffness in lateral bending for the SynFix-LR compared to the established implant. Both implants showed a significantly higher stiffness in all loading directions compared to the native segment. In flexion loading, the PEEK component takes on most of the load, whereas the majority of the extension load is put on the screws and the screw-plate junction. Clinical investigation of the test device seems reasonable based on the good results reported here. PMID:18841399

  13. Biomechanical comparison of two different concepts for stand alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, R.; Schär, B.; Cain, C. M. J.; Achatz, W.; Pflugmacher, R.; Haas, N. P.; Kandziora, F.

    2008-01-01

    Segmental instability in degenerative disc disease is often treated with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). Current techniques require an additional posterior approach to achieve sufficient stability. The test device is an implant which consists of a PEEK-body and an integrated anterior titanium plate hosting four diverging locking screws. The test device avoids posterior fixation by enhancing stability via the locking screws. The test device was compared to an already established stand alone interbody implant in a human cadaveric three-dimensional stiffness test. In the biomechanical test, the L4/5 motion segment of 16 human cadaveric lumbar spines were isolated and divided into two test groups. Tests were performed in flexion, extension, right and left lateral bending, right and left axial rotation. Each specimen was tested in native state first, then a discectomy was performed and either of the test implants was applied. Finite element analysis (FE) was also performed to investigate load and stress distribution within the implant in several loading conditions. The FE models simulated two load cases. These were flexion and extension with a moment of 5 Nm. The biomechanical testing revealed a greater stiffness in lateral bending for the SynFix-LR™ compared to the established implant. Both implants showed a significantly higher stiffness in all loading directions compared to the native segment. In flexion loading, the PEEK component takes on most of the load, whereas the majority of the extension load is put on the screws and the screw–plate junction. Clinical investigation of the test device seems reasonable based on the good results reported here. PMID:18841399

  14. Endovascular embolization of iatrogenic lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm following extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF).

    PubMed

    Santillan, Alejandro; Patsalides, Athos; Gobin, Y Pierre

    2010-10-01

    Iatrogenic lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm is a very rare complication of spinal surgery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm after extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF). The lesion was diagnosed by catheter spinal angiography and was effectively treated with embolization. PMID:20675335

  15. Endoscopic transforaminal decompression, interbody fusion, and percutaneous pedicle screw implantation of the lumbar spine: A case series report

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Said G.

    2012-01-01

    Background On the basis of the experiences gained from conventional open spinal procedures, a long list of desirable objectives have emerged with the evolution of the lesser invasive spinal procedures. At the top of that list is the desire to minimize the trauma of surgery. The rest of the objectives, which include reductions of operating time, surgical blood loss, hospital stay, postoperative narcotic medication, convalescence, complication rates, and escalating health care costs, as well as the desire of elderly patients to continue rigorous physical activities, largely depend on the ability to minimize the trauma of surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the least invasive lumbar decompression, interbody fusion and percutaneous pedicle screw implantation, to minimize surgical trauma without compromising the quality of the treatment outcome, as well as to minimize risk of complications. Methods In this case series, 60 patients with diagnoses of degenerative disc disease, degenerative motion segments with stenosis, and spondylolisthesis, in whom nonoperative treatments failed, were treated with endoscopic transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion by 1 surgeon in 2 centers. The outcome measures were as follows: operating time, intraoperative blood loss, hospital stay, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores for back and leg pain, scores on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, and postoperative imaging studies. A consecutive series of patients who met the treatment criteria completed VAS forms and Roland-Morris questionnaires preoperatively. Surgical procedures included arthroscopic decompression of the foramina and the discs; endplate preparation and implantation of allograft bone chips and bone morphogenetic protein 2 on absorbable collagen sponge into the disc space; and percutaneous implantation of pedicle screws. Postoperatively, the patients again completed the VAS forms and Roland-Morris questionnaires. Their charts were reviewed for office notes, operative notes, hospital stay, medications, and imaging studies. The latest X-ray and computed tomography scan films were reviewed and analyzed. Patients were followed up for a minimum of 6 months. The literature was reviewed for comparison of outcomes. Results Sixty patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 52.8 years. The duration of illness averaged 5 years. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 25 months, with a mean of 12 months. Preoperative diagnoses included degenerative disc disease, degenerative motion segments with stenosis, and spondylolisthesis. The mean time in the operating room was 2 hours 54 minutes. Estimated blood loss averaged 57.6 mL. The duration of the hospital stay averaged 2.6 days. Preoperative back pain and leg pain were significantly reduced (P < .005). Forty-seven imaging studies obtained at the last visit, including X-ray and computed tomography scans, showed solid fusion in 28 patients (59.6%), stable fixation in 17 (36.2%), and osteolysis around the pedicle screws in 2 (4.2%). All patients had improvement of motor function, whereas 2 patients complained of residual numbness. In addition, 8 patients (13%) complained of residual discomfort on extension of the lumbar spine. Two patients had pedicle screw–related complications requiring surgery. A review of the literature showed that endoscopic transforaminal decompression and interbody fusion performed better than open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion/posterior lumbar interbody fusion, minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, and extreme lateral lumbar interbody fusion, with regard to most parameters studied. Conclusions The endoscopic transforaminal lumbar decompression, interbody fusion, and percutaneous pedicle screw instrumentation consistently produced satisfactory results in all demographics. It performed better than the alternative procedures for most parameters studied. PMID:25694885

  16. TranS1 VEO system: a novel psoas-sparing device for transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hardenbrook, Mitchell A; Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive approaches for lumbar interbody fusion have been popularized in recent years. The retroperitoneal transpsoas approach to the lumbar spine is a technique that allows direct lateral access to the intervertebral disc space while mitigating the complications associated with traditional anterior or posterior approaches. However, a common complication of this procedure is iatrogenic injury to the psoas muscle and surrounding nerves, resulting in postsurgical motor and sensory deficits. The TranS1 VEO system (TranS1 Inc, Raleigh, NC, USA) utilizes a novel, minimally invasive transpsoas approach to the lumbar spine that allows direct visualization of the psoas and proximal nerves, potentially minimizing iatrogenic injury risk and resulting clinical morbidity. This paper describes the clinical uses, procedural details, and indications for use of the TranS1 VEO system. PMID:23766663

  17. Treatment of multilevel degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis using a combination of microendoscopic discectomy and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    WU, HAN; YU, WEI-DONG; JIANG, RUI; GAO, ZHONG-LI

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) has become increasingly common and is characterized by multilevel disc herniation and lumbar spondylolisthesis, which are difficult to treat. The current study aimed to evaluate the short-term clinical outcomes and value of the combined use of microendoscopic discectomy (MED) and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for the treatment of multilevel DLSS with spondylolisthesis, and to compare the combination with traditional posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). A total of 26 patients with multilevel DLSS and spondylolisthesis underwent combined MED and MI-TLIF surgery using a single cage and pedicle rod-screw system. These cases were compared with 27 patients who underwent traditional PLIF surgery during the same period. Data concerning incision length, surgery time, blood loss, time of bed rest and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score prior to and following surgery were analyzed statistically. Statistical significance was reached in terms of incision length, blood loss and the time of bed rest following surgery (P<0.05), but there was no significant difference between the surgery time and ODI scores of the two groups. The combined use of MED and MI-TLIF has the advantages of reduced blood loss, less damage to the paraspinal soft tissue, shorter length of incision, shorter bed rest time, improved outcomes and shorter recovery times and has similar short-term clinical outcomes to traditional PLIF. PMID:23403827

  18. Minimally invasive versus open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Villavicencio, Alan T.; Roeca, Cassandra M.; Nelson, E. Lee; Mason, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Background Available clinical data are insufficient for comparing minimally invasive (MI) and open approaches for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). To date, a paucity of literature exists directly comparing minimally invasive (MI) and open approaches for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). The purpose of this study was to directly compare safety and effectiveness for these two surgical approaches. Materials and Methods Open or minimally invasive TLIF was performed in 63 and 76 patients, respectively. All consecutive minimally invasive TLIF cases were matched with a comparable cohort of open TLIF cases using three variables: diagnosis, number of spinal levels, and history of previous lumbar surgery. Patients were treated for painful degenerative disc disease with or without disc herniation, spondylolisthesis, and/or stenosis at one or two spinal levels. Clinical outcome (self-report measures, e.g., visual analog scale (VAS), patient satisfaction, and MacNab's criteria), operative data (operative time, estimated blood loss), length of hospitalization, and complications were assessed. Average follow-up for patients was 37.5 months. Results: The mean change in VAS scores postoperatively was greater (5.2 vs. 4.1) in theopen TLIF patient group (P = 0.3). MacNab's criteria score was excellent/good in 67% and 70% (P = 0.8) of patients in open and minimally invasive TLIF groups, respectively. The overall patient satisfaction was 72.1% and 64.5% (P = 0.4) in open and minimally invasive TLIF groups, respectively. The total mean operative time was 214.9 min for open and 222.5 min for minimally invasive TLIF procedures (P = 0.5). The mean estimated blood loss for minimally invasive TLIF (163.0 ml) was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) than the open approach (366.8 ml). The mean duration of hospitalization in the minimally invasive TLIF (3 days) was significantly shorter (P = 0.02) than the open group (4.2 days). The total rate of neurological deficit was 10.5% in the minimally invasive TLIF group compared to 1.6% in the open group (P = 0.02). Conclusions: Minimally invasive TLIF technique may provide equivalent long-term clinical outcomes compared to open TLIF approach in select population of patients. The potential benefit of minimized tissue disruption, reduced blood loss, and length of hospitalization must be weighted against the increased rate of neural injury-related complications associated with a learning curve. PMID:20657693

  19. Pelvic parameters of sagittal balance in extreme lateral interbody fusion for degenerative lumbar disc disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R D; Valore, A; Villaminar, A; Comisso, M; Balsano, M

    2013-04-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of pelvic indices to evaluate sagittal balance and predict outcomes in patients with spinal disease. Conventional posterior lumbar fusion techniques may adversely affect lumbar lordosis and spinal balance. Minimally invasive fusion of the lumbar spine is rapidly becoming a mainstay of treatment of lumbar degenerative disc disease. To our knowledge there are no studies evaluating the effect of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) on pelvic indices. Hence, our aim was to study the effect of XLIF on pelvic indices related to sagittal balance, and report the results of a prospective longitudinal clinical study and retrospective radiographic analyses of patients undergoing XLIF in a single centre between January 2009 and July 2011. Clinical outcomes are reported for 30 patients and the retrospective analyses of radiographic data is reported for 22 of these patients to assess global and segmental lumbar lordosis and pelvic indices. Effect of XLIF on the correction of scoliotic deformity was assessed in 15 patients in this series. A significant improvement was seen in the visual analogue scale score, the Oswestry Disability Index and the Short Form-36 at 2months and 6months (p<0.0001). The mean pelvic index was 48.6°±11.9° (± standard deviation, SD) with corresponding mean sacral slopes and pelvic tilt of 32.0°±10.6° (SD) and 18.0°±9.5 (SD), respectively. XLIF did not significantly affect sacral slope or pelvic tilt (p>0.2). Global lumbar lordosis was not affected by XLIF (p>0.4). XLIF significantly increased segmental lumbar lordosis by 3.3° (p<0.0001) and significantly decreased the scoliotic Cobb angle by 5.9° (p=0.01). We found that XLIF improved scoliosis and segmental lordosis and was associated with significant clinical improvement in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease. However, XLIF did not change overall lumbar lordosis or significantly alter pelvic indices associated with sagittal balance. Long-term follow-up with a larger cohort will be required to further evaluate the effects of XLIF on sagittal balance. PMID:23375396

  20. Minimally invasive lateral transpsoas interbody fusion using a stand-alone construct for the treatment of adjacent segment disease of the lumbar spine: review of the literature and report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Palejwala, Sheri K; Sheen, Whitney A; Walter, Christina M; Dunn, Jack H; Baaj, Ali A

    2014-09-01

    We describe 3 patients who presented with radiographic signs and clinical symptoms of adjacent segment disease several years after undergoing L4-S1 posterior pedicle screw fusion. All patients underwent successful lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) at 1-2 levels above their previous constructs, using stand-alone cages, with complete resolution of radiculopathy and a significant improvement in low-back pain. In addition to a thorough analysis of these cases, we review the pertinent literature regarding treatment options for adjacent segment disease and the applications of the lateral lumbar interbody technique. PMID:25019458

  1. Direct Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Clinical and Radiological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Young Baeg

    2014-01-01

    Objective According to the recent development of minimally invasive spinal surgery, direct lumbar interbody fusion (DLIF) was introduced as an effective option to treat lumbar degenerative diseases. However, comprehensive results of DLIF have not been reported in Korea yet. The object of this study is to summarize radiological and clinical outcomes of our DLIF experience. Methods We performed DLIF for 130 patients from May 2011 to June 2013. Among them, 90 patients, who could be followed up for more than 6 months, were analyzed retrospectively. Clinical outcomes were compared using visual analog scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Bilateral foramen areas, disc height, segmental coronal and sagittal angle, and regional sagittal angle were measured. Additionally, fusion rate was assessed. Results A total of 90 patients, 116 levels, were underwent DLIF. The VAS and ODI improved statistically significant after surgery. All the approaches for DLIF were done on the left side. The left and right side foramen area changed from 99.5 mm2 and 102.9 mm2 to 159.2 mm2 and 151.2 mm2 postoperatively (p<0.001). Pre- and postoperative segmental coronal and sagittal angles changed statistically significant from 4.1° and 9.9° to 1.1° and 11.1°. Fusion rates of 6 and 12 months were 60.9% and 87.8%. Complications occurred in 17 patients (18.9%). However, most of the complications were resolved within 2 months. Conclusion DLIF is not only effective for indirect decompression and deformity correction but also shows satisfactory mechanical stability and fusion rate. PMID:25132930

  2. The Effect of the Retroperitoneal Transpsoas Minimally Invasive Lateral Interbody Fusion on Segmental and Regional Lumbar Lordosis

    PubMed Central

    Le, Tien V.; Vivas, Andrew C.; Dakwar, Elias; Baaj, Ali A.; Uribe, Juan S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion (MIS LIF) in the lumbar spine can correct coronal Cobb angles, but the effect on sagittal plane correction is unclear. Methods. A retrospective review of thirty-five patients with lumbar degenerative disease who underwent MIS LIF without supplemental posterior instrumentation was undertaken to study the radiographic effect on the restoration of segmental and regional lumbar lordosis using the Cobb angles on pre- and postoperative radiographs. Mean disc height changes were also measured. Results. The mean follow-up period was 13.3 months. Fifty total levels were fused with a mean of 1.42 levels fused per patient. Mean segmental Cobb angle increased from 11.10° to 13.61° (P < 0.001) or 22.6%. L2-3 had the greatest proportional increase in segmental lordosis. Mean regional Cobb angle increased from 52.47° to 53.45° (P = 0.392). Mean disc height increased from 6.50?mm to 10.04?mm (P < 0.001) or 54.5%. Conclusions. The MIS LIF improves segmental lordosis and disc height in the lumbar spine but not regional lumbar lordosis. Anterior longitudinal ligament sectioning and/or the addition of a more lordotic implant may be necessary in cases where significant increases in regional lumbar lordosis are desired. PMID:22919332

  3. Correction of Coronal Imbalance in Degenerative Lumbar Spine Disease Following Direct Lateral Interbody Fusion (DLIF)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Seong; Lee, Hyo Sang; Shin, Dong Ah; Yoon, Do Heum

    2012-01-01

    Objective The authors have recently been using a surgical technique of minimally invasive direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) for correcting of coronal imbalance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcome and complication of DLIF. Methods We undertook retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of 8 DLIF procedures in Degenerative lumbar spine disease since May 2011. Four patients underwent DLIF only, and the others underwent combined DLIF and posterior fixation. Data on intra- and postoperative complications were collected. The pre- and postoperative X-rays were reviewed. We investigated coronal deformity, Cobb's angle, and apical vertebral translation (AVT). The mean follow-up period was months with a range of 2 to 8 months. Results A mean preoperative coronal Cobb's angle was 21.8° (range 11.5-32.4°). Following after DLIF, the mean Cobb's angle was decreased to 13.0° (range 2.9-21.5°). Following additional posterior screw fixation, mean Cobb's angle was further decreased to 7.4° (range 2.9-13.2°). A mean preoperative AVT was 2.0 cm(range 0.6-3.5 cm), and improved to 1.4 cm(range 0.3-2.4 cm) and 0.8 cm(range 0.2-1.8 cm) postoperatively (DLIF and, posterior fixation respectively). One patient (12.5%) showed cage migration during follow-up period. Two patients (25%) developed motor weakness, and 4 patients (50%) experienced postoperative thigh paresthesias or dysesthesias. During follow up period, motor weakness had resolved in 1 patient. Sensory symptoms were improved in all patients at the last follow-up. Conclusion Degenerative lumbar disease can be effectively corrected by DLIF with acceptable complications. PMID:25983811

  4. Clinical and Radiological Outcomes of a New Cage for Direct Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Jae; Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Young Baeg; Hung, Vo Tan

    2014-01-01

    Objective In Korea, direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) was started since 2011, using standard cage (6° lordotic angle, 18mm width). Recently, a new wider cage with higher lordotic angle (12°, 22mm) was introduced. The aim of our study is to compare the clinical and radiologic outcomes of the two cage types. Methods We selected patients underwent DLIF, 125 cases used standard cages (standard group) and 38 cases used new cages (wide group). We followed them up for more than 6 months, and their radiological and clinical outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. For radiologic outcomes, lumbar lordotic angle (LLA), segmental lordoic angle (SLA), disc angle (DA), foraminal height change (FH), subsidence and intraoperative endplate destruction (iED) were checked. Clinical outcomes were compared using visual analog scale (VAS) score, Oswestry disability index (ODI) score and complications. Results LLA and SLA showed no significant changes postoperatively in both groups. DA showed significant increase after surgery in the wide group (p<0.05), but not in the standard group. Subsidence was significantly lower in the wide group (p<0.05). There was no difference in clinical outcomes between the two groups. Additional posterior decompression was done more frequently in the wide group. Postoperative change of foraminal height was significantly lower in the wide group (p<0.05). The iED was observed more frequently in the wide group (p<0.05) especially at the anterior edge of cage. Conclusion The new type of cage seems to result in more DA and less subsidence. But indirect foraminal decompression seems to be less effective than standard cage. Intraoperative endplate destruction occurs more frequently due to a steeper lordotic angle of the new cage. PMID:25346760

  5. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Correction of Spondylolisthesis and Adult Degenerative Scoliosis in High-Risk Patients: Early Radiographic Results and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Brad; Briski, David; Qadir, Rabah; Godoy, Gustavo; Houston, Allison Howard; Rudman, Ernest; Zavatsky, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is not associated with many of the complications seen in other interbody fusion techniques. This study used computed tomography (CT) scans, the radiographic gold standard, to assess interbody fusion rates achieved utilizing the LLIF technique in high-risk patients. Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent LLIF between January 2008 and July 2013. Forty-nine patients underwent nonstaged or staged LLIF on 119 levels with posterior correction and augmentation. Per protocol, patients received CT scans at their 1-year follow-up. Of the 49 patients, 21 patients with LLIF intervention on 54 levels met inclusion criteria. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists and the senior surgeon (JZ) assessed fusion. Results Of the 21 patients, 6 patients had had previous lumbar surgery, and the cohort's comorbidities included osteoporosis, diabetes, obesity, and smoking, among others. Postoperative complications occurred in 12 (57.1%) patients and included anterior thigh pain and weakness in 6 patients, all of which resolved by 6 months. Two cases of proximal junctional kyphosis occurred, along with 1 case of hardware pullout. Two cases of abdominal atonia occurred. By CT scan assessment, each radiologist found fusion was achieved in 53 of 54 levels (98%). The radiologists' findings were in agreement with the senior surgeon. Conclusion Several studies have evaluated LLIF fusion and reported fusion rates between 88%-96%. Our results demonstrate high fusion rates using this technique, despite multiple comorbidities in the patient population. Spanning the ring apophysis with large LLIF cages along with supplemental posterior pedicle screw augmentation can enhance stability of the fusion segment and increase fusion rates. PMID:24688329

  6. Complications and perioperative factors associated with learning the technique of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darryl Lau; Jasmine G. Lee; Seunggu J. Han; Daniel C. Lu; Dean Chou

    2011-01-01

    Before the advent of minimally invasive spine surgery (MIS), open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) was performed to treat spondylosis, spondylolisthesis, and spondylolysis. Minimally invasive TLIF has recently become more popular based upon the premise that a smaller, less traumatic incision should afford better recovery and outcomes. However, the learning curve associated with this technique must be considered. To analyze

  7. Lateral Approach for Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (XLIF and DLIF)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Burak M. Ozgur; Lissa C. Baird

    \\u000a Since 1991, when Obenchain described the first laparoscopic lumbar discectomy [1], the field of minimally invasive spine surgery\\u000a has continued to evolve. Surgeon and patient alike have been attracted by the advantages of minimally invasive surgery, including\\u000a less tissue trauma during the surgical approach, less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stays, and faster return to activities\\u000a of daily living. These reported

  8. Coralline hydroxyapatite reinforced with polylactide fibres in lumbar interbody implantation.

    PubMed

    Ylinen, P; Raekallio, M; Taurio, R; Vihtonen, K; Vainionpää, S; Partio, E K; Törmälä, P; Rokkanen, P

    2005-04-01

    Porous hydroxyapatite HA blocks reinforced with poly-l/dl-lactide fibres were used to maintain the lumbar disc space and to start to create intercorporeal fusion in 23 growing pigs. In four pigs two emptied non adjacent disc spaces were left open. After 3, 6, 12 and 16 weeks the implanted disc blocks were studied radiologically, histologically, histomorphometrically, microradiographically, and with oxytetracycline fluorescence. In plain films slight to moderate ossification of the implanted disc spaces was detected at 12 and 16 weeks. Resorption of the implants was seen radiologically from 3 weeks and fragmentation from 12 weeks onwards. In microradiographs disintegration of the coralline inner structure started at 3 weeks. Histologically, connective tissue ingrowth was seen inside the porous structure from three weeks onwards. Small amounts of new bone were visible and connective tissue inside the implant increased from a mean of 65.6% at 3 weeks to a mean of 79.4% at 16 weeks histomorphometrically. The bone ingrowth varied from 0.7 to 1.7%. A loss of height in the implanted disc spaces was seen (p < 0.05, linear regression analysis). In control pigs the emptied disc spaces lost their height similarly. The implants used were not strong enough to maintain the lumbar disc height. PMID:15803277

  9. Fusion after minimally disruptive anterior lumbar interbody fusion: Analysis of extreme lateral interbody fusion by computed tomography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. B. Rodgers; Edward J. Gerber; Jamie R. Patterson

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundLess invasive fusion approaches, such as extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF), have proliferated, but few reports have critically assessed fusion rates. To date, no studies have reported computed tomography (CT) documented fusion rates following XLIF.

  10. Initial Clinical Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Disease: A Preliminary Report on the Experience of a Single Institution with 30 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Na, Young Cheol; Lee, Hyo Sang; Shin, Dong Ah; Ha, Yoon; Yoon, Do Heum

    2012-01-01

    Objective The object of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion. Methods This study included 30 patients who underwent minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion at our hospital between May 2011 and February 2012 for the following diagnoses: degenerative disc disease, adjacent-segment degeneration, degenerative spondylolisthesis and lumbar degenerative scoliosis. Pain assessment was reported from 0 to 10 using a subjective visual analog scale (VAS) upon admission and at every follow-up day. Lumbar X-rays were obtained in the standing position upon admission and the 1st and 5th postoperative day, and at every follow-up day after the operation. The heights of the intervertebral disc space and neural foramen were measured using an electronic caliper with the PACS software. The surgical outcome was assessed as excellent, good, fair or poor using the Odom scale at the last follow-up. Results The mean VAS for low back pain were 4.93±1.47 on admission and 2.01±1.35 at last follow-up, respectively, and for leg pain, the scores were 4.87±2.16 on admission and 1.58±1.52 at last follow-up. The mean height of intervertebral disc space increased by 34% (7.93±2.33 preoperatively, and 11.09±4.33 immediately after surgery, p<0.01). The mean height of neural foramen also increased by 6.4% without any statistical significance (19.17±2.84 preoperatively, and 20.49±4.50 immediately after the surgery). Minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion was successful in 27 patients (90%) at last follow-up. Surgical complications were reported as transient postoperative thigh sensory changes (5 patients, 16.7%), transient psoas muscle weakness (3 patients, 10%), cage migration (2 patients, 6.7%), lumbar plexus injury (1 patient, 3.3%), and pain aggravation (1 patient, 3.3%). Conclusion The minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion is a safe and effective procedure for treating degenerative lumbar disease with good outcomes and moderate complications. Further follow-up is necessary to establish its safety and efficacy. PMID:25983813

  11. Minimally invasive presacral approach for revision of an Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion rod due to fall-related lumbosacral instability: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to describe procedural details of a minimally invasive presacral approach for revision of an L5-S1 Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion rod. Case presentation A 70-year-old Caucasian man presented to our facility with marked thoracolumbar scoliosis, osteoarthritic changes characterized by high-grade osteophytes, and significant intervertebral disc collapse and calcification. Our patient required crutches during ambulation and reported intractable axial and radicular pain. Multi-level reconstruction of L1-4 was accomplished with extreme lateral interbody fusion, although focal lumbosacral symptoms persisted due to disc space collapse at L5-S1. Lumbosacral interbody distraction and stabilization was achieved four weeks later with the Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion System (TranS1 Inc., Wilmington, NC, USA) and rod implantation via an axial presacral approach. Despite symptom resolution following this procedure, our patient suffered a fall six weeks postoperatively with direct sacral impaction resulting in symptom recurrence and loss of L5-S1 distraction. Following seven months of unsuccessful conservative care, a revision of the Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion rod was performed that utilized the same presacral approach and used a larger diameter implant. Minimal adhesions were encountered upon presacral re-entry. A precise operative trajectory to the base of the previously implanted rod was achieved using fluoroscopic guidance. Surgical removal of the implant was successful with minimal bone resection required. A larger diameter Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion rod was then implanted and joint distraction was re-established. The radicular symptoms resolved following revision surgery and our patient was ambulating without assistance on post-operative day one. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions The Axial Lumbar Interbody Fusion distraction rod may be revised and replaced with a larger diameter rod using the same presacral approach. PMID:21959081

  12. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using unilateral pedicle screw fixation plus contralateral translaminar facet screw fixation in lumbar degenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fubing; Jiang, Chun; Cao, Yuanwu; Jiang, Xiaoxing; Feng, Zhenzhou

    2014-01-01

    Background: Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) has been used in lumbar degenerative diseases. Some researchers have applied unilateral fixation in TLIF to reduce operational trauma without compromising the clinical outcome, but it is always suspected biomechanically unstable. The supplementary contralateral translaminar facet screw (cTLFS) seemed to be able to overcome the inherent drawbacks of unilateral pedicle screw (uPS) fixation theoretically. This study evaluates the safety, feasibility and efficacy of TLIF using uPS with cTLFS fixation in the treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD). Materials and Methods: 50 patients (29 male) underwent the aforementioned surgical technique for their LDD between December 2009 and April 2012. The results were evaluated based on visual analogue scale (VAS) of the leg and back, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were recorded. The radiographic examinations in form of X-ray, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging was done preoperatively and 1 week, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months postoperatively. The student t-test was used for comparison between the preoperative values and postoperative counterparts. P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Among 50 patients, 22 received one level fusion and 28 two level's, with corresponding operation time and estimated blood loss being approximately 90 min, 150 ml and 120 min, 200 ml, respectively. No severe complications happened perioperatively. The mean VAS (back, leg) scores dropped from (7.6, 7.5) preoperatively to (2.1, 0.6) at 12 months’ followup, ODI from 49.1 preoperatively to 5.6 and JOA score raised from 10.6 preoperatively to 28.5, all P < 0.001, suggesting of good clinical outcome. From the three-dimensional reconstructed CT, 62 out of 70 segments displayed solid fusion with fusion rate of 88.6% at 12 months postoperatively. Conclusions: TLIF using uPS fixation plus cTLFS fixation is a safe, feasible and effective technique in the treatment of one or two level lumbar degenerative diseases short termly. PMID:25143640

  13. Anterior Dislodgement of a Fusion Cage after Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Isthmic Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyeong Seok; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is commonly used procedure for spinal fusion. However, there are no reports describing anterior cage dislodgement after surgery. This report is a rare case of anterior dislodgement of fusion cage after TLIF for the treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis with lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV). A 51-year-old man underwent TLIF at L4-5 with posterior instrumentation for the treatment of grade 1 isthmic spondylolisthesis with LSTV. At 7 weeks postoperatively, imaging studies demonstrated that banana-shaped cage migrated anteriorly and anterolisthesis recurred at the index level with pseudoarthrosis. The cage was removed and exchanged by new cage through anterior approach, and screws were replaced with larger size ones and cement augmentation was added. At postoperative 2 days of revision surgery, computed tomography (CT) showed fracture on lateral pedicle and body wall of L5 vertebra. He underwent surgery again for paraspinal decompression at L4-5 and extension of instrumentation to S1 vertebra. His back and leg pains improved significantly after final revision surgery and symptom relief was maintained during follow-up period. At 6 months follow-up, CT images showed solid fusion at L4-5 level. Careful cage selection for TLIF must be done for treatment of spondylolisthesis accompanied with deformed LSTV, especially when reduction will be attempted. Banana-shaped cage should be positioned anteriorly, but anterior dislodgement of cage and reduction failure may occur in case of a highly unstable spine. Revision surgery for the treatment of an anteriorly dislodged cage may be effectively performed using an anterior approach. PMID:24175028

  14. Stand-alone minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion: multicenter clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, Amir; Bach, Konrad; Bolinger, Bryan; Malham, Gregory M; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S; Uribe, Juan S

    2015-04-01

    Stand-alone minimally invasive lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (MIS-LIF), without posterior instrumentation, is feasible because the technique does not necessitate the disruption of the stabilizing elements. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the efficacy and clinical outcomes of patients who underwent stand-alone lateral interbody fusion. A multicenter chart review was conducted to identify patients who underwent stand-alone MIS-LIF between 2008 and 2012. Patients were classified by spinal pathology (degenerative disc disease [DDD], spondylolisthesis [SL] and adult degenerative scoliosis [ADS]). Routine clinical follow-up was scheduled at 3, 6, and12 months. Outcome measures included hospital length of stay, fusion rates, neurologic complications, integrity of construct and clinical outcome questionnaires (Visual Analog Scale [VAS] and Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]). A total of 59 patients met the inclusion criteria. The average age was 60 years (range 31-86 years). Spinal pathologies treated were DDD in 37 (63%), SL in four (7%) and ADS in 18 (30%) patients. Fusion rate was 93% of patients (95% of levels) at 12 months. Two patients required re-operation. Mean hospital stay and follow-up were 3.3days (range 1-10) and 14.6 months, respectively. The mean preoperative VAS and ODI were 69.1 and 51.8, respectively. VAS improved to 37.8 (p<0.0005). ODI improved to 31.8 (p<0.0005). Seventy percent of patients had grade 0 subsidence while 30% had grade I and grade II subsidence. Stand-alone MIS-LIF is viable option in a carefully selected patient population for both single and multilevel disease and shows significant improvement in health related quality of life. PMID:25684343

  15. Accidental Durotomy in Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Frequency, Risk Factors, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Florian; Krüger, Marie T.; Kogias, Evangelos; Rölz, Roland; Sircar, Ronen; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the frequency, risk factors, and management of accidental durotomy in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF). Methods. This single-center study retrospectively investigates 372 patients who underwent MIS TLIF and were mobilized within 24 hours after surgery. The frequency of accidental durotomies, intraoperative closure technique, body mass index, and history of previous surgery was recorded. Results. We identified 32 accidental durotomies in 514 MIS TLIF levels (6.2%). Analysis showed a statistically significant relation of accidental durotomies to overweight patients (body mass index ?25?kg/m2; P = 0.0493). Patient age older than 65 years tended to be a positive predictor for accidental durotomies (P = 0.0657). Mobilizing patients on the first postoperative day, we observed no durotomy-associated complications. Conclusions. The frequency of accidental durotomies in MIS TLIF is low, with overweight being a risk factor for accidental durotomies. The minimally invasive approach seems to minimize durotomy-associated complications (CSF leakage, pseudomeningocele) because of the limited dead space in the soft tissue. Patients with accidental durotomy can usually be mobilized within 24 hours after MIS TLIF without increased risk. The minimally invasive TLIF technique might thus be beneficial in the prevention of postoperative immobilization-associated complications such as venous thromboembolism. This trial is registered with DRKS00006135.

  16. Posterior short segment pedicle screw fixation and TLIF for the treatment of unstable thoracolumbar/lumbar fracture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, Posterior Short Segment Pedicle Screw Fixation is a popular procedure for treating unstable thoracolumbar/lumbar burst fracture. But progressive kyphosis and a high rate of hardware failure because of lack of the anterior column support remains a concern. The efficacy of different methods remains debatable and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. Methods A consecutive series of 20 patients with isolated thoracolumbar/lumbar burst fractures were treated by posterior short segment pedicle screw fixation and transforaminal thoracolumbar/lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) between January 2005 and December 2007. All patients were followed up for a minimum of 2 years. Demographic data, neurologic status, anterior vertebral body heights, segmental Cobb angle and treatment-related complications were evaluated. Results The mean operative time was 167 minutes (range, 150–220). Blood loss was 450 ~ 1200 ml, an average of 820 ml. All patients recovered with solid fusion of the intervertebral bone graft, without main complications like misplacement of the pedicle screw, nerve or vessel lesion or hard ware failure. The post-operative radiographs demonstrated a good fracture reduction and it was well maintained until the bone graft fusion. Neurological recovery of one to three Frankel grade was seen in 14 patients with partial neurological deficit, three grades of improvement was seen in one patient, two grades of improvement was observed in 6 patients and one grade of improvement was found in 6 patients. All the 6 patients with no paraplegia on admission remained neurological intact, and in one patient with Frankel D on admission no improvement was observed. Conclusion Posterior short-segment pedicle fixation in conjunction with TLIF seems to be a feasible option in the management of selected thoracolumbar/lumbar burst fractures, thereby addressing all the three columns through a single approach with less trauma and good results. PMID:24517217

  17. BMP-2-induced Neuroforaminal Bone Growth in the Setting of a Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Junyoung; Tabaraee, Ehsan; Singh, Kern

    2015-06-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) has become a popular alternative to traditional methods of lumbar decompression and fusion. When compared with the open technique, the minimally invasive approach can result in decreased pain and blood loss as well as a shorter length of hospitalization. However, the narrower working channel through the tubular retractor increases the difficulty of decortication and bone grafting. Therefore, recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMP-2) is often utilized (although this is off-label) to create a more favorable interbody fusion environment. Recently, the use of rhBMP-2 has been associated with excessive bone growth in an MIS-TLIF. If this bone growth compresses the neighboring neural structures, patients may present with either new or recurrent radicular pain. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging can demonstrate heterotopic bone growth extending from the disk space into either the ipsilateral neuroforamen or lateral recess, which may result in the compression of the exiting or traversing root, respectively. The purpose of this article and the accompanying video is to demonstrate a technique for defining and resecting rhBMP-2-induced heterotopic bone growth following a previous MIS-TLIF. PMID:25978140

  18. Evaluation of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-calcium phosphate ceramic composite for lumbar fusion in rhesus monkey interbody fusion model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Dang, Gengting; Guo, Zhaoqing; Yang, Min

    2005-01-01

    Autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC)-calcium phosphate ceramic composites were constructed in vitro and implanted as a bone graft substitute for lumbar anterior interbody fusion in rhesus monkeys to determine the osteogenic capacity of the composites. Nine adult rhesus monkeys underwent lumbar L3-L4 and L5-L6 diskectomy and interbody fusion via an anterior retroperitoneal approach. Two fusion sites in each animal were randomly assigned to two of three treatments: autogenous tricortical iliac crest bone graft (autograft group), cell-free ceramic graft (ceramic group), or BMSC-ceramic composite graft (BMSC group). Autologous BMSCs were expanded in culture and stimulated with osteogenic supplement. The spinal fusion segments were evaluated by radiography, biomechanical testing, histologic analysis, and histomorphometric analysis 3 months postsurgery. The BMSC group achieved lumbar interbody fusion superior to that of the ceramic group, both biomechanically and histologically. The BMSC group and the autograft group showed equivalent biomechanical stiffness. Ceramic residues were significantly greater in the ceramic group versus the BMSC group. The results indicate that BMSC-ceramic composites can enhance bone regeneration and achieve osseous spinal fusion 3 months after implantation in the rhesus monkey interbody fusion model. PMID:16144452

  19. Surgical anatomy of the minimally invasive lateral lumbar approach.

    PubMed

    Bina, Robert W; Zoccali, Carmine; Skoch, Jesse; Baaj, Ali A

    2015-03-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion approach (LLIF), which encompasses the extreme lateral interbody fusion or direct lateral interbody fusion techniques, has gained popularity as an alternative to traditional posterior approaches. With rapidly expanding applications, this minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approach is now utilized in basic degenerative pathologies as well as complex lumbar degenerative deformities and tumors. Given the intimate relationship of the psoas muscle, and hence the lumbar plexus, to this MIS approach, several authors have examined the surgical anatomy of this approach. Understanding this regional neural anatomy is imperative given the potential for serious injuries to both the motor and sensory nerves of the lumbar plexus. In this review, we critically and comprehensively discuss all published studies detailing the surgical anatomy of the lateral lumbar approach with respect to the MIS LLIF techniques. This is a timely review given the rapidly growing number of surgeons utilizing this technique. PMID:25449209

  20. Allogeneic morphogenetic protein vs. recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in lumbar interbody fusion procedures: a radiographic and economic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of rhBMP-2 (Infuse®) in 2002, surgeons have had an alternative substitute to autograft and its related donor site morbidity. Recently, the prevalence of reported adverse events and complications related to the use of rhBMP-2 has raised many ethical and legal concerns for surgeons. Additionally, the cost and decreasing reimbursement landscape of rhBMP-2 use have required identification of a viable alternative. Osteo allogeneic morphogenetic protein (OsteoAMP®) is a commercially available allograft-derived growth factor rich in osteoinductive, angiogenic, and mitogenic proteins. This study compares the radiographic fusion outcomes between rhBMP-2 and OsteoAMP allogeneic morphogenetic protein in lumbar interbody fusion spine procedures. Methods Three hundred twenty-one (321) patients from three centers underwent a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) or lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) procedure and were assessed by an independent radiologist for fusion and radiographically evident complications. The independent radiologist was blinded to the intervention, product, and surgeon information. Two hundred and twenty-six (226) patients received OsteoAMP with autologous local bone, while ninety-five (95) patients received Infuse with autologous local bone. Patients underwent radiographs (x-ray and/or CT) at standard postoperative follow-up intervals of approximately 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Fusion was defined as radiographic evidence of bridging across endplates, or bridging from endplates to interspace disc plugs. Osteobiologic surgical supply costs were also analyzed to ascertain cost differences between OsteoAMP and rhBMP-2. Results OsteoAMP produced higher rates of fusion at 6, 12, and 18 months (p???0.01). The time required for OsteoAMP to achieve fusion was approximately 40% less than rhBMP-2 with approximately 70% fewer complications. Osteobiologic supply costs were 80.5% lower for OsteoAMP patients (73.7% lower per level) than for rhBMP-2. Conclusions Results of this study indicate that OsteoAMP is a viable alternative to rhBMP-2 both clinically and economically when used in TLIF and LLIF spine procedures. PMID:24373225

  1. Analysis of spinal lumbar interbody fusion cage subsidence using Taguchi method, finite element analysis, and artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassau, Christopher John; Litofsky, N. Scott; Lin, Yuyi

    2012-09-01

    Subsidence, when implant penetration induces failure of the vertebral body, occurs commonly after spinal reconstruction. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages may subside into the vertebral body and lead to kyphotic deformity. No previous studies have utilized an artificial neural network (ANN) for the design of a spinal interbody fusion cage. In this study, the neural network was applied after initiation from a Taguchi L 18 orthogonal design array. Three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to address the resistance to subsidence based on the design changes of the material and cage contact region, including design of the ridges and size of the graft area. The calculated subsidence is derived from the ANN objective function which is defined as the resulting maximum von Mises stress (VMS) on the surface of a simulated bone body after axial compressive loading. The ANN was found to have minimized the bone surface VMS, thereby optimizing the ALIF cage given the design space. Therefore, the Taguchi-FEA-ANN approach can serve as an effective procedure for designing a spinal fusion cage and improving the biomechanical properties.

  2. Anterior lumbar interbody surgery for spondylosis results from a classically-trained neurosurgeon.

    PubMed

    Chatha, Gurkirat; Foo, Stacy W L; Lind, Christopher R P; Budgeon, Charley; Bannan, Paul E

    2014-09-01

    Anterior lumbar surgery for degenerative disc disease (DDD) is a relatively novel technique that can prevent damage to posterior osseous, muscular and ligamentous spinal elements. This study reports the outcomes and complications in 286 patients who underwent fusion - with artificial disc implants or combined fusion and artificial disc implants - by a single-operator neurosurgeon, with up to 24 months of follow-up. The visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 (SF36) and prospective log of adverse events were used to assess the clinical outcome. Radiographic assessments of implant position and bony fusion were analysed. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were also recorded. Irrespective of pre-surgical symptoms (back pain alone or back and leg pain combined), workers' compensation status and type of surgical implant, clinically significant improvements in VAS, ODI and SF36 were primarily observed at 3 and/or 6 month follow-up, and improvements were maintained at 24 months after surgery. A 94% fusion rate was obtained; the overall complication was 9.8% which included 3.5% with vascular complications. The anterior lumbar approach can be used for treating DDD for both back pain and back and leg pain with low complication rates. With appropriate training, single-operator neurosurgeons can safely perform these surgeries. PMID:24786717

  3. Cost effectiveness of disc prosthesis versus lumbar fusion in patients with chronic low back pain: randomized controlled trial with 2-year follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Fritzell; Svante Berg; Fredrik Borgström; Tycho Tullberg; Hans Tropp

    This randomized controlled health economic study assesses the cost-effectiveness of the concept of total disc replacement\\u000a (TDR) (Charité\\/Prodisc\\/Maverick) when compared with the concept of instrumented lumbar fusion (FUS) [posterior lumbar fusion\\u000a (PLF) \\/posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF)]. Social and healthcare perspectives after 2 years are reported. In all, 152\\u000a patients were randomized to either TDR (n = 80) or lumbar FUS (n = 72). Cost

  4. Viscoelastic Disc Arthroplasty Provides Superior Back and Leg Pain Relief in Patients with Lumbar Disc Degeneration Compared to Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Burkhard; Smith, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) is one of the most frequently diagnosed spinal diseases. The symptoms these disorders cause are anticipated to increase as the population in Western countries ages. Purpose Compare back and leg pain alleviation in patients with LDD and a viscoelastic disc prosthesis documented in the SWISSspine registry versus patients with anterior lumbar interbody fusion documented in the Spine Tango registry. Study Design Prospectively collected clinical and outcome data in two independent spine registries. Outcome Measures were back and leg pain relief on 0 to 10 numerical rating scales. Materials and Methods The analysis included a single surgeon series of 48 patients with viscoelastic total disc replacement (VTDR) from the SWISSspine registry which were compared to 131 patients with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) from the Spine Tango registry. Two linear multivariate regression models were built to assess the associations of patient characteristics with back and leg pain relief. The following covariates were included in the models: patient age and sex, disc herniation as additional diagnosis, number of treated segments, level of treated segment, treatment type (VTDR, ALIF), preoperative back and leg pain levels and follow-up interval. Results Both models showed VTDR to be associated with significantly higher back (2.76 points; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.78 - 3.73; p < 0.001) and leg pain (2.12 points; 95% CI 1.12 to 3.13; p < 0.001) relief than ALIF. Other influential factors for higher back pain relief were female sex compared with male sex (1.03 additional points; 95% CI 0.27 to 1.78; p = 0.008), monosegmental surgery compared with bisegmental surgery (1.02 additional points; 95% CI 0.21 to 1.83; p = 0.014), and higher back pain at baseline (0.87 points additional pain relief per level of preoperative back pain; 95% CI 0.70 to 1.03; p < 0.001). Other influential factors for leg pain relief were monosegmental surgery (0.93 additional points; 95% CI 0.10 to 1.77; p = 0.029) and higher leg pain at baseline (0.83 points additional pain relief per level of preoperative leg pain; 95% CI 0.70 to 0.96). In both models the L3/4 segment showed 2.36 points (95% CI -4.27 to -0.45; p = 0.016) and 3.69 points (95% CI -5.66 to -1.71; p < 0.001) less pain relief than L5/S1. Discussion Significantly higher back and leg pain relief were observed after viscoelastic total disc replacement in comparison with anterior lumbar interbody fusion. The new less rigid materials used in the second generation total disc replacements (TDRs) may make artificial disc replacement an increasingly attractive option for patients with degenerative lumbar disc disease. Further controlled and long-term follow-up studies are required for more detailed comparisons of the outcomes of these types of disc implants. The Freedom Lumbar Disc is limited by U.S. federal law to investigational use only. PMID:26196033

  5. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Unilateral versus Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation in Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xu-Qi; Wu, Xin-Lei; Xu, Cong; Zheng, Xu-Hao; Jin, Yong-Long; Wu, Li-Jun; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Hua-Zi; Tian, Nai-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) has become one of the most widely used procedures for lumbar spinal disorders. However, it is still unclear whether TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw (PS) fixation is as effective as that with bilateral PS fixation. We performed a meta-analysis of the literatures and aimed to gain a better understanding of whether TLIF with unilateral PS fixation was safe and effective for lumbar diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We systematically searched Ovid, Springer, and Medline databases for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the clinical and radiological outcomes of unilateral versus bilateral PS fixation in TLIF. Risk of bias in included studies was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. We generated pooled risk ratios or weighted mean differences across studies. According to our predefined inclusion criteria, seven RCTs with a total of 441 patients were included in this study. Baseline characteristics were similar between the unilateral and bilateral groups. Our meta-analysis showed that no significant difference was detected between the two groups in terms of postoperative clinical function, fusion status, reoperation rate, complication rate, and hospital stay (p>0.05). Pooled estimates revealed that the unilateral group was associated with significantly reduced implant cost, operative time and blood loss (p<0.05). Conclusions/Significances Our meta-analysis suggested TLIF with unilateral PS fixation was as safe and effective as that with bilateral PS fixation for lumbar diseases in selected patients. Despite these findings, our meta-analysis was based on studies with small sample size and different study characteristics that might lead to the inconsistent results such as various functional outcomes among the included studies. Therefore, high-quality randomized controlled trials with larger sample size are also needed to further clarify these issues and to provide the long-term outcomes. PMID:24489929

  6. Clinical and radiographic outcomes of extreme lateral approach to interbody fusion with ?-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite composite for lumbar degenerative conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, W. Blake; Gerber, Edward J.; Rodgers, Jody A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Historically, iliac crest bone graft has been used as the graft of choice for lumbar spine fusion procedures. Because fusion techniques have become less invasive, the demand for minimally disruptive grafting options has increased. This prospective study was performed to assess clinical and radiographic outcomes of patients treated with an iliac crest bone graft alternative and lateral lumbar interbody fusion. Methods Fifty degenerative lumbar patients were treated with the extreme lateral approach to interbody fusion and a ?-tricalcium phosphate–hydroxyapatite graft with bone marrow aspirate (BMA) at 1 or 2 adjacent levels. BMA was collected from the iliac crest with a bone aspiration needle and applied to the FormaGraft (NuVasive, Inc., San Diego, California) in a 1:1 ratio. Radiolucent cages were filled with FormaGraft strips, granules, or blocks and implanted in a standard fashion. Clinical data were collected at baseline, 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months and included visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and Short Form 36 patient-reported assessments. Fusion assessments were made from neutral anteroposterior/lateral radiographs, lateral flexion/extension radiographs, and computed tomography images taken at least 12 months after surgery. Results Forty-four patients treated at 49 levels completed follow-up. The mean patient age was 54.7 ± 10.8 years, and mean body mass index was 30.8 ± 7.7 kg/m2. Radiographic fusion was observed in 41 of 44 assessed levels (93.2%). Blood loss was less than 100 mL in 95.5% of patients. Of the patients, 93.2% spent 1 night or less in the hospital. By the 6-week follow-up, all clinical outcomes were significantly improved (P < .05). Improvements were maintained or increased throughout the course of follow-up. Conclusions This report shows that the technique of extreme lateral approach to interbody fusion in combination with FormaGraft and BMA in the interbody space is a safe and effective treatment option for interbody fusion of the lumbar spine when compared with other approaches and biologic options. PMID:25694867

  7. CT navigated lateral interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Drazin, Doniel; Liu, John C; Acosta, Frank L

    2013-10-01

    Lateral interbody fusion techniques are heavily reliant on fluoroscopy for retractor docking and graft placement, which expose both the patient and surgeon to high doses of radiation. Use of image-guided technologies with CT-based images, however, can eliminate this radiation exposure for the surgeon. We describe the surgical technique of performing lateral lumbar interbody fusion using CT navigation. PMID:23931938

  8. A systematic review of randomised clinical trials using posterior discectomy to treat lumbar disc herniations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alberto Gotfryd; Osmar Avanzi

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this study was to examine the safety and effectiveness of three different discectomy techniques using a posterior\\u000a approach for the treatment of herniated lumbar discs. There are only a small number of prospective randomised studies comparing\\u000a posterior lumbar discectomy techniques, and no recent systematic review has been published on this matter. Using the Cochrane\\u000a Collaboration guidelines, all

  9. Screw Placement Accuracy for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery: A Study on 3-D Neuronavigation-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Jorge; James, Andrew R.; Alimi, Marjan; Tsiouris, Apostolos John; Geannette, Christian; Härtl, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Purpose?The aim of this study was to assess the impact of 3-D navigation for pedicle screw placement accuracy in minimally invasive transverse lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF). Methods?A retrospective review of 52 patients who had MIS-TLIF assisted with 3D navigation is presented. Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analog Scales (VAS), and MacNab scores. Radiographic outcomes were assessed using X-rays and thin-slice computed tomography. Result?The mean age was 56.5 years, and 172 screws were implanted with 16 pedicle breaches (91.0% accuracy rate). Radiographic fusion rate at a mean follow-up of 15.6 months was 87.23%. No revision surgeries were required. The mean improvement in the VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, and ODI at 11.3 months follow-up was 4.3, 4.5, and 26.8 points, respectively. At last follow-up the mean postoperative disc height gain was 4.92?mm and the mean postoperative disc angle gain was 2.79 degrees. At L5–S1 level, there was a significant correlation between a greater disc space height gain and a lower VAS leg score. Conclusion?Our data support that application of 3-D navigation in MIS-TLIF is associated with a high level of accuracy in the pedicle screw placement. PMID:24353961

  10. Short-Term Results of Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using Pedicle Screw with Cortical Bone Trajectory Compared with Conventional Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Kudo, Daisuke; Shimada, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case-control study. Purpose To evaluate clinical and radiological results of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) performed with cortical bone trajectory (CBT) pedicle screw insertion with those of TLIF using 'conventional' or percutaneous pedicle screw insertion. Overview of Literature CBT is a new trajectory for pedicle screw insertion in the lumbar spine; clinical and radiological results of TLIF using pedicle screws inserted with CBT are unclear. Methods In total, 26 patients (11 males, 15 females) were enrolled in this retrospective study and divided into three groups: TLIF with pedicle screw insertion by conventional minimally invasive methods via the Wiltse approach (M-TLIF, n=10), TLIF with percutaneous pedicle screw insertion (P-TLIF, n=6), and TLIF with pedicle screw insertion with CBT (CBT-TLIF, n=10). Surgical results and preand postoperative radiological findings were evaluated and compared. Results Intraoperative blood loss was significantly less with CBT-TLIF (p=0.03) than with M-TLIF. Postoperative lordotic angles did not differ significantly among the three groups. Complete fusions were obtained in 10 of 12 levels (83%) with M-TLIF, in seven levels (100%) with P-TLIF, and in 10 of 11 levels (91%) with CBT-TLIF. On postoperative computed tomography, correct positioning was seen in 84.1% of M-TLIF screws, 88.5% of P-TLIF screws, and 90% of CBT-TLIF screws. Conclusions CBT-TLIF resulted in less blood loss and a shorter operative duration than M-TLIF or P-TLIF. Postoperative rates of bone union, maintenance of lordotic angles, and accuracy of pedicle screw positions were similar among the three groups. PMID:26097661

  11. Miniopen oblique lateral L5-s1 interbody fusion: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Keijiro; Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Toyone, Tomoaki; Inoue, Gen; Hanaoka, Eiji; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) has been widely used for minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), but an approach to L5-S1 is difficult because of the iliac crest. In the current study, we present 2 cases using minimally invasive oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) of L5-S1. The patients showed foraminal stenosis between L5 and S1 and severe low back and leg pain. The patients were placed in a lateral decubitus position and underwent OLIF surgery (using a cage and bone graft from the iliac crest) without posterior decompression. Posterior screws were used in the patients. Pain scores significantly improved after surgery. There was no spinal nerve, major vessel, peritoneal, or urinary injury. OLIF surgery was minimally invasive and produced good surgical results without complications. PMID:25400963

  12. Miniopen Oblique Lateral L5-S1 Interbody Fusion: A Report of 2 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Keijiro; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) has been widely used for minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), but an approach to L5-S1 is difficult because of the iliac crest. In the current study, we present 2 cases using minimally invasive oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) of L5-S1. The patients showed foraminal stenosis between L5 and S1 and severe low back and leg pain. The patients were placed in a lateral decubitus position and underwent OLIF surgery (using a cage and bone graft from the iliac crest) without posterior decompression. Posterior screws were used in the patients. Pain scores significantly improved after surgery. There was no spinal nerve, major vessel, peritoneal, or urinary injury. OLIF surgery was minimally invasive and produced good surgical results without complications. PMID:25400963

  13. Biomechanical Analysis of a Newly Developed Shape Memory Alloy Hook in a Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF) In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Xu, Jing; Zhu, Yuexing; Li, Jiukun; Zhou, Si; Tian, Shunliang; Xiang, Yucheng; Liu, Xingmo; Zheng, Ying; Pan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this biomechanical study was to evaluate the stability provided by a newly developed shape memory alloy hook (SMAH) in a cadaveric transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) model. Methods Six human cadaveric spines (L1-S2) were tested in an in vitro flexibility experiment by applying pure moments of ±8 Nm in flexion/extension, left/right lateral bending, and left/right axial rotation. After intact testing, a TLIF was performed at L4-5. Each specimen was tested for the following constructs: unilateral SMAH (USMAH); bilateral SMAH (BSMAH); unilateral pedicle screws and rods (UPS); and bilateral pedicle screws and rods (BPS). The L3–L4, L4–L5, and L5-S1 range of motion (ROM) were recorded by a Motion Analysis System. Results Compared to the other constructs, the BPS provided the most stability. The UPS significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion and lateral bending; the BSMAH significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion, lateral bending, and axial rotation; and the USMAH significantly reduced the ROM in flexion and left lateral bending compared with the intact spine (p<0.05). The USMAH slightly reduced the ROM in extension, right lateral bending and axial rotation (p>0.05). Stability provided by the USMAH compared with the UPS was not significantly different. ROMs of adjacent segments increased in all fixed constructs (p>0.05). Conclusions Bilateral SMAH fixation can achieve immediate stability after L4–5 TLIF in vitro. Further studies are required to determine whether the SMAH can achieve fusion in vivo and alleviate adjacent segment degeneration. PMID:25474112

  14. Surgeons' exposure to radiation in single- and multi-level minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion; a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Funao, Haruki; Ishii, Ken; Momoshima, Suketaka; Iwanami, Akio; Hosogane, Naobumi; Watanabe, Kota; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

    2014-01-01

    Although minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) has widely been developed in patients with lumbar diseases, surgeons risk exposure to fluoroscopic radiation. However, to date, there is no studies quantifying the effective dose during MIS-TLIF procedure, and the radiation dose distribution is still unclear. In this study, the surgeons' radiation doses at 5 places on the bodies were measured and the effective doses were assessed during 31 consecutive 1- to 3-level MIS-TLIF surgeries. The operating surgeon, assisting surgeon, and radiological technologist wore thermoluminescent dosimeter on the unshielded thyroid, chest, genitals, right middle finger, and on the chest beneath a lead apron. The doses at the lens and the effective doses were also calculated. Mean fluoroscopy times were 38.7, 53.1, and 58.5 seconds for 1, 2, or 3 fusion levels, respectively. The operating surgeon's mean exposures at the lens, thyroid, chest, genitals, finger, and the chest beneath the shield, respectively, were 0.07, 0.07, 0.09, 0.14, 0.32, and 0.05 mSv in 1-level MIS-TLIF; 0.07, 0.08, 0.09, 0.18, 0.34, and 0.05 mSv in 2-level; 0.08, 0.09, 0.14, 0.15, 0.36, and 0.06 mSv in 3-level; and 0.07, 0.08, 0.10, 0.15, 0.33, and 0.05 mSv in all cases. Mean dose at the operating surgeon's right finger was significantly higher than other measurements parts (P<0.001). The operating surgeon's effective doses (0.06, 0.06, and 0.07 mSv for 1, 2, and 3 fusion levels) were low, and didn't differ significantly from those of the assisting surgeon or radiological technologist. Revision MIS-TLIF was not associated with higher surgeons' radiation doses compared to primary MIS-TLIF. There were significantly higher surgeons' radiation doses in over-weight than in normal-weight patients. The surgeons' radiation exposure during MIS-TLIF was within the safe level by the International Commission on Radiological Protection's guidelines. The accumulated radiation exposure, especially to surgeon's hands, should be carefully monitored. PMID:24736321

  15. Posterior epidural migration of an extruded free fragment from a lumbar disc herniation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pietro Lisai; Carlo Doria; Leonardo Crissantu; Tomas Dore; Gabriele Spano; Carlo Fabbriciani

    2000-01-01

    The majority of symptomatic lumbar disc herniations are located in a posterolateral position with resultant nerve root compression.\\u000a Although caudal, rostral and lateral migrations of disc fragments are common, posterior epidural migration of an extruded\\u000a free fragment from a lumbar disc herniation is a rare occurrence and sometimes may cause a dural sac compression with cauda\\u000a equina syndrome. This retrospective

  16. Stability and Load Sharing Characteristics of a Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Device

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel J.; Yeager, Matthew S.; Thampi, Shankar S.; Whiting, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar interbody fusion is a common treatment for a variety of spinal pathologies. It has been hypothesized that insufficient mechanical loading of the interbody graft can prevent proper fusion of the joint. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical stability and anterior column loading sharing characteristics of a posterior dynamic system compared to titanium rods in an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model. Methods Range of motion, interpedicular kinematics and interbody graft loading were measured in human cadaveric lumbar segments tested under a pure moment flexibility testing protocol. Results Both systems provided significant fixation compared to the intact condition and to an interbody spacer alone in flexion extension and lateral bending. No significant differences in fixation were detected between the devices. A significant decrease in graft loading was detected in flexion for the titanium rod treatment compared to spacer alone. No significant differences in graft loading were detected between the spacer alone and posterior dynamic system or between the posterior dynamic system and the titanium rod. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that the posterior dynamic system provides similar fixation compared to that of a titanium rod, however, studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of fixation in a cadaver model may not be sufficiently powered to establish differences in load sharing using the techniques described here.

  17. A systematic review of randomised clinical trials using posterior discectomy to treat lumbar disc herniations

    PubMed Central

    Avanzi, Osmar

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this study was to examine the safety and effectiveness of three different discectomy techniques using a posterior approach for the treatment of herniated lumbar discs. There are only a small number of prospective randomised studies comparing posterior lumbar discectomy techniques, and no recent systematic review has been published on this matter. Using the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines, all randomised or “quasi-randomised” clinical trials, comparing classic, microsurgical, and endoscopic lumbar discectomies using a posterior approach were systematically reviewed. No statistically significant differences were found between these techniques regarding improvement in pain, sensory deficits, motor strength, reflexes, and patient satisfaction. Current data suggest that the microsurgical and endoscopic techniques are superior to the classic technique for the treatment of single level lumbar disc herniations with respect to volume of blood loss, systemic repercussions, and duration of hospital stay. All three surgical techniques were found to be effective for the treatment of single level lumbar disc herniations in patients without degenerative vertebral deformities. No conclusions could be drawn from the clinical randomised studies reviewed regarding the safety of the three techniques studied due to insufficient data on postoperative complications. PMID:18500517

  18. [Lumbar nerve root pain with fever in tropical area: posterior spinal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ouédraogo, D D; Daboiko, J C; Eti, E; Ouali, B; Ouattara, B; Gbané, M; Gbazi, C; Kouakou, N M

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the case of tuberculosis osteitis of the posterior vertebral arch in a 35-year-old man with recent history of pulmonary tuberculosis. Clinical findings were pain due to bilateral inflammation of the lumbar nerve roots, fistulised cold abcess and motor deficit in both lower extremities. The tomodensitometry demonstrated a lytic bone lesion involving the spinous process of the second lumbar vertebra in association with spondylitis and a large paravertebral abscess with calcification typical of tuberculosis. Cure was achieved by a single 12-month course of appropriate treatment. PMID:19639843

  19. Presacral retroperitoneal approach to axial lumbar interbody fusion: a new, minimally invasive technique at L5-S1: Clinical outcomes, complications, and fusion rates in 50 patients at 1-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bohinski, Robert J.; Jain, Viral V.; Tobler, William D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The presacral retroperitoneal approach to an axial lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a percutaneous, minimally invasive technique for interbody fusion at L5-S1 that has not been extensively studied, particularly with respect to long-term outcomes. Objective The authors describe clinical and radiographic outcomes at 1-year follow-up for 50 consecutive patients who underwent the presacral ALIF. Methods Our patients included 24 males and 26 females who underwent the presacral ALIF procedure for interbody fusion at L5-S1. Indications included mechanical back pain and radiculopathy. Thirty-seven patients had disc degeneration at L5-S1, 7 had previously undergone a discectomy, and 6 had spondylolisthesis. A 2-level L4-S1 fusion was performed with a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at L4-5 in 15 patients. AxiaLIF was performed as a stand-alone procedure in 5 patients and supplemented with pedicle screws in 45 patients. Pre- and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores were evaluated and complications were tracked. Fusion was evaluated by an independent neuro-radiologist. Results At 1-year follow-up, VAS and ODI scores had significantly improved by 49% and 50%, respectively, versus preoperative scores. By high-resolution computer tomography (CT) scans, fusion was achieved in 44 (88%) patients, developing bone occurred in 5 (10%), and 1 (2%) patient had pseudoarthrosis. One patient suffered a major operative complication–a bowel perforation with a pre-sacral abscess that resolved with treatment. Conclusion Our initial 50 patients who underwent presacral ALIF showed clinical improvement and fusion rates comparable with other interbody fusion techniques; its safety was reflected by low complication rates. Its efficacy in future patients will continue to be monitored, and will be reported in a 2-year follow-up study of fusion. PMID:25802650

  20. The impact of surgical wait time on patient-based outcomes in posterior lumbar spinal surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason Braybrooke; Henry Ahn; Aimee Gallant; Michael Ford; Yigel Bronstein; Joel Finkelstein; Albert Yee

    2007-01-01

    A prospective observational study was conducted on patients undergoing posterior lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spinal\\u000a disorders. The study purpose was to evaluate the effect of wait time to surgery on patient derived generic and disease specific\\u000a functional outcome following surgery. A prolonged wait to surgery may adversely affect surgical outcome. Although there is\\u000a literature on the effect of wait

  1. Posterior extradural migration of extruded thoracic and lumbar disc fragments: role of MRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Neugroschl; P. Kehrli; M. Gigaud; O. Ragragui; D. Maitrot; C. Manelfe; J. L. Dietemann

    1999-01-01

    We report three patients with a sequestrated disc fragment posterior to the thecal sac. The affected disc was lumbar in two\\u000a cases and thoracic in the third. Disc fragment migration is usually limited to the anterior extra dural space. Migration of\\u000a a disc fragment behind the dural sac is seldom encountered. MRI appears to be the method of choice to

  2. Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial of The Stabilis Stand Alone Cage (SAC) Versus Bagby and Kuslich (BAK) Implants for Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, William; McLain, Robert F.; Rufo-Smith, Candace; Gurd, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Degenerative disc disease is common and debilitating for many patients. If conservative extensive care fails, anterior lumbar interbody fusion has proven to be an alternative form of surgical management. The Stabilis Stand Alone Cage(SAC) was introduced as a method to obtain stability and fusion. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Stabilis Stand Alone Cage (SAC) is comparable in safety and efficacy to the Bagby and Kuslich (BAK) device. Methods As part of a prospective, randomized, controlled FDA trial, 73 patients underwent anterior interbody fusion using either the SAC(56%) or the BAK device (44%). Results Background characteristics were similar between the two groups. There was no significant difference between the SAC and BAK groups in mean operative time or mean blood loss during surgery. Adverse event rates did not differ between the groups. Assessment of plain radiographs could not confirm solid fusion in 63% of control and 71% of study patients. Functional scores from Owestry and SF-36 improved in both groups by the two-year follow-up. There were no significant differences between the SAC and BAK patients with respect to outcome. Conclusions Both the Stabilis Stand Alone Cage and the BAK Cage provided satisfactory improvement in function and pain relief, despite less than expected radiographic fusion rates. The apparent incongruency between fusion rates and functional outcomes suggests that either radiographs underestimate the true incidence of fusion, or that patients are obtaining good pain relief and improved function despite a lower rate of fusion than previously reported. This was a Level III study. PMID:25694930

  3. A prospective, randomised controlled trial of femoral ring allograft versus a titanium cage in circumferential lumbar spinal fusion with minimum 2-year clinical results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick J. McKenna; Brian J. C. Freeman; Robert C. Mulholland; Michael P. Grevitt; John K. Webb; S. H. Mehdian

    2005-01-01

    The literature reports on the safety and efficacy of titanium cages (TCs) with additional posterior fixation for anterior lumbar interbody fusion. However, these papers are limited to prospective cohort studies. The introduction of TCs for spinal fusion has resulted in increased costs, without evidence of superiority over the established practice. There are currently no prospective controlled trials comparing TCs to

  4. Surgical Data and Early Postoperative Outcomes after Minimally Invasive Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Results of a Prospective, Multicenter, Observational Data-Monitored Study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Paulo; Buzek, David; Franke, Jörg; Senker, Wolfgang; Kosmala, Arkadiusz; Hubbe, Ulrich; Manson, Neil; Rosenberg, Wout; Assietti, Roberto; Martens, Frederic; Barbanti Brodano, Giovanni; Scheufler, Kai-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion (MILIF) offers potential for reduced operative morbidity and earlier recovery compared with open procedures for patients with degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD). Firm conclusions about advantages of MILIF over open procedures cannot be made because of limited number of large studies of MILIF in a real-world setting. Clinical effectiveness of MILIF in a large, unselected real-world patient population was assessed in this Prospective, monitored, international, multicenter, observational study. Objective: To observe and document short-term recovery after minimally invasive interbody fusion for DLD. Materials and Methods: In a predefined 4-week analysis from this study, experienced surgeons (?30 MILIF surgeries pre-study) treated patients with DLD by one- or two-level MILIF. The primary study objective was to document patients’ short-term post-interventional recovery (primary objective) including back/leg pain (visual analog scale [VAS]), disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]), health status (EQ-5D) and Patient satisfaction. Results: At 4 weeks, 249 of 252 patients were remaining in the study; the majority received one-level MILIF (83%) and TLIF was the preferred approach (94.8%). For one-level (and two-level) procedures, surgery duration was 128 (182) min, fluoroscopy time 115 (154) sec, and blood-loss 164 (233) mL. Time to first ambulation was 1.3 days and time to study-defined surgery recovery was 3.2 days. Patients reported significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced back pain (VAS: 2.9 vs 6.2), leg pain (VAS: 2.5 vs 5.9), and disability (ODI: 34.5% vs 45.5%), and a significantly (P < 0.0001) improved health status (EQ-5D index: 0.61 vs 0.34; EQ VAS: 65.4 vs 52.9) 4 weeks postoperatively. One adverse event was classified as related to the minimally invasive surgical approach. No deep site infections or deaths were reported. Conclusions: For experienced surgeons, MILIF for DLD demonstrated early benefits (short time to first ambulation, early recovery, high patient satisfaction and improved patient-reported outcomes) and low major perioperative morbidity at 4 weeks postoperatively. PMID:25811615

  5. K-Wire fracture during minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: Report of six cases and recommendations for avoidance and management

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Justin K.; Harvey, Michael J.; Dahdaleh, Nader S.; Smith, Zachary A.; Fessler, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although rare, minimally invasive spine techniques do have the risk of intraoperative device failure. Kirschner wire (K-wire) fractures during minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) have not been previously reported. This report focuses on the incidence of k-wire fractures following MI-TLIF and describes techniques to help avoid and treat these fractures when they occur. Methods: Inclusion criteria: (i) patients underwent 1, 2, or 3 level MI-TLIF over a 10-year period and (ii) had a k-wire fracture leading to a retained fragment. Exclusion criteria included: >10° coronal curves, significant sagittal malalignment, infection, and preoperative instrumentation failure. Results: Of 513 patients undergoing MI-TLIF, 6 (1.2%) sustained k-wire fracture (3 males, 3 females, mean age 43 ± 13 years). Complications included k-wire fracture alone (4 patients), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak (1 patient), and both ileus and revision for hardware removal (1 patient). All six patients went home postoperatively. The mean follow-up duration was 27.7 ± 37.4 months. All retained k-wire fragments were located in the vertebral bodies at the tip of the pedicle screws; none breached the anterior cortex of the vertebral bodies. None of the k-wires migrated at final follow-up 7.8 years (93.7 months) postoperatively. Furthermore, no complications were attributed to retained k-wires. Conclusions: K-wire fractures during MI-TLIF are rare (incidence of 1.2%) and retained k-wire segments led to no postoperative complications (e.g. no migration). PMID:25593770

  6. Posterior Epidural Migration of an Extruded Lumbar Disc Mimicking a Facet Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Young Sun; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Dong Min

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal extradural migration of extruded disc material is clinically uncommon. We report a rare case of posterior epidural migration of an extruded lumbar disc mimicking a facet cyst. A 32-year-old man was admitted to our institute with a 2-week history of severe low back pain and radiating pain in the left leg. The magnetic resonance (MR) images revealed a dorsally located, left-sided extradural cystic mass at the L2-3 level. The initial diagnosis was an epidural facet cyst because of the high signal intensity on MR images and its location adjacent to the facet joint. Intraoperatively, an encapsulated mass of soft tissue adherent to the dural sac was observed and excised. The pathological diagnosis was degenerated disc material. After surgery, the patient experienced complete relief from leg pain. PMID:25883662

  7. Two one-stage posterior approaches for treating thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis: A retrospective case-control study

    PubMed Central

    XU, ZHENGQUAN; WANG, XIYANG; SHEN, XIONGJIE; WU, PING; PANG, XIAOYANG; LUO, CHENGKE; ZENG, HAO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the results of two surgical treatments for thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis. A total of 73 patients with monosegmental thoracic or lumbar spinal tuberculosis were enrolled from January 2006 to April 2011. The patients were divided into two groups. Patients in group A (n=34) underwent one-stage posterior debridement, limited decompression, bone grafting and internal fixation combined with lamina reconstruction, while those in group B (n=39) underwent one-stage posterior debridement, decompression, bone grafting and posterior instrumentation. Clinical and radiographic results were analyzed and compared between the groups. Patients were followed for a mean 31.3 months (range, 21–42 months). Fusion occurred at 4–12 months (mean, 7.7 months). Surgical complications affected one and five patients in groups A and B, respectively. There was extraction of internal fixation in two group B patients. Postoperatively, there was significant Cobb angle correction in the two groups. By the last follow-up, the Cobb angle and correction loss in group A were significantly better than that in group B; the group A Oswestry Disability Index and Frankel grade were better than that in group B. In conclusion, one-stage posterior limited decompression, bone grafting and internal fixation combined with lamina reconstruction enables rapid management of monosegmental thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with fewer complications and minimal invasion. PMID:26136972

  8. Current concepts on spinal arthrodesis in degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Lykissas, Marios G; Aichmair, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Back pain is a common chronic disorder that represents a large burden for the health care system. There is a broad spectrum of available treatment options for patients suffering from chronic lower back pain in the setting of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, including both conservative and operative approaches. Lumbar arthrodesis techniques can be divided into sub-categories based on the part of the vertebral column that is addressed (anterior vs posterior). Furthermore, one has to differentiate between approaches aiming at a solid fusion in contrast to motion-sparing techniques with the proposed advantage of a reduced risk of developing adjacent disc disease. However, the field of application and long-term outcomes of these novel motion-preserving surgical techniques, including facet arthroplasty, nucleus replacement, and lumbar disc arthroplasty, need to be more precisely evaluated in long-term prospective studies. Innovative surgical treatment strategies involving minimally invasive techniques, such as lateral lumbar interbody fusion or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, as well as percutaneous implantation of transpedicular or transfacet screws, have been established with the reported advantages of reduced tissue invasiveness, decreased collateral damage, reduced blood loss, and decreased risk of infection. The aim of this study was to review well-established procedures for lumbar spinal fusion with the main focus on current concepts on spinal arthrodesis and motion-sparing techniques in degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. PMID:24303453

  9. Change of Lumbar Motion after Multi-Level Posterior Dynamic Stabilization with Bioflex System : 1 Year Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hunho; Cho, Bo Young; Park, Jeong Yoon

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study examined the change of range of motion (ROM) at the segments within the dynamic posterior stabilization, segments above and below the system, the clinical course and analyzed the factors influencing them. Methods This study included a consecutive 27 patients who underwent one-level to three-level dynamic stabilization with Bioflex system at our institute. All of these patients with degenerative disc disease underwent decompressive laminectomy with/without discectomy and dynamic stabilization with Bioflex system at the laminectomy level without fusion. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for back and leg pain, whole lumbar lordosis (from L1 to S1), ROMs from preoperative, immediate postoperative, 1.5, 3, 6, 12 months at whole lumbar (from L1 to S1), each instrumented levels, and one segment above and below this instrumentation were evaluated. Results VAS scores for leg and back pain decreased significantly throughout the whole study period. Whole lumbar lordosis remained within preoperative range, ROM of whole lumbar and instrumented levels showed a significant decrease. ROM of one level upper and lower to the instrumentation increased, but statistically invalid. There were also 5 cases of complications related with the fixation system. Conclusion Bioflex posterior dynamic stabilization system supports operation-induced unstable, destroyed segments and assists in physiological motion and stabilization at the instrumented level, decrease back and leg pain, maintain preoperative lumbar lordotic angle and reduce ROM of whole lumbar and instrumented segments. Prevention of adjacent segment degeneration and complication rates are something to be reconsidered through longer follow up period. PMID:19893714

  10. Multilevel extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) and osteotomies for 3-dimensional severe deformity: 25 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    McAfee, Paul C.; Shucosky, Erin; Chotikul, Liana; Salari, Ben; Chen, Lun; Jerrems, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Background This is a retrospective review of 25 patients with severe lumbar nerve root compression undergoing multilevel anterior retroperitoneal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation for deformity. The objective is to analyze the outcomes and clinical results from anterior interbody fusions performed through a lateral approach and compare these with traditional surgical procedures. Methods A consecutive series of 25 patients (78 extreme lateral interbody fusion [XLIF] levels) was identified to illustrate the primary advantages of XLIF in correcting the most extreme of the 3-dimensional deformities that fulfilled the following criteria: (1) a minimum of 40° of scoliosis; (2) 2 or more levels of translation, anterior spondylolisthesis, and lateral subluxation (subluxation in 2 planes), causing symptomatic neurogenic claudication and severe spinal stenosis; and (3) lumbar hypokyphosis or flat-back syndrome. In addition, the majority had trunks that were out of balance (central sacral vertical line ?2 cm from vertical plumb line) or had sagittal imbalance, defined by a distance between the sagittal vertical line and S1 of greater than 3 cm. There were 25 patients who had severe enough deformities fulfilling these criteria that required supplementation of the lateral XLIF with posterior osteotomies and pedicle screw instrumentation. Results In our database, with a mean follow-up of 24 months, 85% of patients showed evidence of solid arthrodesis and no subsidence on computed tomography and flexion/extension radiographs. The complication rate remained low, with a perioperative rate of 2.4% and postoperative rate of 12.2%. The lateral listhesis and anterior spondylolisthetic subluxation were anatomically reduced with minimally invasive XLIF. The main finding in these 25 cases was our isolation of the major indication for supplemental posterior surgery: truncal decompensation in patients who are out of balance by 2 cm or more, in whom posterior spinal osteotomies and segmental pedicle screw instrumentation were required at follow up. No patients were out of sagittal balance (sagittal vertical line <3 cm from S1) postoperatively. Segmental instrumentation with osteotomies was also more effective for restoration of physiologic lumbar lordosis compared with anterior stand-alone procedures. Conclusions This retrospective study supports the finding that clinical outcomes (coronal/sagittal alignment) improve postoperatively after minimally invasive surgery with multilevel XLIF procedures and are improved compared with larger extensile thoracoabdominal anterior scoliosis procedures. PMID:25694908

  11. 100 Consecutive Cases of Degenerative Lumbar Conditions Using a Non-Threaded Locking Screw System With a 90-Degree Locking Cap

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Bryan W.; Tortolani, P. Justin; Fedder, Ira L.; Sefter, John C.; Davis, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Background This prospective study analyzes the perioperative outcomes and long-term fusion success of 100 consecutive lumbar degenerative cases. The cases were managed using a non-threaded locking screw system, in conjunction with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages, for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedures. These 100 cases were compared to another prospective study treating patients with the same inclusion and exclusion criteria using conventional plate-based pedicle screw spinal instrumentation augmented with carbon fiber interbody cages. Methods A total of 167 operative levels were treated in 100 patients (51 single-level, 39 two-level and 10 three-level cases). Eleven cases were revisions and 67 patients received interbody fusion cages. Patients had an average of 22.8 ± 4.0 months followup. Results: There was one instrumentation failure but no significant subsidence at the interbody fusion level. The disc space height was restored as part of the surgical procedure at the interbody cage levels: from 7.5 ± 2.3 mm preoperative to 9.0 ± 2.1 mm postoperative. There were 2 cases of pseudarthrosis (2 / 100 = 2%). The average operative time for 1-level cases was 111 ± 25 minutes; for 2-level cases it was 132.4 ± 21.8 minutes; and for 3-level cases it was 162.6 ± 33 minutes. Blood loss averaged 800 ± 473 cc for 1-level cases, 1055 ± 408 cc for 2 levels, and 1155 ± 714 cc for 3 levels. The length of stay was similar between the 3 groups (4.4 ± 1.2 days for single-level cases, 4.7 ± 1.1 for 2 levels, and 5.0 ± 1.1 for 3 levels; P > .05). There were 3 incidental durotomies, and 4 other patients developed infections postoperatively that required reoperation. Conclusion The disc and foraminal heights can be restored and maintained with a unilateral cage and pedicle screw construct. Unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using a PEEK cage combined with a non-threaded locking pedicle screw and rod system results in similar fusion rates to those achieved using the bilateral Brantigan interbody fusion cage or a single BAK Vista implant. When compared to the bilateral Brantigan cages, decreased operative time (P < .001), decreased blood loss (P < .001) and reduced incidence of dural tears (P < .001) are advantages of using a non-threaded locking screw system and single PEEK interbody cage for lumbar degenerative conditions without compromising subsequent fusion rates. PMID:25802623

  12. Caudal Vertebral Body Fractures Following Lateral Interbody Fusion in Nonosteoporotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tender, Gabriel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The minimally invasive lateral transpsoas approach for lumbar fusions has become increasingly popular. However, vertebral body fractures have been reported after this procedure, particularly in patients with osteoporosis and patients undergoing multilevel fusions. We evaluated the risk factors for caudal vertebral body fractures in 2 nonosteoporotic patients with single-level disease. Case Reports Two patients presented with several years' history of incapacitating chronic low back pain and intermittent radicular pain. Diagnostic imaging in both cases demonstrated grade 1 degenerative spondylolisthesis. The patients underwent a lateral transpsoas interbody fusion, with lateral plate fixation in 1 patient and standalone lateral fusion in the other. The operations were performed without any incidents and both patients experienced immediate symptom relief. Both patients returned several weeks later with excruciating low back pain, without any postoperative history of trauma or heavy lifting. Diagnostic imaging in both patients showed a coronal fracture of the inferior vertebral body. The patients underwent urgent revision surgery involving posterior supplementation with pedicle screw and rod constructs and posterolateral fusion. Conclusion Caudal vertebral body fracture in patients with normal bone quality is a major potential complication after the minimally invasive lateral approach for lumbar fusions. Risk factors may include placement of a lateral plate, the size of the smaller anteroposterior cage, endplate violation, and oblique placement of the interbody cage. PMID:24688345

  13. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Keith L; Hire, Justin M; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Key, Charles C; DeVine, John G

    2015-06-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  14. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Keith L.; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Key, Charles C.; DeVine, John G.

    2015-01-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO.

  15. Extent of intraoperative muscle dissection does not affect long-term outcomes after minimally invasive surgery versus open-transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery: A prospective longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Adogwa, Owoicho; Johnson, Kwame; Min, Elliot T.; Issar, Neil; Carr, Kevin R.; Huang, Kevin; Cheng, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) versus open TLIF, addressing lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD) or grade I spondylolisthesis (DS), are associated with shorter hospital stays, decreased blood loss, quicker return to work, and equivalent short- and long-term outcomes. However, no prospective study has assessed whether the extent of intraoperative muscle trauma utilizing creatinine phosphokinase levels (CPK) differently impacts long-term outcomes. Methods: Twenty-one patients underwent MIS-TLIF (n = 14) versus open-TLIF (n = 7) for DDD or DS. Serum CPK levels were measured at baseline, and postoperatively (days 1, 7, and 1.5, 3 and 6 months). The correlation between the extent of intraoperative muscle trauma and two-year improvement in functional disability was evaluated (multivariate regression analysis). Additionally, baseline and two-year changes in Visual Analog Scale (VAS)-leg pain (LP), VAS-back pain (BP), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short-Form-36 (SF-36) Physical Component Score (PCS) and SF-36 Mental Component Score (MCS), and postoperative satisfaction with surgical care were assessed. Results: Although the mean change from baseline in the serum creatine phosphokinase level on POD 1 was greater for MIS-TLIF (628.07) versus open-TLF (291.42), this did not correlate with lesser two-year improvement in functional disability. Both cohorts also showed similar two-year improvement in VAS-LP, ODI, and SF-36 PCS/MCS. Conclusion: Increased intraoperative muscle trauma unexpectedly observed in higher postoperative CPK levels for MIS-TLIF versus open-TLIF did not correlate with any differences in two-year improvement in pain and functional disability. PMID:23248754

  16. The Lumbar Anterior Epidural Cavity: The Posterior Longitudinal Ligament, the Anterior Ligaments of the Dura Mater and the Anterior Internal Vertebral Venous Plexus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Plaisant; J. L. Sarrazin; G. Cosnard; H. Schill; C. Gillot

    1996-01-01

    The contents of the anterior epidural cavity were studied to elucidate the relationship between veins, ligaments, and membranous formations. Anatomical, radiological and histological studies on human specimens after latex or gelatin\\/ gadolinium venous injection at the level of the lumbar spine show that the posterior longitudinal ligament is a cross-shaped formation which includes the septum, the superficial part extending into

  17. Resect or not to resect: the role of posterior longitudinal ligament in lumbar total disc replacement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Balkan Cakir; Marcus Richter; Werner Schmoelz; René Schmidt; Heiko Reichel; Hans Joachim Wilke

    With regard to the literature, several factors are considered to have an impact on postoperative mobility after lumbar total\\u000a disc replacement (TDR). As TDR results in a distraction of the ligamentous structures, theoretically the postoperatively disc\\u000a height and ligamentous integrity have also an influence on biomechanics of a treated segment. The purpose of the study was\\u000a to evaluate the influence

  18. Harvesting local cylinder autograft from adjacent vertebral body for anterior lumbar interbody fusion: surgical technique, operative feasibility and preliminary clinical results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincent Arlet; Liang Jiang; Thomas Steffen; Jean Ouellet; Rudy Reindl; Max Aebi

    2006-01-01

    Autogenous iliac crest has long served as the gold standard for anterior lumbar arthrodesis although added morbidity results from the bone graft harvest. Therefore, femoral ring allograft, or cages, have been used to decrease the morbidity of iliac crest bone harvesting. More recently, an experimental study in the animal showed that harvesting local bone from the anterior vertebral body and

  19. Clinical Outcomes of Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion in the Treatment of Adult Degenerative Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Adam M.; Michael, Keith W.; Chapman, Todd M.; Massey, Gene M.; Howes, Cameron R.; Isaacs, Robert E.; Brown, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The use of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) and other lateral access surgery is rapidly increasing in popularity. However, limited data is available regarding its use in scoliosis surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of adults with degenerative lumbar scoliosis treated with XLIF. Methods. Thirty consecutive patients with adult degenerative scoliosis treated by a single surgeon at a major academic institution were followed for an average of 14.3 months. Interbody fusion was completed using the XLIF technique with supplemental posterior instrumentation. Validated clinical outcome scores were obtained on patients preoperatively and at most recent follow-up. Complications were recorded. Results. The study group demonstrated improvement in multiple clinical outcome scores. Oswestry Disability Index scores improved from 24.8 to 19.0 (P?

  20. Protecting the genitofemoral nerve during direct/extreme lateral interbody fusion (DLIF/XLIF) procedures.

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Faisal R; Sherman, Jonathan H; Holmberg, Andrea; Louis, Robert; Elias, Jeff; Vega-Bermudez, Francisco

    2010-12-01

    A 77-year-old male presented with a history of severe lower back pain for 10 years with radiculopathy, positive claudication type symptoms in his calf with walking, and severe "burning" in his legs bilaterally with walking. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed lumbar stenosis at the L3-L4 and L4-L5 levels. During the direct or extreme lateral interbody fusion (DLIF/XLIF) procedure, bilateral posterior tibial, femoral, and ulnar nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) were recorded with good morphology of waveforms observed. Spontaneous electromyography (S-EMG) and triggered electromyography (T-EMG) were recorded from cremaster and ipsilateral leg muscles. A left lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach was used to access the anterior disc space for complete discectomy, distraction, and interbody fusion. T-EMG ranging from 0.05 to 55.0 mA with duration of 200 microsec was used for identification of the genitofemoral nerve using a monopolar stimulator during the approach. The genitofemoral nerve (L1-L2) was identified, and the guidewire was redirected away from the nerve. Post-operatively, the patient reported complete pain relief and displayed no complications from the procedure. Intraoperative SSEPs, S-EMG, and T-EMG were utilized effectively to guide the surgeon's approach in this DLIF thereby preventing any post-operative neurological deficits such as damage to the genitofemoral nerve that could lead to groin pain. PMID:21313792

  1. Anterior Decompression and Shortening Reconstruction with a Titanium Mesh Cage through a Posterior Approach Alone for the Treatment of Lumbar Burst Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Eiji; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Murai, Hajime; Kobayashi, Takashi; Abe, Toshiki; Kikuchi, Kazuma; Shimada, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose To examine the efficacy and safety for a posterior-approach circumferential decompression and shortening reconstruction with a titanium mesh cage for lumbar burst fractures. Overview of Literature Surgical decompression and reconstruction for severely unstable lumbar burst fractures requires an anterior or combined anteroposterior approach. Furthermore, anterior instrumentation for the lower lumbar is restricted through the presence of major vessels. Methods Three patients with an L1 burst fracture, one with an L3 and three with an L4 (5 men, 2 women; mean age, 65.0 years) who underwent circumferential decompression and shortening reconstruction with a titanium mesh cage through a posterior approach alone and a 4-year follow-up were evaluated regarding the clinical and radiological course. Results Mean operative time was 277 minutes. Mean blood loss was 471 ml. In 6 patients, the Frankel score improved more than one grade after surgery, and the remaining patient was at Frankel E both before and after surgery. Mean preoperative visual analogue scale was 7.0, improving to 0.7 postoperatively. Local kyphosis improved from 15.7° before surgery to -11.0° after surgery. In 3 cases regarding the mid to lower lumbar patients, local kyphosis increased more than 10° by 3 months following surgery, due to subsidence of the cages. One patient developed severe tilting and subsidence of the cage, requiring additional surgery. Conclusions The results concerning this small series suggest the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of this treatment for unstable lumbar burst fractures. This technique from a posterior approach alone offers several advantages over traditional anterior or combined anteroposterior approaches. PMID:22708016

  2. Pulmonary embolism after a single-stage, combined anterior and posterior approach lumbar surgery.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a fatal complication in orthopaedics surgery. While, the incidence of this life-threatening condition is low in spine surgery and few detailed reports have been published in English literatures. We present a case of pulmonary embolism which occurred after a single-stage, combined anterior and posterior approach surgery for L2 burst fracture. Although positive and timely rescue measures were performed, the patient died finally. We report the case to help spine surgeons to be aware of and take precautions against the fatal condition in spine surgery. PMID:24550977

  3. A case report of a rare complication of bowel perforation in extreme lateral interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Balsano, Massimo; Carlucci, Stefano; Ose, Marija; Boriani, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decade, extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) has gained in popularity as a minimally invasive alternative to direct anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), and ALIF's associated morbidity. Most notably, XLIF largely avoids vascular and visceral structures that are required to be mobilized in ALIF. In this case report, the authors describe a rare complication of a bowel injury in a 70-year-old male who underwent an L3-4 and L4-5 lateral transpsoas approach for interbody fusion. PMID:25906377

  4. Dissection of left iliac artery during anterior lumbar interspace fusion: Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Uwe M; Davies, Mark G; Sayed, Hosam El

    2015-04-01

    Vascular injury is an uncommon complication of spine surgery. Among the different approaches, anterior lumbar interbody fusion has increased potential for vascular injuries, since the great vessels and their branches overly the disc spaces to be operated on, and retraction of these vessels is necessary to gain adequate surgical exposure. The reported incidence for anterior lumbar interbody fusion-associated vascular injuries ranges from 0% to 18.1%, with venous laceration as the most common type. We report a case of anterior lumbar interbody fusion-associated left common iliac artery dissection leading to delayed acute limb ischemia developing in early post-operative period. PMID:24848500

  5. L5-S1 Laparoscopic Anterior Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zeni, Tallal M.; Phillips, Frank M.; Mathur, Sameer; Zografakis, John G.; Moore, Ronald M.; Laguna, Luis E.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated our experience with laparoscopic L5-S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). Methods: This represents a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who underwent L5-S1 laparoscopic ALIF between February 1998 and August 2003. Results: Twenty-eight patients underwent L5-S1 LAIF (15 males and 13 females). The mean age was 43 years (range, 26 to 67). Mean operative time was 225 minutes (range, 137 to 309 minutes). No conversions to an open procedure were necessary. Twenty-four (85.7%) patients underwent successful bilateral cage placement. Four patients (14.3%) in whom only a single cage could be placed underwent supplementary posterior pedicle screw placement. Mean length of stay (LOS) was 4.1 days (range, 2 to 15). Two patients underwent reoperation subacutely secondary to symptomatic lateral displacement of the cage. One patient developed radiculopathy 6 months postoperatively and required reoperation. One patient developed a small bowel obstruction secondary to adhesions to the cage requiring laparoscopic reoperation. Fusion was achieved in all patients. Visual analogue scale scores for back pain were significantly improved from 8.6±0.8 to 2.8±0.8 (P<0.0001) at 1 year. Conclusion: L5-S1 LAIF is feasible and safe with all the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. Fusion rates and pain improvement were comparable to those with an open repair. PMID:17575763

  6. Extreme lateral interbody fusion for the treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Adam M; Michael, Keith W; Chapman, Todd M; Jennings, Jason M; Hubbard, Elizabeth W; Isaacs, Robert E; Brown, Christopher R

    2013-11-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF; NuVasive Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) is a minimally invasive lateral transpsoas approach to the thoracolumbar spine. Though the procedure is rapidly increasing in popularity, limited data is available regarding its use in deformity surgery. We aimed to evaluate radiographic correction using XLIF in adults with degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Thirty consecutive patients were followed for an average of 14.3 months. Interbody fusion was completed using the XLIF technique with supplemental posterior instrumentation. Plain radiographs were obtained on all patients preoperatively, postoperatively, and at most recent follow-up. Plain radiographic measurements of coronal Cobb angle, apical vertebral translation, segmental lordosis, global lordosis, disc height, neuroforaminal height and neuroforaminal width were made at each time point. CT scans were obtained for all patients 1 year after surgery to evaluate for fusion. There was significant improvement in multiple radiographic parameters from preoperative to postoperative. Cobb angle corrected 72.3%, apical vertebral translation corrected 59.7%, neuroforaminal height increased 80.3%, neuroforaminal width increased 7.4%, and disc height increased 116.7%. Segmental lordosis at L4-L5 increased 14.1% and global lordosis increased 11.5%. There was no significant loss of correction from postoperative to most recent follow-up. There was an 11.8% pseudoarthrosis rate at levels treated with XLIF. Complications included lateral incisional hernia (n=1), rupture of anterior longitudinal ligament (n=2), wound breakdown (n=2), cardiac instability (n=1), pedicle fracture (n=1), and nonunion requiring revision (n=1). XLIF significantly improves coronal plane deformity in patients with adult degenerative scoliosis. XLIF has the ability to correct sagittal plane deformity, although it is most effective at lower lumbar levels. PMID:23906522

  7. Minimally invasive trans-sacral approach to L5-S1 interbody fusion: Preliminary results from 1 center and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, W. Daniel; Hisey, Michael S.; Verma-Kurvari, Sunita; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lumbar interbody fusion has long been used for the treatment of painful degenerative spinal conditions. The anterior approach is not feasible in some patients, and the posterior approach is associated with a risk of neural complications and possibly muscle injury. A trans-sacral technique was developed that allows access to the L5-S1 disc space. The purposes of this study were to investigate the clinical outcome of trans-sacral interbody fusion in a consecutive series of patients from 1 center and to perform a comprehensive review of the literature on this procedure. Methods A literature search using PubMed was performed to identify articles published on trans-sacral axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF). Articles reviewed included biomechanical testing, feasibility of the technique, and clinical results. The data from our center were collected retrospectively from charts for the consecutive series, beginning with the first case, of all patients undergoing fusion using the AxiaLIF technique. In most cases, posterior instrumentation was also used. A total of 41 patients with at least 6 months’ follow-up were included (mean follow-up, 22.2 months). The primary clinical outcome measures were visual analog scales separately assessing back and leg pain and the Oswestry Disability Index. Radiographic assessment of fusion was also performed. Results In the group of 28 patients undergoing single-level AxiaLIF combined with posterior fusion, the visual analog scale scores assessing back and leg pain and mean Oswestry Disability Index scores improved significantly (P < .01). In the remaining 13 patients, back pain improved significantly with a trend for improvement in leg pain. Reoperation occurred in 19.5% of patients; in half of these, reoperation was not related to the anterior procedure. Conclusions A review of the literature found that the AxiaLIF technique was similar to other fusion techniques with respect to biomechanical properties and produced acceptable clinical outcomes, although results varied among studies. Clinical relevance The AxiaLIF approach allows access to the L5-S1 interspace without violating the annulus or longitudinal ligaments and with minimal risk to dorsal neural elements. It may be a viable alternative to other approaches to interbody fusion at the L5-S1 level. It is important that the patients be selected carefully and surgeons are familiar with the presacral anatomy and the surgical approach. PMID:25694879

  8. Technical note: Resolution of spontaneous electromyographic discharge following disk-space distraction during lateral transpsoas interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Woodall, Michael Neil; Shakir, Basheer; Smitherman, Adam; Choudhri, Haroon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) is an increasingly popular minimally invasive technique for lumbar interbody fusion. Although a posterior approach to the lumbar spine has traditionally been favored for the treatment of canal stenosis and neural foraminal stenosis, a growing body of evidence suggests that indirect decompression of the spinal canal and neural foramen can be achieved using a lateral transpsoas approach to the lumbar spine. We present 2 cases that may suggest a role for spontaneous electromyography (s-EMG) monitoring in assessing the adequacy of decompression during LTIF. Methods The 2 cases presented in this technical note illustrate resolution of s-EMG firing during LTIF, following distraction across the disk space. Removal of the distracting device produced the return of s-EMG firing. Both of these cases were operated at the L2-3 level. Results In the first case, s-EMG firing was noted in the bilateral tibialis anterior leads. Resolution of EMG firing may suggest indirect decompression of the canal via ligamentotaxis as the L5 root traverses the L2-3 disk space. In the second case, s-EMG firing was noted in the left abductor hallucis and resolved with distraction of the L2-3 disk space. Again, this may be explained by canal decompression via ligamentotaxis as the S1 root traverses the L2-3 disk space. Conclusion In both cases, distraction across the disk space resulted in resolution of s-EMG discharges—this correlated with an improvement in symptoms. These findings may suggest a role for s-EMG as a marker for adequacy of decompression in a select subset of patients undergoing LTIF. Further study is needed to determine if resolution of s-EMG is a useful measure of indirect decompression during LTIF. PMID:25694902

  9. The VariLift® Interbody Fusion System: expandable, standalone interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Emstad, Erik; del Monaco, Diana Cardenas; Fielding, Louis C; Block, Jon E

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral fusion cages have been in clinical use since the 1990s. Cages offer the benefits of bone graft containment, restored intervertebral and foraminal height, and a more repeatable, stable procedure compared to interbody fusion with graft material alone. Due to concerns regarding postoperative stability, loss of lordosis, and subsidence or migration of the implant, interbody cages are commonly used with supplemental fixation such as pedicle screw systems or anterior plates. While providing additional stability, supplemental fixation techniques increase operative time, exposure, cost, and morbidity. The VariLift® Interbody Fusion System (VariLift® system) has been developed as a standalone solution to provide the benefits of intervertebral fusion cages without the requirement of supplemental fixation. The VariLift® system, FDA-cleared for standalone use in both the cervical and lumbar spine, is implanted in a minimal profile and then expanded in situ to provide segmental stability, restored lordosis, and a large graft chamber. Preclinical testing and analyses have found that the VariLift® System is durable, and reduces stresses that may contribute to subsidence and migration of other standalone interbody cages. Fifteen years of clinical development with the VariLift® system have demonstrated positive clinical outcomes, continued patient maintenance of segmental stability and lordosis, and no evidence of implant migration. The purpose of this report is to describe the VariLift® system, including implant characteristics, principles of operation, indications for use, patient selection criteria, surgical technique, postoperative care, preclinical testing, and clinical experience. The VariLift® System represents an improved surgical option for a stable interbody fusion without requiring supplemental fixation.

  10. Posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic thoracolumbar/lumbar scoliosis: clinical outcomes and predictive radiological factors for extension of fusion distal to caudal end vertebra.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S B; Tsirikos, A I; Subramanian, A S

    2014-08-01

    Clinical, radiological, and Scoliosis Research Society-22 questionnaire data were reviewed pre-operatively and two years post-operatively for patients with thoracolumbar/lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated by posterior spinal fusion using a unilateral convex segmental pedicle screw technique. A total of 72 patients were included (67 female, 5 male; mean age at surgery 16.7 years (13 to 23)) and divided into groups: group 1 included 53 patients who underwent fusion between the vertebrae at the limit of the curve (proximal and distal end vertebrae); group 2 included 19 patients who underwent extension of the fusion distally beyond the caudal end vertebra. A mean scoliosis correction of 80% (45% to 100%) was achieved. The mean post-operative lowest instrumented vertebra angle, apical vertebra translation and trunk shift were less than in previous studies. A total of five pre-operative radiological parameters differed significantly between the groups and correlated with the extension of the fusion distally: the size of the thoracolumbar/lumbar curve, the lowest instrumented vertebra angle, apical vertebra translation, the Cobb angle on lumbar convex bending and the size of the compensatory thoracic curve. Regression analysis allowed an equation incorporating these parameters to be developed which had a positive predictive value of 81% in determining whether the lowest instrumented vertebra should be at the caudal end vertebra or one or two levels more distal. There were no differences in the Scoliosis Research Society-22 outcome scores between the two groups (p = 0.17). In conclusion, thoracolumbar/lumbar curves in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis may be effectively treated by posterior spinal fusion using a unilateral segmental pedicle screw technique. Five radiological parameters correlate with the need for distal extension of the fusion, and an equation incorporating these parameters reliably informs selection of the lowest instrumented vertebra. PMID:25086125

  11. A comparison of perioperative charges and outcome between open and mini-open approaches for anterior lumbar discectomy and fusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William D. Smith; Ginger Christian; Sherrie Serrano; Kyle T. Malone

    The objectives of this study were to examine charge data and long-term outcomes of two approaches for anterior lumbar interbody fusion (IF) through retrospective chart review: a mini-open lateral interbody fusion (“XLIF”) and an Open anterior interbody fusion (ALIF). Of 202 patients who underwent one-level or two-level surgery, 87 underwent ALIF and 115 underwent XLIF, all with transpedicular fixation. Complications

  12. Biomechanics of Lateral Interbody Spacers: Going Wider for Going Stiffer

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, Luiz; Turner, Alexander W. L.; Dooley, Zachary A.; Parikh, Rachit D.; Peterson, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the biomechanical stability of a large interbody spacer inserted by a lateral approach and compares the biomechanical differences with the more conventional transforaminal interbody fusion (TLIF), with and without supplemental pedicle screw (PS) fixation. Twenty-four L2-L3 functional spinal units (FSUs) were tested with three interbody cage options: (i) 18?mm XLIF cage, (ii) 26?mm XLIF cage, and (iii) 11?mm TLIF cage. Each spacer was tested without supplemental fixation, and with unilateral and bilateral PS fixation. Specimens were subjected to multidirectional nondestructive flexibility tests to 7.5?N·m. The range of motion (ROM) differences were first examined within the same group (per cage) using repeated-measures ANOVA, and then compared between cage groups. The 26?mm XLIF cage provided greater stability than the 18?mm XLIF cage with unilateral PS and 11?mm TLIF cage with bilateral PS. The 18?mm XLIF cage with unilateral PS provided greater stability than the 11?mm TLIF cage with bilateral PS. This study suggests that wider lateral spacers are biomechanically stable and offer the option to be used with less or even no supplemental fixation for interbody lumbar fusion. PMID:23213284

  13. Biomechanics of lateral interbody spacers: going wider for going stiffer.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Luiz; Turner, Alexander W L; Dooley, Zachary A; Parikh, Rachit D; Peterson, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the biomechanical stability of a large interbody spacer inserted by a lateral approach and compares the biomechanical differences with the more conventional transforaminal interbody fusion (TLIF), with and without supplemental pedicle screw (PS) fixation. Twenty-four L2-L3 functional spinal units (FSUs) were tested with three interbody cage options: (i) 18?mm XLIF cage, (ii) 26?mm XLIF cage, and (iii) 11?mm TLIF cage. Each spacer was tested without supplemental fixation, and with unilateral and bilateral PS fixation. Specimens were subjected to multidirectional nondestructive flexibility tests to 7.5?N·m. The range of motion (ROM) differences were first examined within the same group (per cage) using repeated-measures ANOVA, and then compared between cage groups. The 26?mm XLIF cage provided greater stability than the 18?mm XLIF cage with unilateral PS and 11?mm TLIF cage with bilateral PS. The 18?mm XLIF cage with unilateral PS provided greater stability than the 11?mm TLIF cage with bilateral PS. This study suggests that wider lateral spacers are biomechanically stable and offer the option to be used with less or even no supplemental fixation for interbody lumbar fusion. PMID:23213284

  14. Biomechanical comparison of three stand-alone lumbar cages — a three-dimensional finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), stand-alone cages can be supplemented with vertebral plate, locking screws, or threaded cylinder to avoid the use of posterior fixation. Intuitively, the plate, screw, and cylinder aim to be embedded into the vertebral bodies to effectively immobilize the cage itself. The kinematic and mechanical effects of these integrated components on the lumbar construct have not been extensively studied. A nonlinearly lumbar finite-element model was developed and validated to investigate the biomechanical differences between three stand-alone (Latero, SynFix, and Stabilis) and SynCage-Open plus transpedicular fixation. All four cages were instrumented at the L3-4 level. Methods The lumbar models were subjected to the follower load along the lumbar column and the moment at the lumbar top to produce flexion (FL), extension (EX), left/right lateral bending (LLB, RLB), and left/right axial rotation (LAR, RAR). A 10 Nm moment was applied to obtain the six physiological motions in all models. The comparison indices included disc range of motion (ROM), facet contact force, and stresses of the annulus and implants. Results At the surgical level, the SynCage-open model supplemented with transpedicular fixation decreased ROM (>76%) greatly; while the SynFix model decreased ROM 56-72%, the Latero model decreased ROM 36-91%, in all motions as compared with the INT model. However, the Stabilis model decreased ROM slightly in extension (11%), lateral bending (21%), and axial rotation (34%). At the adjacent levels, there were no obvious differences in ROM and annulus stress among all instrumented models. Conclusions ALIF instrumentation with the Latero or SynFix cage provides an acceptable stability for clinical use without the requirement of additional posterior fixation. However, the Stabilis cage is not favored in extension and lateral bending because of insufficient stabilization. PMID:24088294

  15. Significance of patient-controlled analgesia in combination with continuous epidural block for patients who underwent posterior lumbar surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Matsui; M. Kanamori; N. Terahata; K. Miaki; N. Makiyama; T. Satone; H. Tsuji

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) combined with continuous epidural\\u000a block in patients who underwent lumbar spine surgery. In group 1 (postoperative PCA group), 23 patients were administered\\u000a postoperative continuous epidural block in combination with analgesics, which was self-regulated by the patient using a device.\\u000a In contrast, the 22 patients in group

  16. Interobserver agreement using computed tomography to assess radiographic fusion criteria with a unique titanium interbody device.

    PubMed

    Slosar, Paul J; Kaiser, Jay; Marrero, Luis; Sacco, Damon

    2015-02-01

    The accuracy of using computed tomography (CT) to assess interbody fusion in patients with titanium implants has been questioned in the past. Radiologists have reported difficulty assessing fusion bone quality because of metal artifact and small graft windows. A new titanium interbody implant with a large footprint and a wide graft aperture has been developed. We conducted a study to determine the interobserver reliability of using CT to assess radiographic fusion variables with the new titanium interbody device. Patients underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion with the same titanium interbody implant. Reconstructed CT images were obtained randomly at 6, 9, or 12 months. Two independent radiologists reviewed the scans. Interobserver reliability was calculated using the ? statistic. Fifty-six spinal fusion levels (33 patients) were analyzed. The radiologists agreed on 345 of the 392 fusion data points reviewed (? = .88). Agreement for solid fusion formation was 0.77. This interbody device demonstrated minimal artifact and minimal subsidence, and trabecular bone was easily identified throughout the implant in the vast majority of cases reviewed. High interobserver agreement was noted across all radiographic variables assessed. PMID:25658078

  17. A new lumbar posterior fixation system, the memory metal spinal system: an in-vitro mechanical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection devices (for example: DePuy Spines Titanium Moss Miami Spinal System). The Memory Metal Spinal System of this study consists of a single square spinal rod made of a nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) used in conjunction with connecting transverse bridges and pedicle screws made of Ti-alloy. Nitinol is best known for its shape memory effect, but is also characterized by its higher flexibility when compared to either stainless steel or titanium. A higher fusion rate with less degeneration of adjacent segments may result because of the elastic properties of the memory metal. In addition, the use of a single, unilateral rod may be of great value for a TLIF procedure. Our objective is to evaluate the mechanical properties of the new Memory Metal Spinal System compared to the Titanium Moss Miami Spinal System. Methods An in-vitro mechanical evaluation of the lumbar Memory Metal Spinal System was conducted. The test protocol followed ASTM Standard F1717-96, “Standard Test Methods for Static and Fatigue for Spinal Implant Constructs in a Corpectomy Model.” 1. Static axial testing in a load to failure mode in compression bending, 2. Static testing in a load to failure mode in torsion, 3. Cyclical testing to estimate the maximum run out load value at 5.0 x 10^6 cycles. Results In the biomechanical testing for static axial compression bending there was no statistical difference between the 2% yield strength and the stiffness of the two types of spinal constructs. In axial compression bending fatigue testing, the Memory Metal Spinal System construct showed a 50% increase in fatigue life compared to the Titanium Moss Miami Spinal System. In static torsional testing the Memory Metal Spinal System constructs showed an average 220% increase in torsional yield strength, and an average 30% increase in torsional stiffness. Conclusions The in-vitro mechanical evaluation of the lumbar Memory Metal Spinal System showed good results when compared to a currently available spinal implant system. Throughout testing, the Memory Metal Spinal System showed no failures in static and dynamic fatigue. PMID:24047109

  18. Functional outcome of surgical management of degenerative lumbar canal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rajendra; Middha, Sanjay; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Nath, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Background: The long term outcomes of decompressive surgery on relief of pain and disability in degenerative lumbar canal stenosis are unclear. The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcome of surgical management of secondary degenerative lumbar canal stenosis and to analyze the effect on outcome variables using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients of degenerative lumbar canal stenosis managed surgically were included in this study. Laminectomy (n=2), laminectomy with disectomy (n=23), laminectomy and disectomy with instrumental stabilization (n=5), and laminectomy, disectomy with posterior interbody fusion (n=2) were performed. JOA scoring system for low backache was used to assess the patients. The recovery rate was calculated as described by Hirabayashi et al. (1981). Surgical outcome was assessed based on the recovery rate and was classified using a four-grade scale: Excellent, improvement of >90%; good, 75–89% improvement; fair, 50–74% improvement; and poor, below 49% improvement. The patients were evaluated at 3 months, one year and at last followup. Results: At 3-month followup, 18.75% patients showed excellent outcome, 62.50% patients showed good outcome, and 18.75% showed fair outcome. At 1-year followup, 64% patients showed excellent outcome and 36% patients showed good outcome. At >1 year followup (average 34.2 months, range: 2–110 months), 64% patients showed excellent outcome, 28% showed good outcome, and 8% showed fair outcome. No patient had poor outcome. Outcome of the patients improved as the time after surgery increased till 1 year and was sustained thereafter till the last followup. Conclusion: Operative treatment in patients of degenerative lumbar canal stenosis yields excellent results as observed on the basis of JOA scoring system. No patient got recurrence of symptoms of nerve compression. PMID:22719114

  19. Two-year clinical and radiographic success of minimally invasive lateral transpsoas approach for the treatment of degenerative lumbar conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ozgur, Burak M.; Agarwal, Vijay; Nail, Erin; Pimenta, Luiz

    2010-01-01

    Background The lateral transpsoas approach to interbody fusion is a less disruptive but direct-visualization approach for anterior/anterolateral fusion of the thoracolumbar spine. Several reports have detailed the technique, the safety of the approach, and the short term clinical benefits. However, no published studies to date have reported the long term clinical and radiographic success of the procedure. Materials and methods The current study is a retrospective chart review of prospectively collected clinical and radiographic outcomes in 62 patients having undergone the Anterolateral transpsoas procedure at a single institution for anterior column stabilization as treatment for degenerative conditions, including degenerative disk disease, spondylolisthesis, scoliosis, and stenosis. Only patients who were a minimum of 2 years postoperative were included in this evaluation. Clinical outcomes measured included visual analog pain scales (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI). Radiographic outcomes included identification of successful arthrodesis. Results Sixty-two patients were treated with lateral interbody fusion between 2003 and December 2006. Twenty-six patients (42%) were single-level, 13 (21%) 2-level, and 23 (37%) 3- or more levels. Forty-five (73%) included supplemental posterior pedicle fixation, 4 (6%) lateral fixation, and 13 (21%) were stand-alone. Pain scores (VAS) decreased significantly from preoperative to 2 years follow-up by 37% (P < .0001). Functional scores (ODI) decreased significantly by 39% from preoperative to 2 years follow-up (P < .0001). Clinical success by ODI-change definition was achieved in 71% of patients. Radiographic success was achieved in 91% of patients, with 1 patient with pseudarthrosis requiring posterior revision. Conclusion The lateral transpsoas approach is similar to a traditional anterior lumbar interbody fusion, in that access is obtained through a retroperitoneal, direct-visualization exposure, and a large implant can be placed in the interspace to achieve disk height and alignment correction. The 2 years plus clinical and radiographic success rates are similar to or better than those reported for traditional anterior and posterior approach procedures, which, coupled with significant short-term benefits of minimal morbidity, make the lateral approach a safe and effective treatment option for anterior/anterolateral lumbar fusions. PMID:25802648

  20. Evaluation of unilateral cage-instrumented fixation for lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To investigate how unilateral cage-instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) affects the three-dimensional flexibility in degenerative disc disease by comparing the biomechanical characteristics of unilateral and bilateral cage-instrumented PLIF. Methods Twelve motion segments in sheep lumbar spine specimens were tested for flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending by nondestructive flexibility test method using a nonconstrained testing apparatus. The specimens were divided into two equal groups. Group 1 received unilateral procedures while group 2 received bilateral procedures. Laminectomy, facectomy, discectomy, cage insertion and transpedicle screw insertion were performed sequentially after testing the intact status. Changes in range of motion (ROM) and neutral zone (NZ) were compared between unilateral and bilateral cage-instrumented PLIF. Results Both ROM and NZ, unilateral cage-instrumented PLIF and bilateral cage-instrumented PLIF, transpedicle screw insertion procedure did not revealed a significant difference between flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial rotation direction except the ROM in the axial rotation. The bilateral group's ROM (-1.7 ± 0. 8) of axial rotation was decreased significantly after transpedicle screw insertion procedure in comparison with the unilateral group (-0.2 ± 0.1). In the unilateral cage-instrumented PLIF group, the transpedicle screw insertion procedure did not demonstrate a significant difference between right and left side in the lateral bending and axial rotation direction. Conclusions Based on the results of this study, unilateral cage-instrumented PLIF and bilateral cage-instrumented PLIF have similar stability after transpedicle screw fixation in the sheep spine model. The unilateral approach can substantially reduce exposure requirements. It also offers the biomechanics advantage of construction using anterior column support combined with pedicle screws just as the bilateral cage-instrumented group. The unpleasant effect of couple motion resulting from inherent asymmetry was absent in the unilateral group. PMID:21070626

  1. Cerebral Palsy Spasticity. Selective Posterior Rhizotomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Warwick J. Peacock; Leila J. Arens; Barbara Berman

    1987-01-01

    We have performed selective posterior rhizotomies on 60 children with cerebral palsy. The procedure involves lumbar laminectomy with stimulation of the rootlets (fascicles) of the second lumbar to the first sacral posterior roots bilaterally; those rootlets associated with an abnormal motor response, as evidenced by sustained or diffused muscular contraction, are divided leaving intact rootlets associated with a brief localized

  2. Intraoperative reversal of neuromuscular block with sugammadex or neostigmine during extreme lateral interbody fusion, a novel technique for spine surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Milan Adamus; Lumir Hrabalek; Tomas Wanek; Tomas Gabrhelik; Jana Zapletalova

    Purpose  Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) is a method for stabilization of the lumbar spine. Intraoperatively, the surgeon identifies\\u000a the lumbar nerve roots with a stimulator to prevent their injury. The objective of this study was to determine the extent\\u000a to which shallow rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block must be intraoperatively reversed for reliable identification of nerve\\u000a roots.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  General anesthesia (midazolam–propofol–sufentanil–oxygen\\/air\\/sevoflurane–rocuronium) was administered

  3. Randomized trial demonstrates that extended-release epidural morphine may provide safe pain control for lumbar surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Offley, Sarah C.; Coyne, Ellen; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Rubery, Paul T.; Zeidman, Seth M; Rechtine, Glenn R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Safe and effective postoperative pain control remains an issue in complex spine surgery. Spinal narcotics have been used for decades but have not become commonplace because of safety or re-dosing concerns. An extended release epidural morphine (EREM) preparation has been used successfully in obstetric, abdominal, thoracic, and extremity surgery done with epidural anesthesia. This has not been studied in open spinal surgery. Methods: Ninety-eight patients having complex posterior lumbar surgery were enrolled in a partially randomized clinical trial (PRCT) of low to moderate doses of EREM. Surgery included levels from L3 to S1 with procedures involving combinations of decompression, instrumented arthrodesis, and interbody grafting. The patients were randomized to receive either 10 or 15 mg of EREM through an epidural catheter placed under direct vision at the conclusion of surgery. Multiple safety measures were employed to prevent or detect respiratory depression. Postoperative pain scores, narcotic utilization, and adverse events were recorded. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups as to supplemental narcotic requirements, pain scores, or adverse events. There were no cases of respiratory depression. The epidural narcotic effect persisted from 3 to 36 hours after the injection. Conclusion: By utilizing appropriate safety measures, EREM can be used safely for postoperative pain control in lumbar surgery patients. As there was no apparent advantage to the use of 15 mg, the lower 10 mg dose should be used. PMID:23646274

  4. Spine interbody implants: material selection and modification, functionalization and bioactivation of surfaces to improve osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Rao, Prashanth J; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2014-05-01

    The clinical outcome of lumbar spinal fusion is correlated with achievement of bony fusion. Improving interbody implant bone on-growth and in-growth may enhance fusion, limiting pseudoarthrosis, stress shielding, subsidence and implant failure. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and titanium (Ti) are commonly selected for interbody spacer construction. Although these materials have desirable biocompatibility and mechanical properties, they require further modification to support osseointegration. Reports of extensive research on this topic are available in biomaterial-centric published reports; however, there are few clinical studies concerning surface modification of interbody spinal implants. The current article focuses on surface modifications aimed at fostering osseointegration from a clinician's point of view. Surface modification of Ti by creating rougher surfaces, modifying its surface topography (macro and nano), physical and chemical treatment and creating a porous material with high interconnectivity can improve its osseointegrative potential and bioactivity. Coating the surface with osteoconductive materials like hydroxyapatite (HA) can improve osseointegration. Because PEEK spacers are relatively inert, creating a composite by adding Ti or osteoconductive materials like HA can improve osseointegration. In addition, PEEK may be coated with Ti, effectively bio-activating the coating. PMID:24890288

  5. Allograft Cellular Bone Matrix in Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion: Preliminary Radiographic and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tohmeh, Antoine G.; Watson, Blake; Tohmeh, Mirna; Zielinski, Xavier J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) is a minimally disruptive alternative for anterior lumbar interbody fusion. Recently, synthetic and allograft materials have been increasingly used to eliminate donor-site pain and complications secondary to autogenous bone graft harvesting. The clinical use of allograft cellular bone graft has potential advantages over autograft by eliminating the need to harvest autograft while mimicking autograft's biologic function. The objective of this study was to examine 12-month radiographic and clinical outcomes in patients who underwent XLIF with Osteocel Plus, one such allograft cellular bone matrix. Methods. Forty (40) patients were treated at 61 levels with XLIF and Osteocel Plus and included in the analysis. Results. No complications were observed. From preoperative to 12-month postoperative followup, ODI improved 41%, LBP improved 55%, leg pain improved 43.3%, and QOL (SF-36) improved 56%. At 12 months, 92% reported being “very” or “somewhat” satisfied with their outcome and 86% being either “very” or “somewhat likely” to choose to undergo the procedure again. Complete fusion was observed in 90.2% (55/61) of XLIF levels. Conclusions. Complete interbody fusion with Osteocel Plus was shown in 90.2% of XLIF levels, with the remaining 9.8% being partially consolidated and progressing towards fusion at 12 months. PMID:23251099

  6. Contralateral femoral nerve compression: An unrecognized complication after extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF).

    PubMed

    Papanastassiou, Ioannis D; Eleraky, Mohammad; Vrionis, Frank D

    2011-01-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) is a relatively new procedure for the treatment of degenerative disc disease avoiding the morbidity of anterior approaches. Ipsilateral L2-5 nerve root irritation and injury are well-described complications. We describe two patients with contralateral extremity symptoms, not reported so far. In the first patient the injury was caused by a displaced endplate fragment compressing the contralateral nerve root; in the second patient, the injury resulted from a far-lateral herniation after the XLIF procedure. Both patients experienced resolution of their symptoms after being reoperated. Overall, this complication was encountered in 2/32 levels treated during the study period. Overzealous endplate removal and breaking of the osteophytes in the opposite corner of the intervertebral disc, although desirable for maximal coronal deformity correction, may lead to irritation of the contralateral nerve roots. Attention is needed especially where the interbody cage is placed posteriorly or diagonally towards the neuralforamen. PMID:20965732

  7. Surgical Management of 3-Level Lumbar Spondylolyses.

    PubMed

    Peng, Baogan; Li, Duanming; Pang, Xiaodong

    2015-07-01

    Three-level lumbar spondylolyses are extremely rare. So far, only 11 cases were reported in the literature. Treatment of multilevel spondylolyses has not been consistent. Conservative treatment is commonly considered first in most patients, but those who remain symptomatic may benefit from operative treatment. We report here 3 cases of 3-level lumbar spondylolyses that were treated successfully with direct isthmic repair in 2 cases and a combined surgery of isthmic repair and interbody fusion in 1 case. Our clinical results indicated that direct defect repair using the screw-hook technique is a simple and safe procedure for the motion segment with normal disc. If the involved disc shows degenerative change, fusion surgery should be consideredSurgical treatment of multilevel spondylolyses varies between fusion, direct isthmic repair, and combined management associating 2 procedures at different levels. The success of management of the 3 patients with 3-level spondylolyses depends on the choice of appropriate treatment for every patient. PMID:26166116

  8. Titanium mesh cage fracture after lumbar reconstruction surgery: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Jin; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Wu, De-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Titanium mesh cage (TMC) was introduced recently to provide anterior structural support and interbody fusion without the need to harvest bone from the iliac crest. Because of its good mechanical behavior and satisfactory clinical outcomes, TMC is commonly used for lumbar burst fractures. Here, we present a female patient who underwent a posterior-anterior L4 corpectomy with TMC placement and developed a cage fracture after 42 months. The patient refused the revision surgery and asked for conservative treatment. At the 3-month follow-up, she reported doing well, with no complaints of back pain or leg pain. There were three cases of TMC fracture have been previously reported in the literature. Only one patient performed a revision surgery with an expandable titanium cage, and all this three patients experienced a good outcome during the follow-up period. TMC fracture is a rare complication of spinal surgery. Close observation or surgical treatment should be considered to improve patient outcomes. Although cage placement, instability, subsidence, and both stress shielding and necrotic bone in the cage appear to play key roles in the pathogenesis of this rare complication, the exact mechanism of this condition remains undetermined.

  9. Vertebral body fracture after anterolateral instrumentation and interbody fusion in two osteoporotic patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karan Dua; Christopher K. Kepler; Russel C. Huang; Anna Marchenko

    2010-01-01

    Background contextThe XLP plate is an anterolateral instrumentation system developed as a part of the eXtreme Lateral Interbody Fusion (XLIF) system for lateral transpsoas interbody fusion, an alternative to anterior interbody fusion.

  10. The Effect of Body Mass Index on Intra-Abdominal Pressure and Blood Loss in Lumbar Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Han, In Ho; Nam, Kyoung Hyup; Choi, Byung Kwan; Song, Geun Sung

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of body mass index (BMI) on intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and intraoperative blood loss (IBL) during lumbar spinal surgery. Methods Thirty patients scheduled for single level posterior lumbar interbody fusion were allocated equally to a normal group (Group 1, BMI;18.5-22.9 kg/m2), an overweight group (Group 2, BMI; 23-24.9 kg/m2), and an obese group (Group 3, BMI; 25.0-29.9 kg/m2) according to BMI. IAP was measured using a urinary bladder catheter; 1) supine after anesthesia induction, 2) prone at skin incision, 3) prone at the end of surgery. In addition, IBL was also measured in the three groups. Results IAP in the supine position was not significantly different in groups 1, 2, and 3 (2.7 mm Hg, 3.0 mm Hg, and 4.2 mm Hg, respectively) (p=0.258), and IAP in the prone position at incision increased to 7.8 mm Hg, 8.2 mm Hg, and 10.4 mm Hg, respectively, in the three groups, and these intergroup differences were significant, especially for Group 3 (p=0.000). IAP at the end of surgery was slightly lower (7.0 mm Hg, 7.7 mm Hg, and 9.2 mm Hg, respectively). IBLs were not significantly different between the three groups. However, IBLs were found to increase with IAP in the prone position (p=0.022) and BMI (p<0.05). Conclusion These results show that BMI affects IAP in the prone position more than in the supine position during lumbar spinal surgery. In addition, IBLs were found to increase with IAP in the prone position and with BMI. Thus, IBLs can be expected to be higher in morbidly obese patients due to an increased IAP. PMID:22500198

  11. Migration of a broken scalpel into the heart after spine surgery.

    PubMed

    De Praetere, Herbert; Vanden Eycken, Caroline; Meuris, Bart; Herijgers, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Iatrogenic vascular problems during posterior lumbar interbody fusion are a rare entity. Migration of a broken scalpel towards the heart has, to our knowledge, never been reported. We present the successful surgical retrieval of a broken scalpel from the heart after posterior lumbar interbody fusion without the use of a cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:24435837

  12. The LP-ESP(®) lumbar disc prosthesis with 6 degrees of freedom: development and 7 years of clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Lazennec, Jean-Yves; Aaron, Alain; Brusson, Adrien; Rakover, Jean-Patrick; Rousseau, Marc-Antoine

    2013-02-01

    The viscoelastic lumbar disk prosthesis-elastic spine pad (LP-ESP(®)) is an innovative one-piece deformable but cohesive interbody spacer providing 6 full degrees of freedom about the 3 axes, including shock absorption. A 20-year research program has demonstrated that this concept provides mechanical properties very close to those of a natural disk. Improvements in technology have made it possible to solve the problem of the bond between the elastic component and the titanium endplates and to obtain an excellent biostability. The prosthesis geometry allows limited rotation and translation with resistance to motion (elastic return property) aimed at avoiding overload of the posterior facets. The rotation center can vary freely during motion. It thus differs substantially from current prostheses, which are 2- or 3-piece devices involving 1 or 2 bearing surfaces and providing 3 or 5 degrees of freedom. This design and the adhesion-molding technology differentiate the LP-ESP prosthesis from other mono-elastomeric prostheses, for which the constraints of shearing during rotations or movement are absorbed at the endplate interface. Seven years after the first implantation, we can document in a solid and detailed fashion the course of clinical outcomes and the radiological postural and kinematic behavior of this prosthesis. PMID:23412443

  13. Construct Rigidity after Fatigue Loading in Pedicle Subtraction Osteotomy with or without Adjacent Interbody Structural Cages.

    PubMed

    Deviren, Vedat; Tang, Jessica A; Scheer, Justin K; Buckley, Jenni M; Pekmezci, Murat; McClellan, R Trigg; Ames, Christopher P

    2012-12-01

    Introduction?Studies document rod fracture in pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) settings where disk spaces were preserved above or adjacent to the PSO. This study compares the multidirectional bending rigidity and fatigue life of PSO segments with or without interbody support. Methods?Twelve specimens received bilateral T12-S1 posterior fixation and L3 PSO. Six received extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) cages in addition to PSO at L2-L3 and L3-L4; six had PSO only. Flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation (AR) tests were conducted up to 7.5 Newton-meters (Nm) for groups: (1) posterior fixation, (2) L3 PSO, (3) addition of cages (six specimens). Relative motion across the osteotomy (L2-L4) and entire fixation site (T12-S1) was measured. All specimens were then fatigue tested for 35K cycles. Results?Regardingmultiaxial bending, there was a significant 25.7% reduction in AR range of motion across L2-L4 following addition of cages. Regarding fatigue bending, dynamic stiffness, though not significant (p?=?0.095), was 22.2% greater in the PSO?+?XLIF group than in the PSO-only group. Conclusions?Results suggest that placement of interbody cages in PSO settings has a potential stabilizing effect, which is modestly evident in the acute setting. Inserting cages in a second-stage surgery remains a viable option and may benefit patients in terms of recovery but additional clinical studies are necessary to confirm this. PMID:24353970

  14. Construct Rigidity after Fatigue Loading in Pedicle Subtraction Osteotomy with or without Adjacent Interbody Structural Cages

    PubMed Central

    Deviren, Vedat; Tang, Jessica A.; Scheer, Justin K.; Buckley, Jenni M.; Pekmezci, Murat; McClellan, R. Trigg; Ames, Christopher P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction?Studies document rod fracture in pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) settings where disk spaces were preserved above or adjacent to the PSO. This study compares the multidirectional bending rigidity and fatigue life of PSO segments with or without interbody support. Methods?Twelve specimens received bilateral T12–S1 posterior fixation and L3 PSO. Six received extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) cages in addition to PSO at L2–L3 and L3–L4; six had PSO only. Flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation (AR) tests were conducted up to 7.5 Newton-meters (Nm) for groups: (1) posterior fixation, (2) L3 PSO, (3) addition of cages (six specimens). Relative motion across the osteotomy (L2–L4) and entire fixation site (T12–S1) was measured. All specimens were then fatigue tested for 35K cycles. Results?Regardingmultiaxial bending, there was a significant 25.7% reduction in AR range of motion across L2–L4 following addition of cages. Regarding fatigue bending, dynamic stiffness, though not significant (p?=?0.095), was 22.2% greater in the PSO?+?XLIF group than in the PSO-only group. Conclusions?Results suggest that placement of interbody cages in PSO settings has a potential stabilizing effect, which is modestly evident in the acute setting. Inserting cages in a second-stage surgery remains a viable option and may benefit patients in terms of recovery but additional clinical studies are necessary to confirm this. PMID:24353970

  15. External transpedicular fixation test of the lumbar spine correlates with the outcome of subsequent lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Soini, J; Slätis, P; Kannisto, M; Sandelin, J

    1993-08-01

    External transpedicular fixation was applied to the lower lumbar spine in a prospective study on 42 patients with chronic low back pain combined with suspected instability of the lumbar segments; the diagnosis was failed disk surgery, spondylolisthesis, and degenerative disk disease. The aim was to realign the involved segments, to restore disk height, and to record changes in pain and performance during the external fixation test. Pain was recorded on a visual analog scale, and performance was assessed using the Oswestry disability score. As independent observer assessed the test and treatment results. Twenty-nine patients experienced relief of pain and performed better in the fixator; they were subjected to anterior interbody fusion, the external frame being kept as a stabilizing device for an additional four months. Twenty-two patients have had follow-up evaluations for two years. One and two years after successful lumbar fusion, significantly (p < 0.02) better pain and performance scores were recorded; the results of lumbar fusion corresponded to the preoperative fixation test. A temporary external fixation test may be a useful procedure in patients considered for subsequent spondylodesis. PMID:8339515

  16. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Akhaddar; Omar Boulahroud; Abad Elasri; Brahim Elmostarchid; Mohammed Boucetta

    2010-01-01

    Intraradicular lumbar disc herniation is a rare complication of disc disease that is generally diagnosed only during surgery.\\u000a The mechanism for herniated disc penetration into the intradural space is not known with certainty, but adhesion between the\\u000a radicular dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament was suggested as the most important condition. The authors report the\\u000a first case of an intraradicular

  17. 9:34 Comparison of impacted femoral ring allografts, threaded cortical bone dowels and titanium cages in lumbar fusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth Burkus; John Dorchak

    2002-01-01

    Purpose of study: To test the efficacy of recombinant human bone morphogenic protein (rhBMP-2), we compared clinical and radiographic outcomes in patients who underwent a single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and were treated with impacted femoral rings and autogenous bone graft, threaded cortical allograft dowels or titanium cages. Patients who received dowels or titanium cages were randomized to receive

  18. Stimulation of the Human Lumbar Spinal Cord With Implanted and Surface Electrodes: A Computer Simulation Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Josef Ladenbauer; Karen Minassian; Ursula S. Hofstoetter; Milan R. Dimitrijevic; Frank Rattay

    2010-01-01

    Human lumbar spinal cord networks controlling stepping and standing can be activated through posterior root stimulation using implanted electrodes. A new stimulation method utilizing surface electrodes has been shown to excite lumbar posterior root fibers similarly as with implants, an unexpected finding considering the distance to these target neurons. In the present study we apply computer modeling to compare the

  19. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePLUS

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  20. Anterior column realignment following lateral interbody fusion for sagittal deformity correction.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Luiz; Fortti, Fernanda; Oliveira, Leonardo; Marchi, Luis; Jensen, Rubens; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Amaral, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    Degenerative and iatrogenic diseases may lead to loss of lordosis or even kyphotic thoracolumbar deformity and sagittal misalignment. Traditional surgery with three-column osteotomies is associated with important neurologic risks and postoperative morbidity. In a novel technique, the lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) is complemented with the sacrifice of the anterior longitudinal ligament and anterior portion of the annulus followed by the insertion of a hyperlordotic interbody cage. This is a less invasive lateral technique named anterior column realignment (ACR) and aims to correct sagittal misalignment in adult spinal deformity (ASD), with or without the addition of minor posterior osteotomies. In this article, we provide an account of the evolution to the ACR technique, the literature, and the Brazilian experience in the treatment of adult spinal deformity with this novel advanced application of LTIF. In the presence of ASD, the risk-to-benefit ratio of a surgical correction must be evaluated. Less invasive surgical strategies can be alternatives to treat the deformity and provide better quality of life to the patient. ACR is an advanced application of lateral transpsoas approach, up to date has shown to be reliable and effective when used for ASD, and may minimize complications and morbidity from traditional surgical procedures. Long-term follow-up and comparative studies are needed to evaluate real benefit. PMID:25971442

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar vertebral apophyseal ring fractures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wilfred CG Peh; James F Griffith; Daniel KH Yip; John CY Leong

    1998-01-01

    SUMMARY Posterior lumbar vertebral apophyseal ring fractures are described in three adolescents presenting with severe low back pain, spinal tenderness and lower limb neurological deficit. Magnetic resonance imaging showed severe L4\\/5 posterior disc protrusion in all three patients. The actual fracture fragment was visualized with difficulty on MRI alone. The diagnosis of apophyseal ring fracture was made by either radiography

  2. Navigation-assisted fluoroscopy in minimally invasive direct lateral interbody fusion: a cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Jonathan E.; Regev, Gilad J.; Garfin, Steven R.; Kim, Choll W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is dependent on intraoperative fluoroscopic imaging for visualization, which significantly increases exposure to radiation. Navigation-assisted fluoroscopy (NAV) can potentially decrease radiation exposure and improve the operating room environment by reducing the need for real-time fluoroscopy. The direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) procedure is a technique for MIS intervertebral lumbar and thoracic interbody fusions. This study assesses the use of navigation for the DLIF procedure in comparison to standard fluoroscopy (FLUORO), as well as the accuracy of the NAV MIS DLIF procedure. Methods Three fresh whole-body cadavers underwent multiple DLIF procedures at the T10-L5 levels via either NAV or FLUORO. Radiation exposure and surgical times were recorded and compared between groups. An additional cadaver was used to evaluate the accuracy of the NAV system for the DLIF procedure by measuring the deviation error as the surgeon worked further from the anterior superior iliac spine tracker. Results Approach, discectomy, and total fluoroscopy times for FLUORO were longer than NAV (P < .05). In contrast, the setup time was longer in NAV (P = .005). Cage insertion and total operating times were similar for both. Radiation exposure to the surgeon for NAV was significantly less than FLUORO (P < .05). Accuracy of the NAV system was within 1 mm for L2-5. Conclusion Navigation for the DLIF procedure is feasible. Accuracy for this procedure over the most common levels (L2-5) is likely sufficient for safe clinical application. Although initial setup times were longer with NAV, simultaneous anteroposterior and lateral imaging with the NAV system resulted in overall surgery times similar to FLUORO. Navigation minimizes fluoroscopic radiation exposure. Clinical significance Navigation for the DLIF procedure is accurate and decreases radiation exposure without increasing the overall surgical time. PMID:25802659

  3. A comparison of perioperative charges and outcome between open and mini-open approaches for anterior lumbar discectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Smith, William D; Christian, Ginger; Serrano, Sherrie; Malone, Kyle T

    2012-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine charge data and long-term outcomes of two approaches for anterior lumbar interbody fusion: a mini-open lateral approach (extreme lateral interbody fusion, XLIF) and an open anterior approach (anterior lumbar interbody fusion, ALIF) through retrospective chart review. A total of 202 patients underwent surgery: 87 with ALIF (Open) and 115 with XLIF (Mini-open) procedures, all with transpedicular fixation. Complications occurred in 16.7% of Open, and 8.2% of Mini-open, procedures (p = 0.041). The mean charges ($US) for one-level Mini-open and Open procedures were $91,995 and $102,146, and for two-level procedures were $124,540 and $144,183, respectively. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). This represents a 10% cost-savings, based on charges, for one-level and 13.6% for two-level Mini-open compared to Open procedures. Functional outcomes improved significantly at two years for both cohorts, although the difference between groups was not statistically significant. In conclusion, the Mini-open approach, compared to the Open, resulted in clinical as well as cost benefits with similar long-term outcomes. PMID:22236486

  4. Acquired lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Deasy, JoAnn

    2015-04-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most frequent reason for spinal surgery in patients over age 65 years. In this condition, narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal and nerve root canals leads to painful, debilitating compression of spinal nerves and blood vessels. As the population ages, an increasing number of patients will be diagnosed and treated for lumbar spinal stenosis by primary care providers. This article reviews the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of lumbar spinal stenosis in adults over age 50 years. PMID:25763664

  5. The Microendoscopic Decompression of Lumbar Stenosis: A Review of the Current Literature and Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Albert P.; Smith, Zachary A.; Lall, Rohan R.; Bresnahan, Lacey E.; Fessler, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is a well-defined pathologic condition with excellent surgical outcomes. Empiric evidence as well as randomized, prospective trials has demonstrated the superior efficacy of surgery compared to medical management for lumbar stenosis. Traditionally, lumbar stenosis is decompressed with open laminectomies. This involves removal of the spinous process, lamina, and the posterior musculoligamentous complex (posterior tension band). This approach provides excellent improvement in symptoms, but is also associated with potential postoperative spinal instability. This may result in subsequent need for spinal fusion. Advances in technology have enabled the application of minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) as an acceptable alternative to open lumbar decompression. Recent studies have shown similar to improved perioperative outcomes when comparing MISS to open decompression for lumbar stenosis. A literature review of MISS for decompression of lumbar stenosis with tubular retractors was performed to evaluate the outcomes of this modern surgical technique. In addition, a discussion of the advantages and limitations of this technique is provided. PMID:22900163

  6. Oral Extrusion of Screw after Anterior Cervical Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Soo; Hwang, Soo Hyun; Han, Jong Woo

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of delayed oral extrusion of a screw after anterior cervical interbody fusion in a 68-year-old man with osteoporosis. Fifteen months earlier, he had undergone C5 corpectomy and anterior cervical interbody fusion at C4-6 for multiple spinal stenoses. The patient was nearly asymptomatic, except for a foreign body sensation in his throat. We conclude that the use of a mesh graft or other instrument in elderly patients and those with osteoporosis or problematic bone quality should be considered carefully and that if surgery were to be performed, periodic postoperative follow-up evaluations are mandatory. PMID:19096688

  7. Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert N. Hensinger; Clifford L. Craig

    \\u000a Injuries of the thoracic and lumbar spine in children are rare. The potential for continued growth, the presence of healthy\\u000a disc tissue, the elasticity of the soft tissues, and well-mineralized bone distinguish these injuries from those in the adult.\\u000a The immature spine has the capacity to remodel the vertebral body, but not the posterior elements. Restoration of height of\\u000a a

  8. Clinical Outcome and Fusion Rates after the First 30 Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusions

    PubMed Central

    Malham, Gregory M.; Ellis, Ngaire J.; Parker, Rhiannon M.; Seex, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The lateral transpsoas approach for lumbar interbody fusion (XLIF) is gaining popularity. Studies examining a surgeon's early experience are rare. We aim to report treatment, complication, clinical, and radiographic outcomes in an early series of patients. Methods. Prospective data from the first thirty patients treated with XLIF by a single surgeon was reviewed. Outcome measures included pain, disability, and quality of life assessment. Radiographic assessment of fusion was performed by computed tomography. Results. Average follow-up was 11.5 months, operative time was 60 minutes per level and blood loss was 50?mL. Complications were observed: clinical subsidence, cage breakage upon insertion, new postoperative motor deficit and bowel injury. Approach side-effects were radiographic subsidence and anterior thigh sensory changes. Two patients required reoperation; microforaminotomy and pedicle screw fixation respectively. VAS back and leg pain decreased 63% and 56%, respectively. ODI improved 41.2% with 51.3% and 8.1% improvements in PCS and MCS. Complete fusion (last follow-up) was observed in 85%. Conclusion. The XLIF approach provides superior treatment, clinical outcomes and fusion rates compared to conventional surgical approaches with lowered complication rates. Mentor supervision for early cases and strict adherence to the surgical technique including neuromonitoring is essential. PMID:23213282

  9. Finite element analysis of the spondylolysis in lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jung-Pin; Zhong, Zheng-Cheng; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Chen, Chen-Sheng; Yu, Chung-hung; Chang, Ting-Kuo; Wei, Shun-Hwa

    2006-01-01

    Spondylolysis is a fracture of the bone lamina in the pars interarticularis and has a high risk of developing spondylolisthesis, as well as traction on the spinal cord and nerve root, leading to spinal disorders or low back pain when the lumbar spine is subjected to high external forces. Previous studies mostly investigated the mechanical changes of the endplate in spondylolysis. However, little attention has been focused on the entire structural changes that occur in spondylolysis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical changes in posterior ligaments, disc, endplate, and pars interarticularis between the intact lumbar spine and spondylolysis. A total of three finite element models, namely the intact L2-L4 lumbar spine, lumbar spine with unilateral pars defect and with bilateral pars defect were established using a software ANSYS 6.0. A loading of 10 N.m in flexion, extension, left torsion, right torsion, left lateral bending, and right lateral bending respectively were imposed on the superior surface of the L2 body. The bottom of the L4 vertebral body was completely constrained. The finite element models estimated that the lumbar spine with a unilateral pars defect was able to maintain spinal stability as the intact lumbar spine, but the contralateral pars experienced greater stress. For the lumbar spine with a bilateral pars defect, the rotation angle, the vertebral body displacement, the disc stress, and the endplate stress, was increased more when compared to the intact lumbar spine under extension or torsion. PMID:17075165

  10. Spectrum of magnetic resonance imaging findings in congenital lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Chalian, Majid; Thawait, Shrey; Belzberg, Alan J; Eng, John; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether congenital lumbar spinal stenosis (CLSS) is associated with a specific degenerative changes of the lumbar spine. METHODS: The lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging studies of 52 subjects with CLSS and 48 control subjects were retrospectively evaluated. In each examination, the five lumbar levels were assessed for the presence or absence of circumferential or shallow annular bulges, annular tears, anterior or posterior disc herniations, epidural lipomatosis, Schmorl’s nodes, spondylolisthesis, pars defects, and stress reactions of the posterior vertebral elements. RESULTS: Compared to control individuals, subjects with CLSS exhibited increased incidence of circumferential and shallow annular bulges, annular tears, disc herniations and spondylolisthesis (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: CLSS is associated with increased incidence of degenerative changes in specific osseous and soft-tissue elements of the lumbar spine. PMID:25516864

  11. Posterior Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Grumet, Robert C.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Posterior hip pain is a relatively uncommon but increasingly recognized complaint in the orthopaedic community. Patient complaints and presentations are often vague or nonspecific, making diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions difficult. The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy and pathophysiology related to posterior hip pain in the athletic patient population. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature via a MEDLINE search of all relevant articles between 1980 and 2010. Results: Many patients who complain of posterior hip pain actually have pain referred from another part of the body—notably, the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint. Treatment options for posterior hip pain are typically nonoperative; however, surgery is warranted in some cases. Conclusions: Recent advancements in the understanding of hip anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment options have enabled physicians to better diagnosis athletic hip injuries and select patients for appropriate treatment. PMID:23015944

  12. Posterior endoscopic discectomy: Results in 300 patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Mohinder; Sen, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Posterior endoscopic discectomy is an established method for treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Many studies have not been reported in literature for lumbar discectomy by Destandau Endospine System. We report a series of 300 patients operated for lumbar dissectomy by Destandau Endospine system. Materials and Methods: A total of 300 patients suffering from lumbar disc herniations were operated between January 2002 and December 2008. All patients were operated as day care procedure. Technique comprised localization of symptomatic level followed by insertion of an endospine system devise through a 15 mm skin and fascial incision. Endoscopic discectomy is then carried out by conventional micro disc surgery instruments by minimal invasive route. The results were evaluated by Macnab's criteria after a minimum followup of 12 months and maximum up to 24 months. Results: Based on modified Macnab's criteria, 90% patients had excellent to good, 8% had fair, and 2% had poor results. The complications observed were discitis and dural tear in five patients each and nerve root injury in two patients. 90% patients were able to return to light and sedentary work with an average delay of 3 weeks and normal physical activities after 2 months. Conclusion: Edoscopic discectomy provides a safe and minimal access corridor for lumbar discectomy. The technique also allows early postoperative mobilization and faster return to work. PMID:22345812

  13. Anterior discectomy without interbody fusion for cervical disc herniation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Pointillart; A. Cernier; J. M. Vital; J. Senegas

    1995-01-01

    Between 1985 and 1990, 68 patients with cervical radiculopathy due to soft disc herniation were treated by anterior cervical discectomy without interbody fusion. Eleven patients were unavailable for follow-up examination. The mean follow-up was 23 months (range 12–54 months). Both clinical and radiographic follow-ups were done, and 92% of the patients was found to have excellent or good clinical results.

  14. Lumbar spinous process-splitting laminectomy for lumbar canal stenosis. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kota; Hosoya, Toshihiko; Shiraishi, Tateru; Matsumoto, Morio; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2005-11-01

    In conventional laminectomy for lumbar canal stenosis (LCS), intraoperative damage of posterior supporting structures can lead to irreversible atrophy of paraspinal muscles. In 2001, the authors developed a new procedure for lumbar laminectomy, the lumbar spinous process-splitting laminectomy (LSPSL). In this new procedure, the spinous process is split longitudinally in the middle and then divided at its base from the posterior arch, leaving the bilateral paraspinal muscles attached to the lateral aspects. Ample working space for laminectomy is obtained by retracting the split spinous process laterally together with its attached paraspinal muscles. After successfully decompressing nerve tissues, each half of the split spinous process is reapproximated using a strong suture. Thus, the supra- and interspinous ligaments are preserved, as is the spinous process, and damage to the paraspinal muscles is minimal. Eighteen patients with LCS underwent surgery in which this new technique was used. Twenty patients in whom conventional laminectomy was undertaken were chosen as controls. At 2 years, the clinical outcomes (as determined using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association [JOA] scores and recovery rate) and the rate of measured magnetic resonance imaging-documented paravertebral muscle atrophy were evaluated and compared between the two groups. The mean JOA score recovery rates were 67.6 and 59.2%, respectively, for patients treated with LSPSL and conventional laminectomy; the mean rates of paravertebral muscle atrophy were 5.3 and 23.9%, respectively (p = 0.0005). Preservation of posterior supporting structures and satisfactory recovery rate after 2 years indicated that this technique can be a useful alternative to conventional decompression surgery for lumbar canal stenosis. PMID:16302638

  15. Risk factors for adjacent segment degeneration after surgical correction of degenerative lumbar scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kee-yong; Son, Jong-Min; Im, Jin-Hyung; Oh, In-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Degenerative lumbar scoliosis surgery can lead to development of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after lumbar or thoracolumbar fusion. Its incidence, risk factors, morbidity and correlation between radiological and clinical symptoms of ASD have no consensus. We evaluated the correlation between the occurrence of radiologic adjacent segment disease and certain imperative parameters. Materials and Methods: 98 patients who had undergone surgical correction and lumbar/thoracolumbar fusion with pedicle screw instrumentation for degenerative lumbar scoliosis with a minimum 5 year followup were included in the study. We evaluated the correlation between the occurrence of radiologic adjacent segment disease and imperative patient parameters like age at operation, sex, body mass index (BMI), medical comorbidities and bone mineral density (BMD). The radiological parameters taken into consideration were Cobb's angle, angle type, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, intercristal line, preoperative existence of an ASD on plain radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgical parameters were number of the fusion level, decompression level, floating OP (interlumbar fusion excluding L5-S1 level) and posterolateral lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Visual Analogue Score (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results: ASD was present in 44 (44.9%) patients at an average period of 48.0 months (range 6-98 months). Factors related to occurrence of ASD were preoperative existence of disc degeneration (as revealed by MRI) and age at operation (P = 0.0001, 0.0364). There were no statistically significant differences between radiological adjacent segment degeneration and clinical results (VAS, P = 0.446; ODI, P = 0.531). Conclusions: Patients over the age of 65 years and with preoperative disc degeneration (as revealed by plain radiograph and MRI) were at a higher risk of developing ASD. PMID:23960277

  16. Minimally invasive posterior stabilization for treating spinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rigotti, S; Boriani, L; Luzi, C A; Marocco, S; Angheben, A; Gasbarrini, A; Zorzi, C

    2013-06-01

    We describe a case of dorsal-lumbar vertebral tuberculosis (Pott's disease) first treated with antibiotic therapy, bed rest, and cast. After 2 months of treatment patient's symptoms worsened. Minimally invasive posterior vertebral stabilization was carried out, with excellent clinic and radiographic results. PMID:22358780

  17. A Clinical Investigation of Contralateral Neurological Symptom after Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF)

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jiayue; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yapeng; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze treatment outcomes and morbidity of contralateral neurological symptom in patients after TLIF surgery and to explore its possible causes. Material/Methods A retrospective study was conducted involving a total of 476 patients who underwent TILF from 2009 to 2012 in our hospital. These cases were divided into a symptomatic group (Group S) and a non-symptomatic group. The differences in contralateral foramen area and disc-height index(DHI) before and after surgery were compared between Group S and a random sample of 40 cases of non-symptomatic group patients (group N). In addition, according to whether the patient underwent second surgery, Group S patients were further divided into a transient neurologic symptoms group (Group T) and an operations exploration group (Group O). The time of symptom appearance, duration, and symptomatic severity (JOA VAS score) were compared between Group T and O. Results Among the 476 patients, 18 had postoperative contralateral neurological symptoms; thus, the morbidity was 3.7815%. The indicators in Group S were lower than in Group N in the differences in contralateral foramen area and disc-height index(DHI) before and after surgery (p<0.05). Five patients (Group O) in Group S had second surgery because of invalid conservative treatment. The surgical exploration rate was 1.0504%. Compared with Group T, the symptoms of Group O patients appeared earlier, persisted longer, and were more serious (p<0.05). Conclusions Contralateral neurological symptom is a potential complication after TLIF, and its causes are diverse. Surgical explorations should be conducted early for those patients with the complication who present with obvious nerve damage. PMID:26109143

  18. Herniated Lumbar Disc and Lumbar Radiculopathy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Parviz Kambin

    The satisfactory outcome of arthroscopically and endoscopically assisted management of herniated lumbar discs hinges on accurate\\u000a diagnosis of the symptom-producing site. Although the mean age of onset of symptoms of disc herniation is around 35 yr, disc\\u000a herniations are occasionally observed in populations older than 60 or younger than 20 yr of age. In younger children, combined\\u000a slippage of the

  19. [XLIF--a new technique of the lumbar vertebra disc replacement: initial experience].

    PubMed

    Hrabálek, L; Wanek, T; Adamus, M

    2010-12-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) is a novel technique for the anterior disc replacement. The aim of this report was description of the surgical technique of XLIF. Based on our experience with first eleven patients we report advantages and drawbacks of this method. Patients who presented with symptomatic degenerative disc disease or failed back surgery syndrome were considered candidates for this surgery. The patient was placed in a true right lateral decubitus position and small (6 cm) left lateral skin incision was performed. Access to the lumbar spine was achieved by approach that passes through the retroperitoneally fat and psoas major muscle, using peroperative fluoroscopy. Expandable retractor was inserted, discectomy and replacement by Oracle (Synthes, USA) cage (with synthetic cancellous bone graft) to the interbody space was performed. XLIF represents save surgical method with maximally careful approach and spacious working portal. The new benefit of XLIF is based on the minimally invasive spine surgery technique through retroperitoneal space. The lateral access to the disc avoids the major vessels and nerves and implant placement in the anterior and bilateral position provides sagital and coronal plane imbalance correction. PMID:21404522

  20. Structural and mechanical evaluations of a topology optimized titanium interbody fusion cage fabricated by selective laser melting process.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ying; Wirtz, Tobias; LaMarca, Frank; Hollister, Scott J

    2007-11-01

    A topology optimized lumbar interbody fusion cage was made of Ti-Al6-V4 alloy by the rapid prototyping process of selective laser melting (SLM) to reproduce designed microstructure features. Radiographic characterizations and the mechanical properties were investigated to determine how the structural characteristics of the fabricated cage were reproduced from design characteristics using micro-computed tomography scanning. The mechanical modulus of the designed cage was also measured to compare with tantalum, a widely used porous metal. The designed microstructures can be clearly seen in the micrographs of the micro-CT and scanning electron microscopy examinations, showing the SLM process can reproduce intricate microscopic features from the original designs. No imaging artifacts from micro-CT were found. The average compressive modulus of the tested caged was 2.97+/-0.90 GPa, which is comparable with the reported porous tantalum modulus of 3 GPa and falls between that of cortical bone (15 GPa) and trabecular bone (0.1-0.5 GPa). The new porous Ti-6Al-4V optimal-structure cage fabricated by SLM process gave consistent mechanical properties without artifactual distortion in the imaging modalities and thus it can be a promising alternative as a porous implant for spine fusion. PMID:17415762

  1. [Isolated posterior pre-marginal hernia. Apropos of 6 cases].

    PubMed

    Siala, M; Bellamine, B; Abdelkafi, A; Hamza, R; Slimane, N; Chevrot, A

    1988-10-01

    Posterior pre-marginal disk hernia, a rare lesion, was diagnosed in six young adults with lumbago. Lateral lumbar spine radiographic images showed an unusual appearance, combining a posterior marginal defect of a vertebral corner and a small bony spicule projecting into lumbar canal. A literature review revealed 27 similar cases, mostly in adolescents. These vertebral disk anomalies are considered by some authors to be fractures of the posterior margin border. A more plausible hypothesis is a pre-marginal hernia, because of lack of a history of injury, the radiologic appearance comparable with that of sequelae of Scheuermann's disease, and the frequent association of these lesions with a spinal growth dystrophy. PMID:2974080

  2. JAMA Patient Page: Lumbar Puncture

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Journal of the American Medical Association JAMA PATIENT PAGE Lumbar Puncture L umbar punctur e, also called ... about lumbar puncture to diagnose meningitis. This Patient Page is based on one previously published in the ...

  3. Higher risk of dural tears and recurrent herniation with lumbar micro-endoscopic discectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco Teli; Alessio Lovi; Marco Brayda-Bruno; Antonino Zagra; Andrea Corriero; Fabrizio Giudici; Leone Minoia

    2010-01-01

    Existing studies on micro-endoscopic lumbar discectomy report similar outcomes to those of open and microdiscectomy and conflicting\\u000a results on complications. We designed a randomised controlled trial to investigate the hypothesis of different outcomes and\\u000a complications obtainable with the three techniques. 240 patients aged 18–65 years affected by posterior lumbar disc herniation\\u000a and symptoms lasting over 6 weeks of conservative management were randomised

  4. Current strategies for the restoration of adequate lordosis during lumbar fusion

    PubMed Central

    Barrey, Cédric; Darnis, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Not restoring the adequate lumbar lordosis during lumbar fusion surgery may result in mechanical low back pain, sagittal unbalance and adjacent segment degeneration. The objective of this work is to describe the current strategies and concepts for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. Theoretical lordosis can be evaluated from the measurement of the pelvic incidence and from the analysis of spatial organization of the lumbar spine with 2/3 of the lordosis given by the L4-S1 segment and 85% by the L3-S1 segment. Technical aspects involve patient positioning on the operating table, release maneuvers, type of instrumentation used (rod, screw-rod connection, interbody cages), surgical sequence and the overall surgical strategy. Spinal osteotomies may be required in case of fixed kyphotic spine. AP combined surgery is particularly efficient in restoring lordosis at L5-S1 level and should be recommended. Finally, not one but several strategies may be used to achieve the need for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. PMID:25621216

  5. Current strategies for the restoration of adequate lordosis during lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Barrey, Cédric; Darnis, Alice

    2015-01-18

    Not restoring the adequate lumbar lordosis during lumbar fusion surgery may result in mechanical low back pain, sagittal unbalance and adjacent segment degeneration. The objective of this work is to describe the current strategies and concepts for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. Theoretical lordosis can be evaluated from the measurement of the pelvic incidence and from the analysis of spatial organization of the lumbar spine with 2/3 of the lordosis given by the L4-S1 segment and 85% by the L3-S1 segment. Technical aspects involve patient positioning on the operating table, release maneuvers, type of instrumentation used (rod, screw-rod connection, interbody cages), surgical sequence and the overall surgical strategy. Spinal osteotomies may be required in case of fixed kyphotic spine. AP combined surgery is particularly efficient in restoring lordosis at L5-S1 level and should be recommended. Finally, not one but several strategies may be used to achieve the need for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. PMID:25621216

  6. The lumbar spine in backward bending.

    PubMed

    Adams, M A; Dolan, P; Hutton, W C

    1988-09-01

    Cadaveric lumbar motion segments were loaded to simulate backward bending (extension) movements of the lumbar spine. The motion segments' resistance was measured initially, and after the spinous processes and apophyseal joints had been cut through in turn. Compression tests were then performed on the discs while they were wedged in full extension. The results showed that extension is resisted mainly by the disc and spinous processes, and that, in hyperextension, damage usually occurs first in the spinous processes (or the soft tissue squashed between them). However, if the spinous processes are particularly widely spaced, then the apophyseal joints can become damaged first. The protection offered the disc by the neural arch is greater in young people, and after the disc height has been reduced by creep loading. The disc can be damaged in hyperextension if the spine is subjected to high compressive forces at the same time. A sudden application of compressive force can cause an anterior disc prolapse, while a cyclic (fatigue) compressive force can increase the posterior bulging of the lamellas in the posterior annulus. PMID:3206295

  7. Lumbar Disc Herniation in Adolescence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Serdar Ozgen; Deniz Konya; O. Zafer Toktas; Adnan Dagcinar; M. Memet Ozek

    2007-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation very rarely occurs in adolescence. The aim of this study was to assess the radiological, clinical and surgical features and case outcomes for adolescents with lumbar disc herniation, and to compare with adult cases. The cases of 17 adolescents (7 girls and 10 boys, age range 13–17 years) who were surgically treated for lumbar disc herniation in

  8. Differences in lumbar and pelvic angles and gluteal pressure in different sitting postures

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji-Su; An, Duk-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of erect sitting, slouched posture with cross-legged sitting, and erect posture with cross-legged sitting on the lumbar and pelvic angles, and gluteal pressure. [Subjects] For the experiments, 17 healthy women were recruited. [Methods] All subjects were asked to perform three sitting postures: erect sitting, slouched posture with cross-legged sitting, and erect posture with cross-legged sitting. Lumbar and pelvic angles were measured using a three-dimensional motion-capture system, and gluteal pressure was measured using a pressure mat. [Results] Compared to erector sitting, slouched posture with cross-legged sitting showed significantly greater lumbar flexion, posterior pelvic tilt, and left pelvic tilt. Compared to erect sitting, erect posture with cross-legged sitting showed significantly greater lumbar flexion and posterior pelvic tilt. Compared to erect posture with cross-legged sitting, slouched posture with cross-legged sitting showed significantly greater lumbar flexion and posterior pelvic tilt. Compared to erect sitting and erect posture with cross-legged sitting, slouched posture with cross-legged sitting showed significantly greater left gluteal pressure; there was no significant difference in right gluteal pressure. [Conclusion] An erect posture can reduce changes in lumbar and pelvic angles, and gluteal pressure compared to a slouched posture during cross-legged sitting.

  9. The lateral transpsoas approach to the lumbar and thoracic spine: A review

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Paul M.; Anderson, Karen K.; McGuire, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the last several years, the lateral transpsoas approach to the thoracic and lumbar spine, also known as extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) or direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF), has become an increasingly common method to achieve fusion. Several recent large series describe several advantages to this approach, including less tissue dissection, smaller incisions, decreased operative time, blood loss, shorter hospital stay, reduced postoperative pain, enhanced fusion rates, and the ability to place instrumentation through the same incision. Indications for this approach have expanded and now include degenerative disease, tumor, deformity, and infection. Methods: A lateral X-ray confirms that the patient is in a truly lateral position. Next, a series of tubes and dilators are used, along with fluoroscopy, to identify the mid-position of the disk to be incised. After continued dilation, the optimal site to enter the disk space is the midpoint of the disk, or a position slightly anterior to the midpoint of the disk. XLIF typically allows for a larger implant to be inserted compared to TLIF or PLIF, and, if necessary, instrumentation can be inserted percutaneously, which would allow for an overall minimally invasive procedure. Results: Fixation techniques appear to be equal between XLIF and more traditional approaches. Some caution should be exercised because common fusion levels of the lumbar spine, including L4-5 and L4-S1, are often inaccessible. In addition, XLIF has a unique set of complications, including neural injuries, psoas weakness, and thigh numbness. Conclusion: Additional studies are required to further evaluate and monitor the short and long-term safety, efficacy, outcomes, and complications of XLIF procedures. PMID:22905326

  10. The Effects of Lumbar Facet Dowels on Joint Stiffness: A Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Trahan, Jayme; Morales, Eric; Richter, Erich O.; Tender, Gabriel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Facet joint arthrosis may play a significant role in low back pain generation. The placement of facet dowels is a percutaneous treatment that aims to fuse the facets and increase joint stiffness. In this cadaveric study, we evaluated spine stiffness after facet dowel insertion in combination with several surgical procedures and determined which motions promote dowel migration. Methods Six fresh frozen lumbar spines were tested in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Spine stiffness was determined for the intact specimens, after L4 laminectomy, and after bilateral L4-L5 facet dowel placement, respectively. One specimen underwent a unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) construct and another underwent extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) graft (22 mm) placement, followed by placement of facet dowels. Afterwards, the specimens were subjected to 10,000 cycles of fatigue testing in flexion-extension or axial rotation. Results The overall decrease in stiffness after laminectomy was 4.6%. Facet dowel placement increased overall stiffness by 7.2%. The greatest increase was seen with axial rotation (13%), compared to flexion, extension, and lateral bending (9.5%, 2.3%, and 5.6%, respectively). The TLIF and XLIF plus dowel construct increased specimen stiffness to 266% and 163% of baseline, respectively. After fatigue testing, dowel migration was detected by computed tomography in the 2 uninstrumented specimens undergoing axial rotation cycling. Conclusion Facet dowels increase the stiffness of the motion segment to which they are applied and can be used in conjunction with laminectomy procedures to increase the stiffness of the joint. However, dowel migration can occur after axial rotation movements. Hybrid TLIF or XLIF plus facet dowel constructs have significantly higher stiffness than noninstrumented ones and may prevent dowel migration. PMID:24688332

  11. Lumbar instrumented fusion compared with cognitive intervention and exercises in patients with chronic back pain after previous surgery for disc herniation: A prospective randomized controlled study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jens Ivar Brox; Olav Reikerås; Øystein Nygaard; Roger Sørensen; Aage Indahl; Inger Holm; Anne Keller; Tor Ingebrigtsen; Oliver Grundnes; Johan Emil Lange; Astrid Friis

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of lumbar fusion for chronic low back pain after surgery for disc herniation has not been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. The aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of lumbar fusion with posterior transpedicular screws and cognitive intervention and exercises. Sixty patients aged 25–60 years with low back pain lasting longer than 1

  12. Biomechanical comparison of lumbar spine instability between laminectomy and bilateral laminotomy for spinal stenosis syndrome – an experimental study in porcine model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ching-Lung Tai; Pang-Hsing Hsieh; Weng-Pin Chen; Lih-Huei Chen; Wen-Jer Chen; Po-Liang Lai

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The association of lumbar spine instability between laminectomy and laminotomy has been clinically studied, but the corresponding in vitro biomechanical studies have not been reported. We investigated the hypothesis that the integrity of the posterior complex (spinous process-interspinous ligament-spinous process) plays an important role on the postoperative spinal stability in decompressive surgery. METHODS: Eight porcine lumbar spine specimens were

  13. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePLUS

    ... effective as a cushion. This may cause a displacement of the disc’s center (called a herniated or ruptured disc) through a crack in the outer layer. Most disc herniations occur in the bottom two discs of the lumbar spine, at and just below the waist. A herniated ...

  14. Extra-abdominal lumbar abscesses caused by retroperitoneal gastrointestinal perforations through the lumbar triangle of Petit: report of two cases diagnosed by CT.

    PubMed

    Coulier, Bruno; Gogoase, Monica; Ramboux, Adrien; Pierard, Frederic

    2012-12-01

    Extra-abdominal abscesses of gastrointestinal origin developing within the lumbar subcutaneous tissues are extremely rare. We report two cases of retroperitoneal bowel perforation presenting spontaneously at admission with a lumbar abscess trespassing the lumbar triangle of Petit, a classical "locus of minus resistencia" of the posterior abdominal wall. The first case was caused by perforation of a retrocecal appendicitis--being concomitantly responsible of a necrotizing fasciitis of the thigh--and in the second case perforation was caused by left colonic diverticulitis. In both cases, the full diagnosis was made with abdominal CT. The patients were threatened by a two-step surgical approach comprising a direct posterior percutaneous drainage of the abscess followed by classical laparotomy. PMID:22270582

  15. MRI Evaluation of Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rupal; Mehta, Chetan; Patel, Narrotam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lower back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease is a condition that affects young to middle-aged persons with peak incidence at approximately 40 y. MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. Aims and Objective: To evaluate the characterization, extent, and changes associated with the degenerative lumbar disc disease by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Study Design: Cross-sectional and observational study. Materials and Methods: A total 109 patients of the lumbar disc degeneration with age group between 17 to 80 y were diagnosed & studied on 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine. MRI findings like lumbar lordosis, Schmorl’s nodes, decreased disc height, disc annular tear, disc herniation, disc bulge, disc protrusion and disc extrusion were observed. Narrowing of the spinal canal, lateral recess and neural foramen with compression of nerve roots observed. Ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was observed. Result: Males were more commonly affected in Degenerative Spinal Disease & most of the patients show loss of lumbar lordosis. Decreased disc height was common at L5-S1 level. More than one disc involvement was seen per person. L4 – L5 disc was the most commonly involved. Annular disc tear, disc herniation, disc extrusion, narrowing of spinal canal, narrowing of lateral recess, compression of neural foramen, ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was common at the L4 –L5 disc level. Disc buldge was common at L3 – L4 & L4 – L5 disc level. Posterior osteophytes are common at L3 - L4 & L5 –S1 disc level. L1- L2 disc involvement and spondylolisthesis are less common. Conclusion: Lumbar disc degeneration is the most common cause of low back pain. Plain radiograph can be helpful in visualizing gross anatomic changes in the intervertebral disc. But, MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. PMID:26023617

  16. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ciricillo, S F; Weinstein, P R

    1993-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis, the results of congenital and degenerative constriction of the neural canal and foramina leading to lumbosacral nerve root or cauda equina compression, is a common cause of disability in middle-aged and elderly patients. Advanced neuroradiologic imaging techniques have improved our ability to localize the site of nerve root entrapment in patients presenting with neurogenic claudication or painful radiculopathy. Although conservative medical management may be successful initially, surgical decompression by wide laminectomy or an intralaminar approach should be done in patients with serious or progressive pain or neurologic dysfunction. Because the early diagnosis and treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis may prevent intractable pain and the permanent neurologic sequelae of chronic nerve root entrapment, all physicians should be aware of the different neurologic presentations and the treatment options for patients with spinal stenosis. Images PMID:8434469

  17. Effects on inadvertent endplate fracture following lateral cage placement on range of motion and indirect spine decompression in lumbar spine fusion constructs: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Brandon G.; Alexander, Gerald E.; Nayak, Aniruddh; Cabezas, Andres; Marulanda, German A.; Murtagh, Ryan; Castellvi, Antonio E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The lateral transpsoas approach to interbody fusion is gaining popularity. Existing literature suggests that perioperative vertebra-related complications include endplate breach owing to aggressive enedplate preparation and poor bone quality. The acute effects of cage subsidence on stabilization and indirect decompression at the affected level are unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the kinematics and radiographic metrics of indirect decompression in lumbar spines instrumented with laterally placed cages in the presence of inadvertent endplate fracture, which was determined radiographically, to specimens instrumented with lateral cages with intact endplates. Methods Five levels in 5 specimens sustained endplate fracture during lateral cage implantation followed by supplementary fixation (pedicle screw/rod [PSR]: n = 1; anterolateral plate [ALP]: n = 4), as part of a larger laboratory-based study. Range of motion (ROM) in these specimens was compared with 13 instrumented specimens with intact endplates. All specimens were scanned using computed tomography (CT) in the intact, noninstrumented condition and after 2-level cage placement with internal fixation under a 400-N follower load. Changes in disc height, foraminal area, and canal area were measured and compared between specimens with intact endplates and fractured endplates. Results Subsidence in the single PSR specimen and 4 ALP specimens was 6.5 mm and 4.3 ± 2.7 mm (range: 2.2–8.3 mm), respectively. ROM was increased in the PSR and ALP specimens with endplate fracture when compared with instrumented specimens with intact endplates. In 3 ALP specimens with endplate fracture, ROM in some motion planes increased relative to the intact, noninstrumented spine. These increases in ROM were paralleled by increase in cage translations during cyclic loading (up to 3.3 mm) and an unpredictable radiographic outcome with increases or decreases in posterior disc height, foraminal area, and canal area when compared with instrumented specimens with intact endplates. Conclusions Endplate fracture and cage subsidence noted radiographically intraoperatively or in the early postoperative period may be indicative of biomechanical instability at the affected level concomitant with a lack of neurologic decompression, which may require revision surgery. PMID:25694896

  18. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio Leone; Alessandro Cianfoni; Alfonso Cerase; Nicola Magarelli; Lorenzo Bonomo

    2011-01-01

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture\\u000a secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower\\u000a lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can\\u000a be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine

  19. The lumbar arteries and veins: Quantification of variable anatomical positioning with application to retroperitoneal surgery.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Tyler S; Power, Adam; Johnson, Marjorie; Power, Nicholas E; Allman, Brian L

    2015-07-01

    The lumbar arteries and veins are segmentally arranged vessels in the abdomen that supply the vertebrae and posterior abdominal/paravertebral muscles. Recent studies have indicated that these vessels have a tendency to vary from the classical description of bilateral pairing. The objective of this study was to more accurately characterize the anatomy of the lumbar vessels through the dissection of 22 cadaveric specimens and examination of 41 patients' computed tomography angiography scans. The positions of the lumbar vessels were measured in reference to the bifurcation/confluence of the common iliac arteries/veins. In 22 cadaveric specimens, the course of the lumbar veins was dissected to the psoas major muscle to characterize venous tributaries. Our results indicate that the lumbar veins were rarely paired, segmentally diverged closer to the iliocaval confluence, and preferentially drained into the left side of the IVC. Several types of lumbar veins were additionally characterized based on their consistent coursing patterns. In contrast, the lumbar arteries exhibited pairing, and these successive pairs were found to be equally spaced along the length of the infrarenal abdominal aorta. In specimens where the median sacral artery and 4th lumbar artery pair arose from a trifurcating common trunk, the positions of the 3rd and 4th lumbar arteries were significantly inferior (P?lumbar vessels, and may help in the treatment of vascular diseases. Clin. Anat. 28:649-660, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25644404

  20. Pathological and myelographic changes in the major types of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    McIvor, G W; Kirkaldy-Willis, W H

    1976-01-01

    Correlated pathological and myelographic observations suggest that the combined types of lumbar spinal stenosis appear to be the most common. The posterior articular processes play the greatest part in producing narrowing--the inferior facet narrowing the central canal and the superior facet narrowing the nerve root canal. PMID:1253501

  1. Measurements of vertebral shape by radiographic morphometry: sex differences and relationships with vertebral level and lumbar lordosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. G. Cheng; Y. Sun; S. Boonen; P. H. F. Nicholson; P. Brys; J. Dequeker; D. Felsenberg

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To examine sex-related and vertebral-level-specific differences in vertebral shape and to investigate the relationships between\\u000a the lumbar lordosis angle and vertebral morphology. Design and patients. Lateral thoracic and lumbar spine radiographs were obtained with a standardized protocol in 142 healthy men and 198 healthy\\u000a women over 50 years old. Anterior (Ha), central (Hc) and posterior (Hp) heights of each

  2. Anterior instrumentation for the treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Jiang, Lei-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    Anterior radical debridement and bone grafting is popular in the treatment of pyogenic infection of the spine, but there remains great concern of placing instrumentation in the presence of infection because of the potentiality of infection recurrence after surgery. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of anterior instrumentation in patients who underwent simultaneous anterior debridement and autogenous bone grafting for the treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis. The series consisted of 22 consecutive patients who were treated with anterior debridement, interbody fusion with autogenous bone grafting and anterior instrumentation for pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine. The patients were prospectively followed up for a minimum of 3 years (average 46.1 months; range 36–74 months). Data were obtained for assessing clinically the neurological function and pain and radiologically the spinal alignment and fusion progress as well as recurrence of the infection. All the patients experienced complete or significant relief of back pain with rapid improvement of neurological function. Kyphosis was improved with an average correction rate of 93.1% (range 84–100%). Solid fusion and healing of the infection was achieved in all the patients without any evidence of recurrent or residual infection. The study shows that combined with perioperative antibiotic regimen, anterior instrumentation is effective and safe in the treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine directly following radical debridement and autogenous bone grafting. PMID:18575900

  3. Surgical outcomes of modified lumbar spinous process-splitting laminectomy for lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kanbara, Shunsuke; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Ito, Keigo; Machino, Masaaki; Kato, Fumihiko

    2015-04-01

    The lumbar spinous process-splitting laminectomy (LSPSL) procedure was developed as an alternative to lumbar laminectomy. In the LSPSL procedure, the spinous process is evenly split longitudinally and then divided at its base from the posterior arch, leaving the bilateral paravertebral muscle attached to the lateral aspects. This procedure allows for better exposure of intraspinal nerve tissues, comparable to that achieved by conventional laminectomy while minimizing damage to posterior supporting structures. In this study, the authors make some modifications to the original LSPSL procedure (modified LSPSL), in which laminoplasty is performed instead of laminectomy. The purpose of this study was to compare postoperative outcomes in modified LSPSL with those in conventional laminectomy (CL) and to evaluate bone unions between the split spinous process and residual laminae following modified LSPSL. Forty-seven patients with lumbar spinal stenosis were enrolled in this study. Twenty-six patients underwent modified LSPSL and 21 patients underwent CL. Intraoperative blood loss and surgical duration were evaluated. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale scores were used to assess parameters before surgery and 12 months after surgery. The recovery rates were also evaluated. Postoperative paravertebral muscle atrophy was assessed using MRI. Bone union rates between the split spinous process and residual laminae were also examined. The mean surgical time and intraoperative blood loss were 25.7 minutes and 42.4 ml per 1 level in modified LSPSL, respectively, and 22.7 minutes and 29.5 ml in CL, respectively. The recovery rate of the JOA score was 64.2% in modified LSPSL and 68.7% in CL. The degree of paravertebral muscle atrophy was 7.8% in modified LSPSL and 22.2% in CL at 12 months after surgery (p < 0.05). The fusion rates of the spinous process with the arcus vertebrae at 6 and 12 months in modified LSPSL were 56.3% and 81.3%, respectively. The modified LSPSL procedure was less invasive to the paravertebral muscles and could be a laminoplasty; therefore, the modified LSPSL procedure presents an effective alternative to lumbar laminectomy. PMID:25594729

  4. Acute Lumbar Burst Fracture Treated by Minimally Invasive Lateral Corpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Rodrigo; Marchi, Luis; Oliveira, Leonardo; Coutinho, Thiago

    2013-01-01

    Burst fractures in acute spinal traumas are a difficult problem to solve. Different approaches and techniques have been utilized, but with high incidence of morbidity and mortality, besides unsatisfactory clinical and radiological results. Mini-open approaches recently emerged and have been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of several spinal conditions. Here we report a case of acute lumbar burst fracture at L2 treated by minimally invasive true lateral approach posteriorly instrumented with percutaneous pedicle screws. The minimum disruptive access in addition to a rigid construction allowed a lumbar corpectomy without the morbidity of standard open approaches, lowering surgery costs and accelerating the patient recovery with successfully clinical and radiological results. PMID:23634314

  5. Giant schwannoma of the lumbar spine. A case report.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Roman; Szmeja, Jacek; Nowak, Stanis?aw; Sokó?, Bartosz; Blok, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    Giant "invasive" schwannomas of the spine occur occasionally, most frequently in the lumbar region. We present the case of a 46-year-old woman with giant "invasive" schwannoma of the lumbar spine, with a 12-year history of illness. The tu-mour originated in the vertebral canal and passed through the paraspinal muscles and retroperitoneal area to the abdominal cavity. The part of the tumour which was in the abdominal cavity was removed by means of laparotomy during the first operation. In the second one, the remaining part of the tumour was removed completely from the vertebral canal and retroperitoneal area through posterior-lateral access. The spine was stabilized with metal implants. Histological examination revealed cellular schwannoma. During the follow-up the pain resolved while paresis of the right quadriceps muscle of the thigh was still present. Cellular schwannoma is a benign form of schwannoma, but it may cause a local recurrence if not removed completely. PMID:20358489

  6. Surgical management of Giant Lumbar Extradural Schwannoma: Report of 3 cases

    PubMed Central

    Srikantha, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Standard surgical approach for extradural paraspinal tumours has been through a unilateral facetectomy, inter-transverse or retroperitoneal approach. Some of these approaches destabilise the spine and consequently require a fusion procedure. Access to these tumours through a minimal access route can decrease tissue damage, fasten post-operative recovery and obviate the need for a concomitant fusion procedure. However, proper case selection and adequate pre-operative planning are important in choosing cases for a minimally invasive approach. We discuss three cases of giant extradural, paraspinal schwannomas. One case that was associated with listhesis along with the tumour situated more anteriorly and embedded in the psoas muscle was managed by lateral retroperitoneal route with simultaneous interbody graft followed by posterior interspinous stabilising device. The other two cases were managed by minimal access route using a 22mm fixed tubular retractor, one by a paramedian approach and one by far lateral approach. The technique and merits of the procedure are discussed.

  7. Herniated lumbar disc

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30-50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1. There is little evidence to suggest that drug treatments are effective in treating herniated disc. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, and surgery for herniated lumbar disc? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 49 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, advice to stay active, analgesics, antidepressants, bed rest, corticosteroids (epidural injections), cytokine inhibitors (infliximab), discectomy (automated percutaneous, laser, microdisectomy, standard), exercise therapy, heat, ice, massage, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), percutaneous disc decompression, spinal manipulation, and traction. PMID:19445754

  8. Non-fusion stabilization of the lumbar spine in the case of degenerative diseases with a dynamic pedicle screw rod Estabilização dinâmica da coluna lombar no tratamento das doenças degenerativas ARTIGO ORIGINAL \\/ ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Archibald von Strempel; Christoph Stoss; Dieter Moosmann; Arno Martin

    Objective: To compare the results of the posterior non-fusion stabilizations and fusion in the treatment of painful degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine. Methods: Cosmic is a dynamic non-fusion pedicle screw rod system for the stabilization of the lumbar vertebral column. The hinged pedicle screw provides for the load being shared between the implant and the vertebral column and allows

  9. Posterior spinal anatomy (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The vertebral column is divided into the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar region. It provides structural support for the trunk and surrounds and protects the spinal cord. The vertebral column also provides attachment points for the muscles of the back and ribs.

  10. A new pathological classification of lumbar disc protrusion and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin-long

    2015-02-01

    Lumbar disc protrusion is common. Its clinical manifestations and treatments are closely related to the pathological changes; however, the pathological classification of lumbar disc protrusion is controversial. This article introduces a new pathological classification comprising four types of lumbar disc protrusion according to intraoperative findings. The damage-herniation type is probably caused by injury and is characterized by soft herniation, the capsule can easily be cut and the broken disc tissue blocks overflow or is easily removed. The broken disc substances should be completely removed; satisfactory results can be achieved by minimally invasive endoscopic surgery. The degeneration-protrusion type is characterized by hard and tough protrusions and the pathological process by degeneration and proliferative reaction. The nerve should be decompressed and relaxed with minimally invasive removal of the posterior wall; the bulged or protruded disc often need not be excised. The posterior vertebral osteochondrosis with disc protrusion type is characterized by deformity of the posterior vertebral body, osteochondral nodules and intervertebral disc protrusion. The herniated and fragmented disc tissue should be removed with partially protruding osteochondral nodules. Intervertebral disc cyst is of uncertain pathogenesis and is characterized by a cyst that communicates with the disc. Resection of the cyst under microscopic or endoscopic control can achieve good results; and whether the affected disc needs to be simultaneously resected is controversial. The new pathological classification proposed here is will aid better understanding of pathological changes and pathogenesis of lumbar disc protrusion and provides a reference for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25708029

  11. Subsidence of stand-alone cervical cages in anterior interbody fusion: warning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erol Gercek; Vincent Arlet; Josee Delisle; Dante Marchesi

    2003-01-01

    Anterior cervical decompression and fusion with anterior plating of the cervical spine is a well-accepted treatment for cervical radiculopathy. Recently, to minimise the extent of surgery, anterior interbody fusion with cages has become more common. While there are numerous reports on the primary stabilising effects of the different cervical cages, little is known about the subsidence behaviour of such cages

  12. Intraspinal arachnoiditis and hydrocephalus after lumbar myelography using methylglucamine iocarmate.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, T S; Hein, O

    1978-01-01

    A 35 year old woman developed a severe meningeal reaction after lumbar myelography using the water-soluble contrast medium methylglucamine iocarmate. Three months after myelography the findings were a transverse spinal cord syndrome corresponding to the middle thoracic segments resulting from well developed leptomeningeal adhesions. This was combined with a noncommunicating hydrocephalus, probably the result of leptomeningeal fibrosis in the posterior fossa. After treatment with a ventriculoatrial shunt the patient is almost free of symptoms. A possible pathogenetic relationship between the contrast medium, the chronic leptomeningeal changes, and the symptoms of our patient is discussed on the basis of the literature. Images PMID:305466

  13. Recurrent lumbar disc herniation: A prospective comparative study of three surgical management procedures

    PubMed Central

    El Shazly, Ayman A.; El Wardany, Mohammed A.; Morsi, Ahmad M.

    2013-01-01

    Context: The optimal surgical treatment of recurrent lumbar disc herniation is controversial. Aim: To compare prospectively the clinical outcomes of surgical treatment of recurrent lumbar disc herniation by three different methods; discectomy alone, discectomy with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), and diecectomy with posterolateral fusion (PLF), regardless of the postoperative radiological findings. Study Design: This is a prospective, randomized, comparative study. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective, randomized, comparative study on 45 patients with first time recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Patients were evaluated clinically by using the criteria of the Japanese Orthopedic Association's evaluation system for low back pain syndrome (JOA score). The patients were classified into three groups: Group A; patients who had revision discectomy alone, group B; patients who had revision discectomy with TLIF, and group C; patients who had revision discectomy with PLF. The mean follow-up period was 37 (±7.85 STD) months. Results: The mean overall recovery rate was 87.2% (±19.26 STD) and the satisfactory rate was 88.9%. Comparison between the three groups showed no significant difference with regard to the mean total postoperative JOA score, recovery rate, and satisfactory rate. However, the postoperative low back pain was significantly higher in group A than that of group B and C. Two patients in group A required further revision surgery. The incidences of dural tear and postoperative neurological deficit were higher in group A. The intraoperative blood loss and length of operation were significantly less in group A. The total cost of the procedure was significantly different between the three groups, being least in group A and highest in group B. There was no significant difference between the three groups with regard to the length of postoperative hospital stay. Conclusion: Revision discectomy is effective in patients with recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Fusion with revision discectomy improves the postoperative low back pain, decreases the intraoperative risk of dural tear or neural damage and decreases the postoperative incidence of mechanical instability or re-recurrence. TLIF and PLF have comparable results when used with revision discectomy, but PLF has significantly less total cost than TLIF. PMID:24403956

  14. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore, E-mail: salva.masala@tiscali.it [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Tarantino, Umberto [University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Nano, Giovanni, E-mail: gionano@gmail.com [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Iundusi, Riccardo [University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Fiori, Roberto, E-mail: fiori.r@libero.it; Da Ros, Valerio, E-mail: valeriodaros@hotmail.com; Simonetti, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  15. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Genevay, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is most commonly due to degenerative changes in older individuals. LSS is being more commonly diagnosed and may relate to better access to advanced imaging and to an aging population. This review focuses on radicular symptoms related to degenerative central and lateral stenosis and updates knowledge of LSS pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. Since patients with anatomic LSS can range from asymptomatic to severely disabled, the clinical diagnosis focuses on symptoms and examination findings associated with LSS. Imaging findings are helpful for patients with persistent, bothersome symptoms in whom invasive treatments are being considered. There is limited information from high quality studies about the relative benefits and harms of commonly used treatments. Interpreting and comparing results of available research is limited by a lack of consensus about the definition of LSS. Nevertheless, evidence supports decompressive laminectomy for patients with persistent and bothersome symptoms. Recommendations favor a shared decision making approach due to important trade-offs between alternative therapies and differences among patients in their preferences and values. PMID:20227646

  16. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods: short-term results in lumbar spine degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Colangeli, S; Barbanti Brodàno, G; Gasbarrini, A; Bandiera, S; Mesfin, A; Griffoni, C; Boriani, S

    2015-06-01

    Pedicle screw and rod instrumentation has become the preferred technique for performing stabilization and fusion in the surgical treatment of lumbar spine degenerative disease. Rigid fixation leads to high fusion rates but may also contribute to stress shielding and adjacent segment degeneration. Thus, the use of semirigid rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has been proposed. Although the PEEK rods biomechanical properties, such as anterior load sharing properties, have been shown, there are few clinical studies evaluating their application in the lumbar spine surgical treatment. This study examined a retrospective cohort of patients who underwent posterior lumbar fusion for degenerative disease using PEEK rods, in order to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and the incidence of complications. PMID:25751575

  17. Changes in Neuroforaminal Height with 2 Level Axial Presacral Lumbar Interbody Fusion at L4-S1

    PubMed Central

    Marawar, Satyajit; Jung, Jin; Sun, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective was to examine the changes in neuroforaminal height at L4-L5 and L5-S1 after insertion and graduated foraminal distraction using the 2 level transsacral implant in a cadaveric model. Methods Discectomy and transsacral instrumentation was performed in six fresh human cadavers at L4-S1. The neuroforaminal height was measured at L4-L5 and L5-S1 before and after insertion of the implant and then at each stage of manual distraction. Results Mean L4-5 neuroforaminal height increased from 18.2 ± 3.1mm to 20.3± 2.9mm (11%) on the left and from 18.8±2.8mm to 20.6± 2.3mm (12%) on the right (P<0.05). Mean L5-S1 neuroforaminal height increased from 15.7±3.0mm to 18.4 ±2.8mm (17%) on the left and from 15.6 ±2.1mm to 18.3 ±1.8mm (17%) on the right (P<0.05). When the neuroforaminal height was plotted against amount of rotation of the screw driver it was found that the neuroforaminal height at L5-S1 increased by 1mm on average for every complete revolution of the screw driver. At least 2 full rotations of the screw driver were achieved in all cadavers. Conclusions The transsacral screw construct distracted the disc space and neuroforaminal height in a cadaveric spine model without soft tissue envelope. During the initial process, manual control of disc space distraction predictably correlated with the increase in the neuroforaminal height to a maximum. However, further research is needed to look at variables affecting disc space pliability, implant subsidence, in vivo application, and clinical benefit of this procedure. PMID:25694937

  18. Clinical assessment of lumbar impairment.

    PubMed

    Waddell, G

    1987-08-01

    Assessment of severity in low back injuries may be based on diagnosis, pain, disability, physical impairment, and capacity for work. It is important to distinguish between impairment and disability. Physical impairment is objective structural limitation; disability is the resulting loss of function. Disability can be assessed by the patient's report of restriction in activities of daily living: bending and lifting, sitting, standing, walking, traveling, socializing, sleep, sex, and putting on or taking off footwear. Detailed statistical analysis of 480 patients identified the most important elements of lumbar impairment as the anatomic and time patterns of pain, lumbar flexion, straight leg raising, neurologic signs, previous surgery, and spinal fractures. Methods of examination need to be improved. An anatomic chart is provided to calculate impairment in the individual patient. The patient's report of pain, disability, and capacity for work should then be compared with the physician's objective assessment of the injury, diagnosis, and lumbar impairment. PMID:2955983

  19. The Effects on the Pain Index and Lumbar Flexibility of Obese Patients with Low Back Pain after PNF Scapular and PNF Pelvic Patterns.

    PubMed

    Park, KwangYong; Seo, KyoChul

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercises using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) scapular and pelvic patterns might decrease the pain index and increase the lumbar flexibility of obese patients with low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty obese patients with low back pain were randomly assigned to an experimetal group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). The exercise program of the experimental group consisted of scapular patterns (anterior depression - posterior elevation) and pelvic patterns (anterior elevation - posterior depression). The control group performed neutral back muscle strengthening exercises. Over the course of four weeks, the groups participated in PNF or performed strengthening exercises for 30 minutes, three times per week. Subjects were assessed a pre-test and post-test using measurements of pain and lumbar flexibility. [Results] The results show that lumbar flexion and lumbar extension significantly improved in the experimental group, had significant improvement and that the Oswestry Disability index (ODI) significantly decreased. However, there were no significant changes in the control group. The experimental group also showed significant differences in the pain index and lumbar flexibility from the control group. [Conclusion] This study showed that PNF can be used to improve pain index rating and lumbar flexibility. The findings indicate that the experimental group experienced greater improvement than the control group by participating in the PNF lumbar stabilization program. PMID:25364115

  20. Endoscopic lumbar foraminotomy.

    PubMed

    Evins, Alexander I; Banu, Matei A; Njoku, Innocent; Elowitz, Eric H; Härtl, Roger; Bernado, Antonio; Hofstetter, Christoph P

    2015-04-01

    Foraminal stenosis frequently causes radiculopathy in lumbar degenerative spondylosis. Endoscopic transforaminal techniques allow for foraminal access with minimal tissue disruption. However, the effectiveness of foraminal decompression by endoscopic techniques has yet to be studied. We evaluate radiographic outcome of endoscopic transforaminal foraminotomies performed at L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 on cadaveric specimens. Before and after the procedures, three dimensional CT scans were obtained to measure foraminal height and area. Following the foraminotomies, complete laminectomies and facetectomies were performed to assess for dural tears or nerve root damage. L3-L4 preoperative foraminal height increased by 8.9%, from 2.12±0.13cm to 2.27±0.14cm (p<0.01), and foraminal area increased by 24.8% from 2.21±0.18cm(2) to 2.72±0.19cm(2) (p<0.01). At L4-L5, preoperative foraminal height was 1.87±0.17cm and area was 1.78±0.18cm(2). Endoscopic foraminotomies resulted in a 15.3% increase of foraminal height (2.11±0.15cm, p<0.05) and 44.8% increase in area of (2.51±0.21cm(2), p<0.01). At L5-S1, spondylitic changes caused diminished foraminal height (1.26±0.14cm) and foraminal area (1.17±0.18cm(2)). Postoperatively, foraminal height increased by 41.6% (1.74±0.09cm, p<0.05) and area increased by 98.7% (2.08±0.17cm(2), p<0.01). Subsequent inspection via a standard midline approach revealed one dural tear of an S1 nerve root. Endoscopic foraminotomies allow for effective foraminal decompression, though clinical studies are necessary to further evaluate complications and efficacy. PMID:25744073

  1. Spondylolisthesis and posterior instability.

    PubMed

    Niggemann, P; Simons, P; Kuchta, J; Beyer, H K; Frey, H; Grosskurth, D

    2009-04-01

    We present the case of a patient with a spondylolisthesis of L5 on S1 due to spondylolysis at the level L5/S1. The vertebral slip was fixed and no anterior instability was found. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an upright MRI scanner, posterior instability at the level of the spondylolytic defect of L5 was demonstrated. A structure, probably the hypertrophic ligament flava, arising from the spondylolytic defect was displaced toward the L5 nerve root, and a bilateral contact of the displaced structure with the L5 nerve root was shown in extension of the spine. To our knowledge, this is the first case described of posterior instability in patients with spondylolisthesis. The clinical implications of posterior instability are unknown; however, it is thought that this disorder is common and that it can only be diagnosed using upright MRI. PMID:19253068

  2. Incidental Dural Tears During Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Retrospective Case Study of 84 Degenerative Lumbar Spine Patients

    PubMed Central

    Anekstein, Yoram; Mirovsky, Yigal

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective case study. Purpose To retrospectively review all incidental dural tears (DTs) that occurred at a single institution, classify them anatomically and evaluate the clinical significance of each subgroup. Overview of Literature Dural tears are considered the most commonly encountered complication during lumbar spine surgery. In contrast to the high frequency of DTs, reports on the characteristic location and mechanism are sparse. Methods We retrospectively retrieved all cases of degenerative lumbar spine surgery performed over a 9-year period and classified all identified DTs according to two independent planes. The coronal plane was divided into lower, middle and upper surgical fields, and the sagittal plane into posterior, lateral and ventral occurring tears. Demographic and clinical variables were retrieved and analyzed to search for significant associations. Results From 2003 to 2011, 1,235 cases of degenerative lumbar spine conditions were treated surgically at our institution. In 84 operations (6.8%), an incidental DT was either identified intraoperatively or suspected retrospectively. The most commonly involved location was the lower surgical field (n=39, 46.4%; p=0.002), followed equally by the middle and upper fields (n=16, 19%). In the sagittal plane, the most commonly involved locations were those in close proximity to the nerve root (n=35, 41.6%), followed by the dorsal aspect of the dural sac (n=24, 28.6%). None of the variables recorded was found to be associated with a particular location. Conclusions In our series, incidental DTs were found to occur most commonly in the lower surgical field. We hypothesize that local anatomic feature, such as the lordotic and broadening lumbar dura, may play a role in the observed DT tendency to occur in the lower surgical field. In light of the high frequency and potentially substantial resulting morbidity of incidental DTs, a better characterization of its location and mechanism may optimize both prevention and management. PMID:25346817

  3. EFFECT OF DISC HEIGHT AND DISC WEDGE ANGLE ON LUMBAR SPINE UNDER AXIAL COMPRESSIVE FORCE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    YUAN LI ZHOU; QING HANG ZHANG; EE CHON TEO

    Three-dimensional L4-L5 finite element (FE) models of three disc heights (9.5mm, 11.5mm, and 13.5mm) and three disc wedge angles (5º, 8 º, and 10 º) were developed to investigate their effect on L4-L5 lumbar motion segment under pure axial compressive loading. The FE predictions indicated that the axial disc displacement and the posterior disc bulge increased greatly with an increase

  4. Contralateral femoral nerve compression: An unrecognized complication after extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ioannis D. Papanastassiou; Mohammad Eleraky; Frank D. Vrionis

    2011-01-01

    Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) is a relatively new procedure for the treatment of degenerative disc disease avoiding the morbidity of anterior approaches. Ipsilateral L2–5 nerve root irritation and injury are well-described complications. We describe two patients with contralateral extremity symptoms, not reported so far. In the first patient the injury was caused by a displaced endplate fragment compressing the

  5. Anterior Interbody Fusion with the BAK-Cage in Cervical Spondylosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Matge

    1998-01-01

    Summary   BAK-C is a new autostabilizing interbody cage which is implanted during an anterior cervical procedure to provide stability\\u000a to the motion segment and allow fusion to occur. Special intrumentation is provided with a bone collecting reamer. The system\\u000a utilizes surgical site bone graft as the osteo-inductive material within the implant.\\u000a \\u000a Biomechanical testing indicates improved stability and animal studies show

  6. Posterior Cranial Fossa Meningiomas*

    PubMed Central

    Javalkar, Vijayakumar; Banerjee, Anirban Deep; Nanda, Anil

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the outcomes, complications, and recurrence rates of posterior cranial fossa meningiomas. We retrospectively reviewed our surgical experience with 64 posterior cranial fossa meningiomas. Mean age was 56 years with a female preponderance (67.2%). Headache was the most common symptom. Retrosigmoid approach was the commonest surgical procedure (23.4%). The incidence of cranial nerve related complications was 28%. Postoperatively facial nerve weakness was observed in 11%. The incidence of cerebrospinal fluid leak was 4.6%. Gross total resection was achieved in 37 patients (58%). Sixteen patients (25%) with residual tumors underwent Gamma knife radiosurgery. Recurrence or tumor progression was observed in 12 patients (18.7%). Operative mortality was 3.1%. At their last follow-up, 93% of the cases achieved Glasgow Outcome Scale scores 4 or 5. Total excision is the ideal goal which can be achieved with meningiomas located in certain location, such as lateral convexity, but for other posterior fossa meningiomas the close proximity of critical structures is a major obstacle in achieving this goal. In practicality, a balance between good functional outcome and extent of resection is important for posterior cranial fossa meningiomas in proximity to critical structures. PMID:23372989

  7. Posterior vertebral rim fractures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I BEGGS; J ADDISON

    Fracture of the posterior vertebral endplate is a cause of low back pain in adolescents and young adults. Clinically it resembles an acute disc prolapse with low back pain and radiculopa- thy, but may present with neurogenic claudication due to spinal stenosis in older patients. The lesions may be incidental findings. Plain radiographs are diagnostic in about 40% of cases.

  8. Lateral Interbody Fusion for Treatment of Discogenic Low Back Pain: Minimally Invasive Surgical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Luis; Oliveira, Leonardo; Amaral, Rodrigo; Castro, Carlos; Coutinho, Thiago; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Pimenta, Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain is one of the most common ailments in the general population, which tends to increase in severity along with aging. While few patients have severe enough symptoms or underlying pathology to warrant surgical intervention, in those select cases treatment choices remain controversial and reimbursement is a substancial barrier to surgery. The object of this study was to examine outcomes of discogenic back pain without radiculopathy following minimally-invasive lateral interbody fusion. Twenty-two patients were treated at either one or two levels (28 total) between L2 and 5. Discectomy and interbody fusion were performed using a minimallyinvasive retroperitoneal lateral transpsoas approach. Clinical and radiographic parameters were analyzed at standard pre- and postoperative intervals up to 24 months. Mean surgical duration was 72.1 minutes. Three patients underwent supplemental percutaneous pedicle screw instrumentation. Four (14.3%) stand-alone levels experienced cage subsidence. Pain (VAS) and disability (ODI) improved markedly postoperatively and were maintained through 24 months. Segmental lordosis increased significantly and fusion was achieved in 93% of levels. In this series, isolated axial low back pain arising from degenerative disc disease was treated with minimally-invasive lateral interbody fusion in significant radiographic and clinical improvements, which were maintained through 24 months. PMID:22548181

  9. Clinical outcome of stand-alone ALIF compared to posterior instrumentation for degenerative disc disease: A pilot study and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Udby, Peter M; Bech-Azeddine, Rachid

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the article was to: a) present results from a case cohort pilot study comparing stand-alone ALIF and TLIF and, b) review the literature on studies comparing the clinical outcome of stand-alone ALIF with posterior instrumentation including TLIF or PLIF, in patients with disabling low back pain resulting from degenerative disc disease. ALIF surgery has previously been linked with certain high risk complications and unfavorable long term fusion results. Newer studies suggest that stand-alone ALIF can possibly be advantageous compared to other types of posterior instrumented interbody fusion for a selected group of DDD patients. The methods and material consisted of a cohort pilot study of patients, with DDD treated with stand-alone ALIF or TLIF followed by a literature review conducted through a comprehensive PubMed database search of the English literature. Studies comparing stand-alone ALIF with posterior instrumented interbody fusion were selected and reviewed. Results from the pilot study, n = 21, showed a reduced perioperative blood loss, shorter operative time and a trend towards better pain reduction and decreased use of opioid analgesics in patients undergoing stand-alone ALIF compared to posterior instrumented fusion with TLIF. The literature review included three studies, n = 630. All three studies were retrospective cohort studies. The average patient follow-up was 2-years but with heterogeneous selected outcomes. Two of three articles documented significant advantages when using stand-alone ALIF on outcomes such as ODI, VAS, surgical time, blood loss and patient satisfaction. No study found stand-alone ALIF inferior in chosen outcomes including fusion. In conclusion the pilot study and the literature review, finds similar clinical outcomes and fusion rates after stand-alone ALIF and posterior interbody fusion. Stand-alone ALIF was associated with a shorter duration of surgery, less perioperative blood loss and a faster improvement post-operatively. Therefore stand-alone ALIF is a viable and important surgical option, which could be considered first choice as surgical treatment. PMID:25855474

  10. Posterior Urethral Valves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Divyesh Y. Desai; Peter M. Cuckow

    Posterior urethral valves (PUV) remains the most common cause of bladder outflow obstruction in male infants. The condition\\u000a has an estimated incidence of 1\\/4000 to 1\\/5000 live births. It is a panurinary tract disorder with a variable spectrum of\\u000a severity that can affect both the upper and lower urinary tract.1,2

  11. [Posterior cortical atrophy].

    PubMed

    Solyga, Volker Moræus; Western, Elin; Solheim, Hanne; Hassel, Bjørnar; Kerty, Emilia

    2015-06-01

    BACKGROUND Posterior cortical atrophy is a neurodegenerative condition with atrophy of posterior parts of the cerebral cortex, including the visual cortex and parts of the parietal and temporal cortices. It presents early, in the 50s or 60s, with nonspecific visual disturbances that are often misinterpreted as ophthalmological, which can delay the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to present current knowledge about symptoms, diagnostics and treatment of this condition.METHOD The review is based on a selection of relevant articles in PubMed and on the authors' own experience with the patient group.RESULTS Posterior cortical atrophy causes gradually increasing impairment in reading, distance judgement, and the ability to perceive complex images. Examination of higher visual functions, neuropsychological testing, and neuroimaging contribute to diagnosis. In the early stages, patients do not have problems with memory or insight, but cognitive impairment and dementia can develop. It is unclear whether the condition is a variant of Alzheimer's disease, or whether it is a separate disease entity. There is no established treatment, but practical measures such as the aid of social care workers, telephones with large keypads, computers with voice recognition software and audiobooks can be useful.INTERPRETATION Currently available treatment has very limited effect on the disease itself. Nevertheless it is important to identify and diagnose the condition in its early stages in order to be able to offer patients practical assistance in their daily lives. PMID:26037756

  12. Contemporary management of symptomatic lumbar disc herniations.

    PubMed

    Jegede, Kolawole A; Ndu, Anthony; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2010-04-01

    Lumbar disc herniations are common clinical entities that may cause lumbar-related symptoms. The spectrum of treatment options is geared toward a patient's clinical presentation and ranges from nothing to surgical intervention. Many lumbar disc herniations cause no significant symptoms. In studies of asymptomatic individuals who have never experienced lumbar-related symptoms, 30% have been reported to have major abnormality on magnetic resonance imaging. The mainstay of treatment of patients with symptomatic disc herniations is accepted to be nonoperative (as long as there are no acute or progressive neurologic deficits); this includes medications, physical therapy, and potentially lumbar injection. For patients with symptomatic disc herniations who fail to respond appropriately to conservative measures, surgical intervention may be considered. For this population, lumbar discectomy is considered to be a good option. PMID:20399360

  13. Case report and review of lumbar hernia

    PubMed Central

    Walgamage, Thilan B.; Ramesh, B.S.; Alsawafi, Yaqoob

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar hernias are uncommon and about 300 cases have been reported till date. They commonly occur due to trauma, surgery and infection. They are increasingly being reported after motor vehicle collision injuries. However, spontaneous lumbar hernias are rare and are reported infrequently. It is treated with different surgical approaches and methods. We report a case of primary spontaneous lumbar hernia which was repaired by transperitonial laparoscopic approach using Vypro (polypropylene/polyglactin) mesh and covered with a peritoneal flap. PMID:25555145

  14. Endoscopic Discectomy for Extraforaminal Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuichi Takano; Nobuhiro Yuasa

    The microendoscopic discectomy (MED) technique has been one of the promising surgeries for lumbar disc herniation in the last few years. The purpose of this study is to report the feasibility of a minimally invasive technique for extraforaminal lumbar disc herniation. Ten patients with extraforaminal lumbar disc herniation (one at L3-4, four at L4-5, and five at L5-S1) underwent MED

  15. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH) data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D) computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP). All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical operations by its relative position to the lumbar plexus. 3D reconstructions of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data provide a virtual morphological basis for anterior lumbar surgery. PMID:21492461

  16. Retroperitoneal laparoscopic bilateral lumbar sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Segers, B; Himpens, J; Barroy, J P

    2007-06-01

    The first retroperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy was performed in 1924 by Julio Diez. The classic procedure for sympathectomy is open surgery. We report a unilateral laparoscopic retroperitoneal approach to perform bilateral lumbar sympathectomy. This approach was performed for a 43-year-old man with distal arterial occlusive disease and no indication for direct revascularization. His predominant symptoms were intermittent claudication at 100 metres and cold legs. The patient was placed in a left lateral decubitus position. The optical system was placed first in an intra-abdominal position to check that the trocars were well positioned in the retroperitoneal space. The dissection of retroperitoneum was performed by CO2 insufflation. The inferior vena cava was reclined and the right sympathetic chain was individualized. Two ganglia (L3-L4) were removed by bipolar electro-coagulation. The aorta was isolated on a vessel loop and careful anterior traction allowed a retro-aortic pre-vertebral approach between the lumbar vessels. The left sympathetic chain was dissected. Two ganglia (L3-L4) were removed by bipolar electro-coagulation. PMID:17685269

  17. Minimally invasive surgery through endoscopic laminotomy and foraminotomy for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Polikandriotis, John A.; Hudak, Elizabeth M.; Perry, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common cause of radicular and generalized back pain among older adults. Endoscopic minimally invasive surgery, in contrast to open decompression, may provide the opportunity for a less invasive surgical intervention. Thus, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety (operative complications, estimated blood loss, operative room time) and effectiveness (pre- versus postoperative level of disability and pain severity) of minimally invasive surgery using endoscopic laminotomy and foraminotomy among a large sample of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods This study is composed of 320 consecutive patients with lumbar spinal stenosis who underwent posterior lumbar laminotomy and foraminotomy between 2008 and 2011. Outcome measures consisted of perioperative complications, estimated blood loss, operative room time, level of disability, and pain severity. Pain severity and level of disability were prospectively analyzed to an average of 18 months (12–36 months) post-surgery. Results There was an average estimated blood loss of 39.3 cc and a mean operative room time of 74 min. Seven patients experienced minor operative complications. All patients were discharged the same day as surgery and reported a significantly lower level of disability (p = 0.00) and pain severity (p = 0.00) postoperative compared to preoperative. Conclusions Minimally invasive surgery using endoscopy for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis has a short operative time, a low operative complication rate, and minimal estimated blood loss. This study also indicates that MIS for the treatment of LSS can significantly reduce pain and disability level. Thus, minimally invasive surgery using endoscopic laminotomy and foraminotomy appears to be a safe and effective alternative surgical treatment for open decompression surgery in adult patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:24403742

  18. Acquired lumbar stenosis: topic review and a case series.

    PubMed

    Jane, J A; DiPierro, C G; Helm, G A; Shaffrey, C I; Jane, J A

    1997-08-15

    Stenosis of the central and lateral lumbar vertebral canal can be congenital or acquired; the latter is most often caused by a degenerative process. The associated neurogenic claudication and/or radiculopathic symptom complexes are thought to result from compression of the cauda equina and lumbosacral nerve roots by hypertrophy of or encroachment by any combination of the following: canal walls, ligamenta flava, intervertebral discs, posterior longitudinal ligament, or epidural fat. The authors' technique for the treatment of lumbar stenosis involves extensive unilateral decompression with undercutting of the spinous process and obviates the need for instrumentation by using a contralateral autologous bone fusion. The results in a series of 29 patients in whom the procedure was performed suggest that this decompression method safely and successfully treats not only the radicular symptoms caused by lateral stenosis but also the neurogenic claudication symptoms associated with central stenosis. In addition, the procedure can preserve spinal stability without instrumentation by using contralateral autologous bone fusion along the laminae and spinous processes. PMID:15104424

  19. The effects of single-level instrumented lumbar laminectomy on adjacent spinal biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Bisschop, Arno; Holewijn, Roderick M; Kingma, Idsart; Stadhouder, Agnita; Vergroesen, Pieter-Paul A; van der Veen, Albert J; van Dieën, Jaap H; van Royen, Barend J

    2015-02-01

    Study Design?Biomechanical study. Objective?Posterior instrumentation is used to stabilize the spine after a lumbar laminectomy. However, the effects on the adjacent segmental stability are unknown. Therefore, we studied the range of motion (ROM) and stiffness of treated lumbar spinal segments and cranial segments after a laminectomy and after posterior instrumentation in flexion and extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR). These outcomes might help to better understand adjacent segment disease (ASD), which is reported cranial to the level on which posterior instrumentation is applied. Methods?We obtained 12 cadaveric human lumbar spines. Spines were axially loaded with 250?N for 1 hour. Thereafter, 10 consecutive load cycles (4 Nm) were applied in FE, LB, and AR. Subsequently, a laminectomy was performed either at L2 or at L4. Thereafter, load-deformation tests were repeated, after similar preloading. Finally, posterior instrumentation was added to the level treated with a laminectomy before testing was repeated. The ROM and stiffness of the treated, the cranial adjacent, and the control segments were calculated from the load-displacement data. Repeated-measures analyses of variance used the spinal level as the between-subject factor and a laminectomy or instrumentation as the within-subject factors. Results?After the laminectomy, the ROM increased (+19.4%) and the stiffness decreased (-18.0%) in AR. The ROM in AR of the adjacent segments also increased (+11.0%). The ROM of treated segments after instrumentation decreased in FE (-74.3%), LB (-71.6%), and AR (-59.8%). In the adjacent segments after instrumentation, only the ROM in LB was changed (-12.9%). Conclusions?The present findings do not substantiate a biomechanical pathway toward or explanation for ASD. PMID:25649753

  20. A Prototype Haptic Lumbar Puncture Simulator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Gorman; Thomas Krummel; Roger Webster; Monica Smith; David Hutchens

    2000-01-01

    Lumbar punctures (LP) are complex, precise procedures done to obtain cerebro-spinal fluid from a patient for diagnostic purposes. Incorrect techniques resulting from inadequate training or supervision can result in sub-optimal outcomes. As tactile feedback is crucial for a successful lumbar puncture, this procedure serves as an ideal candidate for the development of a haptic training simulator. The intent of this

  1. Totally extraperitoneal laparoendoscopic repair of lumbar hernia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Meinke

    2003-01-01

    Background: The repair of congenital and acquired lumbar hernias has remained a significant surgical challenge for over three centuries. Transperitoneal laparoendoscopic techniques have been reported that have achieved success in repairing these difficult hernias using a variety of synthetic mesh. Careful review of the surgical literature addressing the repair of lumbar hernia reveals that only fourteen successful cases have been

  2. Investigation of biomechanical behavior of lumbar vertebral segments with dynamic stabilization device using finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deoghare, Ashish B.; Kashyap, Siddharth; Padole, Pramod M.

    2013-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease is a major source of lower back pain and significantly alters the biomechanics of the lumbar spine. Dynamic stabilization device is a remedial technique which uses flexible materials to stabilize the affected lumbar region while preserving the natural anatomy of the spine. The main objective of this research work is to investigate the stiffness variation of dynamic stabilization device under various loading conditions under compression, axial rotation and flexion. Three dimensional model of the two segment lumbar spine is developed using computed tomography (CT) scan images. The lumbar structure developed is analyzed in ANSYS workbench. Two types of dynamic stabilization are considered: one with stabilizing device as pedicle instrumentation and second with stabilization device inserted around the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis suggests that proper positioning of the dynamic stabilization device is of paramount significance prior to the surgery. Inserting the device in the posterior region indicates the adverse effects as it shows increase in the deformation of the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis executed by positioning stabilizing device around the inter-vertebral disc yields better result for various stiffness values under compression and other loadings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Posterior Cervical Foraminotomy and Laminectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John E. O’Toole; Kurt M. Eichholz; Richard G. Fessler

    \\u000a Posterior decompressive procedures are fundamental tools in the surgical treatment of symptomatic cervical degenerative spine\\u000a disease [1–4]. Even as anterior cervical procedures have gained prominence, posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy still provides\\u000a symptomatic relief in 92–97% of patients with radiculopathy from foraminal stenosis or lateral herniated discs [3, 5]. Similarly,\\u000a posterior cervical decompression for cervical stenosis achieves neurological improvement in 62.5–83% of

  4. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  5. Plexiform Schwannoma of Lumbar Region

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Asmita; Verma, Sarika; Suri, Tarun; Agarwal, Anil; Bansal, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Plexiform schwannoma is an unusual peripheral nerve sheath tumor. It can mimic plexiform neurofibroma. A five-year-old girl presented with painful swelling in left lumbar region. Radiologic investigations showed a multinodular tumor in the subcutaneous plane of lumbosacral region. A complete excision and histopathologic examination revealed a plexiform tumor composed of hypocellular and hypercellular areas with verocay bodies. The tumor cells showed strong positivity for S-100 protein, rendering a final diagnosis of plexiform schwannoma. The child has been free of recurrence in 12-month follow-up.

  6. Lumbar disc herniation in patients with developmental spinal stenosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Y. Dai; B. Ni; L. S. Jia; H. K. Liu

    1996-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar disc herniation are usually regarded as two pathogenetically different conditions, but in the literature lumbar disc herniation in patients with developmental spinal stenosis has been rarely documented. In a clinical retrospective study, 42 lumbar disc herniations with developmental spinal stenosis were reported and analyzed. Discectomy was performed after laminotomy. The patients were followed-up for an

  7. Total disc replacement compared to lumbar fusion: a randomised controlled trial with 2-year follow-up

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Svante Berg; Tycho Tullberg; Björn Branth; Claes Olerud; Hans Tropp

    2009-01-01

    The study design includes a prospective, randomised controlled study comparing total disc replacement (TDR) with posterior\\u000a fusion. The main objective of this study is to compare TDR with lumbar spinal fusion, in terms of clinical outcome, in patients\\u000a referred to a spine clinic for surgical evaluation. Fusion is effective for treating chronic low back pain (LBP), but has\\u000a drawbacks, such

  8. The Great Imitator: Ocular Syphilis Presenting as Posterior Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Alan; Ziaee, Saba M.; Hosseini, Hamid; Voleti, Vinod; Schwartz, Steven D.; Kim, Nam U.; Ge, Phillip S.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 34 Final Diagnosis: Ocular syphilis Symptoms: Painful unilateral vision loss Medication: Benzylpenicillin Clinical Procedure: Lumbar puncture Specialty: Infectious Diseases • Ophthalmology Objective: Rare disease Background: Syphilis is often known as the “Great Imitator”. The differential diagnosis of posterior uveitis is broad with ocular syphilis being particularly challenging to diagnose as it presents similarly to other ocular conditions such as acute retinal necrosis. Case Report: A 34-year-old woman with multiple sexual partners over the past few years presented with painful and progressively worsening unilateral vision loss for 2 weeks. Several months prior, she had reported non-specific symptoms of headache and diffuse skin rash. Despite treatment with oral acyclovir for 3 weeks, her vision progressively declined, and she was referred to the university ophthalmology clinic for further evaluation. On examination, there was concern for acute retinal necrosis and she was empirically treated with parenteral acyclovir while awaiting further infectious disease study results. Workup ultimately revealed ocular syphilis, and neurosyphilis was additionally confirmed with cerebrospinal fluid studies. Treatment with intravenous penicillin was promptly initiated with complete visual recovery. Conclusions: Ocular syphilis varies widely in presentation and should be considered in all patients with posterior uveitis, especially with a history of headache and skin rashes. However, given that acute retinal necrosis is a more common cause of posterior uveitis and can rapidly result in permanent vision loss, it should be empirically treated whenever it is suspected while simultaneous workup is conducted to evaluate for alternative diagnoses. PMID:26151369

  9. Clinical and Radiological Outcomes of Anterior Cervical Interbody Fusion Using Hydroxyapatite Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Chul; Kang, Sung Won; Kim, Se Hyuk; Cho, Ki Hong

    2009-01-01

    Objective This is retrospective study of clinical and radiological outcomes of anterior cervical fusion using Bongros-HA™ (BioAlpha, Seongnam, Korea) which is a type of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) spacer to evaluate the efficacy in its clinical application and usefulness as a reliable alternative to autograft bone. Methods Twenty-nine patients were enrolled in this study and 40 segments were involved. All patients were performed anterior cervical interbody fusion using HA spacer and plating system. Indications for surgery were radiculopathy caused by soft-disc herniation or spondylosis in 18 patients, spondylotic myelopathy in 1 patient, and spinal trauma in 10 patients. Cervical spine radiographs were obtained on postoperative 1day, 1week, and then at 1, 2, 6, and 12 months in all patients to evaluate intervertebral disc height, and the degrees of lordosis. Cervical computed tomography was done at postoperative 12 month in all patients to confirm the fusion status. The mean period of clinical follow-up was 17 months. Results Complete interbody fusion was achieved in 100% of patients. Preoperative kyphotic deformities were corrected in all cases after surgery. Intervertebral disc height was well maintained during follow up period. There were no cases of graft extrusion, graft deterioration and graft fracture. Conclusion HA spacer is very efficient in achieving cervical fusion, maintaining intervertebral disc height, and restoring lordosis. When combined with the placement of a cervical plate, immediate stability can be achieved and graft related complication can be prevented. PMID:19893716

  10. Stand-Alone Lateral Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Low-Grade Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Luis; Abdala, Nitamar; Oliveira, Leonardo; Amaral, Rodrigo; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Pimenta, Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the stand-alone lateral interbody fusion as a minimally invasive option for the treatment of low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis with a minimum 24-month followup. Prospective nonrandomized observational single-center study. 52 consecutive patients (67.6 ± 10?y/o; 73.1% female; 27.4 ± 3.4?BMI) with single-level grade I/II single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis without significant spine instability were included. Fusion procedures were performed as retroperitoneal lateral transpsoas interbody fusions without screw supplementation. The procedures were performed in average 73.2 minutes and with less than 50cc blood loss. VAS and Oswestry scores showed lasting improvements in clinical outcomes (60% and 54.5% change, resp.). The vertebral slippage was reduced in 90.4% of cases from mean values of 15.1% preoperatively to 7.4% at 6-week followup (P < 0.001) and was maintained through 24 months (7.1%, P < 0.001). Segmental lordosis (P < 0.001) and disc height (P < 0.001) were improved in postop evaluations. Cage subsidence occurred in 9/52 cases (17%) and 7/52 cases (13%) spine levels needed revision surgery. At the 24-month evaluation, solid fusion was observed in 86.5% of the levels treated. The minimally invasive lateral approach has been shown to be a safe and reproducible technique to treat low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis. PMID:22545019

  11. Posterior fossa ependymomas in adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Davis; L. Symon

    1986-01-01

    Summary Sixteen patients with posterior fossa ependymomas are presented. This tumour is relatively uncommon in adults and is usually associated with a relatively “benign” course when compared with other posterior fossa glial tumours. The natural history and treatment of these tumours is discussed.

  12. A morphometric study of the lumbar spinous process in the Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Cai, B.; Ran, B.; Li, Q.; Li, Z.H.; Li, F.N.; Li, M.; Yan, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to analyze the anatomical parameters of the lumbar spine spinous process for an interspinous stabilization device designed for the Chinese population and to offer an anatomical basis for its clinical application. The posterior lumbar spines (T12-S1) of 52 adult cadavers were used for measuring the following: distance between two adjacent spinous processes (DB), distance across two adjacent spinous processes (DA), thickness of the central spinous processes (TC), thickness of the superior margin of the spinous processes (TS), thickness of the inferior margin of the spinous processes (TI), and height of the spinous processes (H). Variance and correlation analyses were conducted for these data, and the data met the normal distribution and homogeneity of variance. DB decreased gradually from L1-2 to L5-S1. DA increased from T12-L1 to L2-3 and then decreased from L2-3 to L4-5. The largest H in males was noted at L3 (25.45±5.96 mm), whereas for females the largest H was noted at L4 (18.71±4.50 mm). Usually, TS of the adjacent spinous process was lower than TI. Based on the anatomical parameters of the lumbar spinous processes obtained in this study, an “H”-shaped coronal plane (posterior view) was proposed as an interspinous stabilization device for the Chinese population. This study reports morphometric data of the lumbar spinous processes in the Chinese population, which provides an anatomical basis for future clinical applications. PMID:25493388

  13. Gossypiboma mimicking posterior urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bindey; Kumar, Prem; Sinha, Sanjay Kumar; Sinha, Neelam; Hasan, Zaheer; Thakur, Vinit Kumar; Anand, Utpal; Priyadarshi, Rajiv Nayan; Mandal, Manish

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Foreign bodies in the urogenital tract are not uncommon. Hairpins, glass rods, umbilical tapes, ball point pen are described in lower urogenital tract. Retained gauze piece (gossypiboma) in posterior urethra may cause diagnostic dilemma. Symptoms and investigations may mimic stricture of posterior urethra. PRESENTATION OF CASE Two cases of retained gauze pieces in the urethra are described here. The micturating cystourethrogram was suggestive of posterior urethral stricture. DISCUSSION Two cases described here had retained gauze piece as a cause of filling defect and abnormal appearance in the micturating cystourethrogram. Gossypiboma may be a possibility where posterior urethral stricture are seen after previous surgery in paediatric age group. CONCLUSION In the setting of previous urogenital surgery gossypiboma should be kept in the differential diagnosis where posterior urethral stricture are seen in the paediatric age group. PMID:23500749

  14. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lamy, C; Oppenheim, C; Mas, J L

    2014-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a recently proposed cliniconeuroradiologic entity with several well-known causes, such as hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia, and the use of cytotoxic and immunosuppressive drugs, as well as some causes more recently described. PRES is characterized by neuroimaging findings of reversible vasogenic subcortical edema without infarction. The pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Two opposing hypotheses are commonly cited, but the issue is controversial: (1) the current more popular theory suggests that severe hypertension exceeds the limits of autoregulation, leading to breakthrough brain edema; (2) the earlier original theory suggests that hypertension leads to cerebral autoregulatory vasoconstriction, ischemia, and subsequent brain edema. The clinical syndrome of PRES typically involves headache, encephalopathy, visual symptoms, and seizures. The clinical presentation is often nonspecific, and therefore the diagnosis of PRES has come to increasingly rely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities consistent with PRES with documented recovery clinically and on repeated neuroimaging. The diagnosis has important therapeutic and prognostic implications because the reversibility of the clinical and radiologic abnormalities is contingent on the prompt control of blood pressure and/or discontinuing the offending drug. PMID:24365441

  15. Minimal Invasive Decompression for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Victor; Anderson, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common condition in elderly patients and may lead to progressive back and leg pain, muscular weakness, sensory disturbance, and/or problems with ambulation. Multiple studies suggest that surgical decompression is an effective therapy for patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis. Although traditional lumbar decompression is a time-honored procedure, minimally invasive procedures are now available which can achieve the goals of decompression with less bleeding, smaller incisions, and quicker patient recovery. This paper will review the technique of performing ipsilateral and bilateral decompressions using a tubular retractor system and microscope. PMID:22548182

  16. Pedicle subtraction osteotomy in the lumbar spine: indications, technical aspects, results and complications.

    PubMed

    Barrey, Cedric; Perrin, Gilles; Michel, Frederic; Vital, Jean-Marc; Obeid, Ibrahim

    2014-07-01

    Pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) consists of creating posteriorly trapezoidal shape of a vertebra, usually L3 or L4, in order to recreate lordosis in the lumbar spine. It is usually indicated to treat rigid kyphotic lumbar spine associated with sagittal imbalance and due to degenerative changes or to iatrogenic flat back. PSO is technically demanding with high rates of complications and should be performed by experienced teams. We presently report our experience about PSO performed in the lumbar spine (below L1) through a series of 25 cases with a special focus on technical aspects and complications associated with the surgical procedure. Mean age was 64 ± 11 years old. PSO was performed at L4 in the majority of cases. Mean blood loss was 1,070 ± 470 ml, and mean duration of the surgery was 241 ± 44 min. VAS decreased from 7.5 ± 2 preoperatively to 3.2 ± 2.5 at 1 year, and ODI decreased from 64 ± 12 preoperatively to 32 ± 18 at 1 year, p < 0.05. Mean gain of lordosis after PSO varies from 20° to 40° and was measured to 27° ± 10° on average. Lumbar lordosis (T12-S1) was measured to 21° ± 10° preoperatively to 50° ± 11° postoperatively at 1 year, p < 0.05. A total of five major complications (20 %) were observed (two mechanical, one neurological and two infections) necessitating five reoperations. In conclusion, PSO was highly efficient to restore lumbar lordosis and correct sagittal imbalance. It was associated with a non-negligible, but acceptable rate of complications. To limit the risk of mechanical complications, we recommend fusing the adjacent disks whatever the approach (PLIF/TLIF/XLIF). Most complications can be reduced with adequate environment, informed anesthesiologists and experienced surgical team. PMID:24801680

  17. Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after 'Ecstasy' abuse.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2015-07-01

    Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or 'Ecstasy' has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting 'Ecstasy'. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2?mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. 'Ecstasy' can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision. PMID:25006043

  18. The importance of the anterior longitudinal ligament in lumbar disc arthroplasty: 36-Month follow-up experience in extreme lateral total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Luis; Oliveira, Leonardo; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Pimenta, Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Background Current total disc replacement (TDR) for lumbar spine requires an anterior approach for implantation but presents inherent limitations, including risks to the abdominal structures, as well as resection of the anterior longitudinal ligament. By approaching the spine laterally, it is possible to preserve the stabilizing ligaments, which are a natural restraint to excessive rotations and translations, and thereby help to minimize facet stresses. This less invasive approach also offers a biomechanical advantage of placement of the device over the ring apophysis bilaterally; importantly, it also offers a greater opportunity for safer revision surgery, if necessary, by avoiding scarring of the anterior vasculature. We present the clinical and radiologic results of a lateral TDR device from a prospective single-center study. Methods A new metal-on-metal TDR device designed for implantation through a true lateral, retroperitoneal, transpsoatic approach (extreme lateral interbody fusion) was implanted in 36 patients with discography-confirmed 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease. Clinical (pain and function) and radiographic (range of motion) outcome assessments were prospectively collected preoperatively, postoperatively, and serially up to a minimum of 36 months’ follow-up. Results Between December 2005 and December 2006, 36 surgeries were performed in 16 men and 20 women (mean age, 42.6 years). These included 15 single-level TDR procedures at L3-4 or L4-5, 3 2-level TDR procedures spanning L3-4 and L4-5, and 18 hybrid procedures (anterior lumbar interbody fusion) at L5-S1 and TDR at L4-5 (17) or L3-4 (1). Operative time averaged 130 minutes, with mean blood loss of 60 mL and no intraoperative complications. Postoperative X-rays showed good device placement, with restoration of disc height, foraminal volume, and sagittal balance. All patients were up and walking within 12 hours of surgery, and all but 9 were discharged the next day (7 of those 9 were hybrid TDR–anterior lumbar interbody fusion cases). Postoperatively, 5 of 36 patients (13.8%) had psoas weakness and 3 of 36 (8.3%) had anterior thigh numbness, with both symptoms resolving within 2 weeks. Of the 36 patients, 4 (11%) had postoperative facet joint pain, all in hybrid cases. Visual analog scale pain scores and Oswestry Disability Index scores improved by 74.5% and 69.2%, respectively, from preoperatively to 3-year follow-up. Range of motion at 3 years postoperatively averaged 8.1°. Signals of heterotopic ossification were present in 5 patients (13.9%), and 2 patients (5.5%) were considered to have fusion after 36 months. Conclusions The clinical and radiographic results of a laterally placed TDR have shown maintenance of pain relief and functional improvement over a long-term follow-up period. The benefits of the lateral access—minimal morbidity, avoidance of mobilization of the great vessels, preservation of the anterior longitudinal ligament, biomechanically stable orientation, and broader revision options—promote a new option for motion-preservation procedures. PMID:25694866

  19. Lumbar spinal stenosis: surgical considerations.

    PubMed

    Nasca, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    Spinal stenosis is an acquired or congenital narrowing of the spinal or nerve-root canals. Surgical treatment is often effective. Acquired spinal stenosis most commonly occurs in those with degenerative disk disease and arthritic facets. If the degenerative process stabilizes and there is adequate room to accommodate the neural contents, symptomatic patients become asymptomatic. Residual stability after decompression must be assessed in patients having multilevel decompression. Fusion maybe indicated. In women with osteoporosis coexisting with degenerative scoliosis and spinal stenosis, decompression for concave nerve-root compression and fusion are necessary. Spinal fusion is not indicated in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis having unilateral decompression for lateral stenosis. Patients with central-mixed stenosis may not need fusion. Patients with spinal stenosis after laminectomies and diskectomies had better results when arthrodesis was done in conjunction with repeated decompression. Arthrodesis with instrumentation and decompression is recommended for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis. PMID:12539936

  20. Catheter-Based Transepidural Approach to Cervical and Thoracic Posterior and Perineural Epidural Spaces: A Cadaveric Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Khan, Asif A.; Sohail, Amna; Saed, Aveen; Jadhav, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Approaching the cervical and high thoracic level epidural space through transepidural route from lumbar region represents a method to lower the occurrence of complications associated with direct approach. The authors performed a cadaveric pilot project to determine the feasibility of various catheter-based manipulation and cephalad advancement using the transepidural route. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Two cadavers were used to determine the following: 1. Ability to place a guide sheath over a guidewire using a percutaneous approach within the posterior lumbar epidural space; 2. The highest vertebral level catheter can be advanced within the posterior epidural space; 3. Ability to cross midline within the posterior epidural space; and 4. Ability to catheterize the perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. RESULTS We were able to advance the catheters up to the level of cervical vertebral level of C2 within the posterior epidural space under fluoroscopic guidance from a sheath inserted via oblique parasagittal approach at the lumbar L4–L5 intervertebral space. We were able to cross midline within the posterior epidural space and catheterize multiple perineural epidural sheaths of the nerve roots exiting at cervical vertebral level of C2, C3, and C4 on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. We also catheterized multiple epidural sheaths that surround the nerve roots exiting at the thoracic vertebral level on ipsilateral or contralateral sides. CONCLUSIONS We were able to advance a catheter or microcatheter up to the cervical vertebral level within the posterior epidural space and catheterize the perineural epidural sheath of the nerve root exiting at cervical and thoracic vertebral levels. Such observations support further exploration of percutaneous catheter based transepidural approach to cervical and thoracic dorsal epidural spaces for therapeutic interventions.

  1. Mechanical properties of human lumbar spine motion segments. Influence of age, sex, disc level, and degeneration.

    PubMed

    Nachemson, A L; Schultz, A B; Berkson, M H

    1979-01-01

    The influences of age, sex, disc level, and degree of degenration on the mechanical behavior of 42 fresh cadaver lumbar motion segments are reported. The motions and intradiscal pressure changes that result from the application of flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsional moments; compression; and anterior, posterior, and lateral shears are described. The authors find that the mean behaviors of the different segment classes sometimes differ, but these differences are seldom pronounced. Scatter in the behavior of individual motion segments is pronounced, and very often overshadows any class differences. PMID:432710

  2. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly.

    PubMed

    Y?lmaz, Tevfik; Turan, Yahya; Gül?en, Ismail; Dalbayrak, Sedat

    2014-04-01

    Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompression, stabilization was performed. The complaints of the patient diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly at intraoperative period were improved at postoperative period. It should be remembered that in patients with lumbar disc herniation and spondylolysis, lumbar root anomalies may coexist when clinical and neurological picture is severe. Preoperative and perioperative assessments should be made meticulously to prevent neurological injury. PMID:25210343

  3. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Y?lmaz, Tevfik; Turan, Yahya; Gül?en, ?smail; Dalbayrak, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompression, stabilization was performed. The complaints of the patient diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly at intraoperative period were improved at postoperative period. It should be remembered that in patients with lumbar disc herniation and spondylolysis, lumbar root anomalies may coexist when clinical and neurological picture is severe. Preoperative and perioperative assessments should be made meticulously to prevent neurological injury. PMID:25210343

  4. Lateral Transpsoas Fusion: Indications and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vishal C.; Park, Daniel K.; Herkowitz, Harry N.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal fusion historically has been used extensively, and, recently, the lateral transpsoas approach to the thoracic and lumbar spine has become an increasingly common method to achieve fusion. Recent literature on this approach has elucidated its advantage over more traditional anterior and posterior approaches, which include a smaller tissue dissection, potentially lower blood loss, no need for an access surgeon, and a shorter hospital stay. Indications for the procedure have now expanded to include degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, degenerative scoliosis, nonunion, trauma, infection, and low-grade spondylolisthesis. Lateral interbody fusion has a similar if not lower rate of complications compared to traditional anterior and posterior approaches to interbody fusion. However, lateral interbody fusion has unique complications that include transient neurologic symptoms, motor deficits, and neural injuries that range from 1 to 60% in the literature. Additional studies are required to further evaluate and monitor the short- and long-term safety, efficacy, outcomes, and complications of lateral transpsoas procedures. PMID:23213303

  5. Effect of short-term unloading on T2 relaxation time in the lumbar intervertebral disc—in vivo magnetic resonance imaging study at 3.0 tesla

    PubMed Central

    Stelzeneder, David; Kovács, Balázs K.; Goed, Sabine; Welsch, Goetz H.; Hirschfeld, Clemens; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana; Friedrich, Klaus M.; Mamisch, Tallal C.; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    Background context Diurnal changes in T2 values, indicative for changes in water content, have been reported in the lumbar intervertebral discs. However, data concerning short-term T2 changes are missing. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of unloading on T2 values in lumbar intervertebral discs in vivo. Study design Experimental study with repeated measurements of lumbar discs T2 relaxation time during a period of 38 minutes of supine posture. Patient sample Forty-one patients with acute or chronic low back pain (visual analog scale ?3). Outcome measures T2 relaxation time in the intervertebral disc, lumbar lordosis angle, and intervertebral disc height. Methods Forty-one patients (mean age, 41.6 years) were investigated in the supine position using a 3-tesla magnetic resonance system. Sagittal T2 mapping was performed immediately after unloading and after a mean delay of 38 minutes. No patient movement was allowed between the measurements. One region of interest (ROI) was manually placed in both the anterior and the posterior annulus fibrosus (AF) and three ROIs in the nucleus pulposus (NP). Results There was a statistically significant decrease in the anterior NP (?2.7 ms; p<.05) and an increase in T2 values in the posterior AF (+3.5 ms; p<.001). Discs with initially low T2 values in the NP showed minor increase in the posterior AF (+1.6 ms; p<.05), whereas a major increase in the posterior AF was found in discs with initially high T2 values in the NP (+6.8 ms; p=.001). Patients examined in the morning showed no differences, but those investigated in the afternoon showed a decrease in the anterior NP (?5.3 ms; p<.05) and an increase in the posterior AF (+7.8 ms; p=.002). No significant differences were observed in other regions. Correlation analysis showed moderate correlations between the time of investigation and T2 changes in the posterior AF (r=0.46; p=.002). Conclusions A shift of water from the anterior to the posterior disc regions seems to occur after unloading the lumbar spine in the supine position. The clinical relevance of these changes needs to be investigated. PMID:22469305

  6. Economic impact of minimally invasive lumbar surgery.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Christoph P; Hofer, Anna S; Wang, Michael Y

    2015-03-18

    Cost effectiveness has been demonstrated for traditional lumbar discectomy, lumbar laminectomy as well as for instrumented and noninstrumented arthrodesis. While emerging evidence suggests that minimally invasive spine surgery reduces morbidity, duration of hospitalization, and accelerates return to activites of daily living, data regarding cost effectiveness of these novel techniques is limited. The current study analyzes all available data on minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, decompression, short-segment fusion and deformity surgery. In general, minimally invasive spine procedures appear to hold promise in quicker patient recovery times and earlier return to work. Thus, minimally invasive lumbar spine surgery appears to have the potential to be a cost-effective intervention. Moreover, novel less invasive procedures are less destabilizing and may therefore be utilized in certain indications that traditionally required arthrodesis procedures. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing the economic impact of minimally invasive spine surgery. Future studies are necessary to confirm the durability and further define indications for minimally invasive lumbar spine procedures. PMID:25793159

  7. Economic impact of minimally invasive lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Christoph P; Hofer, Anna S; Wang, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    Cost effectiveness has been demonstrated for traditional lumbar discectomy, lumbar laminectomy as well as for instrumented and noninstrumented arthrodesis. While emerging evidence suggests that minimally invasive spine surgery reduces morbidity, duration of hospitalization, and accelerates return to activites of daily living, data regarding cost effectiveness of these novel techniques is limited. The current study analyzes all available data on minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, decompression, short-segment fusion and deformity surgery. In general, minimally invasive spine procedures appear to hold promise in quicker patient recovery times and earlier return to work. Thus, minimally invasive lumbar spine surgery appears to have the potential to be a cost-effective intervention. Moreover, novel less invasive procedures are less destabilizing and may therefore be utilized in certain indications that traditionally required arthrodesis procedures. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing the economic impact of minimally invasive spine surgery. Future studies are necessary to confirm the durability and further define indications for minimally invasive lumbar spine procedures. PMID:25793159

  8. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  9. Continuous posterior lumbar plexus and continuous parasacral and intubation with lighted stylet for ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo; Lucena, Neli

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is characterized by progressive ossification of the spinal column with resultant stiffness. Ankylosing spondylitis can present significant challenges to the anaesthetist as a consequence of the potential difficult airway and performing neuraxial blockade. We describe a case of intubation with lighted stylet, and use of the continuous lumbosacral plexus for THA and postoperative analgesia with an elastomeric pump. Key words: Airways difficult anticipated, anesthesia, ankoylosing spondylitis, arthroplasty, conduction, continuous lumbosacral plexus, hip, infusion pumps, intubation awake, replacement PMID:25886430

  10. [Study of the microscopic structure of the posterior ligaments of the lumbar spine].

    PubMed

    Yahia, L H; Drouin, G; Maurais, G; Rivard, C H

    1989-01-01

    Biopsies of supraspinous ligaments (SSL), interspinous ligaments (ISL) and ligamenta flava (LF), removed at operation from 12 patients aged from 17 to 77 years, were examined by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The structure of normal ligaments was first established, and then a comparison between normal and pathological ligaments was made. It was found that the SSL and ISL were composed of collagen, while the LF contained predominantly elastic fibres. In normal ligaments, a helical arrangement of the collagen fibrils was found. The fascicles were characterized by a regular waviness. Proteoglycan filaments were demonstrated in the three types of ligaments, forming a regular interfibrillar linking between adjacent collagen fibrils. Degenerative changes were found in most of the ligaments obtained from patients with disc herniation. On light microscopy, metaplasia into fibrocartilage and calcification was commonly seen. Ultrastructurally, the flattened fibroblasts were replaced by chondrocytic cells, and an accumulation of proteoglycans with a random arrangement and a cellular necrosis was encountered. The relevance of these degenerative changes to the mechanical properties and to low back pain is discussed. PMID:2599694

  11. Posterior crossbite - treatment and stability

    PubMed Central

    de ALMEIDA, Renato Rodrigues; de ALMEIDA, Marcio Rodrigues; OLTRAMARI-NAVARRO, Paula Vanessa Pedron; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; NAVARRO, Ricardo de Lima; MARQUES, Henry Victor Alves

    2012-01-01

    Posterior crossbite is defined as an inadequate transversal relationship of maxillary and mandibular teeth. Even when eliminating the etiologic factors, this malocclusion does not have a spontaneous correction, and should be treated with maxillary expansion as early as possible. This treatment aims at providing a better tooth/skeletal relationship, thereby improving masticatory function, and establishing a symmetrical condyle/fossa relationship. Should posterior crossbite not be treated early, it may result in skeletal changes, demanding a more complex approach. Additionally, an overcorrection expansion protocol should be applied in order to improve the treatment stability. Although the literature has reported a high rate of relapse after maxillary expansion, the goal of this study was to demonstrate excellent stability of the posterior crossbite correction 21 years post treatment. PMID:22666850

  12. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19...3-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist of the part of...

  13. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19...3-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist of the part of...

  14. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19...3-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist of the part of...

  15. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19...3-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist of the part of...

  16. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section 572.19...3-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist of the part of...

  17. Early clinical results with cortically based pedicle screw trajectory for fusion of the degenerative lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Andrew Glennie, R; Dea, Nicolas; Kwon, Brian K; Street, John T

    2015-06-01

    This study reviews the outcomes and revision rates of degenerative lumbar fusion surgery using cortical trajectory pedicle screws in lieu of traditional pedicle screw instrumentation. Pedicle screw fixation can be a challenge in patients with low bone mineral density. Wide posterior approaches to the lumbar spine exposing lateral to the facet joints and onto transverse processes causes an additional degree of muscular damage and blood loss not present with a simple laminectomy. A cortical bone trajectory pedicle screw has been proposed as an alternative to prevent screw pullout and decrease the morbidity associated with the wide posterior approach to the spine. We present a series of eight consecutive patients using a cortical bone trajectory instead of traditional pedicle screw fixation for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine. A retrospective review of our institutional registry data identified eight patients who had cortical screws placed with the assistance of O-arm Stealth navigation (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) from 2010-2013. We analyzed the need for revision, the maintenance of reduction and the incidence of screw pullout or breakage. Our review demonstrated that two of eight patients were revised at an average of 12months. The reasons for these revisions were pseudarthrosis and caudal adjacent segment failure. All patients who were revised had frank screw loosening. We present early clinical results of a new technique that has been shown to have a better fixation profile in laboratory testing. Our less than favorable early clinical results should be interpreted with caution and highlight important technical issues which should be considered. PMID:25769253

  18. Primary myelolipoma in posterior mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yan; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Myelolipoma in posterior mediastinum is indeed rare. As a benign tumor, it consists of mature fat with scattered foci of haematopoietic elements resembling bone marrow. The computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are effective methods to detect them, while the definite diagnosis still depends on pathological diagnosis. Up to now, there is no standard treatment for this disease. Surgery is thought to be the best choice in some literatures reports. In this paper, two patients with primary posterior mediastinal tumor are reported, both of whom were underwent Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Postoperative pathological diagnosis was myelolipoma. PMID:25276393

  19. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement.

  20. Revisional Percutaneous Full Endoscopic Disc Surgery for Recurrent Herniation of Previous Open Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ho-Guen; Rhee, Nam Kyou; Lim, Kwahn Sue

    2011-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of revisional percutaneous full endoscopic discectomy for recurrent herniation after conventional open disc surgery. Overview of the Literature Repeated open discectomy with or without fusion has been the most common procedure for recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy for recurrent herniation has been thought of as an impossible procedure. Despite good results with open revisional surgery, major problems may be caused by injuries to the posterior stabilized structures. Our team did revisional full endoscopic lumbar disc surgery on the basis of our experience doing primary full endoscopic disc surgery. Methods Between February 2004 and August 2009 a total of 41 patients in our hospital underwent revisional percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy using a YESS endoscopic system and a micro-osteotome (designed by the authors). Indications for surgery were recurrent disc herniation following conventional open discectomy; with compression of the nerve root revealed by Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging; corresponding radiating pain which was not alleviated after conservative management over 6 weeks. Patients with severe neurologic deficits and isolated back pain were excluded. Results The mean follow-up period was 16 months (range, 13 to 42 months). The visual analog scale for pain in the leg and back showed significant post-treatment improvement (p < 0.001). Based on a modified version of MacNab's criteria, 90.2% showed excellent or good outcomes. There was no measurable blood loss. There were two cases of recurrence of and four cases with complications. Conclusions Percutaneous full-endoscopic revisional disc surgery without additional structural damage is feasible and effective in terms of there being less chance of fusion and bleeding. This technique can be an alternative to conventional repeated discectomy. PMID:21386940

  1. [Lumbar spinal stenosis. Classification and clinical presentation].

    PubMed

    van Akkerveeken, P F

    1993-08-01

    A review is presented of the nomenclature, taxonomy and clinical presentation of the lumbar canal and lateral stenosis. A historical review of the literature illustrates the growing importance of this clinical entity in the narrow spinal canal. The definition of Verbiest is introduced and explained. It distinguishes two main groups of spinal stenosis: congenital and developmental stenosis. Developmental stenosis contains several subgroups. Special attention is paid to "central" lumbar canal stenosis and lateral spinal stenosis. Both entities are discussed with a description of the etiology, anatomy, and symptomatology. The importance of nerve root infiltration as a diagnostic tool in asymptomatic radiculopathy is emphasized. PMID:8414475

  2. Lumbar vertebral pedicles: radiologic anatomy and pathology.

    PubMed

    Patel, N P; Kumar, R; Kinkhabwala, M; Wengrover, S I

    1988-01-01

    With the advancement of high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scanning the spine has added new knowledge to the various conditions affecting the pedicles. We wish to review the entire spectrum of pedicular lesions: the embryology, normal anatomy, normal variants, pitfalls, congenital anomalies, and pathological conditions are discussed. Different imaging modalities involving CT, isotope bone scanning, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are used to complement plain films of the lumbar spine. This subject review is an excellent source for future reference to lumbar pedicular lesions. PMID:3293918

  3. How frequent is chronic lumbar arachnoiditis following intrathecal Myodil?

    PubMed

    Hughes, D G; Isherwood, I

    1992-09-01

    Chronic lumbar arachnoiditis has numerous causes, including the introduction of contrast media into the lumbar subarachnoid space. The oily contrast medium Myodil (iophendylate) is often cited but the true incidence of symptomatic lumbar arachnoiditis due solely to the presence of Myodil is unknown. A retrospective review of 98 patients in whom Myodil was introduced by ventriculography or cisternography, i.e. remote from the lumbar spine, revealed no cases of chronic lumbar arachnoiditis. All patients were monitored closely for periods ranging from 1 to 28 years. We conclude that, in these circumstances, it is rare for Myodil to produce symptomatic arachnoiditis. PMID:1393409

  4. [Posterior tibial tenoscopy. Case report].

    PubMed

    Cuélar-Avaroma, A; King-Hayata, M; Martínez-de Anda, M C; King-Martinez, A C

    2014-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendinitis occurs commonly in patients involved in sports activities. It may result from either excessive use or sudden overload of the tendon. This tendinitis may also occur in patients with systemic inflammatory conditions and is classified as posterior tibial tendon dysfunction stage I. Initial treatment, which has produced good results, is based on immobilization and rehabilitation. In cases without clinical improvement or in which tendinitis is associated with partial tendon rupture, open techniques may be used to perform tenosynovectomy and tendon revisions to improve painful symptoms. With the advent of minimally invasive techniques broad tendon revisions may be done that cause minimal damage or they may be combined with traditional techniques in cases of partial rupture. This paper describes the clinical case of a 35 year-old female patient with posterior tibial pathology and chronic pain. She underwent posterior tibial tenoscopy and was followed-up postoperatively for 24 months. Endoscopic and/or tenoscopic treatment is a simple and reproducible technique. We obtained excellent functional and cosmetic results in this patient. We need larger case series of patients subjected to this treatment. PMID:26016290

  5. Minimally invasive surgical procedures for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lühmann, Dagmar; Burkhardt-Hammer, Tatjana; Borowski, Cathleen; Raspe, Heiner

    2005-01-01

    Introduction In up to 30% of patients undergoing lumbar disc surgery for herniated or protruded discs outcomes are judged unfavourable. Over the last decades this problem has stimulated the development of a number of minimally-invasive operative procedures. The aim is to relieve pressure from compromised nerve roots by mechanically removing, dissolving or evaporating disc material while leaving bony structures and surrounding tissues as intact as possible. In Germany, there is hardly any utilisation data for these new procedures – data files from the statutory health insurances demonstrate that about 5% of all lumbar disc surgeries are performed using minimally-invasive techniques. Their real proportion is thought to be much higher because many procedures are offered by private hospitals and surgeries and are paid by private health insurers or patients themselves. So far no comprehensive assessment comparing efficacy, safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery to standard procedures (microdiscectomy, open discectomy) which could serve as a basis for coverage decisions, has been published in Germany. Objective Against this background the aim of the following assessment is: Based on published scientific literature assess safety, efficacy and effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery compared to standard procedures. To identify and critically appraise studies comparing costs and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive procedures to that of standard procedures. If necessary identify research and evaluation needs and point out regulative needs within the German health care system. The assessment focusses on procedures that are used in elective lumbar disc surgery as alternative treatment options to microdiscectomy or open discectomy. Chemonucleolysis, percutaneous manual discectomy, automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, laserdiscectomy and endoscopic procedures accessing the disc by a posterolateral or posterior approach are included. Methods In order to assess safety, efficacy and effectiveness of minimally-invasive procedures as well as their economic implications systematic reviews of the literature are performed. A comprehensive search strategy is composed to search 23 electronic databases, among them MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Methodological quality of systematic reviews, HTA reports and primary research is assessed using checklists of the German Scientific Working Group for Health Technology Assessment. Quality and transparency of cost analyses are documented using the quality and transparency catalogues of the working group. Study results are summarised in a qualitative manner. Due to the limited number and the low methodological quality of the studies it is not possible to conduct metaanalyses. In addition to the results of controlled trials results of recent case series are introduced and discussed. Results The evidence-base to assess safety, efficacy and effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery procedures is rather limited: Percutaneous manual discectomy: Six case series (four after 1998) Automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy: Two RCT (one discontinued), twelve case series (one after 1998) Chemonucleolysis: Five RCT, five non-randomised controlled trials, eleven case series Percutaneous laserdiscectomy: One non-randomised controlled trial, 13 case series (eight after 1998) Endoscopic procedures: Three RCT, 21 case series (17 after 1998) There are two economic analyses each retrieved for chemonucleolysis and automated percutaneous discectomy as well as one cost-minimisation analysis comparing costs of an endoscopic procedure to costs for open discectomy. Among all minimally-invasive procedures chemonucleolysis is the only of which efficacy may be judged on the basis of results from high quality randomised controlled trials (RCT). Study results suggest that the procedure maybe (cost)effectively used as an intermediate therapeutical option between conservative and operative management of small lumbar disc herniations

  6. Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy in the setting of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and hypertensive emergency.

    PubMed

    Joos, Zachary P; Adesina, Ore-Ofe O; Katz, Bradley J

    2014-06-01

    We present the magnetic resonance imaging findings of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy in a patient with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome secondary to hypertensive emergency. PMID:24647142

  7. Partial Facetectomy for Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kevin; Rodriguez-Olaverri, Juan Carlos; Razi, Afshin; Farcy, Jean Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background. Several different techniques exist to address the pain and disability caused by isolated nerve root impingement. Failure to adequately decompress the lumbar foramen may lead to failed back surgery syndrome. However, aggressive treatment often causes spinal instability or may require fusion for satisfactory results. We describe a novel technique for decompression of the lumbar nerve root and demonstrate its effectiveness in relief of radicular symptoms. Methods. Partial facetectomy was performed by removal of the medial portion of the superior facet in patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis. 47 patients underwent the procedure from 2001 to 2010. Those who demonstrated neurogenic claudication without spinal instability or central canal stenosis and failed conservative management were eligible for the procedure. Functional level was recorded for each patient. These patients were followed for an average of 3.9 years to evaluate outcomes. Results. 27 of 47 patients (57%) reported no back pain and no functional limitations. Eight of 47 patients (17%) reported moderate pain, but had no limitations. Six of 47 patients (13%) continued to experience degenerative symptoms. Five of 47 patients (11%) required additional surgery. Conclusions. Partial facetectomy is an effective means to decompress the lumbar nerve root foramen without causing spinal instability. PMID:25110591

  8. Interexaminer reliability of lumbar segmental mobility tests.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Fredrik

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the interexaminer reliability of segmental mobility tests for the lumbar flexion and extension movement. Available reliability studies are rare and investigate total segmental mobility through several tests, making the understanding of the effect of each test more difficult. There is also a risk of creating a test situation that has less resemblance to the work situation of physiotherapists if two physiotherapists who have trained and coordinated their manual techniques together in advance are studied. Three physiotherapists with step 2 of the Swedish orthopaedic manual therapy education (OMT) performed one segmental mobility test for lumbar flexion and one for lumbar extension on twenty subjects. They were not permitted to obtain additional information, apart from a standing inspection without movements. The physiotherapists had not worked together, nor did they have a chance to coordinate their manual techniques prior to the examinations. The results showed no interexaminer reliability and suggest that future research is essential if a conclusion about lumbar intersegmental mobility tests is to be reached. PMID:16844402

  9. Chemical lumbar sympathectomy in plantar hyperhidrosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Winston Bonetti Yoshida; Daniele Cristina Cataneo; Guilherme André Zottele Bomfim; Érica Hasimoto; Antonio José Maria Cataneo

    2010-01-01

    Plantar hyperhidrosis can cause great changes to an individual’s quality of life. We described a case successfully treated\\u000a by the minimally invasive method of percutaneous injection of 7.0% phenolic solution into the lumbar sympathetic chains.

  10. Spinal stenosis subsequent to juvenile lumbar osteochondrosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kaj Tallroth; Dietrich Schlenzka

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes eight patients with spinal stenosis associated with marked osteochondrous changes in the vertebral bodies due to juvenile lumbar osteochondrosis (Scheuermann's disease). In no case was the midsagittal or interpedicular diameter of the spinal canal indicative of bony stenosis. On the other hand, in the myelograms the sagittal diameter of the dural sac was in all cases significantly

  11. Creep of posterior dental composites.

    PubMed

    Papadogianis, Y; Boyer, D B; Lakes, R S

    1985-01-01

    The creep of microspecimens of posterior dental composites was studied using a torsional creep apparatus. Shear stresses were maintained for 3 h and recovery was followed for 50 h. Creep curves were obtained at 21, 37, and 50 degrees C and four torque levels. The effect of conditioning the specimens in water up to 8 weeks was studied. The posterior composites exhibited linear viscoelastic behavior at low deformations. They had higher shear moduli and greater resistance to creep than conventional and microfilled composites. In aging experiments, maximum shear moduli occurred when specimens were 48 h to 1 week old. Subsequent softening was attributed to water absorption. Residual strain was highest when the composites were stressed within 24 h of initiating polymerization. Residual strain was very low in specimens 48 h to 8 weeks of age. PMID:4077874

  12. Distortions of posterior visual space.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Flip; Voshell, Martin G

    2009-01-01

    The study of spatial vision is a long and well traveled road (which, of course, converges to a vanishing point at the horizon). Its various distortions have been widely investigated empirically, and most concentrate, pragmatically, on the space anterior to the observer. The visual world behind the observer has received relatively less attention and it is this perspective the current experiments address. Our results show systematic perceptual distortions in the posterior visual world when viewed statically. Under static viewing conditions, observer's perceptual representation was consistently 'spread' in a hyperbolic fashion. Directions to distant, peripheral locations were consistently overestimated by about 11 degrees from the ground truth and this variability increased as the target was moved toward the center of the observer's back. The perceptual representation of posterior visual space is, no doubt, secondary to the more immediate needs of the anterior visual world. Still, it is important in some domains including certain sports, such as rowing, and in vehicular navigation. PMID:19764306

  13. Aspects concerning posterior urethral valves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. Melekos; H. W. Asbach; S. Giannoulis; P. Perimenis; G. Barbalias

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-six boys were evaluated and treated for posterior urethral valves. At the time the valves were diagnosed unilateral\\u000a or bilateral vesicoureteral reflux was present in 58% of the ureters and 69% of the children, while dilatation of the upper\\u000a urinary tract was present in 88% and 92%, respectively. There was a variety of symptoms and signs, but the most prominent

  14. Posterior glenohumeral joint capsule contracture.

    PubMed

    Dashottar, Amitabh; Borstad, John

    2012-10-01

    Glenohumeral joint posterior capsule contracture may cause shoulder pain by altering normal joint mechanics. Contracture is commonly noted in throwing athletes but can also be present in nonthrowers. The cause of contracture in throwing athletes is assumed to be a response to the high amount of repetitive tensile force placed on the tissue, whereas the mechanism of contracture in nonthrowers is unknown. It is likely that mechanical and cellular processes interact to increase the stiffness and decrease the compliance of the capsule, although the exact processes that cause a contracture have not been confirmed. Cadaver models have been used to study the effect of posterior capsule contracture on joint mechanics and demonstrate alterations in range of motion and in humeral head kinematics. Imaging has been used to assess posterior capsule contracture, although standard techniques and quantification methods are lacking. Clinically, contracture manifests as a reduction in glenohumeral internal rotation and/or cross body adduction range of motion. Stretching and manual techniques are used to improve range of motion and often decrease symptoms in painful shoulders. PMID:24265649

  15. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercise on functional disability and lumbar lordosis angle in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Igsoo; Jeon, Chunbae; Lee, Sangyong; Lee, Daehee; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the functional disability and lumbar lordosis angles in patients with chronic low back pain. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 patients with chronic low back pain divided into a lumbar stabilization exercise group (n = 15) and a conservative treatment group (n = 15). [Methods] The lumbar stabilization exercise and conservative treatment groups performed an exercise program and conservative physical treatment, respectively. Both programs were performed 3 times a week for 6 weeks. The degree of functional disability was assessed by the Oswestry disability index, and lumbar lordosis angles were measured by plain radiography. [Results] The Oswestry disability index decreased significantly in the both groups; however, it was significantly lower in the lumbar stabilization exercise group. The lumbar lordosis angle increased significantly in the lumbar stabilization exercise group after treatment and was also significantly greater than that in the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] Lumbar stabilization exercise is more effective than conservative treatment for improving functional disability and lumbar lordosis angles.

  16. 49 CFR 572.75 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure...Child § 572.75 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure. (a) Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly. The...

  17. 49 CFR 572.75 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure...Child § 572.75 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure. (a) Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly. The...

  18. 49 CFR 572.75 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure...Child § 572.75 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure. (a) Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly. The...

  19. 49 CFR 572.75 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure...Child § 572.75 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure. (a) Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly. The...

  20. 49 CFR 572.75 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure...Child § 572.75 Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly and test procedure. (a) Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis assembly. The...

  1. Characteristics of PMHS Lumbar Motion Segments in Lateral Shear.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, Srini; Prasad, Priya; Rouhana, Stephen W; Demetropoulos, Constantine K; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Nolte, Lutz P

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of eighteen lumbar spine motion segments subjected to lateral shear forces under quasi-static (0.5 mm/s) and dynamic (500 mm/s) test conditions. The quasi-static test was also performed on the lumbar spine of a side impact anthropomorphic test device, the EuroSID-2 (ES-2). In the quasi-static tests, the maximum force before disc-endplate separation in the PMHS lumbar motion segments was 1850 +/- 612 N, while the average linear stiffness of PMHS lumbar motion segments was 323 +/- 126 N/mm. There was a statistically significant difference between the quasi-static (1850 +/- 612 N) and dynamic (2616 +/- 1151 N) maximum shear forces. The ES-2 lumbar spine (149 N/mm) was more compliant than the PMHS lumbar segments under the quasi-static test condition. PMID:17096282

  2. Sagittal spinal alignment in patients with lumbar disc herniation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenji Endo; Hidekazu Suzuki; Hidetoshi Tanaka; Yupeng Kang; Kengo Yamamoto

    2010-01-01

    A retrospective cross-sectional study was designed to evaluate total sagittal spinal alignment in patients with lumbar disc\\u000a herniation (LDH) and healthy subjects. Abnormal sagittal spinal alignment could cause persistent low back pain in lumbar disease.\\u000a Previous studies analyzed sciatic scoliotic list in patients with lumbar disc herniation; but there is little or no information\\u000a on the relationship between sagittal alignment

  3. The lumbar spine in Neanderthals shows natural kyphosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jochen Weber; Carsten Matthias Pusch

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, lumbar spondylosis is one of the most frequent causes of lower back pain. In order to improve our understanding\\u000a of the lumbar spine anatomy and functionality over time, we compared the lumbar vertebrae of Neanderthals with those of anatomically\\u000a modern humans. The fossil record reports on only two Neanderthal skeletons (i.e., Kebara 2 and Shanidar 3, both predating\\u000a the

  4. Lumbar intradural paragangliomas: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Mehmet; Onen, Mehmet Resid; Zerenler, Fatima Gursoy; Kir, Gozde; Naderi, Sait

    2015-01-01

    Paraganglioma (PG) is a rare tumor of the dispersed neuroendocrine system. PG derives from the embryonic sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system. Paraganglioma is a neoplasm of the dispersed neuroendocrine system that affects a variety of anatomic sites, mainly the head and neck. It occurs commonly in the carotid body, glomus jugulare, mediastinum and retroperitoneum. Primary spinal paragangliomas are quite rare tumors. They are commonly located in the cauda equina region, and manifest their own clinical and radiological features. In this study, two cases of lumbar intradural paragangliomas are presented. Both of the tumors were totally resected with surgery and there was no evidence of recurrence or metastases during follow-up period. It was concluded that paragangliomas should be taken into consideration during the preoperative workup studies of lumbar intradural tumors. PMID:25640564

  5. The lumbar disc and low back pain.

    PubMed

    Bogduk, N

    1991-10-01

    The lumbar disc serves to sustain compression loads and is subject to tension and shear in forward bending and rotation. Its outer third is innervated and can be a source of pain. The annulus fibrosus may be injured in rotation and flexion of the lumbar spine and may become symptomatic as a ligamentous injury. Compression injuries of the disc are initially asymptomatic but may set in train a degradative process that, in time, leads to internal disc disruption, which becomes symptomatic as a result of chemical or mechanical irritation of nociceptors in the annulus fibrosus. Disc prolapse is but one possible end stage of internal disc disruption and represents the culmination of a series of destructive processes affecting the disc. This condition can be symptomatic while the external appearance of the disc remains normal and before nerve roots are affected in any way. PMID:1821758

  6. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) treated with arthrodesis and posterior titanium instrumentation: 8 to 12 years follow up without late infection

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Franz J; Gluch, Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Background There are no data in the peer-reviewed literature regarding long term results in patients treated for AIS with a posterior titanium instrumentation. Therefore we assessed the outcome in 50 patients treated by titanium implant. Methods A total of 50 patients with a mean age of 16.6 years were treated. In all patients, titanium hooks and pedicle screws were used in combination. The demographic data and the pre- and post-operative radiographs of all 50 patients were re-examined, and 49 of the 50 patients (98%) attended a radiological and clinical follow up-examination on average 10.1 years post-operatively. The clinical results were recorded by means of the SRS 24 questionnaire. Results In the frontal plane, the mean pre-operative thoracic and lumbar curve had been 62.4° and 43.5° respectively, post-operatively the curves were reduced to 26.9° and 16.3°, resulting in a correction rate of 56.9% for thoracic and 62.5% for lumbar curve. At the follow up-evaluation, the Cobb angle of the thoracic and lumbar curve was 31.0° and 21.3° respectively, giving a final correction rate of 50.3% for thoracic, and 51.0% for lumbar curve. 7 of the 50 patients (14.3%) had undergo revision surgery for complications, but complete implant removal was necessary in only one case. Analysis of the SRS 24 questionnaire showed an average score of 95.8 points. Conclusion Posterior titanium instrumentation is a safe and effective procedure in the surgical correction of AIS. In this retrospective study with small patient number, it shows favourable long-term results; in particular, the loss of correction is low, no late infection occurred and there was a very high survival rate of the implant itself. PMID:19674461

  7. Herniation of the upper lumbar discs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Pásztor; I. Szarvas

    1981-01-01

    Summary On the basis of investigations involving 134 patients operated on at the National Institute of Neurosurgery, Budapest, the authors point out that herniations of the intervertebral discs at L 1\\/2, L 2\\/3, L 3\\/4 levels are characterized by more severe neurological changes. Paresis and autonomic disorders occur much more frequently than in lower lumbar disc herniations: paresis was found

  8. Variability of manual lumbar spine segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel J.; Gladowski, David A.; Acuff, Heather N.; Yeager, Matthew S.; Cheng, Boyle C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The application of kinematic data acquired during biomechanical testing to specimen-specific, three-dimensional models of the spine has emerged as a useful tool in spine biomechanics research. However, the development of these models is subject to segmentation error because of complex morphology and pathologic changes of the spine. This error has not been previously characterized. Methods Eight cadaveric lumbar spines were prepared and underwent computed tomography (CT) scanning. After disarticulation and soft-tissue removal, 5 individual vertebrae from these specimens were scanned a second time. The CT images of the full lumbar specimens were segmented twice each by 2 operators, and the images of the individual vertebrae with soft tissue removed were segmented as well. The solid models derived from these differing segmentation sessions were registered, and the distribution of distances between nearest neighboring points was calculated to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the segmentation technique. Results Manual segmentation yielded root-mean-square errors below 0.39 mm for accuracy, 0.33 mm for intrauser precision, and 0.35 mm for interuser precision. Furthermore, the 95th percentile of all distances was below 0.75 mm for all analyses of accuracy and precision. Conclusions These findings indicate that such models are highly accurate and that a high level of intrauser and interuser precision can be achieved. The magnitude of the error presented here should inform the design and interpretation of future studies using manual segmentation techniques to derive models of the lumbar spine. PMID:25694886

  9. Delayed Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage due to Lumbar Artery Pseudoaneurysm after Lumbar Posterolateral Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Min; Choi, Ha Young

    2013-01-01

    A 55-year-old female patient presented with lower back pain and neurogenic intermittent claudication and underwent L3-L4 posterolateral fusion. To prepare the bone fusion bed, the transverse process of L3 and L4 was decorticated with a drill. On the 9th post-operative day, the patient complained of a sudden onset of severe abdominal pain and distension. Abdominal computed tomography revealed retroperitoneal hematoma in the right psoas muscle and iatrogenic right L3 transverse process fracture. Lumbar spinal angiography showed the delayed hematoma due to rupture of the 2nd lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm and coil embolization was done at the ruptured lumbar artery pseudoaneusyrm. Since then, the patient's postoperative progress proceeded normally with recovery of the hemodynamic parameters. PMID:24294460

  10. Cumulative occupational lumbar load and lumbar disc disease – results of a German multi-center case-control study (EPILIFT)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Seidler; Annekatrin Bergmann; Matthias Jäger; Rolf Ellegast; Dirk Ditchen; Gine Elsner; Joachim Grifka; Johannes Haerting; Friedrich Hofmann; Oliver Linhardt; Alwin Luttmann; Martina Michaelis; Gabriela Petereit-Haack; Barbara Schumann; Ulrich Bolm-Audorff

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The to date evidence for a dose-response relationship between physical workload and the development of lumbar disc diseases is limited. We therefore investigated the possible etiologic relevance of cumulative occupational lumbar load to lumbar disc diseases in a multi-center case-control study. METHODS: In four study regions in Germany (Frankfurt\\/Main, Freiburg, Halle\\/Saale, Regensburg), patients seeking medical care for pain associated

  11. Higher risk of dural tears and recurrent herniation with lumbar micro-endoscopic discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lovi, Alessio; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Zagra, Antonino; Corriero, Andrea; Giudici, Fabrizio; Minoia, Leone

    2010-01-01

    Existing studies on micro-endoscopic lumbar discectomy report similar outcomes to those of open and microdiscectomy and conflicting results on complications. We designed a randomised controlled trial to investigate the hypothesis of different outcomes and complications obtainable with the three techniques. 240 patients aged 18–65 years affected by posterior lumbar disc herniation and symptoms lasting over 6 weeks of conservative management were randomised to micro-endoscopic (group 1), micro (group 2) or open (group 3) discectomy. Exclusion criteria were less than 6 weeks of pain duration, cauda equina compromise, foraminal or extra-foraminal herniations, spinal stenosis, malignancy, previous spinal surgery, spinal deformity, concurrent infection and rheumatic disease. Surgery and follow-up were made at a single Institution. A biomedical researcher independently collected and reviewed the data. ODI, back and leg VAS and SF-36 were the outcome measures used preoperatively, postoperatively and at 6-, 12- and 24-month follow-up. 212/240 (91%) patients completed the 24-month follow-up period. VAS back and leg, ODI and SF36 scores showed clinically and statistically significant improvements within groups without significant difference among groups throughout follow-up. Dural tears, root injuries and recurrent herniations were significantly more common in group 1. Wound infections were similar in group 2 and 3, but did not affect patients in group 1. Overall costs were significantly higher in group 1 and lower in group 3. In conclusion, outcome measures are equivalent 2 years following lumbar discectomy with micro-endoscopy, microscopy or open technique, but severe complications are more likely and costs higher with micro-endoscopy. PMID:20127495

  12. Lumbar Disk Herniation Surgery: Outcome and Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Mahsa; Haghnegahdar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Study Design?A retrospective cohort study. Objectives?To determine the outcome and any differences in the clinical results of three different surgical methods for lumbar disk herniation and to assess the effect of factors that could predict the outcome of surgery. Methods?We evaluated 148 patients who had operations for lumbar disk herniation from March 2006 to March 2011 using three different surgical techniques (laminectomy, microscopically assisted percutaneous nucleotomy, and spinous process osteotomy) by using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire, Resumption of Activities of Daily Living scale and changes of visual analog scale (VAS) for low back pain and radicular pain. Our study questionnaire addressed patient subjective satisfaction with the operation, residual complaints, and job resumption. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 16.0 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, United States). Statistical significance was set at 0.05. For statistical analysis, chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and repeated measure analysis were performed. For determining the confounding factors, univariate analysis by chi-square test was used and followed by logistic regression analysis. Results?Ninety-four percent of our patients were satisfied with the results of their surgeries. VAS documented an overall 93.3% success rate for reduction of radicular pain. Laminectomy resulted in better outcome in terms of JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire. The outcome of surgery did not significantly differ by age, sex, level of education, preoperative VAS for back, preoperative VAS for radicular pain, return to previous job, or level of herniation. Conclusion?Surgery for lumbar disk herniation is effective in reducing radicular pain (93.4%). All three surgical approaches resulted in significant decrease in preoperative radicular pain and low back pain, but intergroup variation in the outcome was not achieved. As indicated by JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire–Low Back Pain (JOABPQ-LBP) and lumbar function functional scores, laminectomy achieved significantly better outcome compared with other methods. It is worth mentioning that relief of radicular pain was associated with subjective satisfaction with the surgery among our study population. Predictive factors for ineffective surgical treatment for lumbar disk herniation were female sex and negative preoperative straight leg raising. Age, level of education, and preoperative VAS for low back pain were other factors that showed prediction power. PMID:25396104

  13. Comparison of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy and Open Lumbar Surgery for Adjacent Segment Degeneration and Recurrent Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-Chieh; Lee, Chih-Hsun; Wei, Li; Lui, Tai-Ngar; Lin, Tien-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The goal of the present study was to examine the clinical results of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and open lumbar surgery for patients with adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) and recurrence of disc herniation. Methods. From December 2011 to November 2013, we collected forty-three patients who underwent repeated lumbar surgery. These patients, either received PELD (18 patients) or repeated open lumbar surgery (25 patients), due to ASD or recurrence of disc herniation at L3-4, L4-5, or L5-S1 level, were assigned to different groups according to the surgical approaches. Clinical data were assessed and compared. Results. Mean blood loss was significantly less in the PELD group as compared to the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Hospital stay and mean operating time were shorter significantly in the PELD group as compared to the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Immediate postoperative pain improvement in VAS was 3.5 in the PELD group and ?0.56 in the open lumbar surgery group (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. For ASD and recurrent lumbar disc herniation, PELD had more advantages over open lumbar surgery in terms of reduced blood loss, shorter hospital stay, operating time, fewer complications, and less postoperative discomfort. PMID:25861474

  14. Meralgia paresthetica-like syndrome may be caused by transient lumbar nerve root injury without definite compression: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dharmasaroja, Pornpatr; Dharmasaroja, Permphan

    2010-12-01

    Meralgia paresthetica is a well-known sensory syndrome describing paresthesia and/or anesthesia in the anterolateral aspect of the thigh that is supplied by the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. Compression of the nerve usually occurs at the point where it passes between the anterior superior iliac spine and the inguinal ligament. Proximal lesions such as lumbar radiculopathy, lumbar disc herniation, and spinal stenosis have been reported to cause meralgia paresthetica-like syndrome. These proximal lesions directly injure L2 and L3 spinal nerve roots and cause a constant compression of the nerve roots. The presented paper introduces a hypothesis that this syndrome can be caused by transient injury to the L2 and L3 nerve roots by the upper adjacent disc bulge without definite compression. This hypothesis is supported by lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging of a patient presenting with a meralgia paresthetica-like symptom during bending forward and twisting of the body, showing no L2/L3 herniated disc but mildly posterior bulging of T12/L1 disc. This hypothesis emphasizes an importance of appropriate postures in patients with meralgia paresthetica-like symptoms in order to prevent long-term morbidity. PMID:21294431

  15. Intradural schwannoma complicated by lumbar disc herniation at the same level: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    BAEK, SEUNG-WOOK; KIM, CHEOL; CHANG, HAN

    2014-01-01

    Intradural tumours of the spine are usually benign and have a good prognosis, if they are diagnosed and removed early. Lumbar disc herniation is a common cause of chronic, acute, or recurrent lumbar radiculopathy. However, to date, there have been no reports of progressive neurological deficiencies due to the co-existence of two significant pathologies contributing to intradural and extradural compression. The current study reports the rare case of a patient with simultaneous extradural and intradural compression of the nerve root due to co-existent intervertebral disc herniation and an intradural schwannoma at the same level. A 71-year-old female suffering from lower back pain and radiating pain of the right lower extremities was admitted to Busan Korea Hospital (Busan, Korea). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed lumbar disc herniation at L4–5 and a mass occupying the intradural space at the same level of the compressed dural sac. Using the posterior approach, surgical excision of the two pathologies was performed. Pathological diagnosis confirmed schwannoma and the symptoms markedly improved. PMID:25013519

  16. [Lumbar cord potentials evoked by stimulation of the nerves of the lower limb in man].

    PubMed

    Georgesco, M; Benezech, J; Zhu, Y; Henry, A; Cadilhac, J

    1985-07-01

    Lumbar cord potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial and sural nerves at the ankle were recorded with monopolar epidural electrodes, at T11-T12 level in 20 subjects and were compared with surface recorded potentials. Two quadriplegic patients with spinal section were included in this group. Curare was given in two cases. Xylocaine block of peripheral nerve was carried out in 4 cases. Double shock study was done in 5 cases. The lumbar cord evoked potentials show two successive components: a 'primary' negative-positive spike response with a latency of 19-35 msec, and the 'secondary' waves with latencies up to 200 msec. The 'primary' response is mainly produced by the afferent volley in the fibres of the dorsal roots and of their intramedullary prolongations. There is no evidence which suggests that it is correlated with presynaptic inhibition. The secondary components may be divided into the early and the late waves. The early waves (40-90 msec) are related to the polysynaptic activities from the afferent fibres of small diameters. The late waves are under the influence of supraspinal mechanism and may be related to long-loop reflexes. The clinical implications of these evoked potentials are discussed. PMID:4048607

  17. Chronic spontaneous lumbar epidural hematoma simulating extradural spinal tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hiroki; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Hirano, Kenichi; Tauchi, Ryoji; Muramoto, Akio; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-02-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is an uncommon disorder, and chronic SEHs are rarer than acute SEHs. However, there is few reported involving the bone change of the vertebral body in chronic SEHs. We present a case report of lumbar epidural hematoma that required differentiation from extramedullary spinal tumors by a long process because the CT scan revealed scalloping of the vertebral body and review the relevant literature. A 78-year-old man had experienced a gradual onset of low back pain and excruciating pain in both legs. Lumbar MRI on T1-weighted images revealed a space-occupying lesion with a hyperintense signal relative to the spinal cord with no enhancement on gadolinium adminisration. Meanwhile, T2-weighted images revealed a heterogeneous intensity change, accompanying a central area of hyperintense signals with a hypointense peripheral border at the L4 vertebra. Moreover, the CT scan demonstrated scalloping of the posterior wall of the L4 vertebral body which is generally suspected as the CT finding of spainal tumor. During the epidural space exploration, we found a dark red-colored mass surrounded by a capsular layer, which was fibrous and adhered to the flavum and dura mater. Microscopic histological examination of the resected mass revealed a mixture of the relatively new hematoma and the hematoma that was moving into the connective tissue. Accordingly, the hematoma was diagnosed as chronic SEH. The particular MRI findings of chronic SEHs are helpful for making accurate preoperative diagnoses of this pathology. PMID:25130006

  18. Motion-preserving technologies for degenerative lumbar spine: The past, present, and future horizons

    PubMed Central

    Serhan, Hassan; Mhatre, Devdatt; Defossez, Henri; Bono, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few decades, remarkable advancements in the understanding of the origin of low-back pain and lumbar spinal disorders have been achieved. Spinal fusion is generally considered the “gold standard” in the treatment of low-back pain; however, fusion is also associated with accelerated degeneration of adjacent levels. Spinal arthroplasty and dynamic stabilization technologies, as well as the continuous improvement in diagnosis and surgical interventions, have opened a new era of treatment options. Recent advancements in nonfusion technologies such as motion-preservation devices and posterior dynamic stabilization may change the gold standard. These devices are designed with the intent to provide stabilization and eliminate pain while preserving motion of the functional spinal unit. The adaption of nonfusion technologies by the surgical community and payers for the treatment of degenerative spinal conditions will depend on the long-term clinical outcome of controlled randomized clinical studies. Although the development of nonfusion technology has just started and the adoption is very slow, it may be considered a viable option for motion preservation in coming years. This review article provides technical and surgical views from the past and from the present, as well as a glance at the future endeavors and challenges in instrumentation development for lumbar spinal disorders. © 2011 SAS - The International Society for the Advancement of Spine Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. PMID:25802672

  19. Transpedicular Curettage and Drainage of Infective Lumbar Spondylodiscitis: Technique and Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Ho; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Hak-Sun; Moon, Eun-Soo; Park, Jin-Oh; Chong, Hyun-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Background Infective spondylodiscitis usually occurs in patients of older age, immunocompromisation, co-morbidity, and individuals suffering from an overall poor general condition unable to undergo reconstructive anterior and posterior surgeries. Therefore, an alternative, less aggressive surgical method is needed for these select cases of infective spondylodiscitis. This retrospective clinical case series reports our novel surgical technique for the treatment of infective spondylodiscitis. Methods Between January 2005 and July 2011, among 48 patients who were diagnosed with pyogenic lumbar spondylodiscitis or tuberculosis lumbar spondylodiscitis, 10 patients (7 males and 3 females; 68 years and 48 to 78 years, respectively) underwent transpedicular curettage and drainage. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 29 months (range, 7 to 61 months). The pedicle screws were inserted to the adjacent healthy vertebrae in the usual manner. After insertion of pedicle screws, the drainage pedicle holes were made through pedicles of infected vertebra(e) in order to prevent possible seeding of infective emboli to the healthy vertebra, as the same instruments and utensils are used for both pedicle screws and the drainage holes. A minimum of 15,000 mL of sterilized normal saline was used for continuous irrigation through the pedicular pathways until the drained fluid looked clear. Results All patients' symptoms and inflammatory markers significantly improved clinically between postoperative 2 weeks and postoperative 3 months, and they were satisfied with their clinical results. Radiologically, all patients reached the spontaneous fusion between infected vertebrae and 3 patients had the screw pulled-out but they were clinically tolerable. Conclusions We suggest that our method of transpedicular curettage and drainage is a useful technique in regards to the treatment of infectious spondylodiscitic patients, who could not tolerate conventional combined anterior and posterior surgery due to multiple co-morbidities, multiple level infectious lesions and poor general condition. PMID:22949951

  20. Posterior mediastinal hyperfunctioning insular thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bellantone, Rocco; Lombardi, Celestino Pio; Bossola, Maurizio; Fadda, Guido; Salvatori, Massimo; Princi, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    A case is presented of a posterior mediastinal mass arising in a 57-year-old woman with severe compressive cervical symptoms and hyperthyroidism. Computed tomography showed intrathoracic thyroid tissue that displaced the trachea towards the front and the right and invaded the posterior mediastinum. Pathological examination showed features of a poorly differentiated (insular) thyroid carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a posterior mediastinal insular thyroid carcinoma with thyroid hyperfunction. PMID:16277105

  1. Segmental Quantitative MR Imaging Analysis of Diurnal Variation of Water Content in the Lumbar Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tingting; Ai, Tao; Zhang, Wei; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes in water content in the lumbar intervertebral discs by quantitative T2 MR imaging in the morning after bed rest and evening after a diurnal load. Materials and Methods Twenty healthy volunteers were separately examined in the morning after bed rest and in the evening after finishing daily work. T2-mapping images were obtained and analyzed. An equally-sized rectangular region of interest (ROI) was manually placed in both, the anterior and the posterior annulus fibrosus (AF), in the outermost 20% of the disc. Three ROIs were placed in the space defined as the nucleus pulposus (NP). Repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired 2-tailed t tests were used for statistical analysis, with p < 0.05 as significantly different. Results T2 values significantly decreased from morning to evening, in the NP (anterior NP = -13.9 ms; central NP = -17.0 ms; posterior NP = -13.3 ms; all p < 0.001). Meanwhile T2 values significantly increased in the anterior AF (+2.9 ms; p = 0.025) and the posterior AF (+5.9 ms; p < 0.001). T2 values in the posterior AF showed the largest degree of variation among the 5 ROIs, but there was no statistical significance (p = 0.414). Discs with initially low T2 values in the center NP showed a smaller degree of variation in the anterior NP and in the central NP, than in discs with initially high T2 values in the center NP (10.0% vs. 16.1%, p = 0.037; 6.4% vs. 16.1%, p = 0.006, respectively). Conclusion Segmental quantitative T2 MRI provides valuable insights into physiological aspects of normal discs. PMID:25598682

  2. Quality criteria implementation for brain and lumbar spine CT examinations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A CALZADO; R RODRIGUEZ; A MUNOZ; Fisica Medica

    2000-01-01

    A study was undertaken to implement the quality criteria proposed by the European Commission for brain general and lumbar spine (disc herniation) CT examinations. The proposed criteria were evaluated for samples including 93 brain and 86 lumbar spine CT examinations, with special emphasis on the diagnostic and radiation dose requirements. The extent to which the image criteria had been achieved

  3. Automatic tracking measurement system on human lumbar vertebral motion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yingyao Zhang; Xiaobo Xie; Hongyan Cui; Yong Hu; Fuge Sui; Lifeng Zhao; Dongjun Wang

    2009-01-01

    An automated tracking system was developed to measure the flexion-extension motion of lumbar vertebrae using the algorithm of Sequential Important Resampling Particle Filter. In vitro validity was performed in 10 samples under digitized video fluoroscopy. Each sample was taken 2 full flexion-extension cycles under a special guide device in fixed speed, while the calibration model of lumbar vertebrae was fixed

  4. Traumatic Lumbar Hernias: Difficulty with Diagnosis and Repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James K. Lukan; Glen A. Franklin; David A. Spain; J. David Richardson

    2000-01-01

    Infrequently encountered, the traumatic lumbar hernia presents a challenge to the surgeon both in diagnosis and management. Repair is often complicated by a lack of viable fascia and a high incidence of associated injuries. The following review considers the natural history of lumbar hernias and their etiologies. Subsequently, the role of computed tomography (CT) in diagnosis is discussed. Finally, the

  5. The Robotic Lumbar Spine (RLS): Dynamics and Feedback Linearization Control

    E-print Network

    Williams II, Robert L.

    The Robotic Lumbar Spine (RLS): Dynamics and Feedback Linearization Control Ernur Karadogan. Karadogan and R.L. Williams II, 2013, "The Robotic Lumbar Spine (RLS): Dynamics and Feedback Linearization Spine (RLS): Dynamics and Feedback Linearization Control Ernur Karadogan 1 and Robert L. Williams II 2 1

  6. 49 CFR 572.43 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.43 Section 572.43 Transportation...Side Impact Dummy 50th Percentile Male § 572.43 Lumbar spine and pelvis. (a) When the pelvis of a fully...

  7. 49 CFR 572.43 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.43 Section 572.43 Transportation...Side Impact Dummy 50th Percentile Male § 572.43 Lumbar spine and pelvis. (a) When the pelvis of a fully...

  8. 49 CFR 572.43 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.43 Section 572.43 Transportation...Side Impact Dummy 50th Percentile Male § 572.43 Lumbar spine and pelvis. (a) When the pelvis of a fully...

  9. The study of lumbar muscle activity using isoforce maps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. M. Neff; Z. Ladin; C. J. De Luca

    1989-01-01

    The concept of isoforce curves and their application to the muscle activity surfaces of the lumbar muscles is introduce. The isoforce curves are constructed from data generated by a biomechanical model of the lumbar musculature. When plotted together, the isoforce curves become contour plots of the muscle activity surfaces. On the basis of contour plots, new verification techniques are suggested

  10. The Clinical Syndrome Associated with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Khean Jin Goh; Waël Khalifa; Philip Anslow; Tom Cadoux-Hudson; Michael Donaghy

    2004-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is well defined in patho-anatomical terms but its clinical features are heterogeneous. We carried out a comprehensive retrospective review of the clinical features, radiological changes and outcome of 75 patients with radiologically diagnosed lumbar spinal stenosis in order to define its clinical spectrum. The presenting complaints were of weakness, numbness\\/tingling, radicular pain and neurogenic claudication in almost

  11. The robotic lumbar spine: dynamics and feedback linearization control.

    PubMed

    Karadogan, Ernur; Williams, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    The robotic lumbar spine (RLS) is a 15 degree-of-freedom, fully cable-actuated robotic lumbar spine which can mimic in vivo human lumbar spine movements to provide better hands-on training for medical students. The design incorporates five active lumbar vertebrae and the sacrum, with dimensions of an average adult human spine. It is actuated by 20 cables connected to electric motors. Every vertebra is connected to the neighboring vertebrae by spherical joints. Medical schools can benefit from a tool, system, or method that will help instructors train students and assess their tactile proficiency throughout their education. The robotic lumbar spine has the potential to satisfy these needs in palpatory diagnosis. Medical students will be given the opportunity to examine their own patient that can be programmed with many dysfunctions related to the lumbar spine before they start their professional lives as doctors. The robotic lumbar spine can be used to teach and test medical students in their capacity to be able to recognize normal and abnormal movement patterns of the human lumbar spine under flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. This paper presents the dynamics and nonlinear control of the RLS. A new approach to solve for positive and nonzero cable tensions that are also continuous in time is introduced. PMID:24151527

  12. A Minimally Invasive Technique for Decompression of the Lumbar Spine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard H. Guiot; Larry T. Khoo; Richard G. Fessler

    gery is an important means of reducing tissue trauma and patient morbidity. This may prove to be essential in improv- ing pain and in reducing postoperative stress responses and delayed sequelae that can lead to unfortunate complica- tions after otherwise uneventful procedures. To date, mini- mally invasive lumbar endoscopic techniques have not been used to decompress the lumbar spinal canal.

  13. Spinal lumbar synovial cysts. Diagnosis and management challenge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amir M. Khan; Federico Girardi

    2006-01-01

    Sophisticated and newer imaging capabilities have resulted in increased reporting and treatment options of spinal lumbar synovial cysts (LSS). Most of the patients with lumbar cysts tend to be in their sixth decade of life with a slight female predominance. The incidence of LSS is thought to be less than 0.5% of the general symptomatic population. They may be asymptomatic

  14. The Robotic Lumbar Spine: Dynamics and Feedback Linearization Control

    PubMed Central

    Karadogan, Ernur; Williams, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The robotic lumbar spine (RLS) is a 15 degree-of-freedom, fully cable-actuated robotic lumbar spine which can mimic in vivo human lumbar spine movements to provide better hands-on training for medical students. The design incorporates five active lumbar vertebrae and the sacrum, with dimensions of an average adult human spine. It is actuated by 20 cables connected to electric motors. Every vertebra is connected to the neighboring vertebrae by spherical joints. Medical schools can benefit from a tool, system, or method that will help instructors train students and assess their tactile proficiency throughout their education. The robotic lumbar spine has the potential to satisfy these needs in palpatory diagnosis. Medical students will be given the opportunity to examine their own patient that can be programmed with many dysfunctions related to the lumbar spine before they start their professional lives as doctors. The robotic lumbar spine can be used to teach and test medical students in their capacity to be able to recognize normal and abnormal movement patterns of the human lumbar spine under flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. This paper presents the dynamics and nonlinear control of the RLS. A new approach to solve for positive and nonzero cable tensions that are also continuous in time is introduced. PMID:24151527

  15. Early clinical effects of the Dynesys system plus transfacet decompression through the Wiltse approach for the treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Lei; Tian, Ji-wei

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigated early clinical effects of Dynesys system plus transfacet decompression through the Wiltse approach in treating lumbar degenerative diseases. Material/Methods 37 patients with lumbar degenerative disease were treated with the Dynesys system plus transfacet decompression through the Wiltse approach. Results Results showed that all patients healed from surgery without severe complications. The average follow-up time was 20 months (9–36 months). Visual Analogue Scale and Oswestry Disability Index scores decreased significantly after surgery and at the final follow-up. There was a significant difference in the height of the intervertebral space and intervertebral range of motion (ROM) at the stabilized segment, but no significant changes were seen at the adjacent segments. X-ray scans showed no instability, internal fixation loosening, breakage, or distortion in the follow-up. Conclusions The Dynesys system plus transfacet decompression through the Wiltse approach is a therapeutic option for mild lumbar degenerative disease. This method can retain the structure of the lumbar posterior complex and the motion of the fixed segment, reduce the incidence of low back pain, and decompress the nerve root. PMID:24859831

  16. Two-level traumatic lateral lumbar fracture and dislocation in a heavy equipment operator: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Yaoki; Kajino, Tomomichi

    2013-01-01

    Objective Lumbar fracture-dislocations are rare and invariably due to high-energy trauma. The purpose of this study is to report the surgical management of a man with lateral lumbar dislocations in 2 noncontiguous lesions. Clinical features A 49-year-old Asian man was crushed by a bulldozer. The patient was transported to a major medical center where he was found to be conscious, and the primary spinal injuries were fracture-dislocation of L1-L2 and L4-L5. His preoperative neurologic status showed a partial paraparesis to all motor groups of the lower extremities bilaterally. His radiological and operative findings showed a rupture of the thoracolumbar fascia and latissimus dorsi muscle, left L1-L2 dislocated facet, right L4-5 facet fracture, and dural tear. Intervention and outcome The patient underwent a posterior reduction, decompression, instrumentation, and fusion surgery from T12 to S1 with autologous bone graft and pedicle screw instrumentation. Postoperatively, his neurologic status improved, allowing him to be ambulatory using a Lofstrand crutch with improved lumbosacral alignment being well maintained. Two weeks postoperatively, the patient regained voluntary bowel and bladder function. At the 1-year follow-up evaluation, his motor power was full in the left leg; however, sensation to pin prick remained lost on the right L5 and S1 distributions. He continued to ambulate using a Lofstrand crutch. Conclusion Lateral lumbar fracture-dislocation at 2 noncontiguous levels is an unusual injury that results from high-energy trauma. Prompt recognition of the injuries, reduction of the fracture-dislocations, and posterior stabilization are recommended for neural decompression, spinal alignment, and long-term stabilization. PMID:24396320

  17. Limbus lumbar and sacral vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Jorge S; Huete, Isidro L; Tagle, Patricio M

    2002-03-01

    We evaluated the fractures of the lumbar and sacral vertebral limbus by disc impingement at the peripheral ring apophysis in 23 adults associated with trauma in 16 of them. Lumbalgia, radicular pain and narrow canal symptoms are the presenting forms of this underdiagnosed pathology. CT is the best method of examination, while plain roentgenograms and MR are usually negative. Accurate diagnosis and surgical technique with larger exposure are needed to resect the fractured fragments and protruded disc material for decompressing the roots and the dural sac. Our results were very good on the majority of cases. PMID:11877896

  18. Posterior urethral valves and vesicolithiasis in children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Neulander; J. Kaneti

    1996-01-01

    Although posterior urethral valves is a well known and important entity in paediatric urology, its association with bladder\\u000a calculi is not well documented and this condition is not discussed commonly in the literature. Association between posterior\\u000a urethral valves and vesicolithiasis is presented in three children.

  19. Posterior Urethral Valves: Inaccuracy of Prenatal Diagnosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jodi F. Abbott; Deborah Levine; Ronald Wapner

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the specificity of prenatal diagnosis of posterior urethral valves. Twenty-two fetuses were diagnosed in utero with posterior urethral valves due to the presence of persistent megacystis and hydronephrosis. Ten cases had oligohydramnios and 12 had normal or increased fluid. Confirmation of diagnosis was not available in 3 fetuses. Only 8 of 19 fetuses had

  20. Evaluation of the outcomes after posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, Daniel; Pagliara, Travis J.; Pisansky, Andrew; Elliott, Sean P.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior urethral injury is a clinically significant complication of pelvic fractures. The management is complicated by the associated organ injuries, distortion of the pelvic anatomy and the ensuing fibrosis that occurs with urethral injury. We report a review of the outcomes after posterior urethroplasty in the context of pelvic fracture urethral injury. PMID:26019979

  1. Nonoperatively treated isolated posterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul M. Keller; K. Donald Shelbourne; John R. McCarroll; Arthur C. Rettig

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the theory that isolated posterior cruciate ligament injuries do well when treated nonoperatively, we reviewed 40 patients (mean age, 33 years at fol lowup ; average interval from injury, 6 years) who com pleted a modified Noyes knee questionnaire and were reevaluated by physical examination, radiographs, and isokinetic testing. Thirty of the injuries to the posterior cruciate ligament

  2. Consistency of Posterior Distributions for Neural Networks

    E-print Network

    Consistency of Posterior Distributions for Neural Networks Herbert Lee \\Lambda May 21, 1998 Abstract In this paper we show that the posterior distribution for feedforward neural networks is asymp neural networks for nonparametric regression in a Bayesian framework. Keywords: Bayesian statistics

  3. Extraaxial Ependymoma of the Posterior Fossa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melanie B. Fukui; Jeffery P. Hogg; A. Julio Martinez

    Summary: We report an unusual case of an extraaxial ependy- moma of the posterior fossa in an adult. MR imaging showed a heterogeneously enhancing extraaxial mass with a cystic com- ponent. Ependymoma should be included in the differential diag- nosis of uncommon extraaxial masses of the posterior fossa.

  4. General versus epidural anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy.

    PubMed

    Ulutas, Murat; Secer, Mehmet; Taskapilioglu, Ozgur; Karadas, Soner; Akyilmaz, Ahmet Aykut; Baydilek, Yunus; Kocamer, Betul; Ozboz, Ayse; Boyaci, Suat

    2015-08-01

    This study was a retrospective analysis of 850 lumbar microdiscectomy (LMD) under epidural anesthesia (EA; n=573) or general anesthesia (GA; n=277) performed by the same surgeon and paid by invoice to the Social Security Institution of the Turkish Republic between April 2003 and May 2013. Although GA is the most frequently used method of anesthesia during LMD, the choice of regional anesthetia (epidural, spinal or a combination of these) differs between surgeons and anesthetists. Studies have reported that EA in surgery for lumbar disc herniation may be more reliable than GA, as it enables the surgeon to communicate with the patient during surgery, but few studies have compared the costs of these two anesthetic methods in LMD. We found that EA patient costs were significantly lower than GA patient costs (p<0.01) and there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the time spent in the operating room (p<0.01). There was no difference in the duration of surgery (p>0.05). The anesthetic method used during LMD affected the complication rate, cost and efficiency of operating room use. We suggest that EA is an anesthetic method that can contribute to health care cost savings and enable LMD to be completed with less nerve root manipulation and more comfort, efficacy, reliability and cost efficiency without affecting the success rate of the surgical procedure. PMID:26067543

  5. Outcome of symptomatic upper lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Awwal, M A; Ahsan, M K; Sakeb, N

    2014-10-01

    "Upper" lumbar disc herniations (LDH) are different from the "lower" and possess increased chance of neural compromise and cauda equina syndrome that necessitates operative management despite of contradictory surgical outcome. We underwent the study to assess the clinical and functional outcome of symptomatic upper LDH surgery from July 2003 to June 2012 in BSMMU, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The records of 123 patients (age range, 30-69 years), 56 men and 67 women (mean 52 years) having upper lumbar discectomy were reviewed. The surgical time, intra-operative blood loss, self evaluated back pain and thigh and/or groin pain status [using Visual Analogue Score (VAS)] and the disability status [using Oswestry disability (ODI) questionnaire] was analyzed. Radiological stability (using Posner's criteria), functional outcome [using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) Score] and overall outcome (using MacNab`s criteria), was calculated. Chi-squared test and z-test using SPSS revealed mean operative time and mean blood loss had no significant (p>0.05) difference. Pain, sensory, motor and reflex status as well as VAS, ODI and all the components of JOA questionnaire had significant (p<0.05) improvement. In spite of intra-operative complications in 20.32% cases, overall satisfactory outcome was achieved in 83.74% cases. The postoperative complications (08.13%) could be managed conservatively. However, carefully decided surgical alternatives resulted in satisfactory clinical and functional outcome in upper LDH surgery. PMID:25481595

  6. Damage accumulation location under cyclic loading in the lumbar disc shifts from inner annulus lamellae to peripheral annulus with increasing disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Muhammad; Natarajan, Raghu N; An, Howard S; Andersson, Gunnar B J

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to study the breakdown of lumbar disc tissue over several years of exposure to bending and lifting by experimental methods. In our earlier published study we have shown how a finite element model of a healthy lumbar motion segment was used to predict the damage accumulation location and number of cyclic to failure under different loading conditions. The aim of the current study was to extend the continuum damage mechanics formulation to the degenerated discs and investigate the initiation and progression of mechanical damage. Healthy disc model was modified to represent degenerative discs (Thompson grade III and IV) by incorporating both geometrical and biochemical changes due to degeneration. Analyses predicted decrease in the number of cycles to failure with increasing severity of disc degeneration. The study showed that the damage initiated at the posterior inner annulus adjacent to the endplates and propagated outwards towards its periphery in healthy and grade III degenerated discs. The damage accumulated preferentially in the posterior region of the annulus. However in grade IV degenerated disc damage initiated at the posterior outer periphery of the annulus and propagated circumferentially. The finite element model predictions were consistent with the infrequent occurrence of rim lesions at early age but a much higher incidence in severely degenerated discs. PMID:24231247

  7. Microcirculation of human fetal posterior root ganglia: a scanning electron microscopic study of corrosion casts.

    PubMed

    Gorczyca, J; Skawina, A; Litwin, J A; Miodo?ski, A J

    1998-02-01

    The vasculature of lumbar posterior root ganglia was investigated in human fetuses aged 17-24 weeks; using the corrosion casting technique and scanning electron microscopy. The arterial supply consisted of one main artery and occasional arterioles entering the ganglion at its pole and running axially, while the venous drainage was located at the periphery of the ganglion, thus indicating a centrifugal pattern of blood flow. The dense capillary network of the ganglion showed the roughly parallel course of the vessels in the central zone and an irregular arrangement in the peripheral zone where capillaries formed "nests", probably surrounding individual perikaryons of ganglionic cells. The capillaries had a sinusoidal character with numerous dilatations about twice the normal capillary size, as well as occasional larger vascular spaces resulting from capillary interconnections and suggesting the intussusceptive type of angiogenesis. PMID:9488902

  8. Vascular Complications in Lumbar Spinal Surgery: Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyoung Ho; Park, Jae Hyung; Chung, Jin Wook; Han, Joon Koo; Shin, Sang Joon; Kang, Heung Sik [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-01-15

    Four patients underwent endovascular treatment of vascular injuries complicating lumbar spinal surgery. In two patients with massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage, the extravasating lumbar arteries were successfully embolized with microcoils. Two patients with large iliac arteriovenous fistula (AVF) were treated, one with embolization using a detachable balloon and coils, which failed, and the other with placement of a stent graft after embolization of distal runoff vessels, which occluded the fistula.We conclude that acute arterial laceration or delayed AVF complicating lumbar spinal surgery can be managed effectively with selective embolization or stent-graft placement, respectively.

  9. [Extreme lateral lumbar intervertebral disk displacement. Incidence, symptoms and therapy].

    PubMed

    Ebeling, U; Mattle, H; Reulen, H J

    1990-04-01

    Upper lumbar nerve root compression or a femoralgia is often caused by extreme lateral lumbar disc herniation. This type of lumbar disc herniation compresses the nerve root inside or laterally to the intervertebral canal, while mediolateral disc herniations squeeze it in the lateral recess. Pain radiating obliquely over the thigh is the dominant clinical symptom. Bending the body to the ipsilateral side usually increases the pain. When neurologic signs are present, motor deficits tend to be more prominent than sensory and the deficits never affect more than one nerve root. Most frequently a weakness of knee extension occurs. PMID:2191229

  10. COMBINED POSTERIOR-ANTERIOR SURGERY FOR OSTEOPOROTIC DELAYED VERTEBRAL FRACTURE WITH NEUROLOGIC DEFICIT

    PubMed Central

    NAKASHIMA, HIROAKI; YUKAWA, YASUTSUGU; ITO, KEIGO; MACHINO, MASAAKI; ISHIGURO, NAOKI; KATO, FUMIHIKO

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT With the aging of society, osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fracture is a concern. This fracture occurs occasionally; however, some cases progress to neural compromise due to delayed vertebral body collapse requiring surgery. Surgical treatment and postoperative care are difficult because of patients’ serious comorbidities and poor bone quality, and hence, optimum treatment is not clear, even though some surgical approaches have been reported. There were 35 consecutive patients (5 males and 30 females) with osteoporotic delayed vertebral fractures and associated neurological deficit. Mean age at surgery was 70.7 years (range 60–84 years). Average postoperative follow-up was 3.8 years (range 0.6–11.3 years). All patients experienced a single vertebra collapse, except for 1 with a 2-level collapse of lumbar vertebrae. One thoracic (Th7), 19 thoracolumbar (Th12-L1), and 16 lumbar (L2-5) fractures were treated with combined posterior-anterior surgery. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale, activities of daily living (ADL) status, and local sagittal angle were evaluated both before and after surgery. Forty-six percent of all patients showed an improvement of more than 1 grade postoperatively on the ASIA impairment scale, and 74% demonstrated an improvement in ADL status. No deterioration was observed in neurological or ADL status after surgery. With regard to sagittal alignment, preoperative kyphosis of 18.4 degrees was corrected to 2.4 degrees of kyphosis postoperatively. However, 11.5 degrees loss of correction was observed at final follow-up observation. Combined posterior-anterior surgery could provide reliable improvement in both neurological and ADL status, although maintenance of postoperative alignment was difficult to achieve in some cases. PMID:25741039

  11. Combined posterior-anterior surgery for osteoporotic delayed vertebral fracture with neurologic deficit.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroaki; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Ito, Keigo; Machino, Masaaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kato, Fumihiko

    2014-08-01

    With the aging of society, osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fracture is a concern. This fracture occurs occasionally; however, some cases progress to neural compromise due to delayed vertebral body collapse requiring surgery. Surgical treatment and postoperative care are difficult because of patients' serious comorbidities and poor bone quality, and hence, optimum treatment is not clear, even though some surgical approaches have been reported. There were 35 consecutive patients (5 males and 30 females) with osteoporotic delayed vertebral fractures and associated neurological deficit. Mean age at surgery was 70.7 years (range 60-84 years). Average postoperative follow-up was 3.8 years (range 0.6-11.3 years). All patients experienced a single vertebra collapse, except for 1 with a 2-level collapse of lumbar vertebrae. One thoracic (Th7), 19 thoracolumbar (Th12-L1), and 16 lumbar (L2-5) fractures were treated with combined posterior-anterior surgery. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale, activities of daily living (ADL) status, and local sagittal angle were evaluated both before and after surgery. Forty-six percent of all patients showed an improvement of more than 1 grade postoperatively on the ASIA impairment scale, and 74% demonstrated an improvement in ADL status. No deterioration was observed in neurological or ADL status after surgery. With regard to sagittal alignment, preoperative kyphosis of 18.4 degrees was corrected to 2.4 degrees of kyphosis postoperatively. However, 11.5 degrees loss of correction was observed at final follow-up observation. Combined posterior-anterior surgery could provide reliable improvement in both neurological and ADL status, although maintenance of postoperative alignment was difficult to achieve in some cases. PMID:25741039

  12. Evaluating the incidence and utility of microscopic metastatic dissemination as diagnosed by lumbar cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) samples in children with newly diagnosed intracranial ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Fangusaro, Jason; Van Den Berghe, Clark; Tomita, Tadanori; Rajaram, Veena; Aguilera, Dolly; Wang, Deli; Goldman, Stewart

    2011-07-01

    Ependymomas are the third most common central nervous system (CNS) tumor in childhood. After resection, the standard evaluation of intracranial ependymomas includes a post-contrast spine MRI and a lumbar CSF sample to evaluate for metastasis. Although it is estimated that 10-30% of patients will present with metastatic disease, it is unclear what percentage of metastatic disease is solely identified microscopically via lumbar cytology versus that identified as bulky disease on post-contrast spinal MRIs. We retrospectively evaluated all patients at our institution with intracranial ependymoma diagnosed between January 1991 and June 2008 in an effort to evaluate prognostic factors, survival outcomes and incidence of metastatic disease. Sixty-one evaluable patients were identified: 46% were male and the mean age at diagnosis was 64 months (2.04-196.92). The most common tumor location was the posterior fossa (77%) and 64% of patients achieved a gross total resection with initial surgery. Five-year event-free and overall survivals were 39 ± 7% and 87 ± 4%, respectively. Approximately 10% of patients presented with bulky metastatic disease as seen on post-contrast spine MRI. No patient whose spine MRI was negative for tumor had positive lumbar CSF cytology. These data highlight the rarity of patients who present with microscopic metastatic disease noted on lumbar cytology alone and suggest that evaluation of lumbar cytology may not be useful in patients with negative post-contrast spine MRIs. Future prospective trials may be helpful in validating this conclusion before eliminating this procedure as part of the standard evaluation in newly diagnosed ependymoma patients. PMID:21038109

  13. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis–Specific Symptom Scale

    PubMed Central

    Wakita, Takafumi; Otani, Koji; Onishi, Yoshihiro; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Kikuchi, Shin-ichi; Konno, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Objectives. To test the validity and responsiveness of the lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS)–specific symptom scale (FLS-25 [Fukushima LSS Scale 25]). Summary of Background Data. The FLS-25, a self-administered questionnaire designed to comprehensively cover various symptoms of LSS, has been developed to address the need to measure symptoms specific to this disorder. Methods. One hundred sixty-seven patients with confirmed LSS who required conservative therapy were asked to complete a questionnaire including questions regarding walking capacity and the FLS-25. These patients also underwent a lumbar extension test and a walking stress test, which are stress tests designed to objectively evaluate LSS symptoms, to measure standing time, walking distance, and walking time. Relationship between the FLS-25 scores and these external standards was analyzed to evaluate the criterion validity of the FLS-25. The patients underwent the same evaluations after 8 weeks of conservative therapy. The relationship between changes from baseline to week 8 in FLS-25 scores and changes in the 3 external standards was analyzed to evaluate the responsiveness of the FLS-25. Results. The distribution of FLS-25 scores among patients was symmetric, and there were no ceiling or floor effects. FLS-25 scores increased as self-reported walking capacity decreased (P = 0.006). The mean standing time in the lumbar extension test was 165 (SD = 109) seconds, and FLS-25 scores increased as standing time decreased (P = 0.003). In the walking stress test, mean walking distance and mean walking time were 213 (SD = 154) m and 236 (SD = 114) seconds. FLS-25 scores increased as walking distance (P = 0.002) and walking time (P = 0.054) decreased. Changes from baseline to week 8 in FLS-25 scores correlated with changes in the stress test standing time (P = 0.014), walking distance (P < 0.001), and walking time (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The criterion validity and responsiveness of the FLS-25 were confirmed. The use of FLS-25 in clinical and investigational settings is warranted to monitor patients and evaluate therapeutic efficacy. Level of Evidence: 3 PMID:25365718

  14. Upright positional MRI of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Alyas, F; Connell, D; Saifuddin, A

    2008-09-01

    Supine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used in the assessment of low back pain and radiculopathy. However, imaging findings often correlate poorly with clinical findings. This is partly related to the positional dependence of spinal stenosis, which reflects dynamic changes in soft-tissue structures (ligaments, disc, dural sac, epidural fat, and nerve roots). Upright MRI in the flexed, extended, rotated, standing, and bending positions, allows patients to reproduce the positions that bring about their symptoms and may uncover MRI findings that were not visible with routine supine imaging. Assessment of the degree of spinal stability in the degenerate and postoperative lumbar spine is also possible. The aim of this review was to present the current literature concerning both the normal and symptomatic spine as imaged using upright MRI and to illustrate the above findings using clinical examples. PMID:18718234

  15. Sciatica caused by lumbar epidural gas

    PubMed Central

    Belfquih, Hatim; El Mostarchid, Brahim; Akhaddar, Ali; Gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Gas production as a part of disc degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. The clinical features are similar to those of common sciatica. CT is very useful in the detection of epidural gas accumulation and nerve root compression. We report a case of symptomatic epidural gas accumulation originating from vacuum phenomenon in the intervertebral disc, causing lumbo-sacral radiculopathy. A 45-year-old woman suffered from sciatica for 9 months. The condition worsened in recent days. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated intradiscal vacuum phenomenon, and accumulation of gas in the lumbar epidural space compressing the dural sac and S1 nerve root. After evacuation of the gas, her pain resolved without recurrence. PMID:25422680

  16. Methodologic evaluation of the lumbar disc syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Though the lumbar disc syndrome is a costly and ubiquitous affliction, effective evaluation of the disease process has been confounded by major unaddressed methodological short falls. Prominent difficulties include: inattention to the clinical boundaries of the syndrome, neglected co-morbid disease processes, comparison of unequal treatment groups and premature clinical data extrapolation, inadequate diagnostic validation, variability in surgical observation, and reliance upon follow-up techniques faulted by unaddressed distorting factors. Proposals for improvement include: formulation of suitable stratification subgroups emphasizing age and sign-symptom intensity and duration, techniques for improved diagnostic return from surgical exploration, suggestions toward improved quantitation of clinical testing procedures, and implantation of a quality of life scale. PMID:6454306

  17. [Lumbar disc herniation--diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Corniola, M-V; Tessitore, E; Schaller, K; Gautschi, O P

    2014-12-10

    A lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a condition frequently encountered in primary care medicine. It may give rise to a compression of one or more nerve roots, which can lead to a nerve root irritation, a so-called radiculopathy, with or without a sensorimotor deficit. The majority of LDHs can be supported by means of a conservative treatment consisting of physical therapy, ergotherapy, analgetics, anti-inflammatory therapy or corticosteroids, which may be eventually administered by infiltrations. If a clinico-radiological correlation is present and moderate neurological deficit appears suddenly, if it is progressive under conservative treatment or if pain is poorly controlled by well-conducted conservative treatment performed during four to six months, surgery is then recommended. PMID:25632633

  18. Endoscopic lumbar discectomy: Experience of first 100 cases

    PubMed Central

    Jhala, Amit; Mistry, Manish

    2010-01-01

    Background: Various modalities of treatment from standard discectomy, microdiscectomy, percutaneous discectomy, and transforaminal endoscopic discectomy have been in use for lumbar intervertebral disc prolapse. The access to spine is kept to a minimum without stripping paraspinal muscles minimizing muscle damage by posterior interlaminar endoscopic approach. The aim of this study was to evaluate technical problems, complications, and overall initial results of microendoscopic discectomy. Materials and Methods: First 100 consecutive cases aged 19-65 years operated by microendoscopic dissectomy between August 2002 – December 2005 are reported. All patients with single nerve root lesions including sequestrated or migrated and selected central disc at L4-5 and L5-S1 were included. The patients with bilateral radiculopathy were excluded. All patients had preoperative MRI and first 11 patients had postoperative MRI to check the adequacy of decompression. Diagnostic selective nerve root blocks were done in selective cases to isolate the single root lesion when MRI was inconclusive (n=7). All patients were operated by a single surgeon with the Metrx system (Medtronics). 97 were operated by 18-mm ports, and only three patients were operated by 16-mm ports. Postoperatively, all patients were mobilized as soon as the pain subsided and discharged within 24–48 h postsurgery. Patients were evaluated for technical problems, complications, and overall results by modified Macnab criteria. Patients were followed up at 2, 6, and 12 weeks. Results: The mean follow up was 12 months (range 3 months – 4 years). Open conversion was required in one patient with suspected root damage. Peroperatively single facet removal was done in 5 initial cases. Minor dural punctures occurred in seven cases and root damage in one case. The average surgical time was 70 min (range 25-210 min). Average blood loss was 20-30 ml. Technical difficulties encountered in initial 25 cases were insertion of guide pin, image orientation, peroperative dissection and bleeding problems, and reaching wrong levels suggestive of a definitive learning curve. Postoperative MRI (n=11) showed complete decompression. Overall 91% of patients had good-to-excellent results, with four patients having recurrence of whom three were reoperated. Four patients had postoperative discitis. One of the patients required fusion for discitis and rest were managed conservatively. One patient had root damage to L5 root that had paresthesia in L5 region even on 4 years of follow-up. Conclusion: Microendoscopic discectomy is minimally invasive procedure for discectomy with early encouraging results. Once definite learning curve was over and expertise is acquired, the results of this procedure are acceptable safe and effective. PMID:20419006

  19. POSTERIOR INTEROSSEOUS NERVE SYNDROME DUE TO PSEUDOGOUT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. TANIGUCHI; M. YOSHIDA; T. TAMAKI

    1999-01-01

    Posterior interosseous nerve palsy associated with pseudogout of the elbow joint in a 71-year-old woman is described. Local steroid injection and administration of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug was effective in treatment.

  20. Efficient search using posterior phone probability estimates. 

    E-print Network

    Renals, Steve; Hochberg, Mike

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel, efficient search strategy for large vocabulary continuous speech recognition (LVCSR). The search algorithm, based on stack decoding, uses posterior phone probability estimates to substantially ...

  1. Confidence measures from local posterior probability estimates 

    E-print Network

    Williams, Gethin; Renals, Steve

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a set of related confidence measures for large vocabulary continuous speech recognition (LVCSR) based on local phone posterior probability estimates output by an acceptor HMM acoustic model. In ...

  2. Does myodil introduced for ventriculography lead to symptomatic lumbar arachnoiditis?

    PubMed

    Hill, C A; Hunter, J V; Moseley, I F; Kendall, B E

    1992-12-01

    Although there is a substantial body of evidence implicating Myodil or Pantopaque as a cause of lumbar arachnoiditis, assessment of the clinically based evidence is complicated by the additional potentially causative factors present in a high proportion of cases. These include pre-existing spinal pathology, traumatic lumbar puncture and surgery. The aim of this retrospective study was to attempt to ascertain whether Myodil introduced via ventricular catheter was associated with subsequent development of symptomatic lumbar arachnoiditis. In 222 patients in whom clinical records were reviewed there was no excess of back pain following ventriculography compared to the general population. Myodil ventriculography does not appear to be a major cause of symptomatic lumbar arachnoiditis. Several unavoidable problems with the methodology of this study are discussed. PMID:1286419

  3. Sense in the lumbar spine Is diminished with flexion

    E-print Network

    Gade, Venkata; Wilson, Sara E.

    2007-01-01

    Proprioception plays an important role in appropriate sensation of spine position, movement and stability. Previous research has demonstrated that position sense error in the lumbar spine is increased in flexed postures. ...

  4. Atypical Guillain-Barré Syndrome Misdiagnosed as Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Dae Young; Lee, Seung Chul

    2013-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. In typical cases, the first symptoms of GBS are pain, numbness, paresthesia, weakness in the limbs. Autonomic involvement is common and causes urinary retention and ileus. Much of these symptoms overlap with those of lumbar spinal stenosis. Therefore, correct diagnosis of GBS in a patient with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis or in a patient with atypical manifestations of GBS can be difficult, especially early in the course of GBS. Here, we report on a case of atypical GBS in a 74-year-old previously healthy patient with lumbar spinal stenosis and discuss the differential diagnosis of the GBS and lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:23826482

  5. Posterior odds ratios for selected regression hypotheses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Zellner; A. Siow

    1980-01-01

    Summary  Bayesian posterior odds ratios for frequently encountered hypotheses about parameters of the normal linear multiple regression\\u000a model are derived and discussed. For the particular prior distributions utilized, it is found that the posterior odds ratios\\u000a can be well approximated by functions that are monotonic in usual sampling theoryF statistics. Some implications of this finding and the relation of our work

  6. The Far Lateral Approach to Lumbar Disc Herniations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Porchet; H. Fankhauser; N. DE TRIBOLET

    \\u000a The diagnosis of extreme lateral lumbar disc herniation (ELLDH) as a cause of lumbar radiculopathy was first described by\\u000a Abdullah in 1974 [1]. This discal pathology has been recognized for many years as an occasional cause of negative disc exploration and immediate\\u000a failure of classical disc surgery in sciatica [1,18, 24, 25, 29, 31, 30, 31, 33, 35, 41]. Only

  7. Extraforaminal lumbar disc herniations: CT demonstration of Sharpey's fibers avulsion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J.-F. Bonneville; M. Runge; F. Cattin; P. Potelon; Y.-S. Tang

    1989-01-01

    Forty-seven extraforaminal lumbar disc herniations (EFLDH) accounting for 7% of all lumbar disc herniations encountered during the same period of time were reviewed. L3–L4 or L4–L5 disc was involved in 89% of the cases giving rise to a L3 or L4 nerve root compression. An abnormal motion of lateral bending with rotation of the trunk was found retrospectively in 60%

  8. [Pregnancy-related, rarely-seen spontaneous lumbar artery rupture].

    PubMed

    Iskender, Serkan; Ergün, Alper; Ipekçi, Fuat; Ekinci, Ozgür; Yener, Oktay

    2002-01-01

    Some arterial aneurysm ruptures can be seen during pregnancy. However, spontaneous rupture of the lumbar artery in pregnancy are very rare. In that manuscript we present a 22 year old female who is 8 months pregnant, seen at a peripheral hospital for suspicion of placenta decolmant. When the fetal heart sounds were missed, the patient was transported to our hospital. We reoperated on her as an emergency. We found that a spontaneous rupture of the lumbar artery. PMID:11881313

  9. Predicting Lumbar Central Canal Stenosis – A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Premchandran, Divya; Mahale, Ajith

    2014-01-01

    Background: Low back pain is a common complaint among adults, worldwide. Lumbar canal stenosis is frequently diagnosed as a cause for low back pain. In this study we evaluate morphometric measures using MRI sections to predict the occurrence of lumbar central canal stenosis. Settings and Design: One hundred and fifty four lumbar spinal MRI sagital and axial section images, 77 males and females each were evaluated from the Department of Radiology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, Manipal University. The study design was a prospective study. Materials and Methods: Various measurements were taken and two constant ratios were calculated. The Canal Body Ratio and the Ratio between the area of the dural sac and the vertebral body was evaluated. Statistical analysis: Unpaired t-test analysis was conducted using SPSS software. Results: A canal body ratio less than 0.6 from L1 to L3 levels and less than 0.5 at L4 and L5 levels were found. The ratio between area of dural sac and vertebral body was found to be a constant at 0.2 at all levels. It was found that maximum central canal stenosis occurred at the L5 lumbar vertebral level in 15.6% males and 13% females. This was followed by stenosis at the L4 and L3 lumbar vertebral levels with 5.1% males having stenosis at both levels and 3.9% and 5.1% females in L4 and L3 lumbar levels respectively. Conclusion: These morphometrical findings of the lumbar vertebrae could be of use in evaluating the possible cases of lumbar canal stenosis. PMID:25584282

  10. Lumbar Nerve Root Occupancy in the Foramen in Achondroplasia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hitesh N. Modi; Seung Woo Suh; Hae-Ryong Song; Jae Hyuk Yang

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is common in patients with achondroplasia because of narrowing of the neural canal. However, it is unclear\\u000a what causes stenosis, narrowing of the central canal or foramina. We performed a morphometric analysis of the lumbar nerve\\u000a roots and intervertebral foramen in 17 patients (170 nerve roots and foramina) with achondroplasia (eight symptomatic, nine\\u000a asymptomatic) and compared the data

  11. Selective posterior decompression of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyongsong; Isu, Toyohiko; Sugawara, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Isobe, Masanori; Morimoto, Daijiro; Mishina, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Shiro; Yoshida, Daizo; Teramoto, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Posterior decompression of the cervical spine is an accepted treatment for patients with cervical canal disease, but some patients experience postoperative axial pain and C5 or C6 palsy that affect their quality of life. Here we describe selective posterior decompression using a spinous process-splitting approach to prevent these complications performed in 17 patients with myelopathy treated at median 2.4 levels by selective posterior decompression via the transspinous approach. Clinical symptoms, axial pain, and C5 or C6 palsy were compared before and after treatment. The range of motion of the cervical spine and shift of the cervical cord were studied at the C5 level. All patients experienced symptom improvement and none suffered deterioration or required reoperation. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association score improved from 10.9 to 14.4 points and none of the patients reported C5 or C6 palsy or axial pain at the last follow-up visit. There was no statistically significant change in pre- and postoperative cervical alignment and range of motion. The posterior shift of the spinal cord at the C5 level was 1.7 mm. None of our 17 patients experienced significant postoperative axial pain after selective posterior decompression via the transspinous approach. Minimal spinal cord shift at the C5 level may have contributed to the reduced incidence of postoperative C5 or C6 palsy in our series. Selective posterior decompression is less invasive and effective in some patients with cervical canal disease. PMID:21358151

  12. Lumbar Apophyseal Ring Fracture- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    T.V., Ravi Kumar; Rao, Raghavendra; Grover, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Posterior apophyseal ring fracture is a rare condition typically seen in adolescent age group because the ring apophysis and the adjacent vertebral body does not fuse completely and may separate at the cephalad or caudal edge. It usually simulates disc herniation in adolescents and children but disc lesion is very commonly associated with PRAF. The condition although is rare but a high index of suspicion should be there during evaluation of any adolescent patient with low back ache as it is often missed on conventional radiography. Multiple treatment options have been described in literature, both conservative and surgical. We hereby report a case of posterior apophyseal ring fracture with a calcified disc adherent to the dura for which decompression alone without discectomy was found to be an effective treatment.

  13. Posterior urethral polyp with type I posterior urethral valves: a rare association in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Kesan, Krushnakumar V; Gupta, Rahul Kumar; Kothari, Paras; Gupta, Abhaya; Mudkhedkar, Kedar; Kamble, Ravikiran; Dikshit, K Vishesh

    2014-06-01

    Urethral polyp is a rare cause of bladder outlet obstruction, voiding dysfunction, and hematuria in the pediatric age group. Urethral polyps are rarely associated with other congenital urinary tract anomalies. In this study, we report a case of solitary posterior urethral polyp with type I posterior urethral valve in a 7-day-old neonate presented with urinary retention and deranged renal function. The polyp was diagnosed on cystoscopy. Transurethral resection of the polyp with posterior urethral valve fulguration was performed. Pathologic assessment revealed a fibroepithelial lesion, which was consistent with congenital posterior urethral polyp. PMID:24767515

  14. Gait in thoracolumbar/lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: effect of surgery on gait mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Detrembleur, C.; Mousny, M.; Banse, X.

    2010-01-01

    For patients whose scoliosis progresses, surgery remains the ultimate way to correct and stabilise the deformity while maintaining as many mobile spinal segments as possible. In thoracolumbar/lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), the spinal fusion has to be extended to the lumbar spine. The use of anterior spinal fusion (ASF) instead of the classic posterior fusion (PSF) may preserve more distal spinal levels in attempt to limit the consequences of surgery on trunk mobility. The effects of surgery on body shape, pain and the decompensation phenomenon have all been well evaluated. Very few studies have addressed the effect of ASF or PSF on basic activities, such as walking. Before any treatment, AIS patients already have reduced pelvis, hip and shoulder motion when walking at a normal speed compared with adolescents without scoliosis (control group). Additionally, they have longer contraction time of the lumbar and pelvic muscles leading to an excessive energy cost and reduced muscle efficiency. In addition, if these changes are associated with spinal stiffness, spinal fusion could further negatively affect this pre-surgical inefficient walk. The goals of this study were (a) to compare pre- and 1-year post-surgery conditions in order to assess the effects of spinal arthrodesis on gait parameters and (b) to compare the anterior versus the posterior surgical approaches. Nineteen young females with thoracolumbar/lumbar AIS were assessed by radiological and clinical examination and by conventional gait analysis before surgery and at almost 12 months after surgery. Seven subjects underwent surgery using ASF and 12 using PSF. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed on a motor-driven treadmill at spontaneous self-selected speed to record kinematic, electromyographic (EMG), mechanical and energetic measurements synchronously. Although it was expected that the instrumentation would modify the characteristics of normal walking, this study showed that surgery does not induce asymmetric gait or any significant differences between the ASP and the PSF surgery groups. One year after surgery, the changes observed consisted of improvements in the gait and mechanical parameters. In the PSF group, 11–14 vertebrae were fused while only 3–4 were fused in the ASF group. In both AIS groups, step length was increased by 4% and cadence reduced by 2%. There was a slight increase in pelvis and hip frontal motion. Only the transverse shoulder motion was mildly decreased by 1.5°. All the other gait parameters were left unchanged or were improved by surgery. Notably, the EMG timing activity did not change. The total muscular mechanical work (Wtot) increased by 6% mainly due to the external work (Wext), i.e. the work performed by the body muscles to move the body in its surroundings. The energy cost, although showing a tendency towards a reduction, remained globally excessive, probably due to the excessive co-contraction of the lumbo-pelvic muscles. PMID:20148341

  15. Gait in thoracolumbar/lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: effect of surgery on gait mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mahaudens, Philippe; Detrembleur, C; Mousny, M; Banse, X

    2010-07-01

    For patients whose scoliosis progresses, surgery remains the ultimate way to correct and stabilise the deformity while maintaining as many mobile spinal segments as possible. In thoracolumbar/lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), the spinal fusion has to be extended to the lumbar spine. The use of anterior spinal fusion (ASF) instead of the classic posterior fusion (PSF) may preserve more distal spinal levels in attempt to limit the consequences of surgery on trunk mobility. The effects of surgery on body shape, pain and the decompensation phenomenon have all been well evaluated. Very few studies have addressed the effect of ASF or PSF on basic activities, such as walking. Before any treatment, AIS patients already have reduced pelvis, hip and shoulder motion when walking at a normal speed compared with adolescents without scoliosis (control group). Additionally, they have longer contraction time of the lumbar and pelvic muscles leading to an excessive energy cost and reduced muscle efficiency. In addition, if these changes are associated with spinal stiffness, spinal fusion could further negatively affect this pre-surgical inefficient walk. The goals of this study were (a) to compare pre- and 1-year post-surgery conditions in order to assess the effects of spinal arthrodesis on gait parameters and (b) to compare the anterior versus the posterior surgical approaches. Nineteen young females with thoracolumbar/lumbar AIS were assessed by radiological and clinical examination and by conventional gait analysis before surgery and at almost 12 months after surgery. Seven subjects underwent surgery using ASF and 12 using PSF. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed on a motor-driven treadmill at spontaneous self-selected speed to record kinematic, electromyographic (EMG), mechanical and energetic measurements synchronously. Although it was expected that the instrumentation would modify the characteristics of normal walking, this study showed that surgery does not induce asymmetric gait or any significant differences between the ASP and the PSF surgery groups. One year after surgery, the changes observed consisted of improvements in the gait and mechanical parameters. In the PSF group, 11-14 vertebrae were fused while only 3-4 were fused in the ASF group. In both AIS groups, step length was increased by 4% and cadence reduced by 2%. There was a slight increase in pelvis and hip frontal motion. Only the transverse shoulder motion was mildly decreased by 1.5 degrees . All the other gait parameters were left unchanged or were improved by surgery. Notably, the EMG timing activity did not change. The total muscular mechanical work (W (tot)) increased by 6% mainly due to the external work (W (ext)), i.e. the work performed by the body muscles to move the body in its surroundings. The energy cost, although showing a tendency towards a reduction, remained globally excessive, probably due to the excessive co-contraction of the lumbo-pelvic muscles. PMID:20148341

  16. The middle layer of lumbar fascia and attachments to lumbar transverse processes: implications for segmental control and fracture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Priscilla J. Barker; Donna M. Urquhart; Ian H. Story; Marius Fahrer; Christopher A. Briggs

    2007-01-01

    The anatomy of the middle layer of lumbar fascia (MLF) is of biomechanical interest and potential clinical relevance, yet\\u000a it has been inconsistently described. Avulsion fractures of the lumbar transverse processes (LxTP’s) are traditionally attributed\\u000a to traction from psoas major or quadratus lumborum (QL), rather than transversus abdominis (TrA) acting via the MLF. This\\u000a attachment is also absent from many

  17. Postural control in patients with lumbar disc herniation in the early postoperative period

    PubMed Central

    Chantsoulis, Marzena; Kuczy?ski, Micha?

    2009-01-01

    Chronic spinal disc disease leads to disorders in postural movement coordination. An incorrect asymmetrical movement pattern for the lower limbs loading impairs proprioception and deteriorates postural stability, particularly when the vision is occluded. The standard surgical treatment improves biomechanical conditions in the lumbar spine, reduces pain, yet does it reduce the stability deficit in the upright position? An answer to the latter question would help work out targeted therapy to improve postural stability. We hypothesized that the standard surgical treatment would improve postural stability reflected by decreased sway variability accounting for better use of proprioceptive inputs postoperatively. Thirty-nine patients with lumbar disc herniation participated in the study. Their postural sway was recorded in anterior/posterior and medial/lateral planes with their eyes open or closed (EC) before and after surgery. The variability, range, mean velocity of the recorded time series and the area of the ellipse enclosed by the statokinesiogram were used as measures of postural stability. Preoperatively, EC condition resulted in an increased variability and mean velocity of postural sway, while postoperatively it caused an increase in sway mean velocity and sway area only with no effect on sway variability and range. The comparison of the balance before and after the surgery in the EC condition showed significant decrease in all parameters. In the early postoperative period, the patients recover the ability to control their postural sway in EC within normal limits, however, at the expense of significantly increased frequency of corrective torques. It is probably a transient short-term strategy needed to compensate for the recovery phase when the normal weighting factors for all afferents are being reestablished. We propose that this transient postoperative period may be the best timing of therapeutic intervention targeted at facilitating and reinforcing the acquisition of correct motor patterns. PMID:19562385

  18. The effect of body mass index on lumbar lordosis on the Mizuho OSI Jackson spinal table

    PubMed Central

    Bundy, Justin; Hernandez, Tommy; Zhou, Haitao; Chutkan, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Study design:?Prospective cohort study. Clinical question:?Does the patients' body mass index (BMI) influence the degree of intraoperative lumbar lordosis in patients undergoing operative treatment on the Mizuho Orthopedic Systems Incorporated (OSI) Jackson spinal table? Methods:?Twenty-four consecutive patients undergoing posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion on the Jackson table, excluding those with sagittal malalignment, underwent standing preoperative and prone intraoperative lateral x-rays. Intervertebral body angle measurements were obtained from L1–S1 using the modified method of Cobb. Changes in angle measurements were compared to BMI using linear regression and ANOVA. Results:?We found a mean lordosis of 52.6° in standing preoperative x-rays compared to a prone position mean lordosis of 61.5° on the Jackson table. The mean change was 8.88° with a range of 0°–18°. A linear association between lordosis and BMI was demonstrated (P?lumbar lordosis on the Jackson table and that care must be used when dealing with a population with large BMI on the Jackson table. Methods evaluation and class of evidence (CoE) Methodological principle: Study design:  Prospective cohort •  Retrospective cohort  Case control  Case series Methods  Patients at similar point in course of treatment •  Follow-up ?85% •  Similarity of treatment protocols for patient groups •  Patients followed for long enough for outcomes to occur •  Control for extraneous risk factors Evidence class: II *Authors must provide a description of robust baseline characteristics, and control for those that are potential prognostic factors. The definiton of the different classes of evidence is available on page 83. PMID:23544022

  19. Biomechanical effect of altered lumbar lordosis on intervertebral lumbar joints during the golf swing: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bae, Tae Soo; Cho, Woong; Kim, Kwon Hee; Chae, Soo Won

    2014-11-01

    Although the lumbar spine region is the most common site of injury in golfers, little research has been done on intervertebral loads in relation to the anatomical-morphological differences in the region. This study aimed to examine the biomechanical effects of anatomical-morphological differences in the lumbar lordosis on the lumbar spinal joints during a golf swing. The golf swing motions of ten professional golfers were analyzed. Using a subject-specific 3D musculoskeletal system model, inverse dynamic analyses were performed to compare the intervertebral load, the load on the lumbar spine, and the load in each swing phase. In the intervertebral load, the value was the highest at the L5-S1 and gradually decreased toward the T12. In each lumbar spine model, the load value was the greatest on the kypholordosis (KPL) followed by normal lordosis (NRL), hypolordosis (HPL), and excessive lordosis (EXL) before the impact phase. However, results after the follow-through (FT) phase were shown in reverse order. Finally, the load in each swing phase was greatest during the FT phase in all the lumbar spine models. The findings can be utilized in the training and rehabilitation of golfers to help reduce the risk of injury by considering individual anatomical-morphological characteristics. PMID:25162173

  20. Routine use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in posterior fusions of the pediatric spine and incidence of cancer.

    PubMed

    Sayama, Christina; Willsey, Matthew; Chintagumpala, Murali; Brayton, Alison; Briceño, Valentina; Ryan, Sheila L; Luerssen, Thomas G; Hwang, Steven W; Jea, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to determine the safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) use in posterior instrumented fusions in the pediatric population, focusing on cancer risk. In a previous study, the authors reported the short-term (mean follow-up of 11 months) safety and efficacy of rhBMP-2 in the pediatric age group. The present study reports their results with a minimum of 24 months' follow-up. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed 57 consecutive cases involving pediatric patients who underwent posterior occiptocervical, cervical, thoracic, lumbar, or lumbosacral spine fusion from October 1, 2007, to June 30, 2011, at Texas Children's Hospital. Seven cases were excluded from further analysis because of loss to follow-up. Three patients died during the follow-up period and were placed in a separate cohort. RESULTS The patients' average age at the time of surgery was 11 years, 4 months (range 9 months to 20 years). The mean duration of follow-up was 48.4 months (range 24-70 months). Cancer status was determined at the most recent encounter with the patient and/or caretaker(s) in person, or in telephone follow-up. Twenty-four or more months after administration of rhBMP-2, there were no cases of new malignancy, degeneration, or metastasis of existing tumors. The cause of death of the patients who died during the study period was not related to BMP or to the development, degeneration, or metastasis of cancer. CONCLUSIONS Despite the large number of adult studies reporting increased cancer risk associated with BMP use, the authors' outcomes with rhBMP-2 in the pediatric population suggest that it is a safe adjunct to posterior spine fusions of the occipitocervical, cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and lumbosacral spine. There were no new cases of cancer, or degeneration or metastasis of existing malignancies in this series. PMID:25860984

  1. Comparison of lumbar repositioning error according to different lumbar angles in a flexion pattern (FP) subgroup of patients with non-specific chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Kyung-Hee; Oh, Jae-Seop; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study determined the change in lumbar position sense according to lumbar angles in a flexion pattern (FP) subgroup of patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (NCSLBP). [Subjects] Thirteen subjects with FP low back pain participated. [Methods] The lumbar repositioning error (RE) of subjects was measured between a neutral starting position and re-position phases at three angles, in sitting and standing upright positions. [Results] Lumbar RE was significantly greater during lumbar flexion at a 30° angle in the sitting position than in the other tasks. [Conclusion] In the flexion-related subgroup, the lumbar RE measurement may be a more sensitive evaluation method using a lumbar flexion angle of 30° while in the sitting position, compared with other angles in sitting or standing positions. PMID:25642094

  2. Lumbar nerve rootlet entrapment by an iatrogenically spliced percutaneous intra-thecal lumbar cerebrospinal fluid catheter

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Castro, Carlos A.; Scott, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Complications associated with the use of percutaneous intra-thecal lumbar indwelling spinal catheters include infection, hematoma, neurologic dysfunction, and persistent undesired retention among others. A case of iatrogenic splicing associated with neurologic dysfunction with the use of a percutaneous intra-thecal indwelling spinal catheter is presented in this study. Method Single case study review. Results Review of case materials indicate Y pattern splicing/fragmentation of an indwelling intra-thecal catheter causing neurologic dysfunction and resistance to removal during attempted removal. Pain and weakness were evident soon after insertion of the catheter and were amplified with attempted catheter removal. Computed tomography revealed a double dot sign on axial view and a Y appearance on sagittal view. Surgical findings revealed entrapment of nerve rootlets in the axilla of the spliced catheter. Conclusions Splicing/fragmentation causing neurologic dysfunction as well as catheter retention is described as a potential complication of intra-thecal indwelling cerebrospinal fluid catheters. A symptom of fragmentation of a catheter may include neurologic dysfunction including pain and weakness of a lumbar nerve root. If resistance is experienced upon attempted catheter removal, with or without associated neurologic dysfunction, further attempts at removal should not be attempted. In those cases in which pain and/or lumbar weakness are evident post catheter placement and/or following attempted removal, computed tomography should be performed. If fragmentation of a catheter is evident on CT scan, spinal surgical consultation should be obtained. Recommended spinal surgical intervention includes an open durotomy and visualization of catheter fragments and nerve rootlets and removal of catheter fragments. PMID:25600724

  3. Posterior urethral disruption secondary to a penetrating gluteal injury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronen Rub; Ralph Madeb; Yoram Kluger; Tzipi Chen; Yoav Avidor

    2000-01-01

    We report a case of a complete posterior urethral injury secondary to a penetrating gluteal injury. Posterior urethral injury usually occurs in male patients with pelvic trauma. The reported incidence of urethral injury with pelvic fracture ranges from 1.6% to 25% (mean 10%), with 66% of them being complete posterior urethral ruptures. Causes of posterior urethral disruptions include blunt trauma,

  4. Posterior Predictive Bayesian Phylogenetic Model Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Paul O.; Xie, Wangang; Chen, Ming-Hui; Fan, Yu; Kuo, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    We present two distinctly different posterior predictive approaches to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection and illustrate these methods using examples from green algal protein-coding cpDNA sequences and flowering plant rDNA sequences. The Gelfand–Ghosh (GG) approach allows dissection of an overall measure of model fit into components due to posterior predictive variance (GGp) and goodness-of-fit (GGg), which distinguishes this method from the posterior predictive P-value approach. The conditional predictive ordinate (CPO) method provides a site-specific measure of model fit useful for exploratory analyses and can be combined over sites yielding the log pseudomarginal likelihood (LPML) which is useful as an overall measure of model fit. CPO provides a useful cross-validation approach that is computationally efficient, requiring only a sample from the posterior distribution (no additional simulation is required). Both GG and CPO add new perspectives to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection based on the predictive abilities of models and complement the perspective provided by the marginal likelihood (including Bayes Factor comparisons) based solely on the fit of competing models to observed data. [Bayesian; conditional predictive ordinate; CPO; L-measure; LPML; model selection; phylogenetics; posterior predictive.] PMID:24193892

  5. Posterior cruciate ligament removal contributes to abnormal knee motion during posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melinda J. Cromie; Robert A. Siston; Nicholas J. Giori; Scott L. Delp

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal anterior translation of the femur on the tibia has been observed in mid flexion (20-608) following posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty. The underlying biomechanical causes of this abnormal motion remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to isolate the effects of posterior cruciate ligament removal on knee motion after total knee arthroplasty. We posed two questions: Does removing

  6. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by the Right Lumbar Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro, E-mail: s-miyayama@fukui.saiseikai.or.jp; Yamashiro, Masashi; Okuda, Miho; Yoshie, Yuichi; Sugimori, Natsuki; Igarashi, Saya; Nakashima, Yoshiko [Fukuiken Saiseikai Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Matsui, Osamu [Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    This study evaluated the clinical features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) supplied by the right lumbar artery. Eleven patients with HCC supplied by the right lumbar artery were treated with chemoembolization. The patients' medical records were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent 6.7 {+-} 3.7 (mean {+-} SD) chemoembolization sessions, and the hepatic arterial branches were noted as being attenuated. The right inferior phrenic artery (IPA) was also embolized in 10 patients. The interval between initial chemoembolization and chemoembolization of the lumbar artery supply was 53.2 {+-} 26.9 months. Mean tumor diameter was 3.1 {+-} 2.4 cm and was located at the surface of S7 and S6. The feeding-branch arose proximal to the bifurcation of the dorsal ramus and muscular branches (n = 8) or from the muscular branches (n = 3) of the right first (n = 10) or second lumbar artery (n = 1). The anterior spinal artery originated from the tumor-feeding lumbar artery in one patient. All feeders were selected, and embolization was performed after injection of iodized oil and anticancer drugs (n = 10) or gelatin sponge alone in a patient with anterior spinal artery branching (n = 1). Eight patients died from tumor progression 10.1 {+-} 4.6 months later, and two patients survived 2 and 26 months, respectively. The remaining patient died of bone metastases after 32 months despite liver transplantation 10 months after chemoembolization. The right lumbar artery supplies HCC located in the bare area of the liver, especially in patients who undergo repeated chemoembolization, including chemoembolization by way of the right IPA. Chemoembolization by way of the right lumbar artery may be safe when the feeder is well selected.

  7. Late presentation of posterior urethral valves.

    PubMed

    Jalbani, Imran Khan; Biyabani, Syed Raziuddin

    2014-05-01

    Presence of posterior urethral valves (PUV) is the most common cause of urinary tract obstruction in the male neonate. Late presentation occurs in 10% of cases. We present a case of PUVs in an adult male who presented with history of obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms and hematuria. On evaluation, he was found to have raised serum creatinine level. A voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) could not be completely performed because of narrowing in the posterior urethra. A rigid urethrocystoscopy was performed at which he was found to have type-I posterior urethral valve which were fulgurated. A repeat uroflowmetry revealed maximum flow rate of 12 ml/second. This case highlights that PUVs is not solely a disease of infancy but may also present late. VCUG is the radiological investigation of choice but the diagnosis may be missed. A urethrocystoscopy is advised if there is a high index of suspicion. PMID:24906275

  8. Lumbar discal cyst causing bilateral radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyung-Jun, Kwak; Dae-Yong, Kim; Tae-Ho, Kim; Ho-Sang, Park; Jae-Sung, Kim; Jae-Won, Jang; Jung-Kil, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Background: Discal cyst is a rare lesion that can result in clinical symptoms typical of disc herniation manifesting as a unilateral single nerve root lesion. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported case of discal cyst resulting in bilateral radiculopathy. Case Description: A 48-year-old female presented with bilateral sciatica and neurogenic claudication for 3 months. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extradural cystic lesion compressing the ventral aspect of the thecal sac at the level of the L3-L4 intervertebral disc. The lesion showed low and high signal intensities on T1- and T2-weighted images, respectively. Total excision of the cyst was achieved after a left hemipartial laminectomy of L3, and an obvious communication with the disc space was found. Bilateral sciatica was immediately resolved after surgery, and was sustained at the two-year follow-up. The histological diagnosis was consistent with a discal cyst. Conclusions: Although a discal cyst is extremely rare, the possibility of a discal cyst should be considered in differential diagnosis of patients with radiculopathy, particularly when encountering any extradural mass lesion ventral to the thecal sac. Surgical resection is the most employed therapeutic method for symptomatic lumbar discal cysts. PMID:21427789

  9. Posterior predictive checking of multiple imputation models.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cattram D; Lee, Katherine J; Carlin, John B

    2015-07-01

    Multiple imputation is gaining popularity as a strategy for handling missing data, but there is a scarcity of tools for checking imputation models, a critical step in model fitting. Posterior predictive checking (PPC) has been recommended as an imputation diagnostic. PPC involves simulating "replicated" data from the posterior predictive distribution of the model under scrutiny. Model fit is assessed by examining whether the analysis from the observed data appears typical of results obtained from the replicates produced by the model. A proposed diagnostic measure is the posterior predictive "p-value", an extreme value of which (i.e., a value close to 0 or 1) suggests a misfit between the model and the data. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the posterior predictive p-value as an imputation diagnostic. Using simulation methods, we deliberately misspecified imputation models to determine whether posterior predictive p-values were effective in identifying these problems. When estimating the regression parameter of interest, we found that more extreme p-values were associated with poorer imputation model performance, although the results highlighted that traditional thresholds for classical p-values do not apply in this context. A shortcoming of the PPC method was its reduced ability to detect misspecified models with increasing amounts of missing data. Despite the limitations of posterior predictive p-values, they appear to have a valuable place in the imputer's toolkit. In addition to automated checking using p-values, we recommend imputers perform graphical checks and examine other summaries of the test quantity distribution. PMID:25939490

  10. Surgical indications in low lumbar burst fractures: experiences with Anterior Locking Plate System and the reduction-fixation system.

    PubMed

    Huang, T J; Chen, J Y; Shih, H N; Chen, Y J; Hsu, R W

    1995-11-01

    A study of 14 surgically treated patients with low lumbar burst fractures (L3 to L5) is reported. Initially, 13 patients presented with incomplete neurologic deficits below the level of injury. The follow-up period ranged from 24 to 40 months, with an average of 30 months. In group 1, seven patients underwent one-stage anterior decompression, fusion, and Anterior Locking Plate System (ALPS) fixation. In Group 2, seven patients had posterior surgery with decompression, portero-lateral fusion, and a short segment fixation, one above and one below the injuried level, with the reduction-fixation transpediculate system. Indications for one-stage anterior surgery consisted of patients with incomplete neurologic deficits, segmental kyphotic deformity caused by loss of anterior vertebral height (< 50%), or canal encroachment < 50%. When there is significant radiologic evidence of lamina fractures, displaced or greenstick type, or injuries that occurred at the L5 level, the posterior approach was undertaken initially. This may be followed by anterior surgery if satisfactory vertebral height restoration or canal clearance was not achieved. Five dura tears (36%) were noted during surgery: two tears in group 1 and three tears in group 2. There were two patients in group 2 (29%) who had screws broken; however, none in group 1 demonstrated implant failure. In the low lumbar region, the step-off ALPS plate is preferable to the straight plate because of the increasing size of the vertebral body toward the caudal area. A low profile and easy application were its advantages. However, the ALPS could not be distracted or compressed anteriorly. PMID:7474007

  11. The Effects of Massage Therapy after Decompression and Fusion Surgery of the Lumbar Spine: a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Glenda

    2012-01-01

    Background Spinal fusion and decompression surgery of the lumbar spine are common procedures for problems such as disc herniations. Various studies for postoperative interventions have been conducted; however, no massage therapy studies have been completed. Purpose The objective of this study is to determine if massage therapy can beneficially treat pain and dysfunction associated with lumbar spinal decompression and fusion surgery. Participants Client is a 47-year-old female who underwent spinal decompression and fusion surgery of L4/L5 due to chronic disc herniation symptoms. Research Design The research design was a case study in a private clinic involving the applications of seven, 30-minute treatments conducted over eight weeks. Common Swedish massage and myofascial techniques were applied to the back, shoulders, posterior hips, and posterior legs. Outcomes were assessed using the following measures: VAS pain scale, Hamstring Length Test, Oswestry Disability Index, and the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Results Hamstring length improved (in degrees of extension) from pretreatment measurements in the right leg of 40° and left leg 65° to post-treatment measurement at the final visit, when the results were right 50° and left 70°. The Oswestry Disability Index improved 14%, from 50% to 36% disability. Roland-Morris Disability decreased 1 point, from 3/24 to 2/24. The VAS pain score decreased by 2 points after most treatments, and for three of the seven treatments, client had a post-treatment score of 0/10. Conclusions Massage for pain had short-term effects. Massage therapy seemed to lengthen the hamstrings bilaterally. Massage therapy does appear to have positive effects in the reduction of disability. This study is beneficial for understanding the relationship between massage therapy and clients who have undergone spinal decompression and fusion. Further research is warranted. PMID:23429839

  12. Imaging the posterior mediastinum: a multimodality approach

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Mariaelena; Heidinger, Benedikt H.; Franquet, Elisa; Eisenberg, Ronald L.; Bankier, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    The posterior mediastinum contains several structures that can produce a wide variety of pathologic conditions. Descending thoracic aorta, esophagus, azygos and hemiazygos veins, thoracic duct, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, and nerves are all located in this anatomical region and can produce diverse abnormalities. Although chest radiography may detect many of these pathologic conditions, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are the imaging modalities of choice for further defining the relationship of posterior mediastinal lesions to neighboring structures and showing specific imaging features that narrow the differential diagnosis. This review emphasizes modality-related answers to morphologic questions, which provide precise diagnostic information. PMID:25993732

  13. Structure of the human tibialis posterior tendon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolf Petersen; Gerrit Hohmann; Thomas Pufe; Michael Tsokos; Thore Zantop; Friedrich Paulsen; Bernhard Tillmann

    2004-01-01

    Background  The most common site of rupture of the posterior tibial tendon is the retromalleolar region where the tendon changes its direction\\u000a of pull. The aim of this study was to characterize the tissue of the gliding zone of the tibialis posterior tendon to gain\\u000a further knowledge about possible structural causes for spontaneous tendon rupture.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and

  14. Diurnal variations in the stresses on the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Adams, M A; Dolan, P; Hutton, W C

    1987-03-01

    Two complementary experiments were performed, the first on living people and the second on cadaveric spines. In the first experiment, electronic inclinometers were used to measure the range of lumbar flexion of 21 volunteers in the early morning and in the afternoon. The results showed that the range of movement increased by 5 degrees during the day. In the second experiment, cadaveric lumbar motion segments were creep loaded to simulate a day's activity and their bending properties were measured before and after creep. The results showed that creep loading reduces the spine's resistance to bending (the effect being particularly marked in the disc) and increases the range of lumbar flexion by 12.5 degrees. The results of the two experiments were combined to show that in life, forward bending movements subject the lumbar spine to higher bending stresses in the early morning compared with later in the day. The increase is about 300% for the discs and 80% for the ligaments of the neural arch. It is concluded that lumbar discs and ligaments are at greater risk of injury in the early morning. PMID:3589804

  15. Role of posterior elements in the disc bulging of a degenerated cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Solitro, Giovanni F.; Siemionow, Kris; Drucker, David; Upadhyay, Ashish; Patel, Priyesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Many studies have been developed to characterize the mechanical behavior of the intervertebral disc specifically for the lumbar spine and there have been limited studies done on the cervical spine with the goal to evaluate the strength of the cervical spine under compression without any information on the bulging of the intervertebral discs. The goal of the current study is to examine the deformation response of the cervical intervertebral disc classified with grade III or greater degeneration and analyze the relationship between axial deformation and anterior and posterior bulge under compression up to 550 N. Methods Each specimen was compressed for 3 cycles to a maximum load of 550N in steps of 50 N. The bulge was measured using Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs on an intact spinal segment, spinal segment with post laminectomy, and spinal segment post facetectomy. Results The anterior budge for an intact spinal segment shows a change of slope at loads of 262N±66N. For a physiological load of 250N the vertical displacement or spine segment height was reduced by 10.1% for an intact segment and 8.78% for the laminectomy and facetectomy configurations with F = 0.159 (Fcrit = 3.89) with no statistical difference observed. For the post laminectomy there was a decrease of 35% in anterior bulge compared to the intact specimen. Conclusions Our results show that for grade III disc degeneration the cervical segments bulging for both the laminectomy and facetectomy procedures are not significantly different. In post laminectomy the average anterior and posterior bulges are similar to the average anterior and posterior bulge post facetectomy. PMID:26056628

  16. TO APPEAR IN MICCAI 2008. Lumbar Disc Localization and Labeling with a

    E-print Network

    Chaudhary, Vipin

    TO APPEAR IN MICCAI 2008. Lumbar Disc Localization and Labeling with a Probabilistic Model on both localization and labeling of the lumbar region discs. To that end, we propose a two-level probabilistic model, we show a normal example of the lumbar region of the spinal column with the discs labeled according

  17. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Secondary to Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is often idiopathic. We report on a patient presenting with symptomatic intracranial hypotension and pain radiating to the right leg caused by a transdural lumbar disc herniation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain revealed classic signs of intracranial hypotension, and an additional spinal MR confirmed a lumbar transdural herniated disc as the cause. The patient was treated with a partial hemilaminectomy and discectomy. We were able to find the source of cerebrospinal fluid leak, and packed it with epidural glue and gelfoam. Postoperatively, the patient's headache and log radiating pain resolved and there was no neurological deficit. Thus, in this case, lumbar disc herniation may have been a cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. PMID:20157378

  18. A rare cause of lumbar radiculopathy: spinal gas collection.

    PubMed

    Tamburrelli, F; Leone, A; Pitta, L

    2000-10-01

    The presence of gas in the intervertebral disk space, known as the vacuum phenomenon, is a relatively common radiologic finding, especially on computed tomographic investigation. In a few cases, the gas can be collected into the lumbar spinal canal and can also compress the nerve root. To date only seven cases of symptomatic lumbar radiculopathy caused by a bubble of gas are reported in the literature. The presence of gas inside a narrowed disk and the collection of gas in the spinal canal suggest a communication between the two structures. A case of lumbar radiculopathy caused by a collection of gas in the spinal canal provided the authors the opportunity to study this rare condition by magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging had not been used before in the referred cases and proved conclusively the discal origin of the gas. PMID:11052357

  19. Posterior predictive Bayesian phylogenetic model selection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul O; Xie, Wangang; Chen, Ming-Hui; Fan, Yu; Kuo, Lynn

    2014-05-01

    We present two distinctly different posterior predictive approaches to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection and illustrate these methods using examples from green algal protein-coding cpDNA sequences and flowering plant rDNA sequences. The Gelfand-Ghosh (GG) approach allows dissection of an overall measure of model fit into components due to posterior predictive variance (GGp) and goodness-of-fit (GGg), which distinguishes this method from the posterior predictive P-value approach. The conditional predictive ordinate (CPO) method provides a site-specific measure of model fit useful for exploratory analyses and can be combined over sites yielding the log pseudomarginal likelihood (LPML) which is useful as an overall measure of model fit. CPO provides a useful cross-validation approach that is computationally efficient, requiring only a sample from the posterior distribution (no additional simulation is required). Both GG and CPO add new perspectives to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection based on the predictive abilities of models and complement the perspective provided by the marginal likelihood (including Bayes Factor comparisons) based solely on the fit of competing models to observed data. PMID:24193892

  20. Genitourinary neurofibromatosis mimicking posterior urethral valves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James A. Brown; Jay B. Levy; Stephen A. Kramer

    1997-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy, examined after an episode of acute urinary retention, was found to have neurofibromatosis of the bladder neck and prostatic urethra. His symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction and radiographic findings of a dilated prostatic urethra mimicked posterior urethral valves. Complete urologic investigation, including cystourethroscopy, revealed that the dilatation of the prostatic urethra was secondary to neural involvement of

  1. Markov Chains for Exploring Posterior Distributions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luke Tierney

    1994-01-01

    Several Markov chain methods are available for sampling from a posterior distribution. Two important examples are the Gibbs sampler and the Metropolis algorithm. In addition, several strategies are available for constructing hybrid algorithms. This paper outlines some of the basic methods and strategies and discusses some related theoretical and practical issues. On the theoretical side, results from the theory of

  2. Arthroscopic reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chih-Hwa Chen; Wen-Jer Chen; Chun-Hsiung Shih

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Considerable controversies remain on the graft choice and fixation methods in the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to compare, at minimal 2-year follow-up, the outcomes of PCL reconstruction between using quadriceps tendon autograft and using quadruple hamstring tendon autograft. Type of Study: Case series. Methods: All patients received only PCL reconstruction without combined

  3. BAER suppression during posterior fossa dural opening

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Christopher B.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Jiang, Yi Dan; Yao, Tom; Zhang, Yi Ping; Sun, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative monitoring with brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAER) provides an early warning signal of potential neurological injury and may avert tissue damage to the auditory pathway or brainstem. Unexplained loss of the BAER signal in the operating room may present a dilemma to the neurosurgeon. Methods: This paper documents two patients who displayed a unique mechanism of suppression of the BAER apparent within minutes following dural opening for resection of a posterior fossa meningioma. Results: In two patients with anterior cerebellopontine angle and clival meningiomas, there was a significant deterioration of the BAER soon after durotomy but prior to cerebellar retraction and tumor removal. Intracranial structures in the posterior fossa lying between the tumor and dural opening were shifted posteriorly after durotomy. Conclusion: We hypothesized that the cochlear nerve and vessels entering the acoustic meatus were compressed or stretched when subjected to tissue shift. This movement caused cochlear nerve dysfunction that resulted in BAER suppression. BAER was partially restored after the tumor was decompressed, dura repaired, and bone replaced. BAER was not suppressed following durotomy for removal of a meningioma lying posterior to the cochlear complex. Insight into the mechanisms of durotomy-induced BAER inhibition would allay the neurosurgeon's anxiety during the operation. PMID:25883849

  4. Chemotherapy of Pediatric Posterior Fossa Tumors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael S. Edwards; Victor A. Levin; Charles B. Wilson

    1980-01-01

    Results of chemotherapy of recurrent posterior fossa tumors in children are presented. Cerebellar astrocytoma, ependymoma, and brain stem glioma have all shown objectively determined responses to treatment with nitrosourea compounds (BCNU or CCNU). Medulloblastoma has shown objectively determined response to various chemotherapeutic agents; but in our experience the best responses have been obtained with a combination of a nitrosourea (CCNU),

  5. Posterior Fossa Lateral Ependymoma in Childhood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahmoud G. Nagib; Therese O’Fallon

    1996-01-01

    Over a period extending from 1984 to 1993, 16 children ranging in ages from 2 months to 12 years with posterior fossa ependymoma were treated. Four of these tumors were classified as lateral ependymomas because of their configuration and suspected site of origin. These 4 patients’ ages ranged from

  6. Posterior cranial fossa tumours in childhood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Chang; M. M. H. Teng; J. F. Lirng

    1993-01-01

    We reviewed clinical and CT findings in 133 posterior cranial fossa tumours in children. All had histological diagnosis, apart from 20 cases of brain stem glioma. The majority were intra-axial tumours, including 53 medulloblastomas (40%), 31 cerebellar astrocytomas (23%), 28 brain stem gliomas (21%), 14 ependymomas (11%), and single cases of ganglioglioma, haemangioblastoma and teratoma. Extra-axial tumours formed only 3%,

  7. Estimation of shear load sharing in moderately degenerated human lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Skrzypiec, Daniel M; Bishop, Nicholas E; Klein, Anke; Püschel, Klaus; Morlock, Michael M; Huber, Gerd

    2013-02-22

    Shear load sharing between intervertebral discs and apophyseal joints was investigated experimentally in human lumbar motion segments with moderately degenerated intervertebral discs. 'Motion-Segments' (21-42 years, n=6) and 'Disc-Segments' (22-42 years, n=6) were subjected to shear in 0° flexion, using a modified materials testing machine, while immersed in a Ringer bath at 37°C. Initially, two cycles of anterior and posterior shear loading up to 200N (50N/s) were applied, to evaluate stiffnesses in both directions. Specimens were then exposed to 15mm of anterior displacement at a rate of 0.5mm/s. A physiological compressive load of 500N was applied throughout. The initial 5mm of the load-displacement curves were approximated with 6th order polynomials for evaluation of the mean behaviour in each group. 'Disc-Segments' were 66% (p=0.002) and 43% (p=0.026) less stiff than 'Motion-Segments' for anterior and posterior shear directions, respectively. 'Disc-Segments' exhibited 44% lower peak shear load (p=0.015) than 'Motion-Segments'. All specimens in the 'Disc-Segments' group showed damage either at the interface between the endplates and the disc. The intervertebral disc contributes 38% to initial anterior shear load-bearing, increasing to 66% at 5mm displacement. Some over-estimation of disc load-bearing might have been caused by the comparison of segments from different levels. The apophyseal joints make a substantial contribution (65-55%) to anterior shear load-bearing over the initial 2mm of shear displacement but this decreases with increasing shear displacement. PMID:23312826

  8. Restoration of Lumbar Lordosis in Flat Back Deformity: Optimal Degree of Correction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Tack; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Hyo-Jong; Kim, Jung-Youn; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective comparative study. Purpose To provide an ideal correction angle of lumbar lordosis (LL) in degenerative flat back deformity. Overview of Literature The degree of correction in degenerative flat back in relation to pelvic incidence (PI) remains controversial. Methods Forty-nine patients with flat back deformity who underwent corrective surgery were enrolled. Posterior-anterior-posterior sequential operation was performed. Mean age and mean follow-up period was 65.6 years and 24.2 months, respectively. We divided the patients into two groups based on immediate postoperative radiographs-optimal correction (OC) group (PI-9°?LL

  9. Genetic Association Studies in Lumbar Disc Degeneration: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Eskola, Pasi J.; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjaer, Per; Solovieva, Svetlana; Männikkö, Minna; Tommerup, Niels; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.; Chan, Danny

    2012-01-01

    Objective Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Science, The Genetic Association Database and The Human Genome Epidemiology Network for information published between 1990–2011 addressing genes and lumbar disc degeneration. Two investigators independently identified studies to determine inclusion, after which they performed data extraction and analysis. The level of cumulative genetic association evidence was analyzed according to The HuGENet Working Group guidelines. Results Fifty-two studies were included for review. Forty-eight studies reported at least one positive association between a genetic marker and lumbar disc degeneration. The phenotype definition of lumbar disc degeneration was highly variable between the studies and replications were inconsistent. Most of the associations presented with a weak level of evidence. The level of evidence was moderate for ASPN (D-repeat), COL11A1 (rs1676486), GDF5 (rs143383), SKT (rs16924573), THBS2 (rs9406328) and MMP9 (rs17576). Conclusions Based on this first extensive systematic review on the topic, the credibility of reported genetic associations is mostly weak. Clear definition of lumbar disc degeneration phenotypes and large population-based cohorts are needed. An international consortium is needed to standardize genetic association studies in relation to disc degeneration. PMID:23185509

  10. Lumbo-Costo-Vertebral Syndrome with Congenital Lumbar Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Lucky; Gupta, Rahul; Malla, Shahid Amin

    2014-01-01

    Lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome (LCVS) is a set of rare abnormalities involving vertebral bodies, ribs, and abdominal wall. We present a case of LCVS in a 2-year-old girl who had a progressive swelling over left lumbar area noted for the last 12 months. Clinical examination revealed a reducible swelling with positive cough impulse. Ultrasonography showed a defect containing bowel loops in the left lumbar region. Chest x-ray showed scoliosis and hemivertebrae with absent lower ribs on left side. Meshplasty was done. PMID:24834386

  11. Lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome with congenital lumbar hernia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Lucky; Mala, Tariq Ahmed; Gupta, Rahul; Malla, Shahid Amin

    2014-01-01

    Lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome (LCVS) is a set of rare abnormalities involving vertebral bodies, ribs, and abdominal wall. We present a case of LCVS in a 2-year-old girl who had a progressive swelling over left lumbar area noted for the last 12 months. Clinical examination revealed a reducible swelling with positive cough impulse. Ultrasonography showed a defect containing bowel loops in the left lumbar region. Chest x-ray showed scoliosis and hemivertebrae with absent lower ribs on left side. Meshplasty was done. PMID:24834386

  12. Intracranial Venous Thrombosis After Placement of a Lumbar Drain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mitchell G. Miglis; David N. Levine

    2010-01-01

    Background  Lumbar drains are frequently used in clinical neuroscience and are often managed in the neurointensive care unit. Complications\\u000a are generally rare, and intracranial venous thrombosis (IVT) and infarction has not been reported.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We report the case of a 45-year-old woman who developed a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak after spinal surgery. Fifteen hours\\u000a after placement of a lumbar drain she developed

  13. Reliability and validity of the Metrecom Skeletal Analysis System in the assessment of sagittal plane lumbar angles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Walsh; AC Breen

    1995-01-01

    Seventeen asymptomatic subjects were examined by the Metrecom Skeletal Analysis System and by lateral lumbar radiography. Measurements of sacral base angle, lumbar curve angle, and lumbosacral disc angle were compared with the values derived from the lumbar radiographs. Repeated readings using the Metrecom showed high intraexaminer reliability in measuring these angles. However, the Metrecom values for the lumbar curve and

  14. Hypertensive posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome causing posterior fossa edema and hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Grossbach, Andrew J; Abel, Taylor J; Hodis, Brendan; Wassef, Shafik N; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2014-02-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a well characterized entity resulting from the inability of cerebral autoregulation to adequately protect the brain from uncontrolled hypertension. It primarily affects the occipital lobes, but can also involve the structures in the posterior fossa including the brainstem and cerebellum. Treatment usually consists of strict blood pressure control, but more aggressive management may be indicated with acutely worsening neurological status. We present a patient with hypertensive encephalopathy that resulted in hydrocephalus and brainstem compression necessitating surgical decompression requiring ventriculostomy and suboccipital craniectomy. In rare cases, PRES can present with severe brainstem compression requiring emergent posterior fossa decompression. When brainstem signs are present on exam, emergent posterior fossa decompression may be safer than ventriculostomy alone. PMID:24126039

  15. Nonvirally engineered porcine adipose tissue-derived stem cells: use in posterior spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Sheyn, Dima; Pelled, Gadi; Zilberman, Yoram; Talasazan, Farahnaz; Frank, Jonathan M; Gazit, Dan; Gazit, Zulma

    2008-04-01

    Multiple factors alter intervertebral disc volume, structure, shape, composition, and biomechanical properties, often leading to low back pain. Spinal fusion is frequently performed to treat this problem. We recently published results of our investigation of a novel system of in vivo bone formation, in which we used nonvirally nucleofected human mesenchymal stem cells that overexpress a bone morphogenetic protein gene. We hypothesized that primary porcine adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) nucleofected with plasmid containing recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 (rhBMP-6) could induce bone formation and achieve spinal fusion in vivo. Primary ASCs were isolated from freshly harvested porcine adipose tissue. Overexpression of rhBMP-6 was achieved ex vivo by using a nucleofection technique. Transfection efficiency was monitored by assessing a parallel transfection involving an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene and flow cytometry analysis. rhBMP-6 protein secreted by the cells was measured by performing an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Genetically engineered cells were injected into the lumbar paravertebral muscle in immunodeficient mice. In vivo bone formation was monitored by a quantitative microcomputed tomography (muCT). The animals were euthanized 5 weeks postinjection, and spinal fusion was evaluated using in vitro muCT and histological analysis. We found formation of a large bone mass adjacent to the lumbar area, which produced posterior spinal fusion of two to four vertebrae. Our data demonstrate that efficient bone formation and spinal fusion can be achieved using ex vivo, nonvirally transfected primary ASCs. These results could pave the way to a novel biological solution for spine treatment. PMID:18218819

  16. Intradural Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Lumbar Spine: A Distinctive Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kaksi, Mustafa; Onoz, Mustafa; Sav, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Solitary fibrous tumors are ubiquitous mesenchymal neoplasms of putative fibroblastic origin. They were originally described in the pleura but subsequently have been reported in many extraserosal sites. Solitary fibrous tumors may also occur in the meninges, central nervous system parenchyma, and spinal cord. Case. A 67-year-old male patient with progressive lower extremity weakness, urinary urgency, and sexual dysfunction has been admitted to our hospital. On his lumbar MRI, we detected an intradural lesion posterior to the L3 vertebral corpus. We resected the lesion by L3 total laminectomy. Immunohistological findings revealed strong and diffuse immunopositivity with vimentin, CD34, and bcl-2. Ki-67 proliferation index was 5–8%. We did not detect any recurrence 12 months after his operation. Conclusion. SFT is mostly seen in young and middle-aged patients and should be considered among differential diagnosis in cases suffering from pain, hypoesthesia, and urinary dysfunction. Gross total resection should be primary treatment. Tumors that have high Ki-67 labeling should be followed up for potential recurrences. PMID:25648160

  17. Intradural solitary fibrous tumor of the lumbar spine: a distinctive case report.

    PubMed

    Basaran, Recep; Kaksi, Mustafa; Onoz, Mustafa; Balkuv, Ece; Sav, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Solitary fibrous tumors are ubiquitous mesenchymal neoplasms of putative fibroblastic origin. They were originally described in the pleura but subsequently have been reported in many extraserosal sites. Solitary fibrous tumors may also occur in the meninges, central nervous system parenchyma, and spinal cord. Case. A 67-year-old male patient with progressive lower extremity weakness, urinary urgency, and sexual dysfunction has been admitted to our hospital. On his lumbar MRI, we detected an intradural lesion posterior to the L3 vertebral corpus. We resected the lesion by L3 total laminectomy. Immunohistological findings revealed strong and diffuse immunopositivity with vimentin, CD34, and bcl-2. Ki-67 proliferation index was 5-8%. We did not detect any recurrence 12 months after his operation. Conclusion. SFT is mostly seen in young and middle-aged patients and should be considered among differential diagnosis in cases suffering from pain, hypoesthesia, and urinary dysfunction. Gross total resection should be primary treatment. Tumors that have high Ki-67 labeling should be followed up for potential recurrences. PMID:25648160

  18. Chiropractic management of a patient with lumbar spine pain due to synovial cyst: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Cox, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to report the findings resulting from chiropractic care using flexion distraction spinal manipulation for a patient with low back and radicular pain due to spinal stenosis caused by a synovial cyst. Case Report A 75-year-old man presented with low back pain radiating to the right anterior thigh and down the left posterior leg of 3 years' duration. Physical and imaging examinations showed a synovial cyst–induced spinal stenosis at the right L3-L4 level and bilateral L4-L5 spinal stenosis. Intervention and Outcomes Flexion distraction spinal manipulation and physiological therapeutics were applied at the levels of stenosis. After 4 visits, the patient noted total absence of the right and left lower extremity pain and no adverse reaction to treatment. After 3 months of treatment and 16 visits, his low back and buttock pain were minimal; and he had no leg pain. Conclusion Lumbar synovial cyst and stenosis–generated low back and radicular pain was 80% relieved in a 75-year-old man following Cox flexion distraction spinal manipulation. PMID:22942836

  19. Long-term results of pediculo-body fixation and posterolateral fusion for lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Zagra, Antonino; Giudici, Fabrizio; Minoia, Leone; Corriero, Andrea Saverio; Zagra, Luigi

    2009-06-01

    Grob et al. (Eur Spine J 5:281-285, 1996) illustrated a new fixation technique in inveterate cases of grade 2-3 spondylolisthesis (degenerative or spondylolytic): a fusion without reduction of the spondylolisthesis. Fixation of the segment was achieved by two cancellous bone screws inserted bilaterally through the pedicles of the lower vertebra into the body of the upper slipped vertebra. Since 1998 we have been using this technique according to the authors' indications: symptomatic spondylolisthesis with at least 25% anterior slippage and advanced disc degeneration. Afterwards this technique was used also in spondylolisthesis with low reduction of the disc height and slippage less than 25%. In every case we performed postero-lateral fusion and fixation with two AO 6.5 Ø thread 16 mm cancellous screws. From 1998 to 2002 we performed 62 fusions for spondylolisthesis with this technique: 28 males (45.16%) and 34 females (54.84%), mean age 45 years (14-72 years). The slipped vertebra was L5 in 57 cases (92%), L4 in 2 cases (3.2%), L3 in 1 case (1.6%), combined L4 and L5 in 2 cases (3.2%). In all cases there was an ontogenetic spondylolisthesis with lysis. Lumbar pain was present in 22 patients and lumbar-radicular pain was present in 40 patients. The mean preoperative VAS was 6.2 (range 5-8) for lumbar pain, and 5.5 (range 4-7) for leg pain. The fusion area was L5-S1 in 53 cases (85.5%), L3-L4 in 1 case (1.6%), L4-S1 in 8 cases (12.9%). A decompression of the spinal canal by laminectomy was performed in 33 procedures (53%). When possible a bone graft was done from the removed neural arc, and from the posterior iliac crest in the other cases. The mean blood loss was about 254 ml (100-1,000). The mean operative time was 75 min (range 60-90). The results obtained by computerized analysis at follow-up at least 5 years after surgery showed a significant improvement in preoperative symptoms. The patients were asymptomatic in 52 cases (83.9%); strained-back pain was present in 8 cases (12.9%), and there was persistent lumbar-radicular pain in 2 cases (3.2%). The mean ODI score was 2.6%, the mean VAS back pain was 1.3, the mean VAS leg pain 0.7. Some complications were observed: a nerve root compression by a screw invasion of intervertebral foramen, resolved by screw removal; an iliac artery compression by a lateral exit screw from pediculo, resolved by screw removal; a deep iliac vein phlebitis with thrombosis caused by external compression due to a wrong intraoperative position, treated by medicine. Two cases of synthesis mobilization and two cases of broken screws was detected. No cases of pseudoarthrosis and immediate or late superficial or deep infection were observed. The analysis of the long-term results of the spondylolisthesis surgical treatment with direct pediculo-body screw fixation and postero-lateral fusion gave a very satisfactory response. The technique is reliable in allowing an optimal primary stability, creating the best biomechanical conditions to obtain a solid fusion. PMID:19444490

  20. Late-onset Alzheimer disease genetic variants in posterior cortical atrophy and posterior AD

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Khan, Qurat ul Ain; Murray, Melissa E.; Krishnan, Siddharth; Aakre, Jeremiah; Pankratz, V. Shane; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Bisceglio, Gina; Petersen, Ronald C.; Younkin, Steven G.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate association of genetic risk factors for late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) with risk of posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), a syndrome of visual impairment with predominant Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology in posterior cortical regions, and with risk of “posterior AD” neuropathology. Methods: We assessed 81 participants with PCA diagnosed clinically and 54 with neuropathologic diagnosis of posterior AD vs 2,523 controls for association with 11 significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from published LOAD risk genome-wide association studies. Results: There was highly significant association with APOE ?4 and increased risk of PCA (p = 0.0003, odds ratio [OR] = 3.17) and posterior AD (p = 1.11 × 10?17, OR = 6.43). No other locus was significant after corrections for multiple testing, although rs11136000 near CLU (p = 0.019, OR = 0.60) and rs744373 near BIN1 (p = 0.025, OR = 1. 63) associated nominally significantly with posterior AD, and rs3851179 at the PICALM locus had significant association with PCA (p = 0.0003, OR = 2.84). ABCA7 locus SNP rs3764650, which was also tested under the recessive model because of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium, also had nominally significant association with PCA risk. The direction of association at APOE, CLU, and BIN1 loci was the same for participants with PCA and posterior AD. The effects for all SNPs, except rs3851179, were consistent with those for LOAD risk. Conclusions: We identified a significant effect for APOE and nominate CLU, BIN1, and ABCA7 as additional risk loci for PCA and posterior AD. Our findings suggest that at least some of the genetic risk factors for LOAD are shared with these atypical conditions and provide effect-size estimates for their future genetic studies. PMID:24670887

  1. Comparison of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy and Open Lumbar Microdiscectomy for Recurrent Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Yeob; Shim, Chan Shik; Ahn, Yong; Choi, Young-Geun; Kim, Ho Jin

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and radiological outcomes of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and open lumbar microdiscectomy (OLM) for recurrent disc herniation. Methods Fifty-four patients, who underwent surgery, either PELD (25 patients) or repeated OLM (29 patients), due to recurrent disc herniation at L4-5 level, were divided into two groups according to the surgical methods. Excluded were patients with sequestrated disc, calcified disc, severe neurological deficit, or instability. Clinical outcomes were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Radiological variables were assessed using plain radiography and/or magnetic resonance imaging. Results Mean operating time and hospital stay were significantly shorter in PELD group (45.8 minutes and 0.9 day, respectively) than OLM group (73.8 minutes and 3.8 days, respectively) (p < 0.001). Complications occurred in 4% in PELD group and 10.3% in OLM group in the perioperative period. At a mean follow-up duration of 34.2 months, the mean improvements of back pain, leg pain, and functional improvement were 4.0, 5.5, and 40.9% for PELD group and 2.3, 5.1, and 45.0% for OLM group, respectively. Second recurrence occurred in 4% after PELD and 10.3% after OLM. Disc height did not change after PELD, but significantly decreased after OLM (p = 0.0001). Neither sagittal rotation angle nor volume of multifidus muscle changed significantly in both groups. Conclusion Both PELD and repeated OLM showed favorable outcomes for recurrent disc herniation, but PELD had advantages in terms of shorter operating time, hospital stay, and disc height preservation. PMID:20062565

  2. Radicular Pain due to Subsidence of the Nitinol Shape Memory Loop for Stabilization after Lumbar Decompressive Laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Son, Byung-Chul; Kim, Deog-Ryeong

    2015-01-01

    A number of dynamic stabilization systems have been used to overcome the problems associated with spinal fusion with rigid fixation recently and the demand for an ideal dynamic stabilization system is greater for younger patients with multisegment disc degeneration. Nitinol, a shape memory alloy of nickel and titanium, is flexible at low temperatures and regains its original shape when heated, and the Nitinol shape memory loop (SML) implant has been used as a posterior tension band mostly in decompressive laminectomy cases because the Nitinol implant has various characteristics such as high elasticity and a tensile force, flexibility, and biological compatibility. The reported short-term outcomes of the application of SMLs as posterior column supporters in cervical and lumbar decompressive laminectomies seem to be positive, and complications are minimal except for the rare occurrence of pullout and fracture of the SML. However, there was no report of neurological complications related to neural compression in spite of the use of the loop of SML in the epidural space. The authors report a case of delayed development of radiating pain caused by subsidence of the SML resulting epidural compression. PMID:25674347

  3. Radicular Pain due to Subsidence of the Nitinol Shape Memory Loop for Stabilization after Lumbar Decompressive Laminectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deog-ryeong

    2015-01-01

    A number of dynamic stabilization systems have been used to overcome the problems associated with spinal fusion with rigid fixation recently and the demand for an ideal dynamic stabilization system is greater for younger patients with multisegment disc degeneration. Nitinol, a shape memory alloy of nickel and titanium, is flexible at low temperatures and regains its original shape when heated, and the Nitinol shape memory loop (SML) implant has been used as a posterior tension band mostly in decompressive laminectomy cases because the Nitinol implant has various characteristics such as high elasticity and a tensile force, flexibility, and biological compatibility. The reported short-term outcomes of the application of SMLs as posterior column supporters in cervical and lumbar decompressive laminectomies seem to be positive, and complications are minimal except for the rare occurrence of pullout and fracture of the SML. However, there was no report of neurological complications related to neural compression in spite of the use of the loop of SML in the epidural space. The authors report a case of delayed development of radiating pain caused by subsidence of the SML resulting epidural compression. PMID:25674347

  4. Consistency of posterior distributions for neural networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, H K

    2000-07-01

    In this paper we show that the posterior distribution for feedforward neural networks is asymptotically consistent. This paper extends earlier results on universal approximation properties of neural networks to the Bayesian setting. The proof of consistency embeds the problem in a density estimation problem, then uses bounds on the bracketing entropy to show that the posterior is consistent over Hellinger neighborhoods. It then relates this result back to the regression setting. We show consistency in both the setting of the number of hidden nodes growing with the sample size, and in the case where the number of hidden nodes is treated as a parameter. Thus we provide a theoretical justification for using neural networks for nonparametric regression in a Bayesian framework. PMID:10987516

  5. Pseudoexfoliation material on posterior chamber intraocular lenses

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha-Bastos, Ricardo António; Silva, Sérgio Estrela; Prézia, Flávio; Falcão-Reis, Fernando; Melo, António B

    2014-01-01

    The presence of pseudoexfoliation material on the surface of an intraocular lens (IOL) is a rare finding. We report a series of seven cases with different patterns of pseudoexfoliation material deposition on the posterior chamber IOLs, recognized 2–20 years after cataract surgery. Six patients had an IOL implanted in the capsular bag and one in the ciliary sulcus. Two patients had undergone posterior capsulotomy. Although the pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical significance of this finding remain unknown, the careful follow-up of pseudophakic patients with known or suspected pseudoexfoliation syndrome is essential to monitor the development or progression of glaucoma, since deposition of pseudoexfoliation material continues even after cataract surgery. PMID:25143707

  6. Treatment of posterior fossa tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Muzumdar, Dattatraya; Ventureyra, Enrique C G

    2010-04-01

    The most common posterior fossa tumors in children are medulloblastoma, astrocytoma and ependymoma. Atypical rhabdoid teratoid tumors and brain stem gliomas are relatively rare. As the posterior fossa is a limited space, the tumors presenting in this region cause symptoms early on and require prompt treatment to avoid potential morbidity and mortality. Early detection and diagnosis of these tumors and prompt neurosurgical consultation is crucial in the optimum management of pediatric infratentorial brain tumors. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, as it provides biopsy and decompression of the tumor. Adjuvant therapy is required in the majority of cases. Recent advances in the field of radiation biology and pharmacology have improved dose and delivery techniques of chemoradiation therapy. In the current era, advances in translational research and molecular genetics have assumed a major role in the pursuit of achieving a 'cure' for these potentially malignant tumors. PMID:20367206

  7. Intraosseous schwannoma with ancient change on the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Youn, Boram; Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Eun-Sang; Eoh, Whan

    2012-08-01

    A 65-year-old male was admitted for progressive lower back pain. The preoperative revealed an osteolytic expansile mass with a sclerotic margin involving the right lamina and pedicle of L2. The histopathology revealed an ancient schwannoma. We report a rare case of an intraosseous ancient schwannoma involving lumbar vertebra along with its imaging findings and surgical aspects. PMID:22463813

  8. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...abdomen, and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist of the assemblies designated as numbers SA 150 M050 and SA 150 M060 in Figure 1 and conform to the drawings subtended by these numbers. (b) When subjected to...

  9. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...abdomen, and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist of the assemblies designated as numbers SA 150 M050 and SA 150 M060 in Figure 1 and conform to the drawings subtended by these numbers. (b) When subjected to...

  10. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...abdomen, and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist of the assemblies designated as numbers SA 150 M050 and SA 150 M060 in Figure 1 and conform to the drawings subtended by these numbers. (b) When subjected to...

  11. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...abdomen, and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist of the assemblies designated as numbers SA 150 M050 and SA 150 M060 in Figure 1 and conform to the drawings subtended by these numbers. (b) When subjected to...

  12. 49 CFR 572.43 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Impact Dummy 50th Percentile Male § 572.43 Lumbar spine and pelvis. (a) When the pelvis of a fully assembled dummy (SA-SID-M001A revision B, dated September 12, 1996, (incorporated by reference; see § 572.40) is impacted...

  13. 49 CFR 572.43 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Impact Dummy 50th Percentile Male § 572.43 Lumbar spine and pelvis. (a) When the pelvis of a fully assembled dummy (SA-SID-M001A revision B, dated September 12, 1996, (incorporated by reference; see § 572.40) is impacted...

  14. 49 CFR 572.9 - Lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...abdomen, and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis consist of the assemblies designated as numbers SA 150 M050 and SA 150 M060 in Figure 1 and conform to the drawings subtended by these numbers. (b) When subjected to...

  15. Diagnosis and conservative management of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) is a disorder that causes the slip of one vertebral body over the one below due to degenerative changes in the spine. Lumbar DS is a major cause of spinal canal stenosis and is often related to low back and leg pain. We reviewed the symptoms, prognosis and conservative treatments for symptoms associated with DS. PubMed and MEDLINE databases (1950–2007) were searched for the key words “spondylolisthesis”, “pseudospondylolisthesis”, “degenerative spondylolisthesis”, “spinal stenosis”, “lumbar spine”, “antherolisthesis”, “posterolisthesis”, “low back pain”, and “lumbar instability”. All relevant articles in English were reviewed. Pertinent secondary references were also retrieved. The prognosis of patients with DS is favorable, however, those who suffer from neurological symptoms such as intermittent claudication or vesicorectal disorder, will most probably experience neurological deterioration if they are not operated upon. Nonoperative treatment should be the initial course of action in most cases of DS, with or without neurologic symptoms. Treatment options include use of analgesics and NSAIDs to control pain; epidural steroid injections, and physical methods such as bracing and flexion strengthening exercises. An up-to-date knowledge on diagnosis and prevention of lumbar DS can assist in determination of future research goals. Additional studies are required to establish treatment protocols for the conservative treatment of DS. PMID:18026865

  16. Hemilaminoplasty for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Xinyu, Liu; Jianmin, Li; Liangtai, Gong

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of the hemilaminoplasty technique for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Forty-three cases of single-level LDH underwent a discectomy and hemilaminoplasty procedure. The preoperative JOA score and VAS of lower back and leg pain were 10.4±1.3, 7.8±2.1, and 8.6±1.7, respectively. The Cobb angle of lumbar sagittal alignment was 10.1±2.0. Twenty-five patients who agreed to lumbar discectomy through fenestration were enrolled as the control group. The postoperative JOA score and VAS of low back and leg pain of the hemilaminoplasty group were 19.4±1.3, 1.4±0.4, and 2.1±0.5, respectively. The Cobb angle was 29.2±1.9 degrees. There was no epidural scar observed in any of the patients. The Cobb angle of the hemilaminoplasty group was higher than that of the control group (p?lumbar spine. PMID:18636258

  17. Hemilaminoplasty for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Xinyu, Liu; Yanping, Zheng; Jianmin, Li; Liangtai, Gong

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of the hemilaminoplasty technique for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Forty-three cases of single-level LDH underwent a discectomy and hemilaminoplasty procedure. The preoperative JOA score and VAS of lower back and leg pain were 10.4+/-1.3, 7.8+/-2.1, and 8.6+/-1.7, respectively. The Cobb angle of lumbar sagittal alignment was 10.1+/-2.0. Twenty-five patients who agreed to lumbar discectomy through fenestration were enrolled as the control group. The postoperative JOA score and VAS of low back and leg pain of the hemilaminoplasty group were 19.4+/-1.3, 1.4+/-0.4, and 2.1+/-0.5, respectively. The Cobb angle was 29.2+/-1.9 degrees. There was no epidural scar observed in any of the patients. The Cobb angle of the hemilaminoplasty group was higher than that of the control group (p < 0.05), while the VAS was significantly lower (p < 0.05). Hemilaminoplasty is a useful method to improve clinical outcome, prevent epidural scar, and preserve the normal alignment of lumbar spine. PMID:18636258

  18. Voiding Dysfunction in Women with Lumbar Disc Prolapse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. B. Goldman; R. A. Appell

    1999-01-01

    :   A significant proportion of women with lumbar disc prolapse experience voiding dysfunction. The most common finding is detrusor\\u000a areflexia, frequently associated with impaired sensation. The pertinent neuropathophysiologic findings, clinical features\\u000a and methods of evaluation and treatment are reviewed.

  19. Migration of lumbar disc herniation: An unusual case

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralph J. Mobbs; T. R. Steel

    2007-01-01

    We illustrate a patient with a migrating lumbar disc fragment that caused a change in radicular symptoms from the L3 nerve root on one side to the L5 nerve root on the contralateral side, documented by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our patient presented with 3 months of L3 pain on the right side with sensory and motor changes. Over a

  20. Acute spinal subdural hematoma complicating lumbar decompressive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kok Chun; Samartzis, Dino; Luk, Keith D.K.; Cheung, Kenneth M.C.; Wong, Yat-Wa

    2012-01-01

    Study design:?A case report. Objective:?To report a rare case of acute spinal subdural hematoma (SSH) complicating lumbar spine surgery, its characteristic presenting symptoms, diagnostic imaging, possible cause, and pitfall in management. Methods:?A 59-year-old woman with lumbar spinal instability and stenosis underwent laminectomy and decompression at L3–L5 with instrumentation and fusion from L3–S1. Results:?Immediately following surgery, the patient presented with incapacitating pain of both lower extremities from the mid-thigh downward, which was not relieved by narcotic analgesia and was disproportional to surgical trauma. Left ankle and great toes weakness was detected at postoperative day 2 and deteriorated on day 6. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed urgently and revealed a characteristic SSH with thecal sac compression at the level of L2, proximal to the laminectomy. Emergency decompression and evacuation of the hematoma was performed. The patient had partial recovery 6 weeks postoperatively. Conclusion:?Acute SSH is a rare complication of lumbar spine surgery. This diagnosis must be considered when severe leg pain, unresolved with analgesia and disproportional to surgical trauma, with neurological deterioration occurring after lumbar spine surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging modality of choice to assist in the differential diagnosis of an SSH. Early surgical decompression is necessary for optimal neurological recovery. PMID:23236307

  1. Result of Full Endoscopic Uniportal Lumbar Discectomy: Preliminary Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Objective: Several techniques of minimal invasive spinal surgery are now becoming common roles in the treatment of spinal diseases in many spinal centers. In the present report, the authors present a retrospective, cohort evaluation of 46 consecutive patients who underwent full endoscopic lumbar discectomy. The purpose of the present report was to present outcomes in this initial series of patients

  2. Radiologic features of lumbar spine in ochronosis in late stages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Petek Bayindir; Gülgün Yilmaz Ovali; Yüksel Pabu?çu; Cüneyt Temiz; Tuncay Duruoz

    2006-01-01

    Ochronosis is a rare hereditary disorder of tyrosine metabolism. Severe degenerative arthritis and spondylosis occur in the later stages of this disease. Radiologic examinations may reveal changes considered almost pathognomonic for ochronosis. We present the radiologic features of the lumbar spine in two ochronotic patients who were diagnosed after radiologic examinations in the late stages of the disease.

  3. Posterior urethral valve: delayed presentation in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Mahadik, Punit; Vaddi, Surya Prakash; Godala, Chandra-Mohan; Sambar, Venkatkrishna; Kulkarni, Sushanth; Gundala, Ramesh

    2012-09-01

    Posterior urethral valves (PUV) are now commonly suspected on antenatal ultrasound, but can present with a broad spectrum of severity postnatally. Rarely, the diagnosis is missed until adolescence or adulthood when the patient usually presents with lower urinary tract symptoms. We describe an even rarer case of PUV in a late adolescent who first presented with preserved renal function and urinary incontinence. We review the literature on presentation, natural history and outcomes of both early and late presenting PUV cases. PMID:23094222

  4. Posterior urethral valves: Pre and postnatal management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John M. Gatti; Andrew J. Kirsch

    2001-01-01

    Posterior urethral valves are a common problem encountered by pediatric urologists. The diagnosis is most frequently suggested\\u000a by antenatal screening ultra-sound. A variety of pre- and postnatal parameters have been identified to aid in predicting ultimate\\u000a renal outcome. These prognostic tools are invaluable to the clinician for counseling parents and for choosing appropriate\\u000a manage-ment. Several approaches to the treatment of

  5. Posterior urethral valves: long-term outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paolo Caione; Simona Gerocarni Nappo

    Posterior urethral valves represent the most common cause of bladder outlet obstruction in infancy that impairs renal and\\u000a bladder function. Long-term outcome of patients with previous PUV is evaluated. Patients over 18 years of age, treated from\\u000a 1982 to 1995 before the age of 3 years were considered. Previous surgery, renal function, bladder activity, urinary incontinence,\\u000a and fertility\\/sexual activity were evaluated. Clinical

  6. The mechanism of continence after posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, Herman S.; Angermeier, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    The standard of care after a pelvic fracture urethral injury is a repair via a one-stage anastomotic posterior urethroplasty using a step-wise perineal approach. The initial injury, immediate postoperative management, and surgical repair can all affect urinary continence in these patients. Proximal continence mechanisms, particularly the bladder neck, are particularly important in maintaining urinary continence in these patients. Patients with bladder neck dysfunction should be counselled about the greater risk of urinary incontinence. PMID:26019981

  7. Posterior fossa lesions in childhood and infancy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Irith Reider-Groswasser; Amiram Catz; Shaul Harel

    1987-01-01

    Forty-three children with CT studies demonstrating abnormalities in the posterior fossa are presented. Tumors constitute the largest group of lesions (53.5%). Their mean size at time of diagnosis was 39.5 mm. Astrocytomas, medulloblastomas, and ependymomas were the most frequent tumors and their CT features are described and discussed. The congenital group of lesions comprised 18.6% of the cases — the

  8. Posterior Urethral Valve: Delayed Presentation in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Vaddi, Surya Prakash; Godala, Chandra-Mohan; Sambar, Venkatkrishna; Kulkarni, Sushanth; Gundala, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Posterior urethral valves (PUV) are now commonly suspected on antenatal ultrasound, but can present with a broad spectrum of severity postnatally. Rarely, the diagnosis is missed until adolescence or adulthood when the patient usually presents with lower urinary tract symptoms. We describe an even rarer case of PUV in a late adolescent who first presented with preserved renal function and urinary incontinence. We review the literature on presentation, natural history and outcomes of both early and late presenting PUV cases. PMID:23094222

  9. Imaging Correlates of Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Jack, Clifford R.; Kantarci, Kejal; Weigand, Stephen D.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Knopman, David S.; Drubach, Daniel A.; Tang-Wai, David F.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare patterns of cerebral atrophy on MRI, and neurochemistry on magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in subjects with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) and typical Alzheimer's disease (AD). Voxel-based morphometry was used to assess grey matter atrophy in 38 subjects with PCA, 38 subjects with typical AD, and 38 controls. Clinical data was assessed in all PCA subjects. Single-voxel 1H MRS located in the posterior cingulate was analyzed in a subset of subjects with PCA, typical AD, and control subjects. PCA showed a pattern of atrophy affecting occipital, parietal and posterior temporal lobes, compared to controls. The pattern was bilateral, but more severe on the right. Subjects with PCA showed greater atrophy in the right visual association cortex than subjects with typical AD, whereas those with AD showed greater atrophy in the left hippocampus than those with PCA. 1H MRS suggested loss of neuronal integrity and glial activation in subjects with PCA and AD. The differing patterns of atrophy on MRI suggest that PCA should be considered a distinct entity from typical AD. PMID:16797786

  10. A method for quantitative measurement of lumbar intervertebral disc structures: an intra- and inter-rater agreement and reliability study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a shortage of agreement studies relevant for measuring changes over time in lumbar intervertebral disc structures. The objectives of this study were: 1) to develop a method for measurement of intervertebral disc height, anterior and posterior disc material and dural sac diameter using MRI, 2) to evaluate intra- and inter-rater agreement and reliability for the measurements included, and 3) to identify factors compromising agreement. Methods Measurements were performed on MRIs from 16 people with and 16 without lumbar disc herniation, purposefully chosen to represent all possible disc contours among participants in a general population study cohort. Using the new method, MRIs were measured twice by one rater and once by a second rater. Agreement on the sagittal start- and end-slice was evaluated using weighted Kappa. Length and volume measurements were conducted on available slices between intervertebral foramens, and cross-sectional areas (CSA) were calculated from length measurements and slice thickness. Results were reported as Bland and Altman’s limits of agreement (LOA) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Results Weighted Kappa (Kw (95% CI)) for start- and end-slice were: intra-: 0.82(0.60;0.97) & 0.71(0.43;0.93); inter-rater: 0.56(0.29;0.78) & 0.60(0.35;0.81). For length measurements, LOA ranged from [?1.0;1.0] mm to [?2.0;2.3] mm for intra-; and from [?1.1; 1.4] mm to [?2.6;2.0] mm for inter-rater. For volume measurements, LOA ranged from [?293;199] mm3 to [?582;382] mm3 for intra-, and from [?17;801] mm3 to [?450;713] mm3 for inter-rater. For CSAs, LOA ranged between [?21.3; 18.8] mm2 and [?31.2; 43.7] mm2 for intra-, and between [?10.8; 16.4] mm2 and [?64.6; 27.1] mm2 for inter-rater. In general, LOA as a proportion of mean values gradually decreased with increasing size of the measured structures. Agreement was compromised by difficulties in identifying the vertebral corners, the anterior and posterior boundaries of the intervertebral disc and the dural sac posterior boundary. With two exceptions, ICCs were above 0.81. Conclusions Length measurements and calculated CSAs of disc morphology and dural sac diameter from MRIs showed acceptable intra- and inter-rater agreement and reliability. However, caution should be taken when measuring very small structures and defining anatomical landmarks. PMID:23953197

  11. Spontaneous disappearance of lumbar disk herniation within 3 months.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Satoshi; Nozawa, Asae; Kojima, Hisashi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2009-11-01

    Although spontaneous regression of disk herniation is a well-known phenomenon, the time taken for the condition to resolve has not been detailed in previous studies. This article describes a case of vanishing lumbar disk herniation in a 33-year-old man. The patient experienced sudden severe lumbar pain while lifting a 240-kg weight while attempting a Donkey Calf Raise during muscle training. The pain persisted despite the use of a lumbar corset and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Twelve days after onset, sensory disturbance appeared in the right L5 dermatome, and a manual muscle test of the right anterior tibial muscle revealed level 3. The pain gradually spread over the right lower extremity and the indistinct lumbago changed to localized back pain at the L4/5 vertebral level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine 12 days after onset revealed a large disk herniation at L4/5. T2-weighted images demonstrated the herniated disk with a sequestrated disk fragment, which compressed the right L5 nerve root. Over the following month, his pain gradually diminished and he was able to resume his muscle-building program. Follow-up MRI 3 months after the lumbar injury showed complete disappearance of the extruded disk material. This is the first reported case of disk herniation that disappeared within only 3 months, as previous reports have reported that a minimum 30-week period was needed. Clinical awareness of the possibility that disk herniation may resolve within a relatively short time may aid both correct informed consent and treatment. PMID:19902881

  12. Risk Factors for Adjacent Segment Disease Development after Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ptashnikov, Dmitry; Michaylov, Dmitry; Meng, Hao; Smekalenkov, Oleg; Zaborovskii, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Purpose To identify factors which may be important in the occurrence of symptomatic adjacent segment disease (ASD) after lumbar fusion. Overview of Literature Many reports have been published about the risk factors for ASD after lumbar fusion. Despite on the great numbers of risk factors identified for ASD development, study results have been inconsistent and there is controversy regarding which are the most important. Methods This study evaluated 120 patients who underwent 360° fusion lumbar surgery from 2007 to 2012. We separated the population into two groups: the first group included 60 patients with long lumbar fusion (three or more levels) and the second group included 60 patients with short lumbar fusion (less than three levels). Results In the first group, symptomatic ASD was found in 19 cases during the one year follow-up. There were 14 cases with sagittal imbalance and 5 cases at the incipient stage of disc degeneration according to the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. At the three year follow-up, symptomatic ASD was diagnosed in 31 cases, of which 17 patients had postoperative sagittal balance disturbance. In the second group, 10 patients had ASD at the one year follow-up. Among these cases, preoperative disc degenerative changes were identified in 8 patients. Sagittal imbalance was found only in 2 cases with symptomatic ASD at the one year follow-up. At the three year follow-up, the number of patients with symptomatic ASD increased to 14. Among them, 13 patients had initial preoperative adjacent disc degenerative changes. Conclusions Patients with postoperative sagittal imbalance have a statistically significant increased risk of developing symptomatic ASD due to an overloading the adjacent segments and limited compensatory capacities due to the large number of fixed mobile segments. In the case of a short fixation, preoperative degenerative changes are more important factors in the development of ASD. PMID:25901236

  13. A unique modular implant system enhances load sharing in anterior cervical interbody fusion: a finite element study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The efficacy of dynamic anterior cervical plates is somewhat controversial. Screws in static-plate designs have a smaller diameter and can cut through bone under load. While not ideal, this unintended loosening can help mitigate stress shielding. Stand-alone interbody devices with integral fixation have large endplate contact areas that may inhibit or prevent loosening of the fixation. This study investigates the load sharing ability of a novel dynamic plate design in preventing the stress shielding of the graft material compared to the non-dynamic devices. Methods An experimentally validated intact C5-C6 finite element model was modified to simulate discectomy and accommodate implant-graft assembly. Four implant iterations were modeled; InterPlate titanium device with dynamic surface features (springs), InterPlate titanium non-dynamic device, InterPlate titanium design having a fully enclosed graft chamber, and the InterPlate design in unfilled PEEK having a fully enclosed graft chamber. All the models were fixed at the inferior-most surface of C6 and the axial displacement required to completely embed the dynamic surface features was applied to the model. Results InterPlate device with dynamic surface features induced higher graft stresses compared to the other design iterations resulting in uniform load sharing. The distribution of these graft stresses were more uniform for the InterPlate dynamic design. Conclusions These results indicate that the dynamic design decreases the stress shielding by increasing and more uniformly distributing the graft stress. Fully enclosed graft chambers increase stress shielding. Lower implant material modulus of elasticity does not reduce stress shielding significantly. PMID:24618205

  14. Congenital stenosis of lumbar spinal canal: Comparison of results of surgical treatment for this and other causes of lumbar syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Reale; R. Delfini; D. Gambacorta; G. P. Cantore

    1978-01-01

    Summary The operative results in 37 consecutive patients suffering from developmental stenosis of the lumbar spinal canal, compared with those in spondylosis and disc herniations, are discussed. The diagnostic certainty of stenosis, suspected on the bases of clinical and radiographic data, is reached only at the operating table. To judge the usefulness of the operation we have considered not only

  15. An anatomic investigation of the serratus posterior superior and serratus posterior inferior muscles.

    PubMed

    Loukas, Marios; Louis, Robert G; Wartmann, Christopher T; Tubbs, R Shane; Gupta, Ankmalika A; Apaydin, Nihal; Jordan, Robert

    2008-03-01

    In classical anatomy textbooks the serratus posterior superior muscle was said to elevate the superior four ribs, thus increasing the AP diameter of the thorax and raising the sternum. However, electromyographic and other studies do not support its role in respiration. In order to help resolve this controversy and provide some insight into their possible functionality, the present study aimed at examining the morphology, topography and morphometry of serratus posterior superior and inferior muscles in both normal specimens and those derived from patients with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD). These muscles were examined in 50 human cadavers with an age range of 58-82 years. In 18 of the cadavers their histories revealed that they were suffering from COPD. There was no significant difference between right and left sides, race, gender and age and positive COPD history in regard to dimensions and nerves supply of serratus posterior superior and inferior muscles (P > 0.05). Based upon our findings that no morphometric differences exist between the of serratus posterior superior and inferior muscles of COPD patients versus controls, we are suggesting that no respiratory function be attributed to either of the serratus posterior superior and inferior muscles. PMID:18196199

  16. Early Clinical & Radiographic Results of NFix II Posterior Dynamic Stabilization System

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank L.; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Coe, Jeffrey D.; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kitchel, Scott H.; Meisel, Hans Jörg; Schnöring, Mark; Wingo, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    Background Complications associated with rigid posterior instrumented fusions of the lumbar spine include pseudarthrosis, accelerated adjacent-segment disease, hardware failure, and iatrogenic fixed sagittal imbalance. Posterior pedicle screw/rod-based dynamic stabilization systems, in which semirigid rods or cords are used to restrict or control, rather than completely eliminate spinal segmental motion, aim to reduce or eliminate these fusion-associated drawbacks. In this study, we analyzed the early radiographic and clinical outcomes of patients treated with the NFix II System (N Spine, Inc., San Diego, California), a novel pedicle screw/ rod-based system used as a nonfusion posterior dynamic stabilization system, and compared our results to those of similar systems currently in use. Methods Seven sites participated in a retrospective assessment of 40 consecutive patients who underwent dynamic stabilization of the lumbar spine with the NFix II System at a single level. (One patient underwent 2 single-level dynamic constructs at noncontiguous levels (L3-4 and L5-S1).) Patients were included based on the presence of spinal stenosis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, adjacent segment degeneration, recurrent disc herniation, symptomatic degenerative disc disease, and degenerative scoliosis requiring dynamic stabilization at 1 level with or without instrumented rigid fusion at a contiguous level. Participants were evaluated preoperatively, with planned postoperative assessments at 3 and 6 weeks (1 center assessed patients at 4 weeks), 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months. The primary clinical outcome measures at each assessment were visual analogue scale (VAS) scores to measure back pain, and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI)1 scores to measure function. Radiographic outcome measurements included evidence of instrumentation failure and range of motion (ROM) based on postoperative flexion-extension radiographs at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results Forty patients (15males, 25 females) with a mean age of 55 years (range 21–81) were included. Average follow-up was 8.1 months (range 6–12). The mean VAS score improved from 7.6 preoperatively to 3.3 postoperatively (P < .001), and the ODI score from 47.3 to 22.8 (P < .001). Eighty percent of patients were severely disabled or worse (ODI ? 41) preoperatively, which was reduced to 13% postoperatively. Of the 10 patients with more than 6 months’ follow-up, only 4 demonstrated adequate flexion/extension effort. ROM measurements in those 4 patients showed that on average 53% of preoperative segmental motion was retained at the dynamically stabilized level 6 months postoperatively. There were no instrumentation-related complications. Conclusions Results of this limited study indicate that the NFix II System when used as a nonfusion device for dynamic stabilization produces significant improvements in pain and function at short-term follow-up with outcomes comparable to other dynamic stabilization systems. The use of this system was not associated with an increased risk of instrumentation failure. The small number of patients with postoperative severe disability or worse compares favorably to long-term published data on posterolateral fusion. Lastly, in this small sample, ROM was preserved at 6-month follow-up. Clinical Relevance Posterior pedicle screw/rod dynamic stabilization using the NFix II System seems very effective in improving pain and function scores, at least in the short term (mean postoperative ODI of 22.8). Preservation of ROM is also possible. Longerterm follow-up is necessary to assess sustained clinical improvement, hardware complications, and maintenance in segmental ROM. The NFix II System may be considered an effective alternative to existing dynamic stabilization systems. This device is cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration for use as an adjunct to fusion and has the European CE Marking for use in both fusion and nonfusion applications. PMID:25802605

  17. The role of cumulative physical work load in lumbar spine disease: risk factors for lumbar osteochondrosis and spondylosis associated with chronic complaints

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Seidler; U Bolm-Audorff; H Heiskel; N Henkel; B Roth-Küver; U Kaiser; R Bickeböller; W J Willingstorfer; W Beck; G Elsner

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVESTo investigate the relation with a case-control study between symptomatic osteochondrosis or spondylosis of the lumbar spine and cumulative occupational exposure to lifting or carrying and to working postures with extreme forward bending.METHODSFrom two practices and four clinics were recruited 229 male patients with radiographically confirmed osteochondrosis or spondylosis of the lumbar spine associated with chronic complaints. Of these 135

  18. Quantifying the centre of rotation pattern in a multi-body model of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Abouhossein, Alireza; Weisse, Bernhard; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the kinematics of the spine provides paramount knowledge for many aspects of the clinical analysis of back pain. More specifically, visualisation of the instantaneous centre of rotation (ICR) enables clinicians to quantify joint laxity in the segments, avoiding a dependence on more inconclusive measurements based on the range of motion and excessive translations, which vary in every individual. Alternatively, it provides motion preserving designers with an insight into where a physiological ICR of a motion preserving prosthesis can be situated in order to restore proper load distribution across the passive and active elements of the lumbar region. Prior to the use of an unconstrained dynamic musculoskeletal model system, based on multi-body models capable of transient analysis, to estimate segmental loads, the model must be kinematically evaluated for all possible sensitivity due to ligament properties and the initial locus of intervertebral disc (IVD). A previously calibrated osseoligamentous model of lumbar spine was used to evaluate the changes in ICR under variation of the ligament stiffness and initial locus of IVD, when subjected to pure moments from 0 to 15 Nm. The ICR was quantified based on the closed solution of unit quaternion that improves accuracy and prevents coordinate singularities, which is often observed in Euler-based methods and least squares principles. The calculation of the ICR during flexion/extension revealed complexity and intrinsic nonlinearity between flexion and extension. This study revealed that, to accommodate a good agreement between in vitro data and the multi-body model predictions, in flexion more laxity is required than in extension. The results showed that the ICR location is concentrated in the posterior region of the disc, in agreement with previous experimental studies. However, the current multi-body model demonstrates a sensitivity to the initial definition of the ICR, which should be recognised as a limitation of the method. Nevertheless, the current simulations suggest that, due to the constantly evolving path of the ICR across the IVD during flexion-extension, a movable ICR is a necessary condition in multi-body modelling of the spine, in the context of whole body simulation, to accurately capture segmental kinematics and kinetics. PMID:22439815

  19. Dexmedetomidine sedation in painful posterior segment surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad; Taha, Samar

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To present a case series on the use of dexmedetomidine (Precedex) sedation in painful posterior segment surgery performed under topical anesthesia, similar to its use in cataract surgery. Methods A prospective review of cases that had posterior segment surgery under topical anesthesia and that needed sedation. Dexmedetomidine-loading infusion was 1 mcg/kg over 10 minutes, followed by a maintenance infusion (0.5 mcg/kg/h). Results Nine patients were operated on under topical anesthesia: two scleral buckle, five cryopexy, one scleral laceration, and one pars plana vitrectomy with very dense laser therapy in an albinotic fundus; six patients had retinal detachment. General or local anesthesia were not possible due to medical or ocular morbidities, use of anticoagulants, or the surgery plan changed intraoperatively when new pathologies were discovered. The surgeon achieved good surgical control in eight of nine cases, with one patient having ocular and bodily movements that were disturbing. Six patients had no pain, while three patients reported mild pain. No adverse effects were noted and all patients had successful surgical outcomes. Heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were well controlled throughout the procedures. The most frequent adverse reactions of dexmedetomidine reported in the literature in less than 5% (hypotension, bradycardia, and dry mouth) were not recorded in the present study. Conclusion When a surgeon has planned to do a pars plana vitrectomy under topical anesthesia and the surgical situation dictates the addition of cryopexy, scleral buckle, or intense laser retinopexy, then sedation with dexmedetomidine can help in the control of ocular pain in the majority of cases, with good intraoperative and immediate postoperative hemodynamic control with the possibility of supplemental rescue analgesia. Dexmedetomidine, a sedative analgesic, is devoid of respiratory depressant effects, and its use in posterior segment surgery under topical anesthesia is reported here for the first time. PMID:23271889

  20. Complications when augmenting the posterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, Paul; Melnick, Philip R; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary posterior edentulous region presents a challenge when planning for restoring missing teeth with a dental implant. The available bone in such cases is often not dense and not adequate for the placement of a properly sized implant because of maxillary sinus pneumatization and alveolar bone loss. Maxillary sinus lift is a predictable procedure to provide adequate bone height for the purpose of implant placement. However, complications are encountered during or after the execution of the sinus lift procedure. In this article, the prevention and management of maxillary sinus complications are discussed. PMID:25434561

  1. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with documented hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, Puneet; Fatakhov, Eduard; Koch, Christopher Francis; Kapil, Shikha

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 78-year-old African-American man with a history of hypertension, and with no prior history of seizure. The patient presented with hypertensive urgency as well as stroke such as symptoms of confusion, seizure, postictal confusion, left hemianopsia and hyponatraemia. MRI findings were suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). The patient was treated with appropriate medications with the resolution of his stroke-like symptoms. This case report discusses a patient with PRES, in the setting of hyponatraemia, and how prompt recognition may prevent permanent neurological sequela such as epilepsy. PMID:23904416

  2. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Hemorrhage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosalyn M. Aranas; Shyam Prabhakaran; Vivien H. Lee

    2009-01-01

    Background  Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological entity characterized by headache, encephalopathy,\\u000a visual disturbances, and seizures in association with reversible vasogenic edema on neuroimaging. Intracerebral hemorrhage\\u000a associated with PRES (PRES-ICH) is generally considered an atypical finding.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Retrospective case series.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Seven patients were identified with PRES-ICH, four males and three females. The presenting clinical symptoms included headache\\u000a (2), encephalopathy (5),

  3. Lumbar puncture opening pressure is not a reliable measure of intracranial pressure in children.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Cathy; Igbaseimokumo, Usiakimi

    2015-02-01

    There is very little data correlating lumbar puncture pressures to formal intracranial pressure monitoring despite the widespread use of both procedures. The hypothesis was that lumbar puncture is a single-point measurement and hence it may not be a reliable evaluation of intracranial pressure. The study was therefore carried out to compare lumbar puncture opening pressures with the Camino bolt intracranial pressure monitor in children. Twelve children with a mean age of 8.5 years who had both lumbar puncture and intracranial pressure monitoring were analyzed. The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure was 22.4 mm Hg versus a mean Camino bolt intracranial pressure of 7.8 mm Hg (P < .0001). Lumbar puncture therefore significantly overestimates the intracranial pressure in children. There were no complications from the intracranial pressure monitoring, and the procedure changed the treatment of all 12 children avoiding invasive operative procedures in most of the patients. PMID:24799366

  4. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: the endothelial hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Marra, A; Vargas, M; Striano, P; Del Guercio, L; Buonanno, P; Servillo, G

    2014-05-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterised by headache, visual disorders, seizures, altered mentation, consciousness disturbances and focal neurological signs. Initially described in patients with pre and eclampsia, severe hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome can occur in other clinical conditions such as infection, sepsis, shock, cancer chemotherapy, autoimmune diseases and hypercalcemia. Pathogenesis of brain lesions in PRES is not full understood and two opposite theories have been proposed. Both models are based on the central role of hypertension. According to the first theory, hypertension could cause a breakdown of the autoregulatory system in cerebral circulation, leading to brain edema. The second theory suggests that hypertension causes activation of autoregulatory system, which finally results in a vasoconstriction of brain vessels with hypoperfusion, ischemia and subsequent fluid leakage. However a large number of patients, with PRES, doesn't show hypertension. We here describe the hypothesis of the crucial role of endothelial dysfunction and activation in PRES pathogenesis. Our hypothesis offers a common pathogenetic mechanism in which every PRES-related condition can be set. In our model, the activation of immune system and the consequent endothelial activation start a molecular cascade which finally causes the production of molecules which alter the normal homeostasis of blood-brain barrier. This alteration consists in a weakening of brain vessel tight junctions, which allows fluid leakage and edema. In this scenario, hypertension would be an epiphenomenon of the underlying mechanism and not the cause and, for this reason, it can be present or not in PRES. PMID:24613735

  5. Bladder neck incompetence at posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2015-01-01

    The finding of an incompetent bladder neck (BN) at the time of posterior urethroplasty will necessarily exacerbate the already difficult situation. In such cases the aim of the treatment is not only to restore urethral continuity by end-to-end urethral anastomosis, but also to restore the function of the BN to maintain urinary continence. Fortunately, the incidence of incompetence of the BN at posterior urethroplasty is uncommon, usually ?4.5%. It seems that pelvic fracture-related BN injuries, in contrast to urethral injuries which result from a shearing force, are due to direct injury by the sharp edge of the fractured and displaced pubic bone. The risk of injuries to the BN is greater in children, in patients with a fracture involving both superior and inferior pubic rami on the same side, and in those managed initially by primary realignment. An incompetent BN is suspected by finding an open rectangular BN on cystography, and a fixedly open BN on suprapubic cystoscopy. An incompetent BN can be treated either subsequent to or concomitant with the urethral repair, according to whether a perineal or a perineo-abdominal urethroplasty is used, respectively. Several options have been reported to treat pelvic fracture-related BN incompetence, including reconstructing the BN, forming a new sphincter by tubularisation of a rectangular flap of the anterior bladder wall, and mechanical occlusion by an artificial sphincter or collagen injection. Reconstruction of the BN by the Young-Dees-Leadbetter?? procedure probably provides the most successful results. PMID:26019982

  6. Sampling Networks from Their Posterior Predictive Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Ravi; De Gruttola, Victor; Blitzstein, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Recent research indicates that knowledge about social networks can be leveraged to increase efficiency of interventions (Valente, 2012). However, in many settings, there exists considerable uncertainty regarding the structure of the network. This can render the estimation of potential effects of network-based interventions difficult, as providing appropriate guidance to select interventions often requires a representation of the whole network. In order to make use of the network property estimates to simulate the effect of interventions, it may be beneficial to sample networks from an estimated posterior predictive distribution, which can be specified using a wide range of models. Sampling networks from a posterior predictive distribution of network properties ensures that the uncertainty about network property parameters is adequately captured. The tendency for relationships among network properties to exhibit sharp thresholds has important implications for understanding global network topology in the presence of uncertainty; therefore, it is essential to account for uncertainty. We provide detail needed to sample networks for the specific network properties of degree distribution, mixing frequency, and clustering. Our methods to generate networks are demonstrated using simulated data and data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. PMID:25339990

  7. Lumbar spine loads during education and training with self-contained breathing apparatus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Küpper; M. Haisch

    2000-01-01

    Objective: German fire fighters often complain of lumbar back pain after training with a self-contained breathing apparatus while using\\u000a a device called `Schlag- hammer' (SH). We investigated whether this training produces an excessive load on the lumbar spine.\\u000a Method: We developed a model to estimate the load on the lumbar spine using a vector model similar to Jäger et?al.'s model.

  8. Cardiovascular and lifestyle risk factors in lumbar radicular pain or clinically defined sciatica: a systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rahman Shiri; Jaro Karppinen; Päivi Leino-Arjas; Svetlana Solovieva; Helena Varonen; Eija Kalso; Olavi Ukkola; Eira Viikari-Juntura

    2007-01-01

    Lumbar radicular pain is a fairly common health problem, yet its risk factors are far from clear. There are no published systematic\\u000a reviews on associations between cardiovascular or lifestyle risk factors and lumbar radicular pain or sciatica. The aim of\\u000a this systematic literature review was to assess associations between these risk factors and lumbar radicular pain or sciatica.\\u000a We conducted

  9. The time-varying response of the in vivo lumbar spine to dynamic repetitive flexion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Parkinson; Tyson A. C. Beach; Jack P. Callaghan

    2004-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the time-varying stiffness and kinematic responses of the in vivo lumbar spine exposed to dynamic repetitive flexion movements.Design. Changes in in vivo passive lumbar moment–angle relationships were monitored in response to dynamic repetitive flexion.Background. While previous in vitro studies have provided conflicting evidence on the effects of repetitive flexion movements on the stiffness of the lumbar spine,

  10. Kinematics of the lumbar spine in elderly subjects with decreased bone mineral density

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather Ting Ma; James F. Griffith; Zhengyi Yang; Anthony Wai Leung Kwok; Ping Chung Leung; Raymond Y. W. Lee

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar spine kinematics was studied in subjects with normal bone mineral density, osteopenia and osteoporosis to determine\\u000a the effect of bone mineral density and morphology on the flexion–extension movement patterns of the lumbar spine. Lateral\\u000a radiographs and skin-mounted electromagnetic motion tracking sensors were employed to study lumbar spine kinematics using\\u000a a Bayesian Belief Network model. The predicted angular displacement of

  11. Lumbar and cervical stenosis. Frequency of the association, role of the ankylosing hyperostosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Laroche; L. Moulinier; J. Arlet; Ph. Arrue; H. Rousseau; A. Cantagrel; B. Mazieres

    1992-01-01

    Summary  The authors report a study of 47 patients admitted for cervical myelopathy (N=17) or symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (N=30). Nine patients had clinical evidence of coexisting cervical myelopathy and lumbar spinal stenosis. Ten out of the 17 patients having cervical myelopathy had lumbar spinal stenosis as evidenced by saggital tomography and\\/or computerized tomography. Nine out of the 30 patients admitted

  12. Changes in lumbar lordosis modify the role of the extensor muscles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stuart M McGill; Richard L Hughson; Kellie Parks

    2000-01-01

    Study Design. Fiber angles of longissimus thoracis and iliocostalis lumborum at L3 were documented in vivo, using high resolution ultrasound, with the lumbar spine in neutral curve and when fully flexed.Objectives. To evaluate the effect of changes in lumbar curvature on the mechanics of these muscles.Background. Full flexion modifies the failure tolerance of the lumbar spine, determines the load distribution

  13. Extraforaminal lumbar disc herniations: CT demonstration of Sharpey's fibers avulsion.

    PubMed

    Bonneville, J F; Runge, M; Cattin, F; Potelon, P; Tang, Y S

    1989-01-01

    Forty-seven extraforaminal lumbar disc herniations (EFLDH) accounting for 7% of all lumbar disc herniations encountered during the same period of time were reviewed. L3-L4 or L4-L5 disc was involved in 89% of the cases giving rise to a L3 or L4 nerve root compression. An abnormal motion of lateral bending with rotation of the trunk was found retrospectively in 60% of the patients. In 53% of all EFLDH a bony avulsion of the vertebral end-plate facing the herniation was demonstrated at the site of attachment of Sharpey's fibers. This study suggests that this previously undescribed bony change witnesses a special injury of the spine responsible for most EFLDH. PMID:2717008

  14. A maladaptive gait abnormality in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, D C; Ehrenthal, S R

    1996-01-01

    A maladaptive pattern of abnormally increased anterior pelvic tilt during gait was documented using quantitative gait analysis in two patients presenting with lumbar spinal stenosis. Both patients also had, by physical examination, mild bilateral hip flexion contracture impairments which mayor may not have been directly related to the spinal stenosis. There is no literature to date supporting the presence of either hip flexion contractures or excessive anterior pelvic tilt during gait in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. The excessive anterior pelvic tilt present in these patients was presumably a compensation for the hip flexion contractures to achieve reasonable step lengths. Increased anterior pelvic tilt induces increased hyperextension of the lumbosacral spine, which in a patient with spinal stenosis, could cause pain and lead to further spinal nerve impingement. Since hip flexion contracture impairments are amenable to stretching, their presence should be especially pursued in patients with spinal stenosis. PMID:24572555

  15. Cerebellopontine angle empyema after lumbar disc herniation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Clarissa Gambara; Brock, Roger Schmidt; Morais, Barbara Albuquerque; Tavares, Wagner Malagó; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Paiva, Wellingson Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lumbar discectomy is still one of the most common spinal surgeries performed today. Nevertheless, there are few publications considering severe complications. Case Description: We report a case with severe complication, without any previous report, a brain empyema after cerebrospinal fluid leak with good outcome afterword. A 45 years old man, returned six days after surgery, presenting cerebrospinal fluid leak, which after clinical and laboratory deterioration was reoperated. In the 14th postoperative facing worsening level of consciousness was diagnosed empyema in cerebellopontine angle and hydrocephalus underwent emergency surgery. Evolved with hemiplegia in the first postoperative attributed to vasculitis, completely recovered after 5 days. Conclusions: Although infrequent, lumbar discectomy is subject to severe complications, which as the case presented, can be dramatic. In surgeries must be careful to avoid cerebrospinal fluid leak e infectious complications.

  16. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Who Should Be Fused? An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Ashjazadeh, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is mostly caused by osteoarthritis (spondylosis). Clinically, the symptoms of patients with LSS can be categorized into two groups; regional (low back pain, stiffness, and so on) or radicular (spinal stenosis mainly presenting as neurogenic claudication). Both of these symptoms usually improve with appropriate conservative treatment, but in refractory cases, surgical intervention is occasionally indicated. In the patients who primarily complain of radiculopathy with an underlying biomechanically stable spine, a decompression surgery alone using a less invasive technique may be sufficient. Preoperatively, with the presence of indicators such as failed back surgery syndrome (revision surgery), degenerative instability, considerable essential deformity, symptomatic spondylolysis, refractory degenerative disc disease, and adjacent segment disease, lumbar fusion is probably recommended. Intraoperatively, in cases with extensive decompression associated with a wide disc space or insufficient bone stock, fusion is preferred. Instrumentation improves the fusion rate, but it is not necessarily associated with improved recovery rate and better functional outcome. PMID:25187873

  17. Lumbar spinal stenosis: who should be fused? An updated review.

    PubMed

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Ashjazadeh, Amir

    2014-08-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is mostly caused by osteoarthritis (spondylosis). Clinically, the symptoms of patients with LSS can be categorized into two groups; regional (low back pain, stiffness, and so on) or radicular (spinal stenosis mainly presenting as neurogenic claudication). Both of these symptoms usually improve with appropriate conservative treatment, but in refractory cases, surgical intervention is occasionally indicated. In the patients who primarily complain of radiculopathy with an underlying biomechanically stable spine, a decompression surgery alone using a less invasive technique may be sufficient. Preoperatively, with the presence of indicators such as failed back surgery syndrome (revision surgery), degenerative instability, considerable essential deformity, symptomatic spondylolysis, refractory degenerative disc disease, and adjacent segment disease, lumbar fusion is probably recommended. Intraoperatively, in cases with extensive decompression associated with a wide disc space or insufficient bone stock, fusion is preferred. Instrumentation improves the fusion rate, but it is not necessarily associated with improved recovery rate and better functional outcome. PMID:25187873

  18. Finite Element Analysis for Comparison of Spinous Process Osteotomies Technique with Conventional Laminectomy as Lumbar Decompression Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the biomechanical behavior of the lumbar spine after posterior decompression with the spinous process osteotomy (SPiO) technique or the conventional laminectomy (CL) technique using a finite element (FE) model. Materials and Methods Three validated lumbar FE models (L2-5) which represented intact spine and two decompression models using SPiO and CL techniques at the L3-4 segment were developed. In each model, the ranges of motion, the maximal von Mises stress of the annulus fibrosus, and the intradiscal pressures at the index segment (L3-4) and adjacent segments (L2-3 and L4-5) under 7.5 Nm moments were analyzed. Facet contact forces were also compared among three models under the extension and torsion moments. Results Compared to the intact model, the CL and SPiO models had increased range of motion and annulus stress at both the index segment (L3-4) and the adjacent segments under flexion and torsion. However, the SPiO model demonstrated a reduced range of motion and annulus stress than the CL model. Both CL and SPiO models had an increase of facet contact force at the L3-4 segment under the torsion moment compared to that of the intact model. Under the extension moment, however, three models demonstrated a similar facet contact force even at the L3-4 model. Conclusion Both decompression methods lead to postoperative segmental instability compared to the intact model. However, SPiO technique leads to better segmental stability compared to the CL technique. PMID:25510758

  19. [Anatomical background of low back pain: variability and degeneration of the lumbar spinal canal and intervertebral disc].

    PubMed

    van Roy, P; Barbaix, E; Clarijs, J P; Mense, S

    2001-12-01

    The central and lateral lumbar canals constitute complex osteofibrous neurovascular tunnels, allowing movement and deformation of the spine without loss of their main configuration. Intervertebral discs play an important role in determining their configuration. Disc degeneration may alter or even threat the functional anatomical relationships between successive adjacent "juncturae" of the vertebral column. Shape and morphometric aspects of the bony neural canals reveal level dependency [39], inter-individual variation [11], and are particularly susceptible for changes with aging [49]. Articular tropism and other left-right differences may influence their morphology. In the epidural compartments behind the vertebral bodies, a sagittal membrane may totally or partly connect the deeper layer of the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) with the posterior midline of the vertebral body. This membrane is considered clinically significant in the prevention of movement of disc material from one side to the other at the level of the vertebral bodies [44]. Meningovertebral ligaments represent a heterogenous group of membranous formations, connecting the dura with the PPL and other elements of the spinal canal. They prevent the dura from moving away from the bony container. These ligaments may vary from loose areolar tissue to clearly individualised ligaments and from pure midsagittal septa to more laterally oriented attachments. A double cross vault structure between the PPL and the dura mater often extends from L3 to the end of the dural envelope [3]. A retrospective study of medial and paramedial attachments in CT- and MRT-scans confirmed the presence of a mediosagittal structure below L3 in 35% of the cases 7). It was hypothesized that meningovertebral ligaments may play a [7] role as a barrier to transverse displacement of extruded disc material [43]. The surrounding morphology renders the lateral neural canal its typical inverted teardrop shape [39]. The subpedicular notch of the upper vertebra provides the widest part and represents the neural foramen strictu sensu. The posterolateral aspect of two articulating vertebrae and the interposed intervertebral disc constitute the anterior wall. The morphology of the anteroinferior aspect of the intervertebral foramen strongly depends on the condition of the apophyseal rings and the intervertebral disc. The latter may show a slight physiological posterior bulging at lower lumbar levels. The posterior wall of the nerve root canal is represented by the ligamentum flavum, the pars interarticularis of the upper vertebra, and the superior articular facet of the vertebra below. Thickening of the ligamentum flavum must be considered in relationship to alterations of anterior components: trabecular reorganization and spreading of vertebrae in aging [49], and disc degeneration [38, 49]. Nerve root sleeves display a level dependent, variable oblique course from their emanation from the thecal sac towards the outer third of the neural canal [39]. The presence of anamalous lumbosacral nerve roots may result in considerable course alterations, originating from an abnormal high or low level emanation, conjoined nerve roots, a double set of nerve roots or anastomosis between nerve roots of adjacent levels [20]. Variation exists in the position of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) relative to the intervertebral foramen. An intraforaminal position seems to be more common at L4 and L5 levels; an intraspinal position has to be expected for the S1 DRG. Intraspinal position of L4 and L5 DRG renders them more susceptible to compression from a superior articular facet or a bulging disc. Cases of extraforaminal positions of dorsal root ganglia have been reported at L4 and L5 levels [22]. On its recurrent course through the lateral canal, the sinuvertebral nerve(s) supplies the laterodorsal outer annulus of the intervertebral disc, the PLL, the anterior 2/3 of the dural sac and the anterior vascular plexus [4, 14]. Many blood vessels pass through the lateral neural canal: the anterior and posterior s

  20. The absent posterior drawer test in some acute posterior cruciate ligament tears of the knee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack C. Hughston

    1988-01-01

    Over a 10 year period, 24 of 54 acute PCL tears in cases of straight medial instability demonstrated an absent or an equivocal posterior drawer test. Most of these (22, 91.6%) were contact injuries, and in the 11 cases where the mechanism of injury was known (45.8%), were incurred by a blow to the outer aspect of the leg while

  1. Unilateral Pedicle Fracture Accompanying Spondylolytic Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeun Sung; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Yun Sung

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral pedicle stress fracture accompanying spondylolytic spondylolisthesis is rare even in the elderly. Most are associated with major trauma, previous spine surgery, or stress-related activity. Here, the authors describe an unique case of unilateral pedicle fracture associated with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis at the L5 level, which was successfully treated by posterior lumbar interbody fusion with screw fixation at the L5-S1 level. As far as the authors' knowledge, no such case has been previously reported in the literature. The pathophysiological mechanism of this uncommon entity is discussed and a review of relevant literature is included. PMID:26180621

  2. Modic type I changes of the lumbar spine in golfers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason Mefford; Koichi Sairyo; Toshinori Sakai; Justin Hopkins; Madoka Inoue; Rui Amari; Nitin N. Bhatia; Akira Dezawa; Natsuo Yasui

    2011-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is the most prevalent musculoskeletal complaint among professional and amateur golfers; however, associated\\u000a radiological changes in golf-related LBP have not been examined in the literature. We suspect that Modic Type 1 changes in\\u000a the lumbar spine are linked to golf-related LBP. In this retrospective case series, four middle-aged golfers (one professional\\u000a and three high-level amateurs) presented

  3. Lumbar spinal loads and muscle activity during a golf swing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Young-Tae Lim; John W. Chow; Woen-Sik Chae

    2012-01-01

    This study estimated the lumbar spinal loads at the L4–L5 level and evaluated electromyographic (EMG) activity of right and left rectus abdominis, external and internal obliques, erector spinae, and latissimus dorsi muscles during a golf swing. Four super VHS camcorders and two force plates were used to obtain three-dimensional (3D) kinematics and kinetics of golf swings performed by five male

  4. Critical analysis of lumbar interspinous devices failures: a retrospective study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesco Ciro Tamburrelli; Luca Proietti; Carlo Ambrogio Logroscino

    2011-01-01

    Interspinous devices (IDs) were introduced in the 90s. Since then, they have rapidly become very popular for the minimally\\u000a invasive treatment of lumbar pain disorders. They feature different shapes and biomechanical characteristics, and are used\\u000a in the spine degenerative pathologies or as motion segment stabilizers (dynamic stabilization) or to obtain the decompression\\u000a of neurological structures. The indications seem to be

  5. Unusual case of camptocormia triggered by lumbar-disc herniation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iltekin Duman; Korhan Baklac?; Arif Kenan Tan; Tunc Alp Kalyon

    2008-01-01

    A 21-year-old male patient with low back pain and marked forward bending was presented. The exaggerated lumbar flexion was\\u000a preventing him to stand in erect posture but disappeared while lying. The symptoms had begun after he had lifted a heavy object.\\u000a Straight-leg-raising test could not be performed properly because of the exaggerated pain. The light-touch sense was decreased\\u000a on L5

  6. PREDICTING HEALTH CARE NEEDS FOLLOWING LUMBAR SPINE SURGERY

    E-print Network

    Kanaan, Saddam

    2013-08-31

    surgeries would be spinal tumor, spinal infection, spinal fracture and other conditions which are beyond the scope of our current project. 1.2.2 Types of lumbar spine surgeries Discectomy, laminectomy, and spinal fusion are common surgical procedures...-term benefit. (O'Connell, Malhotra, Vresilovic, & Elliott, 2011) Discectomy has a success rate of at least 75%, as suggested by self-reported patient outcomes.(Asch et al., 2002) Laminectomy (or open decompression surgery) is a common spinal surgery used...

  7. Low-back pain, sciatica, cervical and lumbar spondylosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas WM Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Spondylosis is the progressive, age-related degenerative changes of the spine. The mid-cervical and lower-lumbar regions are particularly affected because of the distribution of mechanical stresses due to spinal motion and loading of the spinal segments when in the erect posture. These changes are usually asymptomatic apart from increasing stiffness and reduced mobility of the spine. When symptomatic, clinical features include

  8. Surgical Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis in the Elderly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Kalbarczyk; A. Lukes; R. W. Seiler

    1998-01-01

    Summary  ?148 elderly patients, aged 70 years or more, diagnosed as having lumbar spinal stenosis, were operated upon at our institution\\u000a during 1983 to 1995. Totally 161 operative procedures were performed. We analysed retrospectively the results of the surgical\\u000a treatment.\\u000a \\u000a ?The most frequently performed procedure was multisegmental laminectomy, in 32% interlaminar fenestration and laminotomy were\\u000a done. In 9 cases fusion was

  9. Analysis of Efficacy Differences between Caudal and Lumbar Interlaminar Epidural Injections in Chronic Lumbar Axial Discogenic Pain: Local Anesthetic Alone vs. Local Combined with Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Benyamin, Ramsin M.; Boswell, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: Comparative assessment of randomized controlled trials of caudal and lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in chronic lumbar discogenic pain. Objective: To assess the comparative efficacy of caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches of epidural injections in managing axial or discogenic low back pain. Summary of Background Data: Epidural injections are commonly performed utilizing either a caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach to treat chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain, which is pain exclusive of that associated with a herniated intervertebral disc, or that is due to degeneration of the zygapophyseal joints, or due to dysfunction of the sacroiliac joints, respectively. The literature on the efficacy of epidural injections in managing chronic axial lumbar pain of presumed discogenic origin is limited. Methods: The present analysis is based on 2 randomized controlled trials of chronic axial low back pain not caused by disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain, utilizing either a caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach, with a total of 240 patients studied, and a 24-month follow-up. Patients were assigned to receive either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic with a steroid in each 60 patient group. Results: The primary outcome measure was significant improvement, defined as pain relief and functional status improvement of at least 50% from baseline, which was reported at 24-month follow-ups in 72% who received local anesthetic only with a lumbar interlaminar approach and 54% who received local anesthetic only with a caudal approach. In patients receiving local anesthetic with a steroid, the response rate was 67% for those who had a lumbar interlaminar approach and 68% for those who had a caudal approach at 12 months. The response was significantly better in the lumbar interlaminar group who received local anesthetic only, 77% versus 56% at 12 months and 72% versus 54% at 24 months. Conclusion: This assessment shows that in patients with axial or discogenic pain in the lumbar spine after excluding facet joint and SI Joint pain, epidural injections of local anesthetic by the caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach may be effective in managing chronic low back pain with a potential superiority for a lumbar interlaminar approach over a caudal approach. PMID:25678838

  10. The NEtherlands Cervical Kinematics (NECK) Trial. Cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with or without interbody fusion and arthroplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation; a double-blind randomised multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with cervical radicular syndrome due to disc herniation refractory to conservative treatment are offered surgical treatment. Anterior cervical discectomy is the standard procedure, often in combination with interbody fusion. Accelerated adjacent disc degeneration is a known entity on the long term. Recently, cervical disc prostheses are developed to maintain motion and possibly reduce the incidence of adjacent disc degeneration. A comparative cost-effectiveness study focused on adjacent segment degeneration and functional outcome has not been performed yet. We present the design of the NECK trial, a randomised study on cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with or without interbody fusion and arthroplasty in patients with cervical disc herniation. Methods/Design Patients (age 18-65 years) presenting with radicular signs due to single level cervical disc herniation lasting more than 8 weeks are included. Patients will be randomised into 3 groups: anterior discectomy only, anterior discectomy with interbody fusion, and anterior discectomy with disc prosthesis. The primary outcome measure is symptomatic adjacent disc degeneration at 2 and 5 years after surgery. Other outcome parameters will be the Neck Disability Index, perceived recovery, arm and neck pain, complications, re-operations, quality of life, job satisfaction, anxiety and depression assessment, medical consumption, absenteeism, and costs. The study is a randomised prospective multicenter trial, in which 3 surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses will be kept blinded of the allocated treatment for 2 years. The follow-up period is 5 years. Discussion Currently, anterior cervical discectomy with fusion is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of cervical disc herniation. Whether additional interbody fusion or disc prothesis is necessary and cost-effective will be determined by this trial. Trial Registration Netherlands Trial Register NTR1289 PMID:20553591

  11. [Thyroid cancer metastasis to the lumbar spine successfully treated by embolization and radioiodine. A case report].

    PubMed

    Sumimura, J; Nakagawa, K; Kawamura, J; Tayama, M; Takahashi, E; Moritomo, T; Miyata, M

    1990-07-01

    A 82-year-old woman suffered from a metastatic lesion of follicular carcinoma of the thyroid to the fourth lumbar spine, which compressed the spinal nerves and caused lumbar pain and paresthesis of the lower limb. External irradiation, 5200 RAD, was carried out. Total thyroidectomy was done for the preparation of radioiodine(131I) therapy. Two weeks later, embolization of lumbar arteries was performed to prevent the progression of the spinal cord damage during a period waiting for 131I administration. The size of the lumbar lesion decreased, and lumbal pain and spinal cord symptoms disappeared. After administration of 131I, the metastatic lesion became further smaller. PMID:2398883

  12. Lumbar Spondylolysis and Spondylolytic Spondylolisthesis: Who Should Be Have Surgery? An Algorithmic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohamad Hossein; Salari, Saman

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis are common spinal disorders that most of the times are incidental findings or respond favorably to conservative treatment. In a small percentage of the patients, surgical intervention becomes necessary. Because too much attention has been paid to novel surgical techniques and new modern spinal implants, some of fundamental concepts have been forgotten. Identifying that small but important number of patients with lumbar spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis who would really benefit from lumbar surgery is one of those forgotten concepts. In this paper, we have developed an algorithmic approach to determine who is a good candidate for surgery due to lumbar spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis. PMID:25558333

  13. Thoracic and lumbar spine accelerations in everyday activities.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tracy P; Bussone, William R; Duma, Stefan M; Kress, Tyler A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify thoracic and lumbar spine accelerations for men and women of different body sizes during daily activities. Measured spine accelerations were compared to determine if there were significant differences in peak accelerations based on gender, size, and spine location. Each subject performed seven activities, which included sitting in a chair, sitting quickly in a chair, walking at 1.3 m/s, running at 2.7 m/s, performing jumping jacks, achieving maximum vertical leap, and jumping off a step approximately 20 cm high. Overall, the peak lumbar spine accelerations were significantly greater than the thoracic spine accelerations. Based on the statistical analysis, it was determined that gender and body size did not have a significant effect on peak accelerations of the thoracic and lumbar spine. The findings from the present study are of great value to researchers in order to understand the acceleration patterns of the human body during low impact accelerations. PMID:16817643

  14. Clinical outcomes and efficacy of transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Türk, Cezmi Ça?r?; Kara, Niyazi Nefi; Biliciler, Bülent; Karasoy, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy (TLED) is a minimally invasive procedure for removing lumbar disc herniations. This technique was initially reserved for herniations in the foraminal or extraforaminal region. This study concentrated on our experience regarding the outcomes and efficacy of TLED. Materials and Methods: A total of 105 patients were included in the study. The patients were retrospectively evaluated for demographic features, lesion levels, numbers of affected levels, visual analog scores (VASs), Oswestry disability questionnaire scale scores and MacNab pain relief scores. Results: A total of 48 female and 57 male patients aged between 25 and 64 years (mean: 41.8 years) underwent TLED procedures. The majority (83%) of the cases were operated on at the levels of L4-5 and L5-S1. Five patients had herniations at two levels. There were significant decreases between the preoperative VAS scores collected postoperatively at 6 months (2.3) and those collected after 1-year (2.5). Two patients were referred for microdiscectomy after TLED due to unsatisfactory pain relief on the 1st postoperative day. The overall success rate with respect to pain relief was 90.4% (95/105). Seven patients with previous histories of open discectomy at the same level reported fair pain relief after TLED. Conclusions: Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy is a safe and effective alternative to microdiscectomy that is associated with minor tissue trauma. Herniations that involved single levels and foraminal/extraforaminal localizations were associated with better responses to TLED.

  15. Rate-dependent fracture characteristics of lumbar vertebral bodies.

    PubMed

    Stemper, Brian D; Yoganandan, Narayan; Baisden, Jamie L; Umale, Sagar; Shah, Alok S; Shender, Barry S; Paskoff, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Experimental testing incorporating lumbar columns and isolated components is essential to advance the understanding of injury tolerance and for the development of safety enhancements. This study incorporated a whole column axial acceleration model and an isolated vertebral body model to quantify compression rates during realistic loading and compressive tolerance of vertebrae. Eight lumbar columns and 53 vertebral bodies from 23 PMHS were used. Three-factor ANOVA was used to determine significant differences (p<0.05) in physiologic and failure biomechanics based on compression rate, spinal level, and gender. Results demonstrated a significant increase in ultimate force (i.e., fracture) from lower to higher compression rates. Ultimate stress also increased with compression rate. Displacement and strain to failure were consistent at both compression rates. Differences in ultimate mechanics between vertebral bodies obtained from males and females demonstrated non-significant trends, with female vertebral bodies having lower ultimate force that would be associated with decreased injury tolerance. This was likely a result of smaller vertebrae in that population. Combined with existing literature, results presented in this manuscript contribute to the understanding of lumbar spine tolerance during axial loading events that occur in both military and civilian environments with regard to effects of compression rate and gender. PMID:25154535

  16. Unusual case of camptocormia triggered by lumbar-disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Duman, Iltekin; Baklaci, Korhan; Tan, Arif Kenan; Kalyon, Tunc Alp

    2008-04-01

    A 21-year-old male patient with low back pain and marked forward bending was presented. The exaggerated lumbar flexion was preventing him to stand in erect posture but disappeared while lying. The symptoms had begun after he had lifted a heavy object. Straight-leg-raising test could not be performed properly because of the exaggerated pain. The light-touch sense was decreased on L5 and S1 dermatomes. There was no loss of muscle strength. The deep-tendon reflexes were normal. Plain graph showed mild narrowing in the L4-5 and L5-S1 intervertebral spaces. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging revealed disc protrusions in L4-5 and L5-S1 levels. During his stay in the department, the patient was given tizanidine and tramadol, and physical therapy was performed. A paravertebral intramuscular injection with lidocaine was applied. Moreover, the patient was referred to psychiatrist for evaluation regarding his medical history of conversive seizures and possible efforts for secondary gain. No response was obtained from all the treatments. The final diagnosis was camptocormia triggered by lumbar-disc herniation. He was applied supportive psychotherapy, psychoeducation regarding secondary gain, strong suggestions to improve posture, positive reinforcement, and behavioral therapy. His postural abnormality resolved and disappeared completely with mild pain. PMID:18087763

  17. A Symptomatic Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Kadono, Yoshinori; Yuguchi, Takamichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (EAC) is a rare, usually asymptomatic condition of unknown origin, which typically involves the lower thoracic spine. We report a case of posttraumatic symptomatic EAC with lumbar disc herniation. A 22-year-old man experienced back pain and sciatica after a traffic accident. Neurological examination revealed a right L5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion at the L3 to L5 level and an L4-5 disc herniation; computed tomography myelography showed that the right L5 root was sandwiched between the cyst and the herniation. A dural defect was identified during surgery. The cyst was excised completely and the defect was repaired. A herniation was excised beside the dural sac. Histology showed that the cyst wall consisted of collagen and meningothelial cells. Postoperatively the symptoms resolved. Lumbar spinal EACs are rare; such cysts may arise from a congenital dural crack and grow gradually. The 6 cases of symptomatic lumbar EAC reported in the literature were not associated with disc herniation or trauma. In this case, the comorbid disc herniation was involved in symptom progression. Although many EACs are asymptomatic, comorbid spinal disorders such as disc herniation or trauma can result in symptom progression. PMID:25861499

  18. Lumbar Spine Disc Herniation Diagnosis with a Joint Shape Model

    E-print Network

    Corso, Jason J.

    an active shape model (ASM) and a gradient vector flow snake model (GVF-snake). The ASM roughly segments distribution to initial- ize a GVF-snake model to delineate the posterior disc segment. We then extract the set

  19. Posterior left atrial–esophageal relationship throughout the cardiac cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jasbir Sra; David Krum; Angela Malloy; Atul Bhatia; Ryan Cooley; Zalmen Blanck; Anwer Dhala; Alfred J. Anderson; Masood Akhtar

    2006-01-01

    Background  Radiofrequency energy delivered throughout the cardiac cycle has the potential to cause thermal injury to the esophagus if the anatomical relationship between the posterior left atrium and the esophagus changes during cardiac motion.Objective  To assess the posterior left atrial–esophageal relationship throughout the cardiac cycle.Methods  In this study, the anatomical relationship between the posterior left atrium and the esophagus was assessed throughout the

  20. Minimally invasive surgical approach to treat posterior urethral diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Alsowayan, Ossamah; Almodhen, Fayez; Alshammari, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Urethral diverticulum is a localized saccular or fusiform out-pouching of the urethra. It may occur at any point along the urethra in both male and females. Male urethral diverticulum is rare, and could be either congenital or acquired, anterior or posterior. The mainstay treatment of posterior urethral diverticulum (PUD) is the open surgical approach. Here we discuss our minimally invasive surgical approach (MIS) in managing posterior urethral diverticulum. PMID:25834967

  1. Evaluation of posterior fossa lesions by computer assisted tomography (CAT).

    PubMed

    Lott, T; El Gammal, T; Volcan, I

    1977-07-01

    Valuable neuroradiologic information can be obtained with routine examination of the posterior fossa by computer assisted tomography (CAT). The diagnosis can be difficult in the posterior fossa due to the relatively small size of the compartment and its proximities to large bony masses and air in the mastoid cells. However, many lesions can be accurately diagnosed when close attention is given to anatomic detail and the frequent use of contrast enhancement. We introduced a new CAT classification of posterior fossa neoplasms. PMID:877637

  2. The arterial anatomy of the developing human dorsal and lumbar vertebral body. A microarteriographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, J F

    1981-01-01

    The arterial anatomy of 60 lumbar and lower dorsal vertebral bodies from eight subjects aged between 29 weeks gestation and 15 years was studied. The arteries had been injected with a suspension of barium sulphate and the vertebrae decalcified, sectioned and radiographed. In the specimen of 29 weeks gestation, the equatorial arteries were present. Precursors of the metaphyseal arteries lay obliquely over and completely outside the ossification centre. These precursors originated from an irregular network of perichondral arteries near the equator. By six months of age, the perichondral arteries had migrated discally and had become well organized metaphyseal anastomoses while the metaphyseal arteries had become horizontal. Also by six months, the extra-osseous longitudinal anastomoses had developed into the adult pattern. In the 36 weeks fetus, the ends of the unbranching metaphyseal arteries were incorporated into the ossification centre. This central relationship was maintained into adult life, but, as the ossification centre expanded, the branches of the intra-osseous arteries followed the zone of ossification in a centrifugal manner. In infancy, the metaphyseal arteries were approximately equal in length and the equatorial arteries divided in the middle of the vertebral body; by the age of 15 years, the metaphyseal arteries arising from the anterolateral surfaces were longer than those which arose from the posterior surface, and the equatorial arteries divided behind the mid-point. From these arterial observations, a number of deductions concerning the mode of growth of the vertebral body have been drawn. Preterminal coils and typical peripheral arteries, frequent features in the adult vertebral body, were not seen in any of these specimens. There was no evidence of any epiphyseal growth plate, nor of epiphyseal arteries in these specimens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:7333964

  3. Effects of modified bridging exercises on static postural control of a poststroke hemiplegic patient who had received surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Dong

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the efficacy on postural control of a bridging exercise in order to suggest a pertinent procedure for the bridging exercise. [Subject] One poststroke hemiplegic patient who had received surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis participated in this study [Methods] A reverse ABAB single-case experimental design was used. To assess postural control, foot pressure and the stability limit test were evalulated once a week a total of 4 times during the intervention period. [Results] Noticeable improvement in the distribution of foot pressure and increased stability limit were shown after performing the bridging exercise supervised by a physical therapist. [Conclusion] Bridging exercise on a plinth is effective at balancing body weight-bearing and resulted in the patient putting her weight on both feet evenly and in both the anterior and posterior directions. PMID:25995605

  4. Posterior Cruciate Ligament: Focus on Conflicting Issues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Seuk

    2013-01-01

    There is little consensus on how to optimally reconstruct the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the natural history of injured PCL is also unclear. The graft material (autograft vs. allograft), the type of tibial fixation (tibial inlay vs. transtibial tunnel), the femoral tunnel position within the femoral footprint (isometric, central, or eccentric), and the number of bundles in the reconstruction (1 bundle vs. 2 bundles) are among the many decisions that a surgeon must make in a PCL reconstruction. In addition, there is a paucity of information on rehabilitation after reconstruction of the PCL and posterolateral structures. This article focused on the conflicting issues regarding the PCL, and the scientific rationales behind some critical points are discussed. PMID:24340144

  5. Asymptomatic posterior mediastinal teratoma diagnosed incidentally.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Riddhi; Rani, Poonam; Devenraj, Vijayant

    2014-01-01

    We present a young patient with occasional chest pain and an incidentally found posterior mediastinal mass on radiology which was confirmed as mature teratoma on histopathology. The gross specimen received in the department of pathology was globular measuring 9.0×7.0×5.5 cm and varying in consistency from soft cystic to firm. Cut surface showed numerous hair entangled in pultaceous material. Representative sections were taken and stained with H&E stain. Histopathology revealed haphazardly distributed mature derivatives of all the three germ layers comprising of epidermis, pilo sebaceous units, nerve bundles (ectodermal), cartilage, bone, salivary gland clusters, blood vessels, muscle bundles, fibrous tissue infiltrated by foreign body giant cells, lymphoid follicles (mesodermal) and pseudostratified columnar epithelium (mesodermal), thus establishing the diagnosis of mature teratoma. PMID:24654248

  6. Endoscopic Correction of Vesicoureteral Reflux Secondary to Posterior Urethral Valves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Prem Puri; Rajendra Kumar

    1996-01-01

    PurposeWe review our experience with children with high grade vesicoureteral reflux secondary to posterior urethral valves treated endoscopically with subureteral polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) injection.

  7. Posterior Circulation Stroke: Animal Models and Mechanism of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lekic, Tim; Ani, Chizobam

    2012-01-01

    Posterior circulation stroke refers to the vascular occlusion or bleeding, arising from the vertebrobasilar vasculature of the brain. Clinical studies show that individuals who experience posterior circulation stroke will develop significant brain injury, neurologic dysfunction, or death. Yet the therapeutic needs of this patient subpopulation remain largely unknown. Thus understanding the causative factors and the pathogenesis of brain damage is important, if posterior circulation stroke is to be prevented or treated. Appropriate animal models are necessary to achieve this understanding. This paper critically integrates the neurovascular and pathophysiological features gleaned from posterior circulation stroke animal models into clinical correlations. PMID:22665986

  8. Posterior circulation stroke: animal models and mechanism of disease.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Ani, Chizobam

    2012-01-01

    Posterior circulation stroke refers to the vascular occlusion or bleeding, arising from the vertebrobasilar vasculature of the brain. Clinical studies show that individuals who experience posterior circulation stroke will develop significant brain injury, neurologic dysfunction, or death. Yet the therapeutic needs of this patient subpopulation remain largely unknown. Thus understanding the causative factors and the pathogenesis of brain damage is important, if posterior circulation stroke is to be prevented or treated. Appropriate animal models are necessary to achieve this understanding. This paper critically integrates the neurovascular and pathophysiological features gleaned from posterior circulation stroke animal models into clinical correlations. PMID:22665986

  9. Osteoporosis or Low Bone Mass at the Femur Neck or Lumbar Spine in Older Adults: United States, 2005-2008

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Femur Neck or Lumbar Spine in Older Adults: United States, 2005–2008 On This Page Key findings In ... or lumbar spine among older adults in the United States population based on these WHO categories. Results are ...

  10. Posttraumatic lumbar cerebrospinal fluid leak: detection by retrograde In111DTPA myeloscintography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PATRICK M. COLLETTI; MICHAEL E. SIEGEL

    1981-01-01

    A case of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) extravasation with an unsuspected traumatic meningocele after a gunshot wound was detected by means of retrograde myeloscintography using isobaric In-111-DTPA. Our experience and a review of the literature have provided evidence retrograde myeloscintography may be useful for detecting and delineating significant traumatic thoracic and lumbar CSF leaks.

  11. A New Technique for Digital Fluoroscopic Video Assessment of Sagittal Plane Lumbar Spine Motion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deydre S. Teyhen; Timothy W. Flynn; Alan C. Bovik; Lawrence D. Abraham

    2005-01-01

    Study Design. Methodological reliability. Objective. Develop a measurement technique to as- sess dynamic motion of the lumbar spine using enhanced digital fluoroscopic video (DFV) and a distortion compen- sated roentgen analysis (DCRA). Summary of Background Data. Controversy over both the definition and consequences of lumbar segmental instability persists. Information from static imaging has had limited success in providing an understanding

  12. Automated Segmentation of the Lumbar Pedicle in CT Images for Spinal Fusion Surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jongwon Lee; Sungmin Kim; Young Soo Kim; Wan Kyun Chung

    2011-01-01

    Exact information about the shape of a lumbar pedi- cle can increase operation accuracy and safety during computer- aided spinal fusion surgery, which requires extreme caution on the part of the surgeon, due to the complexity and delicacy of the procedure. In this paper, a robust framework for segmenting the lumbar pedicle in computed tomography (CT) images is presented. The

  13. Lumbar hernia treated with lightweight partially absorbable mesh: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Norifumi; Kusumoto, Eiji; Endo, Kazuya; Ikejiri, Koji; Yamashita, Yo-ichi; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Morita, Masaru; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2013-12-01

    Superior lumbar hernia, also known as Grynfeltt-Lesshaft hernia, is an uncommon abdominal wall defect. We report a case of superior lumbar hernia, which was successfully treated with a lightweight partially absorbable mesh. A 73-year-old man visited our department with complaints of lumbar pain and a feeling of pressure associated with a right lumbar mass. A CT scan of the abdomen demonstrated a defect in the aponeurosis of the transversus abdominis muscle and a protrusion of the small intestine through the defect. The diagnosis of a right superior lumbar hernia was made. The lumbar hernia was surgically treated with a lightweight large-pore polypropylene mesh containing an absorbable component consisting of poliglecaprone (ULTRAPRO Plug). The patient had no evidence of recurrence after 4 years of follow-up without any sense of discomfort. This is the first case report of a lumbar hernia treated with a lightweight partially absorbable mesh. This partially absorbable mesh can be considered to be suitable for the treatment of a lumbar hernia. PMID:24693687

  14. Comparison of chronic low-back pain patients hip range of motion with lumbar instability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Wk; Kim, Suhn Yeop

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare differences in hip range of motion between a lumbar stability group and a lumbar instability group of patients with chronic low-back pain. [Subjects] Sixty-nine patients with chronic low-back pain were divided into two groups: a lumbar stability group (n=39) and a lumbar instability group (n=30). [Methods] The patients were assessed using a goniometer to evaluate the hip range of motion at pre-test. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 software for Windows. The experimental data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, repeated one-way ANOVA, and the t-test, and a significance level of 0.05. [Results] The limitation of hip range of motion of the lumbar instability group was significantly greater than that of the lumbar stability group. [Conclusion] The chronic low-back pain patients showed greater limitation of hip range of motion than healthy persons, and among them, those who had lumbar instability showed greater limitation than those with lumbar stability. PMID:25729165

  15. The effect of epidural free fat graft on the outcome of lumbar disc surgery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Askin Görgülü; Osman Simsek; Sabahattin Çobanoglu; Murat Imer; Turgay Parsak

    2004-01-01

    Numerous materials have been used to prevent epidural scar tissue after lumbar disc surgery. Free fat grafts are common both experimentally and clinically, but there is some doubt about their protection against fibrosis, and some complications have been reported. In this prospective study, the usefulness of free fat grafts during lumbar disc surgery was evaluated. Ninety-nine patients who had undergone

  16. Altered Function of Lumbar Nerve Roots in Patients With Transitional Lumbosacral Vertebrae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Han Soo Chang; Hiroshi NAKAGAWA

    2004-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective study was conducted on the preoperative neurologic symptoms of patients with lumbar herniated discs. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the possibility that the muscle innervation pattern and the sensory dermatomes of lumbar nerve roots are altered when a lumbosacral transitional vertebra is present. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In 1962, McCulloch et al suggested with intraoperative recordings that the

  17. Neonatal Androgen-Dependent Sex Differences in Lumbar Spinal Cord Dopamine Concentrations and

    E-print Network

    Breedlove, Marc

    Neonatal Androgen-Dependent Sex Differences in Lumbar Spinal Cord Dopamine Concentrations to the spinal cord. DA in the dorsal and ventral horns modulates sensory, motor, nociceptive, and sexual in the lumbar spinal cord. The purpose of this study was to determine whether sex dif- ferences in spinal cord

  18. Comparison of chronic low-back pain patients hip range of motion with lumbar instability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang wk; Kim, Suhn Yeop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare differences in hip range of motion between a lumbar stability group and a lumbar instability group of patients with chronic low-back pain. [Subjects] Sixty-nine patients with chronic low-back pain were divided into two groups: a lumbar stability group (n=39) and a lumbar instability group (n=30). [Methods] The patients were assessed using a goniometer to evaluate the hip range of motion at pre-test. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 software for Windows. The experimental data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, repeated one-way ANOVA, and the t-test, and a significance level of 0.05. [Results] The limitation of hip range of motion of the lumbar instability group was significantly greater than that of the lumbar stability group. [Conclusion] The chronic low-back pain patients showed greater limitation of hip range of motion than healthy persons, and among them, those who had lumbar instability showed greater limitation than those with lumbar stability. PMID:25729165

  19. Massive epidural varix mimicking lumbar disc herniation: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Kenneth M

    2014-10-01

    Sciatica is generally caused by such well-recognized entities as lumbar disc herniation and degenerative stenosis. A rarely reported alternative cause of lumbar nerve root compression is by distended epidural veins. A case is presented of sciatica produced by such a mechanism, successfully treated by decompressive laminotomy. PMID:25675591

  20. Anatomic basis of minimal anterior extraperitoneal approach to the lumbar spine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Y. Lazennec; B. Pouzet; S. Ramare; N. Mora; S. Hansen; R. Trabelsi; H. Guérin-Surville; G. Saillant

    1999-01-01

    Anterior lumbar spine approaches may be indicated for fusion in degenerative lumbar spine disorders or to fill discal and bone gaps after fracture reduction. We present an anterior extraperitoneal approach applicable to any discal and vertebral levels from T12 to S1. The anatomic study, based on 25 cadavers, highlights retroperitoneal dissection principles for easy kidney and duodenopancreatic mobilisation and direct