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1

Posterior lumbar interbody fusion and segmental lumbar lordosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  The sagittal plane of body produces a convex curve anteriorly referred to as the lordotic curve. Malalignment of lordotic\\u000a curve leads to low back disorders and lumbar spinal surgery has been known to cause this. This study was a retrospective analysis\\u000a of the effects of posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages on segmental lumbar lordosis.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  We conducted a

Rahul Kakkar; P. B. R. Sirigiri; A. Howieson; A. Siva Raman; R. J. Crawford

2007-01-01

2

Clinical and radiological relationship between posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral lumbar fusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPosterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) is the most popular technique for stabilizing the lumbar spine. Biomechanically, PLF decreases segmental motion in the posterior column, which presumably reduces facet joint pain. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) may decompress nerve roots by distracting the collapsed disc space, and achieving optimal fusion in relation to load-bearing capacity. The purpose of the study was to

Zvi Lidar; Andrew Beaumont; Jason Lifshutz; Dennis J. Maiman

2005-01-01

3

Comparison of low back fusion techniques: transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) or posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors review and compare posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF).\\u000a A review of the literature is performed wherein the history, indications for surgery, surgical procedures with their respective\\u000a biomechanical advantages, potential complications, and grafting substances are presented. Along with the technical advancements\\u000a and improvements in grafting substances, the indications and use of PLIF and

Chad D. Cole; Todd D. McCall; Meic H. Schmidt; Andrew T. Dailey

2009-01-01

4

Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion via a Unilateral Approach  

PubMed Central

This study sought to determine the outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), via a unilateral approach, in selected patients who presented with unilateral leg pain and segmental instability of the lumbar spine. Patients with a single level of a herniated disc disease in the lumbar spine, unilateral leg pain, chronic disabling lower back pain (LBP), and a failed conservative treatment, were considered for the procedure. A total of 41 patients underwent a single-level PLIF using two PEEK™ (Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone) cages filled with iliac bone, via a unilateral approach. The patients comprised 21 women and 20 men with a mean age of 41 years (range: 22 to 63 years). Two cages were inserted using a unilateral medial facetectomy and a partial hemilaminectomy. At follow-up, the outcomes were assessed using the Prolo Scale. The success of the fusion was determined by dynamic lumbar radiography and/or computerized tomography scanning. All the patients safely underwent surgery without severe complications. During a mean follow-up period of 26 months, 1 patient underwent percutaneous pedicle screw fixation due to persistent LBP. A posterior displacement of the cage was found in one patient. At the last follow up, 90% of the patients demonstrated satisfactory results. An osseous fusion was present in 85% of the patients. A PLIF, via a unilateral approach, enables a solid union with satisfactory clinical results. This preserves part of the posterior elements of the lumbar spine in selected patients with single level instability and unilateral leg pain.

Shin, Hyun Chul; Yi, Seong; Kim, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Do Heum

2006-01-01

5

Comparison of the early results of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion in symptomatic lumbar instability  

PubMed Central

Background: Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) has been preferred to posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for different spinal disorders but there had been no study comparing their outcome in lumbar instability. A comparative retrospective analysis of the early results of TLIF and PLIF in symptomatic lumbar instability was conducted between 2005 and 2011. Materials and Methods: Review of the records of 102 operated cases of lumbar instability with minimum 1 year followup was done. A total of 52 cases (11 men and 41 women, mean age 46 years SD 05.88, range 40-59 years) underwent PLIF and 50 cases (14 men and 36 women, mean age 49 years SD 06.88, range 40-59 years) underwent TLIF. The surgical time, duration of hospital stay, intraoperative blood loss were compared. Self-evaluated low back pain and leg pain status (using Visual Analog Score), disability outcome (using Oswestry disability questionnaire) was analyzed. Radiological structural restoration (e.g., disc height, foraminal height, lordotic angle, and slip reduction), stability (using Posner criteria), fusion (using Hackenberg criteria), and overall functional outcome (using MacNab's criteria) were compared. Results: Pain, disability, neurology, and overall functional status were significantly improved in both groups but PLIF required more operative time and caused more blood loss. Postoperative hospital stay, structural restoration, stability, and fusion had no significant difference but neural complications were relatively more with PLIF. Conclusions: Both methods were effective in relieving symptoms, achieving structural restoration, stability, and fusion, but TLIF had been associated with shorter operative time, less blood loss, and lesser complication rates for which it can be preferred for symptomatic lumbar instability.

Sakeb, Najmus; Ahsan, Kamrul

2013-01-01

6

Extension CT scan: its suitability for assessing fusion after posterior lumbar interbody fusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is a popular procedure for treating lumbar canal stenosis with spinal instability,\\u000a and several reports concerning fusion assessment methods exist. However, there are currently no definitive criteria for diagnosing\\u000a a successful interbody fusion in the lumbar spine. We suggested evaluating fusion status using computed tomography (CT) in\\u000a extension position to detect pseudoarthrosis more precisely. The

Hiroaki NakashimaYasutsugu; Yasutsugu Yukawa; Keigo Ito; Yumiko Horie; Masaaki Machino; Shunsuke Kanbara; Daigo Morita; Shiro Imagama; Naoki Ishiguro; Fumihiko Kato

7

Outcomes of allogenic cages in anterior and posterior lumbar interbody fusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interbody lumbar fusions provide a proven logical solution to diseases of the intervertebral discs by eliminating motion of the segment. Historically, there are many techniques to achieve spinal fusion in the lumbar spine. These include anterior, posterior, and foramenal approaches, often in combination with various internal fixation devices. The surgeon's choice of the approach and mechanical or biological implant is

M. E. Janssen; C. Lam; R. Beckham

2001-01-01

8

Repeated adjacent-segment degeneration after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.  

PubMed

One of the most important sequelae affecting long-term results is adjacent-segment degeneration (ASD) after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Although several reports have described the incidence rate, there have been no reports of repeated ASD. The purpose of this report was to describe 1 case of repeated ASD after PLIF. A 62-year-old woman with L-4 degenerative spondylolisthesis underwent PLIF at L4-5. At the second operation, L3-4 PLIF was performed for L-3 degenerative spondylolisthesis 6 years after the primary operation. At the third operation, L2-3 PLIF was performed for L-2 degenerative spondylolisthesis 1.5 years after the primary operation. Vertebral collapse of L-1 was detected 1 year after the third operation, and the collapse had progressed. At the fourth operation, 3 years after the third operation, vertebral column resection of L-1 and replacement of titanium mesh cages with pedicle screw fixation between T-4 and L-5 was performed. Although the patient's symptoms resolved after each operation, the time between surgeries shortened. The sacral slope decreased gradually although each PLIF achieved local lordosis at the fused segment. PMID:24654745

Okuda, Shinya; Oda, Takenori; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Maeno, Takafumi; Iwasaki, Motoki

2014-05-01

9

Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using one diagonal fusion cage with transpedicular screw\\/rod fixation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using threaded cages has gained wide popularity for lumbosacral spinal disease. Our biomechanical tests showed that PLIF using a single diagonal cage with unilateral facetectomy does add a little to spinal stability and provides equal or even higher postoperative stability than PLIF using two posterior cages with bilateral facetectomy. Studies also demonstrated that cages placed

Jie Zhao; Tiesheng Hou; Xinwei Wang; Shengzhong Ma

2003-01-01

10

Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using rhBMP-2  

PubMed Central

The use of biological technologies for the treatment of degenerative spinal diseases has undergone rapid clinical and scientific development. BMP strategies have gained wide support for an inherent potential to improve the ossification process. It has been extensively studied in combination with various techniques for spinal stabilisation from both anterior and posterior approach. We studied the fusion process after implantation of rhBMP-2 in 17 patients with degenerative lumbar spine diseases in combination with dorsal fixation with pedicle screws and poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) interbody cages. We used 12 mg rhBMP-2 carried by collagen sponge, 6 mg in every cage. Patient follow up consisted of pre-operative radiographic and clinical evaluation. Similar post-operative evaluations were performed at 3 and 6 months. Clinical assessment demonstrated clear improvement in all patients despite evidence of vertebral endplate osteoclastic activity in the 3-month radiographs. The 6-month radiograph, however, confirmed evidence of fusion, and no untoward results or outcomes were noted. While previous studies have shown exclusively positive results in both fusion rates and process, our study demonstrated an intermediate morphology at 3 months during the ossification process using Induct Os in combination with peek-cages using a PLIF-technique. The transient resorption of bone surrounding the peek cage did not result in subsidence, pain or complication, and fusion was reached in all cases within a 6-month-controlled evaluation. Although there was no negative influence on clinical outcome, the potential for osteoclastic or metabolic resorption bears watching during the post-surgical follow up.

Schnoring, Mark; Hohaus, Christian; Minkus, Yvonne; Beier, Andre; Ganey, Timothy; Mansmann, Ulrich

2008-01-01

11

Defatted, gas-sterilised cortical bone allograft for posterior lumbar interbody vertebral fusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. In posterior lumbar interbody vertebral fusion operations, variously sized, rectangular shaped, defatted, freeze-dried, gas-sterilised\\u000a cortical bone allografts were used in combination with cancellous bone autografts from excised posterior elements. Single-level\\u000a fusion, with or without internal fixation, was undertaken in 38 patients aged 50 years or less with disc herniation or a failed\\u000a discectomy (the younger group) and in 33

M. Kakiuchi; K. Ono

1998-01-01

12

Posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage with unilateral transpedicular screw fixation for lumbar stenosis.  

PubMed

Few reports have described the combined use of unilateral pedicle screw fixation and interbody fusion for lumbar stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed 79 patients with lumbar stenosis. The rationale and effectiveness of unilateral pedicle screw fixation were studied from biomechanical and clinical perspectives, aiming to reduce stiffness of the implant. All patients were operated with posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage in combination with unilateral transpedicular screw fixation and had reached the 3-year follow-up interval after operation. The mean operating time was 115 minutes (range=95-150 min) and the mean estimated blood loss was 150 mL (range=100-200 mL). The mean duration of hospital stay was 10 days (range=7-15 days). Clinical outcomes were assessed prior to surgery and reassessed at intervals using Denis' pain and work scales. Fusion status was determined from X-rays and CT scans. At the final follow-up, the clinical results were satisfactory and patients showed significantly improved scores (p<0.01) either on the pain or the work scale. Successful fusion was achieved in all patients. There were no new postoperative radiculopathies, or instances of malpositioned or fractured hardware. Posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage with unilateral transpedicular fixation is an effective treatment for decompressive surgery for lumbar stenosis. PMID:21237659

Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Xiaoqing; Yao, Yu

2011-03-01

13

Repeated Migration of a Fusion Cage after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion  

PubMed Central

Although posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is a widely accepted procedure, perioperative and postoperative complications are still encountered. In particular, cage migration can result in severe sequelae, and revision surgery is technically demanded. Here, we report a rare case of repeated migration of a fusion cage after PLIF. To the best of our knowledge, no report has been previously issued on repeated migration of a fusion cage after PLIF. The authors discuss the radiological and clinical findings of this unusual complication with a review of the literature.

Lee, Jun Gue; Lee, Sung Myung; Shin, Ho

2013-01-01

14

Posterior lumbar interbody fusion versus posterolateral fusion in spondylolisthesis: a prospective controlled study in the Han nationality  

PubMed Central

In this prospective study, our aim was to compare the clinical outcome of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and posterolateral fusion (PLF) in spondylolisthesis. A total of 138 patients with spondylolisthesis were randomly assigned to two groups: those operated on with pedicle screw fixation and posterior lumbar interbody fusion by autografting (PLIF), and those operated on with pedicle screw fixation and posterolateral fusion by autografting (PLF). The patients were followed-up for four years. Clinical evaluation was carried out using the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and pain index (VAS). Radiography was performed preoperatively and postoperatively to assess the fusion. Both surgical procedures were effective, but the PLF group showed more complications related to hardware biomechanics. There was no significant statistical difference in clinical and functional outcome in the two groups. The PLIF group presented a better fusion rate than the PLF group.

Nie, Lin; Zhang, Li

2008-01-01

15

7:52 Recombinant human bone morphogenic protSD stem–2 in a posterior lumbar interbody fusion construct  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose of study: Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP)-2 has been demonstrated to form bone in various spine fusion applications as effectively as autologous iliac crest bone, without the morbidity of the graft harvest. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) constructs are commonly used in the treatment of degenerative spinal disease. This study evaluates the use of rhBMP-2 in a PLIF

Joseph Alexander; Charles Branch

2002-01-01

16

Biomechanical evaluation of three surgical scenarios of posterior lumbar interbody fusion by finite element analysis  

PubMed Central

Background For the treatment of low back pain, the following three scenarios of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) were usually used, i.e., PLIF procedure with autogenous iliac bone (PAIB model), PLIF with cages made of PEEK (PCP model) or titanium (Ti) (PCT model) materiel. But the benefits or adverse effects among the three surgical scenarios were still not fully understood. Method Finite element analysis (FEA), as an efficient tool for the analysis of lumbar diseases, was used to establish a three-dimensional nonlinear L1-S1 FE model (intact model) with the ligaments of solid elements. Then it was modified to simulate the three scenarios of PLIF. 10?Nm moments with 400?N preload were applied to the upper L1 vertebral body under the loading conditions of extension, flexion, lateral bending and torsion, respectively. Results Different mechanical parameters were calculated to evaluate the differences among the three surgical models. The lowest stresses on the bone grafts and the greatest stresses on endplate were found in the PCT model. The PCP model obtained considerable stresses on the bone grafts and less stresses on ligaments. But the changes of stresses on the adjacent discs and endplate were minimal in the PAIB model. Conclusions The PCT model was inferior to the other two models. Both the PCP and PAIB models had their own relative merits. The findings provide theoretical basis for the choice of a suitable surgical scenario for different patients.

2012-01-01

17

Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using one diagonal fusion cage with transpedicular screw/rod fixation.  

PubMed

Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using threaded cages has gained wide popularity for lumbosacral spinal disease. Our biomechanical tests showed that PLIF using a single diagonal cage with unilateral facetectomy does add a little to spinal stability and provides equal or even higher postoperative stability than PLIF using two posterior cages with bilateral facetectomy. Studies also demonstrated that cages placed using a posterior approach did not cause the same increase in spinal stiffness seen with pedicle screw instrumentation, and we concluded that cages should not be used posteriorly without other forms of fixation. On the other hand, placement of two cages using a posterior approach does have the disadvantage of risk to the bilateral nerve roots. We therefore performed a prospective study to determine whether PLIF can be accomplished by utilizing a single diagonal fusion cage with the application of supplemental transpedicular screw/rod instrumentation. Twenty-seven patients underwent a PLIF using one single fusion cage (BAK, Sulzer Spine-Tech, Minneapolis, MN, USA) inserted posterolaterally and oriented anteromedially on the symptomatic side with unilateral facetectomy and at the same level supplemental fixation with a transpedicular screw/rod system. The internal fixation systems included 12 SOCON spinal systems (Aesculap AG, Germany) and 15 TSRH spinal systems (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, USA). The inclusion criteria were grade 1 to 2 lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis, lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, and recurrent lumbar disc herniations with instability. Patients had at least 1 year of low back pain and/or unilateral sciatica and a severely restricted functional ability in individuals aged 28-55 years. Patients with more than grade 2 spondylolisthesis or adjacent-level degeneration were excluded from the study. Patients were clinically assessed prior to surgery by an independent assessor; they were then reassessed at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postoperatively by the same assessor and put into four categories: excellent, good, fair, and poor. Operative time, blood loss, hospital expense, and complications were also recorded. All patients achieved successful radiographic fusion at 2 years, and this was achieved at 1 year in 25 out of 27 patients. At 2 years, clinical results were excellent in 15 patients, good in 10, fair in 1, and poor in 1. Regarding complications, one patient had a postoperative motor and sensory deficit of the nerve root. Reoperation was required in one patient due to migration of pedicle screws. No implant fractures or deformities occurred in any of the patients. PLIF using diagonal insertion of a single threaded cage with supplemental transpedicular screw/rod instrumentation enables sufficient decompression and solid interbody fusion to be achieved with minimal invasion of the posterior spinal elements. It is a clinically safer, easier, and more economical means of accomplishing PLIF. PMID:12709855

Zhao, Jie; Hou, Tiesheng; Wang, Xinwei; Ma, Shengzhong

2003-04-01

18

Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using a Unilateral Single Cage and a Local Morselized Bone Graft in the Degenerative Lumbar Spine  

PubMed Central

Background We retrospectively evaluated the clinical and radiological outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with using a unilateral single cage and a local morselized bone graft. Methods Fifty three patients who underwent PLIF with a unilateral single cage filled with local morselized bone graft were enrolled in this study. The average follow-up duration was 31.1 months. The clinical outcomes were evaluated with using the visual analogue scale (VAS) at the pre-operative period, at 1 year post-operation and at the last follow-up, the Oswestry Disability Index, the Prolo scale and the Kim & Kim criteria at the last follow-up; the radiological outcomes were evaluated according to the change of bone bridging, the radiolucency, the instablity and the disc height. Results For the clinical evaluation, the VAS pain index, the Oswestry Disability Index, the Prolo scale and the Kim & Kim criteria showed excellent outcomes. For the the radiological evaluation, 52 cases showed complete bone union at the last follow-up. Regarding the complications, only 1 patient had cage breakage during follow-up. Conclusions PLIF using a unilateral single cage filled with a local morselized bone graft has the advantages of a shorter operation time, less blood loss and a shorter hospital stay, as compared with the PLIF using bilateral cages, for treating degenerative lumbar spine disease. This technique also provides excellent outcomes according to the clinical and radiological evaluation.

Kim, Dong-Hee; Lee, Sang-Soo

2009-01-01

19

Anterolateral Corrective Lumbar Corpectomy and Interbody Fusion by Using Extended Screw Fixation without Posterior Instrumentation for Posttraumatic Kyphosis  

PubMed Central

A 26-year-old paraplegic schizophrenic Japanese woman suffered from severe kyphosis and back pain derived from lumbar burst fractures caused by jumping. She had already undergone resection of the L1 and L2 spinous processes for sharp angular kyphosis, but she still had severe kyphosis and back pain at the L1 and L2. Radiographical examination revealed fused anterior columns at L1 and L2 with severe local kyphosis and a significantly decreased percutaneous distance in the back. The patient underwent anterior instrumented bony resection including an L2 vertebral osteotomy: bilateral L2-L3 facetectomy and partial posterior osteotomy of the L2 vertebrae via a posterior approach followed by an anterior corpectomy of the L2 vertebrae and insertion of a cylindrical cage. No posterior instrumentation was used owing to the presence of atrophied paraspinal soft tissues. Lumbar interbody fusion was performed with vertebral body screws extending from T12 to L4 and corresponding anterior distension and posterior compression. The procedure corrected the kyphosis by 15° and enhanced local stability. Postsurgical visual analogue scale improved from 9.0 to 2.0 and Oswestry Disability Index from 40 to 17.8, respectively. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that anterolateral interbody fusion using extended fixation can compensate for posterior corrective surgery.

Yamazaki, Atsuro; Orita, Sumihisa; Sainoh, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Kubota, Go; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Nakata, Yukio; Inoue, Gen; Aoki, Yasuchika; Toyone, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Junichi; Miyagi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

2013-01-01

20

Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion utilizing BMP-2 in treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis: neither safe nor cost effective  

PubMed Central

Background: With the rise of health care costs, there is increased emphasis on evaluating the cost of a particular surgical procedure for quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Recent data have shown that surgical intervention for the treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) is as cost-effective as total joint arthroplasty. Despite these excellent outcomes, some argue that the addition of interbody fusion supplemented with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) enhances the value of this procedure. Methods: This review examines the current research regarding the cost-effectiveness of the surgical management of lumbar DS utilizing interbody fusion along with BMP. Results: Posterolateral spinal fusion with instrumentation for focal lumbar spinal stenosis with DS can provide and maintain improvement in self-reported quality of life. Based on the available literature, including nonrandomized comparative studies and case series, the addition of interbody fusion along with BMP does not lead to significantly better clinical outcomes and increases costs when compared with more routine posterolateral fusion techniques. Conclusions: To enhance the value of the surgical management for DS, costs must decrease or there should be substantial improvement in effectiveness as measured by clinical outcomes. To date, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of interbody fusion devices along with BMP to treat routine cases of focal stenosis accompanied by DS, which are routinely adequately treated utilizing posterolateral fusion techniques.

Moatz, Bradley; Tortolani, P. Justin

2013-01-01

21

Posterior lumbar interbody fusion with stand-alone Trabecular Metal cages for repeatedly recurrent lumbar disc herniation and back pain.  

PubMed

Object Patients with recurrent sciatica due to repeated reherniation of the intervertebral disc carry a poor prognosis for recovery and create a large burden on society. There is no consensus about the best treatment for this patient group. The goal of this study was to evaluate the 12-month results of the placement of stand-alone Trabecular Metal cages in these patients. Methods The authors performed a retrospective analysis of 26 patients with recurrent disc herniations treated with stand-alone posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with Trabecular Metal cages. At 1 year patients were evaluated using the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and a visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain. Furthermore, Likert scores of perceived recovery and satisfaction with the treatment were recorded. Lumbar spine radiographs after 1 year were compared with postoperative radiographs to measure subsidence. Stability of the operated segment was assessed using dynamic radiography. Results The patient group consisted of 26 patients (62% male) with a mean age of 45.7 ± 11.4 years (± SD). Patients had a history of 1 (31%), 2 (42%), or more (27%) discectomies at the same level. The mean follow-up period was 15.3 ± 7.3 months. At follow-up the mean VAS score for pain in the affected leg was 36.7 ± 27.9. The mean VAS score for back pain was 42.5 ± 30.2. The mean RMDQ score at follow-up was 9.8 ± 6.2. Twelve (46%) of the 26 patients had a global perceived good recovery. With respect to treatment satisfaction, 18 patients (69%) were content or very content with the operation and would recommend it. Disc height was increased immediately postoperatively, and at the 1-year follow-up it was still significantly higher compared with the preoperative height (mean 41% ± 38.7%, range -25.7 to 126.8, paired t-test, both p < 0.001), although a mean of 7.52% ± 11.6% subsidence occurred (median 2.0% [interquartile range 0.0%-10.9%], p < 0.003). No significant correlation between subsidence and postoperative back pain was found (Spearman's rho -0.2, p = 0.459). Flexion-extension radiographs showed instability in 1 patient. Conclusions Although only 46% of patients reported a good recovery with significant reductions in back and leg pain, 85% of patients reported at least some benefit from the operation, and a marked improvement in working status at follow-up was noted. In view of previously published poor results of instrumented lumbar fusion for patients with failed back surgery syndrome, the present data indicate that Trabecular Metal interbody fusion cages can be used in a stand-alone fashion and should not always need supplemental posterior fixation in patients with recurrent disc herniation without spinal instability, although a long-term follow-up study is warranted. PMID:24678638

Lequin, Michiel B; Verbaan, Dagmar; Bouma, Gerrit J

2014-06-01

22

Prospective clinical outcomes of revision fusion surgery in patients with pseudarthrosis after posterior lumbar interbody fusions using stand-alone metallic cages  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background contextPosterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is a popular method of arthrodesis for surgical treatment of instabilities and degenerative conditions of the spine. With the introduction of threaded titanium cage devices, surgeons began performing PLIF procedures using these cages as stand-alone devices. Complications have been reported, however, including pseudarthrosis with persistent pain. Outcomes after revision surgical treatment for these patients

Ezequiel H. Cassinelli; Corey Wallach; Brett Hanscom; Molly Vogt; James D. Kang

2006-01-01

23

A Multi-center Clinical Study of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with the Expandable Stand-alone Cage (Tyche(R) Cage) for Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Disorders  

PubMed Central

Objective This multi-center clinical study was designed to determine the long-term results of patients who received a one-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion with expandable cage (Tyche® cage) for degenerative spinal diseases during the same period in each hospital. Methods Fifty-seven patients with low back pain who had a one-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion using a newly designed expandable cage were enrolled in this study at five centers from June 2003 to December 2004 and followed up for 24 months. Pain improvement was checked with a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and their disability was evaluated with the Oswestry Disability Index. Radiographs were obtained before and after surgery. At the final follow-up, dynamic stability, quality of bone fusion, interveretebral disc height, and lumbar lordosis were assessed. In some cases, a lumbar computed tomography scan was also obtained. Results The mean VAS score of back pain was improved from 6.44 points preoperatively to 0.44 at the final visit and the score of sciatica was reduced from 4.84 to 0.26. Also, the Oswestry Disability Index was improved from 32.62 points preoperatively to 18.25 at the final visit. The fusion rate was 92.5%. Intervertebral disc height, recorded as 9.94±2.69 mm before surgery was increased to 12.23±3.31 mm at postoperative 1 month and was stabilized at 11.43±2.23 mm on final visit. The segmental angle of lordosis was changed significantly from 3.54±3.70° before surgery to 6.37±3.97° by 24 months postoperative, and total lumbar lordosis was 20.37±11.30° preoperatively and 24.71±11.70° at 24 months postoperative. Conclusion There have been no special complications regarding the expandable cage during the follow-up period and the results of this study demonstrates a high fusion rate and clinical success.

Kim, Jin Wook; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Oh, Seong Hoon; Roh, Sung Woo; Rim, Dae Cheol; Kim, Tae Sung

2007-01-01

24

Functional outcomes of instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion in active-duty US servicemen  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background context: The existing literature lacks a functional outcome study addressing instrumented posterior lumbar fusion surgery in physically active patients. Furthermore, results of operative versus nonoperative treatment in these patients are not clear. Purpose: To evaluate patient-assessed function, pain, and satisfaction and military job performance between servicemen treated operatively and nonoperatively. Study design\\/setting: This is a nonrandomized analysis of consecutive

Major Robert W Molinari; Major Tad Gerlinger

2001-01-01

25

Good Functional Outcome and Adjacent Segment Disc Quality 10 Years after Single-Level Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Posterior Fixation  

PubMed Central

We reviewed the records of a prospective consecutive cohort to evaluate the clinical performance of anterior lumbar interbody fusion with a titanium box cage and posterior fixation, with emphasis on long-term functional outcome. Thirty-two patients with chronic low back pain underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior fixation. Radiological and functional results (visual analogue scale [VAS] and Oswestry score) were evaluated. Adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) was evaluated radiologically and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty-five patients (78%) were available for follow-up. Functional scores showed significant improvement in pain and function up to the 2-year follow-up observation. At 4 years, there was some deterioration of the clinical results. At 10-year follow-up, results remained stable compared with 4-year results. MRI showed ASD in 3/25 (12%) above and 2/10 (20%) below index level (compared with absent preoperatively). ASD could not be related to clinical outcome in this study. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior fixation is safe and effective. Initial improvement in VAS and Oswestry scores is partly lost at the 4-year follow-up. Good clinical results are maintained at 10-year follow-up and are not related to adjacent segment degeneration.

Horsting, Philip P.; Pavlov, Paul W.; Jacobs, Wilco C.H.; Obradov-Rajic, Marina; de Kleuver, Marinus

2012-01-01

26

Effect of Psychological Status on Outcome of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery  

PubMed Central

Study Design Prospective longitudinal study. Purpose To determine if preoperative psychological status affects outcome in spinal surgery. Overview of Literature Low back pain is known to have a psychosomatic component. Increased bodily awareness (somatization) and depressive symptoms are two factors that may affect outcome. It is possible to measure these components using questionnaires. Methods Patients who underwent posterior interbody fusion (PLIF) surgery were assessed preoperatively and at follow-up using a self-administered questionnaire. The visual analogue scale (VAS) for back and leg pain severity and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used as outcome measures. The psychological status of patients was classified into one of four groups using the Distress and Risk Assessment Method (DRAM); normal, at-risk, depressed somatic and distressed depressive. Results Preoperative DRAM scores showed 14 had no psychological disturbance (normal), 39 were at-risk, 11 distressed somatic, and 10 distressed depressive. There was no significant difference between the 4 groups in the mean preoperative ODI (analysis of variance, p = 0.426). There was a statistically and clinically significant improvement in the ODI after surgery for all but distressed somatic patients (9.8; range, -5.2 to 24.8; p = 0.177). VAS scores for all groups apart from the distressed somatic showed a statistically and clinically significant improvement. Our results show that preoperative psychological state affects outcome in PLIF surgery. Conclusions Patients who were classified as distressed somatic preoperatively had a less favorable outcome compared to other groups. This group of patients may benefit from formal psychological assessment before undergoing PLIF surgery.

Lakkol, Sandesh; Budithi, Chakra; Bhatia, Chandra; Krishna, Manoj

2012-01-01

27

Demineralized Bone Matrix, as a Graft Enhancer of Auto-Local Bone in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion  

PubMed Central

Study Design A case controlled study with prospective data collection. Purpose To evaluate the early influence and the final consequence of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) on auto-local bone as a graft enhancer in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Overview of Literature DBM is known as an osteoinductive material; however, it has not been clearly recognized to enhance auto-local bone with a small amount. Methods Patients who had a PLIF were allocated into two groups. Group I (70 cases) used auto-local bone chips and group II (44 cases) used DBM as an additive to auto-local bone, 1 mL per a segment. Group selection was alternated. Early assessment was performed by computed tomography at 6 months and final assessment was done by simple radiography after 24 months at least. The degree of bone formation was assessed by 4 grade scale. Results The subjects of both groups were homogenous and had similar Oswestry Disability Index at final assessment. The ratio of auto-local bone chips and DBM was 6:1. The degree of bone formation at 6 months after surgery was superior in group II. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups at the final assessment. Conclusions DBM was not recognized to enhance auto-local bone with small amount.

Moon, Sang Ho; Kim, Tae Woo; Boo, Kyung Hwan; Hong, Sung Won

2014-01-01

28

Comparative Study of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion via Unilateral and Bilateral Approaches in Patients with Unilateral Leg Symptoms  

PubMed Central

Objective We investigated the clinical and radiological advantages of unilateral laminectomy in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedure comparing with bilateral laminectomy, under the same procedural condition including bilateral instrumentation and insertion of two cages, in patients with degenerative lumbar disease with unilateral leg symptoms. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 124 consecutive cases of PLIF via unilateral or bilateral approach between January 2006 and April 2010. In 80 cases (bilateral group), two cages were inserted via bilateral laminectomy, and in 44 cases (unilateral group), via unilateral laminectomy. The average follow-up duration was 29.5 months. The clinical outcomes were evaluated with the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). The fusion rates and disc space heights were determined by dynamic standing radiographs and/or computed tomography. Operative times, intra-operative and post-operative blood losses and hospitalization periods were also evaluated. Results In clinical evaluation, the VAS and ODI scores showed excellent outcomes in both groups. There were no significant differences in term of fusion rate, but the perioperative blood loss and the operative time of the unilateral group were lower than that of the bilateral group. Conclusion Unilateral laminectomy can minimize the operative time and perioperative blood loss in PLIF procedure. However, the different preoperative disc height between two groups is a limitation of this study. Despite this limitation, solid fusion and satisfactory symptomatic improvement could be achieved uniquely by our surgical method. This surgical method can be an alternative surgical technique in patients with unilateral leg pain.

Lee, Jong-Won; Kwon, Ki-Young; Rhee, Jong-Joo; Hur, Jin-Woo; Lee, Hyun-Koo

2011-01-01

29

The influence of cage positioning and cage type on cage migration and fusion rates in patients with monosegmental posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior fixation  

PubMed Central

In posterior lumbar interbody fusion, cage migrations and lower fusion rates compared to autologous bone graft used in the anterior lumbar interbody fusion procedure are documented. Anatomical and biomechanical data have shown that the cage positioning and cage type seem to play an important role. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of cage positioning and cage type on cage migration and fusion. We created a grid system for the endplates to analyze different cage positions. To analyze the influence of the cage type, we compared “closed” box titanium cages with “open” box titanium cages. This study included 40 patients with 80 implanted cages. After pedicle screw fixation, 23 patients were treated with a “closed box” cage and 17 patients with an “open box” cage. The follow-up period averaged 25 months. Twenty cages (25%) showed a migration into one vertebral endplate of <3 mm and four cages (5%) showed a migration of ?3 mm. Cage migration was highest in the medio-medial position (84.6%), followed by the postero-lateral (42.9%), and the postero-medial (16%) cage position. Closed box cages had a significantly higher migration rate than open box cages, but fusion rates did not differ. In conclusion, cage positioning and cage type influence cage migration. The medio-medial cage position showed the highest migration rate. Regarding the cage type, open box cages seem to be associated with lower migration rates compared to closed box cages. However, the cage type did not influence bone fusion.

Abbushi, Alexander; Cabraja, Mario; Thomale, Ulrich-Wilhelm; Woiciechowsky, Christian

2009-01-01

30

Minimally Invasive Multi-Level Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using a Percutaneously Inserted Spinal Fixation System : Technical Tips, Surgical Outcomes  

PubMed Central

Objective There are technical limitations of multi-level posterior pedicle screw fixation performed by the percutaneous technique. The purpose of this study was to describe the surgical technique and outcome of minimally invasive multi-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and to determine its efficacy. Methods Forty-two patients who underwent mini-open PLIF using the percutaneous screw fixation system were studied. The mean age of the patients was 59.1 (range, 23 to 78 years). Two levels were involved in 32 cases and three levels in 10 cases. The clinical outcome was assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS) and Low Back Outcome Score (LBOS). Achievement of radiological fusion, intra-operative blood loss, the midline surgical scar and procedure related complications were also analyzed. Results The mean follow-up period was 25.3 months. The mean LBOS prior to surgery was 34.5, which was improved to 49.1 at the final follow up. The mean pain score (VAS) prior to surgery was 7.5 and it was decreased to 2.9 at the last follow up. The mean estimated blood loss was 238 mL (140-350) for the two level procedures and 387 mL (278-458) for three levels. The midline surgical scar was 6.27 cm for two levels and 8.25 cm for three level procedures. Complications included two cases of asymptomatic medial penetration of the pedicle border. However, there were no signs of neurological deterioration or fusion failure. Conclusion Multi-level, minimally invasive PLIF can be performed effectively using the percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation system. It can be an alternative to the traditional open procedures.

Kim, Hyeun Sung; Park, Keun Ho; Ju, Chag Il; Lee, Seung Myung; Shin, Ho

2011-01-01

31

Remodeling of heat-treated cortical bone allografts for posterior lumbar interbody fusion: serial 10-year follow-up.  

PubMed

We have selected heat-treated bone allografts as the graft material since the Tokai Bone Bank, the first regional bone bank in Japan, was established in 1992. In this study, we examined changes in bone mineral density (BMD), and morphology observed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and histological findings of bone grafts in cases followed up for 7-10 years after bone grafting to grasp the remodeling of heat-treated cortical bone allografts for posterior lumber interbody fusion (PLIF). BMD of bone grafts was reduced by half at 10 years after grafting. MRI revealed that bone grafts were indistinguishable initially in only 22.2% of cases, whereas after a lengthy period of 10 years distinguishable in many cases. Histologically, new bone formation at the graft-host interface was observed earlier, at 1 year after grafting, than that at the periphery of canals in the specimens. The laminated structure of the cortical bone eroded over time, and fragmented bone trabeculae were observed in the specimens at 8 years or longer after grafting, though necrotic bone still remained in some sites. PMID:21773718

Muramatsu, Koichi; Hachiya, Yudo; Izawa, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Harumoto

2012-12-01

32

Compressive strength of interbody cages in the lumbar spine: the effect of cage shape, posterior instrumentation and bone density  

Microsoft Academic Search

One goal of interbody fusion is to increase the height of the degenerated disc space. Interbody cages in particular have\\u000a been promoted with the claim that they can maintain the disc space better than other methods. There are many factors that\\u000a can affect the disc height maintenance, including graft or cage design, the quality of the surrounding bone and the

B. Jost; P. A. Cripton; T. Lund; T. R. Oxland; K. Lippuner; P. Jaeger; L.-P. Nolte

1998-01-01

33

Assessment of bone graft incorporation by 18 F-fluoride positron-emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with persisting symptoms after posterior lumbar interbody fusion  

PubMed Central

Background Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is a method that allows decompression of the spinal canal and nerve roots by laminectomy combined with fusion by means of intervertebral cages filled with bone graft and pedicle screw fixation. Conventional imaging techniques, such as plain radiography and computed tomography (CT), have limitations to assess bony fusion dynamics. Methods In 16 PLIFs of 15 patients with persisting symptoms, positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT scans were made 60?min after intravenous administration of 156 to 263?MBq of 18?F-fluoride, including 1-mm sliced, high-dose, non-contrast-enhanced CT scanning. Maximal standard uptake values (SUVmax) of various regions were calculated and correlated with abnormalities on CT. Results Subsidence of the cages into the vertebral endplates was the most frequently observed abnormality on CT (in 16 of 27 or 59% of evaluable endplates). Endplate SUVmax values were significantly higher for those patients with pronounced (p?posterior transmission of increased bone stress. In our patient group, intercorporal fusion was seen on CT in 63% but showed no correlation to intercorporal SUVmax values. Conclusions With the use of 18?F-fluoride PET/CT, intervertebral cage subsidence appeared to be a prominent finding in this patient group with persisting symptoms, and highly correlating with the degree of PET hyperactivity at the vertebral endplates and pedicle screw entry points. Further study using 18?F-fluoride PET/CT should specifically assess the role of metabolically active subsidence in a prospective patient group, to address its role in nonunion and as a cause of persisting pain.

2012-01-01

34

[Axial lumbar Interbody Fusion: Prospective Monocentric Study].  

PubMed

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate clinical and radiographic results in the patients who underwent L5-S1 fixation using the technique of percutaneous lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF). MATERIAL The study comprised 23 patients, 11 women and 12 men, who ranged from age of 21 to 63 years, with an average of 48.2 years. In all patients surgical posterior stabilisation involving the L5-S1 segment had previously been done. The initial indications for surgery were L5-S1 spondylolisthesis in 20 and L5-S1 spondylosis and stenosis in three patients. METHODS The AxiaLIF technique for L5-S1 fixation was indicated in overweight patients and in those after repeated abdominal or retroperitoneal surgery. A suitable position and shape of the sacrum or lumbosacral junction was another criterion. The patients were evaluated between 26 and 56 months (average, 40.4 months) after primary surgery and, on the basis of CT and radiographic findings, bone union and lumbosacral junction stability were assessed. The clinical outcome was investigated using the ODI and VAS systems and the results were statistically analysed by the Wilcoxon test for paired samples with statistical significance set at a level of 0.05. RESULTS The average VAS value was 6.6 before surgery and, after surgery, 5.2 at three months, 4.2 at six months, 3.1 at one year, 2.9 at two years and 2.1 at three years (n=18). At two post-operative years, improvement in the VAS value by 56.1% was recorded. The average pre-operative ODI value was 25.1; the post-operative values were 17.0 at six months, 12.3 at one year, 10.6 at two years and 8.2 at three years (n=18). At two years after surgery the ODI value improved by 57.8%. To the question concerning their willingness to undergo, with acquired experience, surgery for the same diagnosis, 21 patients (91.3%) gave an affirmative answer. Neither screw breakage nor neurovascular damage or rectal injury was found. CT scans showed complete interbody bone fusion in 22 of the 23 patients (95.6%), In one patient the finding was not clear. Also, posterolateral fusion was achieved in all but one patients (95.6%). A stable L5-S1 segment was found in all patients at all follow-up intervals. The improvement in both VAS and ODI values was statistically significant. DISCUSSION In addition to indications usual in degenerative disc disease, overweight patients, those who had repeated trans- or retroperitoneal surgery in the L5-S1 region or who underwent long posterior fixation to stabilise the caudal margin of instrumentation are indicated for the AxiaLIF procedure. The clinical results of our study are in agreement with the conclusions of other studies and are similar to the outcomes of surgery using other types of fusion or dynamic stabilisation for this diagnosis. The high rate of fusion in our group is affected by use of a rigid transpedicular fixator together with posterolateral arthrodesis. On the other hand, no negative effects of only synthetic bone applied to interbody space were recorded. CONCLUSIONS The percutaneous axial pre-sacral approach to the L5-S1 interbody space with application of a double-treaded screw is another option for the management of this much strained segment. The technique is useful particularly when contraindications for conventional surgical procedures are present in patients with anatomical anomalies, in overweight patients or in those who have had repeated surgery in the region. Clinical outcomes and the success rate for L5-S1 bone fusion are comparable with conventional techniques. Complications are rare but their treatment is difficult. Key words:AxiaLIF, lumbar spine, spinal fusion, axial lumbar fixation. PMID:24945389

Stulík, J; Adámek, S; Barna, M; Kasp?íková, N; Polanecký, O; Kryl, J

2014-01-01

35

Failed anterior lumbar interbody fusion due to incomplete foraminal decompression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) has gained widespread popularity for spinal disorders requiring fusion. The purpose\\u000a of this study was to analyze ALIF failures.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The medical records of 223 patients treated with ALIF between January 2007 and June 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients\\u000a with unfavorable outcomes, including subsequent posterior decompression at the index level or poor outcomes after ALIF were

Kyung-Chul Choi; Yong Ahn; Byung-Uk Kang; Joo-Hee Jang; Kyeong-Ki Kim; Yong Hwan Shin; Jong-Oh Choi; Sang-Ho Lee

2011-01-01

36

Evaluation of an injectable calcium phosphate cement as an autograft substitute for transpedicular lumbar interbody fusion: a controlled, prospective study in the sheep model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anteroposterior procedures for lumbar interbody fusion usually combine posterior instrumentation with anterior techniques that achieve primary stability for compressive loading: tricortical strut-graft, anterior plating systems, or cages. In comparison to transpedicular lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), these methods bear the burden of the additional anterior approach. TLIF with autograft, in contrast, does not prove to be clinically sufficient because of its

T. R. Blattert; G. Delling; A. Weckbach

2003-01-01

37

Anterior Lumbar Interbody Implants: Importance of the Interdevice Distance  

PubMed Central

Object. The implantation of interbody fusion cages allows for the restoration of disc height and the enlargement of the neuroforaminal space. The purpose of this study was to compare the extent of subsidence occurring after conventional cage placement compared to a novel wider cage placement technique. Methods. This study is a retrospective evaluation of radiographs of patients who underwent stand-alone single level anterior lumbar interbody fusion with lordotic titanium cages and rhBMP-2. Fifty-three patients were evaluated: 39 patients had wide cage placement (6?mm interdevice distance) and 14 had narrow cage placement (2?mm interdevice distance). Anterior and posterior intervertebral disc space heights were measured post-operatively and at follow-up imaging. Results. The decrease in anterior intervertebral disc space height was 2.05?mm versus 3.92?mm (P < .005) and 1.08?mm versus 3.06?mm in posterior disc space height for the wide cage placement and the narrow cage placement respectively. The proportion of patients with subsidence greater than 2?mm was 41.0% in the wide cage patients and 85.7% for the narrow cage patients (P < .005). Conclusions. The wider cage placement significantly reduced the amount of subsidence while allowing for a greater exposed surface area for interbody fusion.

Subach, Brian R.; Copay, Anne G.; Martin, Marcus M.; Schuler, Thomas C.

2011-01-01

38

Radiographic Results of Minimally Invasive (MIS) Lumbar Interbody Fusion (LIF) Compared with Conventional Lumbar Interbody Fusion  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the radiographic results of minimally invasive (MIS) anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Methods Twelve and nineteen patients who underwent MIS-ALIF, MIS-TLIF, respectively, from 2006 to 2008 were analyzed with a minimum 24-months' follow-up. Additionally, 18 patients treated with single level open TLIF surgery in 2007 were evaluated as a comparative group. X-rays and CT images were evaluated preoperatively, postoperatively, and at the final follow-up. Fusion and subsidence rates were determined, and radiographic parameters, including lumbar lordosis angle (LLA), fused segment angle (FSA), sacral slope angle (SSA), disc height (DH), and foraminal height (FH), were analyzed. These parameters were also compared between the open and MIS-TLIF groups. Results In the MIS interbody fusion group, statistically significant increases were observed in LLA, FSA, and DH and FH between preoperative and final values. The changes in LLA, FSA, and DH were significantly increased in the MIS-ALIF group compared with the MIS-TLIF group, but SSA and FH were not significantly different. No significant differences were seen between open and MIS-TLIF except for DH. The interbody subsidence and fusion rates of the MIS groups were 12.0±4% and 96%, respectively. Conclusion Radiographic results of MIS interbody fusion surgery are as favorable as those with conventional surgery regarding fusion, restoration of disc height, foraminal height, and lumbar lordosis. MIS-ALIF is more effective than MIS-TLIF for intervertebral disc height restoration and lumbar lordosis.

Lim, Jae Kwan

2013-01-01

39

Minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion with direct psoas visualization  

PubMed Central

Background Minimally invasive lateral approaches to the lumbar spine have been adopted to allow access to the intervertebral disc space while avoiding the complications associated with anterior or posterior approaches. This report describes a minimally invasive technique for lateral lumbar interbody fusion LLIF that allows direct intraoperative visualization of the psoas and surrounding neurovasculature (DV-LIF). Methods The technique utilizes a radiolucent tubular retractor and a secondary psoas retractor that allows a muscle-sparing approach while offering excellent visualization of the operative site. The unique advantage of this procedure is that the psoas muscle and surrounding nerves can be directly visualized intraoperatively to supplement neuromonitoring. We retrospectively reviewed complication rates in 34 patients treated with DV-LLIF (n?=?19) or standard lateral lumbar interbody fusion (S-LLIF, n?=?15). Results There were 29 complications (median: 1 per patient) with DV-LLIF and 20 (median: 1 per patient) complications with S-LLIF. Postoperative sensory deficits were reported in eight (42%) and seven (47%) patients, respectively. Thigh pain or numbness was reported in eight (42%) and five (33%) patients, respectively. The percentage of the overall complications directly attributable to the procedure was 69% with DV-LLIF and 83% with S-LLIF. One severe complication (back pain) was reported in one DV-LLIF patient and four severe complications (severe bleeding, respiratory failure, deep venous thrombosis and gastrointestinal prophylaxis, and nicked renal vein and aborted procedure) were reported in two S-LLIF patients. Conclusions Preliminary evidence suggests that minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion with direct psoas visualization may reduce the risk for severe procedural complications.

2014-01-01

40

Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 11: Interbody techniques for lumbar fusion.  

PubMed

Interbody fusion techniques have been promoted as an adjunct to lumbar fusion procedures in an effort to enhance fusion rates and potentially improve clinical outcome. The medical evidence continues to suggest that interbody techniques are associated with higher fusion rates compared with posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis who demonstrate preoperative instability. There is no conclusive evidence demonstrating improved clinical or radiographic outcomes based on the different interbody fusion techniques. The addition of a PLF when posterior or anterior interbody lumbar fusion is performed remains an option, although due to increased cost and complications, it is not recommended. No substantial clinical benefit has been demonstrated when a PLF is included with an interbody fusion. For lumbar degenerative disc disease without instability, there is moderate evidence that the standalone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) has better clinical outcomes than the ALIF plus instrumented, open PLF. With regard to type of interbody spacer used, frozen allograft is associated with lower pseudarthrosis rates compared with freeze-dried allograft; however, this was not associated with a difference in clinical outcome. PMID:24980588

Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dhall, Sanjay S; Eck, Jason C; Groff, Michael W; Ghogawala, Zoher; Watters, William C; Dailey, Andrew T; Resnick, Daniel K; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Sharan, Alok; Wang, Jeffrey C; Kaiser, Michael G

2014-07-01

41

Anterior lumbar interbody fusion with LT-cages  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose of study: Workers compensation status is a predictor of clinical outcome in patients undergoing spinal fusion. The intent of this study was to examine the influence of workers compensation status on the chronological outcome of patients undergoing anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with intervertebral fusion cages.Methods used: Patients with symptomatic lumbar disc disease were enrolled in prospective studies to

Harvinder Sandhu; Thomas Zdeblick; Kevin Foley; Fengyu Zheng; Safdar Khan

2002-01-01

42

Post-discectomy syndrome treated with lumbar interbody fusion  

PubMed Central

We studied 27 patients with post-discectomy syndrome. All patients had Lumbar Interbody Fusion with titanium cages and pedicle screw fixation either as Anterior (ALIF, n=18) or as Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF, n=9). Follow-up ranged from 24 to 94 months. The clinical and radiological data were compared. The outcome was evaluated using the Oswestry low back pain disability score and the visual analogue pain intensity scale. Outcomes were similar for all patients regardless of surgical technique and showed a significant improvement at final follow-up.

Halm, Henry; Hackenberg, Lars; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Bovingloh, Albert Schulze

2006-01-01

43

The Memory Metal Spinal System in a Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF) Procedure: A Prospective, Non-Comparative Study to Evaluate the Safety and Performance  

PubMed Central

Study Design: A prospective, non-comparative study of 27 patients to evaluate the safety and performance of the Memory Metal Spinal System used in a PLIF procedure in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD). Objective: To evaluate the clinical performance, radiological outcome and safety of the Memory Metal Spinal System, used in a PLIF procedure, in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease in human subjects. Summary of Background Data: Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylosis or degenerative disc disease, use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection devices. The Memory Metal Spinal System consists of a single square spinal rod made from a nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) used in conjunction with connection devices. Nitinol is characterized by its shape memory effect and is a more flexible material than either stainless steel or titanium. With current systems there is loss of achieved reposition due to the elastic properties of the spine. By using a memory metal in this new system the expectation was that this loss of reposition would be overcome due to the metal’s inherent shape memory properties. Furthermore, we expect a higher fusion rate because of the elastic properties of the memory metal. Methods: Twenty-seven subjects with primary diagnosis of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD) were treated with the Memory Metal Spinal System in conjunction with the Brantigan IF® Cage in two consecutive years. Clinical performance of the device was evaluated over 2 years using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. Safety was studied by collection of adverse events intra-operative and during the followup. Interbody fusion status was assessed using radiographs and a CT scan. Results: The mean pre-operative ODI score of 40.9 (±14.52) significantly improved to 17.7 (±16.76) at 24 months postoperative. Significant improvement in the physical component from the SF36 questionnaire was observed with increases from the baseline result of 42.4 to 72.7 at 24 months (p<.0001); The emotional component in the SF36 questionnaires mean scores highlighted a borderline significant increase from 56.5 to 81.7 at 24 months (p=0.0441). The average level of leg pain was reduced by more than 50% postoperation (VAS values reduced from 5.7 (±2.45) to 2.2 (±2.76) at 24 month post-operation with similar results observed for back pain. CT indicated interbody fusion rate was not significantly faster compared to other devices in literature. No device related adverse events were recorded in this study. Conclusions: The Memory Metal Spinal System, different from other devices on the market with regard to material and the one rod configuration, is safe and performed very well by improving clinically important outcomes in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease. In addition the data compares favorably to that previously reported for other devices in the literature.

Kok, D; Grevitt, M; Wapstra, FH; Veldhuizen, AG

2012-01-01

44

Posterolateral versus posterior interbody fusion in isthmic spondylolisthesis.  

PubMed

Spondylolisthesis is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by subluxation of a vertebral body over another in the sagittal plane. Its most common form is isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS). This study aims to compare clinical outcomes of posterolateral fusion (PLF) with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with posterior instrumentation in the treatment of IS. We performed a randomized prospective study in which 80 patients out of a total of 85 patients with IS were randomly allocated to one of two groups: PLF with posterior instrumentation (group I) or PLIF with posterior instrumentation (group II). Posterior decompression was performed in the patients. The Oswestry low back pain disability (OLBP) scale and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) were used to evaluate the quality of life (QoL) and pain, respectively. Fisher's exact test was used to evaluate fusion rate and the Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare categorical data. Fusion in group II was significantly better than in group I (p=0.012). Improvement in low back pain was statistically more significant in group I (p=0.001). The incidence of neurogenic claudication was significantly lower in group I than in group II (p=0.004). In group I, there was no significant correlation between slip Meyerding grade and disc space height, radicular pain, and low back pain. There was no significant difference in post-operative complications at 1-year follow-up. Our data showed that PLF with posterior instrumentation provides better clinical outcomes and more improvement in low back pain compared to PLIF with posterior instrumentation despite the low fusion rate. PMID:22260338

Farrokhi, Majid Reza; Rahmanian, Abdolkarim; Masoudi, Mohammad Sadegh

2012-05-20

45

Failure of a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer implant used for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.  

PubMed

Lumbar interbody fusion is a common procedure owing to the high prevalence of degenerative spinal disorders. During such procedures, carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) cages are frequently utilized to fill the void created between adjacent vertebral bodies, to provide mechanical stability, and to carry graft material. Failure of such implants can lead to significant morbidity. We discuss the possible causes leading to the failure of a CFRP cage in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Review of a 49-year-old woman who underwent revision anterior lumbar interbody fusion 2 years after posterior instrumentation and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at L4-L5 and L5-S1. The patient developed pseudarthrosis at the two previously fused levels with failure of the posterior instrumentation. Revision surgery reveled failure with fragmentation of the CFRP cage at the L5-S1 level. CFRP implants can break if mechanical instability or nonunion occurs in the spinal segments, thus emphasizing the need for optimizing medical management and meticulous surgical technique in achieving stability. PMID:24436878

Sardar, Zeeshan; Jarzem, Peter

2013-12-01

46

The Significance of Removing Ruptured Intervertebral Discs for Interbody Fusion in Treating Thoracic or Lumbar Type B and C Spinal Injuries through a One-Stage Posterior Approach  

PubMed Central

Objectives To identify the negative effect on treatment results of reserving damaged intervertebral discs when treating type B and type C spinal fracture-dislocations through a one-stage posterior approach. Methods This is a retrospective review of 53 consecutive patients who were treated in our spine surgery center from January 2005 to May 2012 due to severe thoracolumbar spinal fracture-dislocation. The patients in Group A (24 patients) underwent long-segment instrumentation laminectomy with pedicle screw-rod fixators for neural decompression. In Group B (29 patients), the patients underwent long-segment instrumentation laminectomy with pedicle screw-rod fixators for neural decompression evacuating of the ruptured disc and inserting of a bone graft into the evacuated disc space for interbody fusion. The mean time between injury and operation was 4.1 days (range 2–15 days). The clinical, radiologic and complication outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. Results Periodic follow-ups were carried out until an affirmative union or treatment failure took place. A progressive kyphosis angle larger than 10°, loss of disc height, pseudoarthrosis, recurrence of dislocation or subluxation, or instrument failure before fusion were considered treatment failures. Treatment failures were detected in 13 cases in Group A (failure rate was 54.2%). In Group B, there were 28 cases in which definitive bone fusion was demonstrated on CT scans, and CT scans of the other cases demonstrated undefined pseudoarthrosis without hardware failure. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups (p<0.001 chi-square test). The neurologic recoveries, assessed by the ASIA scoring system, were not satisfactory for the neural deficit patients in either group, indicating there was no significant difference with regard to neurologic recovery between the two groups (p>0.05 Fisher's exact test). Conclusion Intervertebral disc damage is a common characteristic in type B and C spinal fracture-dislocation injuries. The damaged intervertebral disc should be removed and substituted with a bone graft because reserving the damaged disc in situ increases the risk of treatment failure.

Zhang, Qian-Shi; Lu, Guo-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Bin; Li, Jing

2014-01-01

47

Biomechanical comparison of anterior lumbar interbody fusion: stand-alone interbody cage versus interbody cage with pedicle screw fixation - a finite element analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) followed by pedicle screw fixation (PSF) is used to restore the height of the intervertebral disc and provide stability. Recently, stand-alone interbody cage with anterior fixation has been introduced, which eliminates the need for posterior surgery. We compared the biomechanics of the stand-alone interbody cage to that of the interbody cage with additional PSF in ALIF. Methods A three-dimensional, non-linear finite element model (FEM) of the L2-5 segment was modified to simulate ALIF in L3-4. The models were tested under the following conditions: (1) intact spine, (2) destabilized spine, (3) with the interbody cage alone (type 1), (4) with the stand-alone cage with anterior fixation (SynFix-LR®; type 2), and (5) with type 1 in addition to PSF (type 3). Range of motion (ROM) and the stiffness of the operated level, ROM of the adjacent segments, load sharing distribution, facet load, and vertebral body stress were quantified with external loading. Results The implanted models had decreased ROM and increased stiffness compared to those of the destabilized spine. The type 2 had differences in ROM limitation of 8%, 10%, 4%, and 6% in flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending, respectively, compared to those of type 3. Type 2 had decreased ROM of the upper and lower adjacent segments by 3-11% and 3-6%, respectively, compared to those of type 3. The greatest reduction in facet load at the operated level was observed in type 3 (71%), followed by type 2 (31%) and type 1 (23%). An increase in facet load at the adjacent level was highest in type 3, followed by type 2 and type 1. The distribution of load sharing in type 2 (anterior:posterior, 95:5) was similar to that of the intact spine (89:11), while type 3 migrated posterior (75:25) to the normal. Type 2 reduced about 15% of the stress on the lower vertebral endplate compared to that in type 1. The stress of type 2 increased two-fold compared to the stress of type 3, especially in extension. Conclusions The stand-alone interbody cage can provide sufficient stability, reduce stress in adjacent levels, and share the loading distribution in a manner similar to an intact spine.

2013-01-01

48

MRI Measurement of Neuroforaminal Dimension at the Index and Supradjacent Levels after Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Prospective Study  

PubMed Central

Background Anterior interbody fusion has previously been demonstrated to increase neuroforaminal height in a cadaveric model using cages. No prior study has prospectively assessed the relative change in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated neuroforaminal dimensions at the index and supradjacent levels, after anterior interbody fusion with a corticocancellous allograft in a series of patients without posterior decompression. The objective of this study was to determine how much foraminal dimension can be increased with indirect foraminal decompression alone via anterior interbody fusion, and to determine the effect of anterior lumbar interbody fusion on the dimensions of the supradjacent neuroforamina. Methods A prospective study comparing pre- and postoperative neuroforaminal dimensions on MRI scan among 26 consecutive patients undergoing anterior lumbar interbody fusion without posterior decompression was performed. We studies 26 consecutive patients (50 index levels) that had undergone anterior interbody fusion followed by posterior pedicle screw fixation without distraction or foraminotomy. We used preoperative and postoperative MRI imaging to assess the foraminal dimensions at each operated level on which the lumbar spine had been operated. The relative indirect foraminal decompression achieved was calculated. The foraminal dimension of the 26 supradjacent untreated levels was measured pre- and postoperatively to serve as a control and to determine any effects after anterior interbody fusion. Results In this study, 8 patients underwent 1 level fusion (L5-S1), 12 patients had 2 levels (L4-S1) and 6 patients had 3 levels (L3-S1). The average increase in foraminal dimension was 43.3% (p < 0.05)-19.2% for L3-4, 57.1% for L4-5, and 40.1% for L5-S1. Mean pre- and postoperative supradjacent neuroforaminal dimension measurements were 125.84 mm2 and 124.89 mm2, respectively. No significant difference was noted (p > 0.05). Conclusions Anterior interbody fusion with a coriticocancellous allograft can significantly increase neuroforaminal dimension even in the absence of formal posterior distraction or foraminotomy; anterior interbody fusion with a coriticocancellous allograft has little effect on supradjacent neuroforaminal dimensions.

Sokolowski, Mark J.; Mehbod, Amir A.; Denis, Francis; Garvey, Timothy A.; Perl, John; Transfeldt, Ensor E.

2013-01-01

49

Lateral transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion: outcomes and deformity correction.  

PubMed

The lateral transpsoas approach for interbody fusion is a minimally invasive technique that has been gaining increasing popularity in the management of a variety of spinal degenerative disorders. Recently, there has been increasing utilization of this technique in the management of adult deformity. The authors present a review of the current evidence of using the lateral lumbar transpsoas approach in the correction of adult degenerative scoliosis. PMID:24703453

Dahdaleh, Nader S; Smith, Zachary A; Snyder, Laura A; Graham, Randall B; Fessler, Richard G; Koski, Tyler R

2014-04-01

50

Outcome of instrumented lumbar fusion for low grade spondylolisthesis; Evaluation of interbody fusion with & without cages  

PubMed Central

Object: The aim is to evalute the outcome of posterior lumbar interbody fusion with autologous bone graft versus titanium Cages, BAK system (Bagby – Kuslich, Spine Tech, Inc. Minneapolis, MN) for low grade spondyloisthesis (Grade1,11). Interbody cages have been developed to replace tricortical Interbody grafts in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedures. The cages provide immediate post operative stability and facilitate bony union with cancellous bone packed in the cage itself. METHOD: We Evaluated 50 consecutive patients in whom surgery was performed between June 2000 to June 2003 in the Main Alexandria University Hospital at EGYPT. Twenty five patients were operated using autologous bone graft and 25 patients using the BAK cages. The neuro–radiologic al work up consisted of; plain X – ray lumbosacral spine including dynamic films preoperative and postoperative follow up; C.T lumbosacral spine and MRI lumbosacral spine. The surgery was performed at L4-5 level in 34 cases and at L5-S1 level in 16 cases. The median follow up was 15 months. RESULTS: Satisfactory fusion was obtained at all levels at a minimum one year follow – up. The fusion rate was 96% (24 patients) for the cage group and 80% (20 patients) for bone graft group however clinical improvement was 64% (16 patients) for those with bone graft group. CONCLUSION: A higher fusion rates and a better clinical outcome have been obtained by Instrumented PLIF with titanium cages that with bone graft. Inderbody fusion cages help to stabilize spainal segment primarily by distracting them as well as by allowing bone ingrowth and fusion. The procedure is safe and effective with 96% fusion rate and 76% overall Satisfactory rate. The use of cages help to distract the space between the vertebral bodies making the correction of the degree of spondylolisthesis easier. Long term follow up revealed better fusion rate and better realignment and less resorption with cages than with bone grafts.

Fathy, Mostafa; Fahmy, Mohamed; Fakhri, Mazen; Aref, Khaled; Abdin, Khaled; Zidan, Ihab

2010-01-01

51

Cantilever Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Upper Lumbar Degenerative Diseases (Minimum 2 Years Follow Up)  

PubMed Central

Purpose To evaluate the clinical outcomes of cantilever transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (c-TLIF) for upper lumbar diseases. Materials and Methods Seventeen patients (11 males, 6 females; mean ± SD age: 62 ± 14 years) who underwent c-TLIF using kidney type spacers between 2002 and 2008 were retrospectively evaluated, at a mean follow-up of 44.1 ± 12.3 months (2 year minimum). The primary diseases studied were disc herniation, ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), degenerative scoliosis, lumbar spinal canal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and degeneration of adjacent disc after operation. Fusion areas were L1-L2 (5 patients), L2-L3 (9 patients), L1-L3 (1 patient), and L2-L4 (2 patients). Operation time, blood loss, complications, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score for back pain, bone union, sagittal alignment change of fusion level, and degeneration of adjacent disc were evaluated. Results JOA score improved significantly after surgery, from 12 ± 2 to 23 ± 3 points (p < 0.01). We also observed significant improvement in sagittal alignment of the fusion levels, from - 1.0 ± 7.4 to 5.2 ± 6.1 degrees (p < 0.01). Bony fusion was obtained in all cases. One patient experienced a subcutaneous infection, which was cured by irrigation. At the final follow-up, three patients showed degenerative changes in adjacent discs, and one showed corrective loss of fusion level. Conclusion c-TLIF is a safe procedure, providing satisfactory results for patients with upper lumbar degenerative diseases.

Hioki, Akira; Hosoe, Hideo; Sugiyama, Seiichi; Suzuki, Naoki; Shimizu, Katsuji

2011-01-01

52

Bone graft substitutes for anterior lumbar interbody fusion.  

PubMed

The procedure of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is commonly performed on patients suffering from pain and/or neurological symptoms associated with disorders of the lumbar spine caused by disc degeneration and trauma. Surgery is indicated when prolonged conservative management proves ineffective. Because an important objective of the ALIF procedure is solid arthrodesis of the degenerative spinal segment, bone graft selection is critical. Iliac crest bone grafts (ICBG) remain the "gold standard" for achieving lumbar fusion. However, patient dissatisfaction stemming from donor site morbidity, lengthier operating times and finite supply of ICBG has prompted a search for better alternatives. Here presented is a literature review evaluating available bone graft options assessed within the clinical setting. These options include autografts, allograft-based, synthetic and cell-based technologies. The emphasis is on the contentious use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins, which is in widespread use and has demonstrated both significant osteogenic potential and risk of complications. PMID:23658041

Mobbs, Ralph J; Chung, Mina; Rao, Prashanth J

2013-05-01

53

Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using unilateral pedicle screws and a translaminar screw  

PubMed Central

Lumbar spinal fusion is advancing with minimally invasive techniques, bone graft alternatives, and new implants. This has resulted in significant reductions of operative time, duration of hospitalization, and higher success in fusion rates. However, costs have increased as many new technologies are expensive. This study was carried out to investigate the clinical outcomes and fusion rates of a low implant load construct of unilateral pedicle screws and a translaminar screw in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) which reduced the cost of the posterior implants by almost 50%. Nineteen consecutive patients who underwent single level TLIF with this construct were included in the study. Sixteen patients had a TLIF allograft interbody spacer placed, while in three a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage was used. Follow-up ranged from 15 to 54 months with a mean of 32 months. A clinical and radiographic evaluation was carried out preoperatively and at multiple time points following surgery. An overall improvement in Oswestry scores and visual analogue scales for leg and back pain (VAS) was observed. Three patients underwent revision surgery due to recurrence of back pain. All patients showed radiographic evidence of fusion from 9 to 26 months (mean 19) following surgery. This study suggests that unilateral pedicle screws and a contralateral translaminar screw are a cheaper and viable option for single level lumbar fusion.

Lee, Sandra; Vaidya, Rahul

2008-01-01

54

The Wilhelm tell technique for anterior lumbar interbody fusion. Technical note.  

PubMed

Experience indicates that stand-alone cages may lack the necessary stability to secure highly unstable motion segments at the lumbosacral junction. The authors have designed a special carbon fiber composite interbody cage that allows additional screw placement in anterior lumbar interbody fusion procedures performed at the lumbosacral junction. PMID:12650410

Markwalder, Thomas-Marc; Wenger, Markus; Elsig, Jean-Pierre; Laloux, Etienne

2003-03-01

55

A Radiological Comparison of Anterior Fusion Rates in Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion  

PubMed Central

Aim?To compare anterior fusion in standalone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) using cage and screw constructs and anterior cage–alone constructs with posterior pedicle screw supplementation but without posterior fusion. Methods?Eighty-five patients underwent single- or two-level ALIF procedure for degenerative disk disease or lytic spondylolisthesis (SPL). Posterior instrumentation was performed without posterior fusion in all cases of lytic SPL and when the anterior cage used did not have anterior screw through cage fixation. Results?Seventy (82%) patients had adequate radiological follow-up at a mean of 19 months. Forty patients had anterior surgery alone (24 single level and 16 two levels) and 30 had front-back surgery (15 single level and 15 two levels). Anterior locked pseudarthrosis was only seen in the anterior surgery–alone group when using the STALIF cage (Surgicraft, Worcestershire, UK) (37 patients). This occurred in five of the single-level surgeries (5/22) and nine of the two-level surgeries (9/15). Fusion was achieved in 100% of the front-back group and only 65% (26/40) of the anterior surgery–alone group. Conclusion?Posterior pedicle screw supplementation without posterolateral fusion improves the fusion rate of ALIF when using anterior cage and screw constructs. We would recommend supplementary posterior fixation especially in cases where more than one level is being operated.

McCarthy, M. J. H.; Ng, L.; Vermeersch, G.; Chan, D.

2012-01-01

56

Biomechanical comparison of two different concepts for stand alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion  

PubMed Central

Segmental instability in degenerative disc disease is often treated with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF). Current techniques require an additional posterior approach to achieve sufficient stability. The test device is an implant which consists of a PEEK-body and an integrated anterior titanium plate hosting four diverging locking screws. The test device avoids posterior fixation by enhancing stability via the locking screws. The test device was compared to an already established stand alone interbody implant in a human cadaveric three-dimensional stiffness test. In the biomechanical test, the L4/5 motion segment of 16 human cadaveric lumbar spines were isolated and divided into two test groups. Tests were performed in flexion, extension, right and left lateral bending, right and left axial rotation. Each specimen was tested in native state first, then a discectomy was performed and either of the test implants was applied. Finite element analysis (FE) was also performed to investigate load and stress distribution within the implant in several loading conditions. The FE models simulated two load cases. These were flexion and extension with a moment of 5 Nm. The biomechanical testing revealed a greater stiffness in lateral bending for the SynFix-LR™ compared to the established implant. Both implants showed a significantly higher stiffness in all loading directions compared to the native segment. In flexion loading, the PEEK component takes on most of the load, whereas the majority of the extension load is put on the screws and the screw–plate junction. Clinical investigation of the test device seems reasonable based on the good results reported here.

Gerlach, R.; Schar, B.; Cain, C. M. J.; Achatz, W.; Pflugmacher, R.; Haas, N. P.; Kandziora, F.

2008-01-01

57

Coblation of spinal endplates in preparation for interbody spinal fusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) have become routine alternatives to intertransverse process fusion. The use of Coblation® (ArthroCare Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA) allows for routine and reproducible removal of cartilaginous endplate down to the bony endplate. Our experience with this new technology is reviewed. The authors used Coblation® to prepare endplates of 10 consecutive patients

Henry E. Aryan; Christopher P. Ames; Bartek Szandera; Andrew D. Nguyen; Frank L. Acosta; William R. Taylor

2006-01-01

58

The Effect of the Retroperitoneal Transpsoas Minimally Invasive Lateral Interbody Fusion on Segmental and Regional Lumbar Lordosis  

PubMed Central

Background. The minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion (MIS LIF) in the lumbar spine can correct coronal Cobb angles, but the effect on sagittal plane correction is unclear. Methods. A retrospective review of thirty-five patients with lumbar degenerative disease who underwent MIS LIF without supplemental posterior instrumentation was undertaken to study the radiographic effect on the restoration of segmental and regional lumbar lordosis using the Cobb angles on pre- and postoperative radiographs. Mean disc height changes were also measured. Results. The mean follow-up period was 13.3 months. Fifty total levels were fused with a mean of 1.42 levels fused per patient. Mean segmental Cobb angle increased from 11.10° to 13.61° (P < 0.001) or 22.6%. L2-3 had the greatest proportional increase in segmental lordosis. Mean regional Cobb angle increased from 52.47° to 53.45° (P = 0.392). Mean disc height increased from 6.50?mm to 10.04?mm (P < 0.001) or 54.5%. Conclusions. The MIS LIF improves segmental lordosis and disc height in the lumbar spine but not regional lumbar lordosis. Anterior longitudinal ligament sectioning and/or the addition of a more lordotic implant may be necessary in cases where significant increases in regional lumbar lordosis are desired.

Le, Tien V.; Vivas, Andrew C.; Dakwar, Elias; Baaj, Ali A.; Uribe, Juan S.

2012-01-01

59

A two-cage reconstruction versus a single mega-cage reconstruction for lumbar interbody fusion: an experimental comparison  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Interbody cages are used as an adjunct to anterior lumbar interbody fusion, but exposure and insertion of two cages can be difficult. A biomechanical study was performed to compare the stability and exposed surface for fusion obtained with interbody reconstruction using two traditional cylindrical cages (18-mm diameter) vs. a single expanded mega-cage (24-mm diameter). A single-cage technique could result

Hideki Murakami; William C. Horton; Katsuro Tomita; William C. Hutton

2004-01-01

60

Current status of bone graft options for anterior interbody fusion of the cervical and lumbar spine.  

PubMed

Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) are common surgical procedures for degenerative disc disease of the cervical and lumbar spine. Over the years, many bone graft options have been developed and investigated aimed at complimenting or substituting autograft bone, the traditional fusion substrate. Here, we summarise the historical context, biological basis and current best evidence for these bone graft options in ACDF and ALIF. PMID:23743981

Chau, Anthony Minh Tien; Xu, Lileane Liang; Wong, Johnny Ho-Yin; Mobbs, Ralph Jasper

2014-01-01

61

A randomized double-blind prospective study of the efficacy of pulsed electromagnetic fields for interbody lumbar fusions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A randomized double-blind prospective study of pulsed electromagnetic fields for lumbar interbody fusions was performed on 195 subjects. There were 98 subjects in the active group and 97 subjects in the placebo group. A brace containing equipment to induce an electromagnetic field was applied to patients undergoing interbody fusion in the active group, and a sham brace was used in

VERT MOONEY

1990-01-01

62

Surgical treatment of recurrent lumbar disc herniation by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion  

PubMed Central

Between 2001 and 2005, 43 patients (average age 54.2, range 36–68 years) with recurrent lumbar disc herniation underwent reoperation with the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) technique at our unit. All cases were followed up for 24–72 months (mean 45 months) and graded using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score system pre- and post-operation and during the follow-up period. The leg pain of all patients was relieved significantly within one month postoperatively. The mean JOA score was improved from 9.3 before surgery to 25.0 at the final follow-up visit (P<0.0001). The average recovery rate was 86.0% (range 52–100%). General clinical outcome was excellent in 23 (53.5%) patients, good in 14 (32.6%) and fair in 6 (13.9%). The fusion rate was 100% two years postoperatively. Three patients (7%) had transient neurological deficits, which resolved completely within 3 months. There were no major complications. We, therefore, believe the TLIF technique to be an effective procedure with satisfactory clinical results for the treatment of recurrent lumbar disc herniation.

Zhao, Jie; Liu, AiGang; Yuan, Jiandong; Li, Zhonghai

2008-01-01

63

The Clinical and Radiological Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Single Level Fusion  

PubMed Central

Study Design This is a retrospective study that was done according to clinical and radiological evaluation. Purpose We analyzed the clinical and radiological outcomes of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody single level fusion. Overview of Literature Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion is effective surgical method for treating degenerative lumbar disease. Methods The study was conducted on 56 patients who were available for longer than 2 years (range, 24 to 45 months) follow-up after undergoing minimally invasive transforminal lumbar interbody single level fusion. Clinical evaluation was performed by the analysis of the visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the Kirkaldy-Willis score. For the radiological evaluation, the disc space height, the segmental lumbar lordotic angle and the whole lumbar lordotic angle were analyzed. At the final follow-up after operation, the fusion rate was analyzed according to Bridwell's anterior fusion grade. Results For the evaluation of clinical outcomes, the VAS score was reduced from an average of 6.7 prior to surgery to an average of 1.8 at the final follow-up. The ODI was decreased from an average of 36.5 prior to surgery to an average of 12.8 at the final follow-up. In regard to the clinical outcomes evaluated by the Kirkaldy-Willis score, better than good results were obtained in 52 cases (92.9%). For the radiological evaluation, the disc space height (p = 0.002), and the whole lumbar lordotic angle (p = 0.001) were increased at the final follow-up. At the final follow-up, regarding the interbody fusion, radiological union was obtained in 54 cases (95.4%). Conclusions We think that if surgeons become familiar with the surgical techniques, this is a useful method for minimally invasive spinal surgery.

Chung, Hung-Tae; Kim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Sang-Hyuk; Jeon, Sang-Ho

2011-01-01

64

A biomechanical and histological evaluation of a bioresorbable lumbar interbody fusion cage.  

PubMed

Novel spinal interbody fusion cages made of bioactive and bioresorbable composites by a unique forging process were developed. Previous in vitro study demonstrated that these cages marked excellent biomechanical values. The purpose of the present in vivo study was to evaluate the viability and advantage of this forged composite of uncalcined hydroxyapatite/poly L-Lactide (F-u-HA/PLLA) cage radiographically, biomechanically, and histologically, when compared to conventional autologous iliac bone (AIB) and carbon fiber cage (CFC). Twenty-five mature sheep underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion at L2-3 level with pedicle screws system made of titanium. Three types of interbody fusion implants were grafted: AIB (n = 7), CFCs (n = 9), F-u-HA/PLLA cages (n = 9). Two types of cages were packed with autologous fragmented cancellous bone harvested locally. All animals were euthanized at 120 days after surgery. The fusion scoring using the coronal view CT scans was designed to three-dimensionally evaluate fusion quality within and around cages. The mean CT scores of three groups were 33.3 points, 35.0 points, and 33.6 points in AIB, CFC, and F-u-HA/PLLA cage groups, respectively (full-score: 56 points). Statistical differences were not detected among the three groups. The mean range of motion values among fused groups had no significant difference under all pure loadings. The range of motion showed strong and significant correlation with the CT fusion scores. Histologic results demonstrated that F-u-HA/PLLA cages contacted with the surrounding bone directly, and CFC was encircled with thick fibrous tissue layers without any sign of inflammation around cages. The fusion quality of fused spinal segment using F-u-HA/PLLA cages was equal to that of AIB or CFCs both radiographically and biomechanically. In the histological observation, biocompatibility of F-u-HA/PLLA cage was obviously superior to CFC. It has been confirmed that the novel bioactive and bioresorbable cages had valuable advantages over existing CFC for use in spinal reconstructive surgery. PMID:15585267

Hojo, Yoshihiro; Kotani, Yoshihisa; Ito, Manabu; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Shikinami, Yasuo; Minami, Akio

2005-05-01

65

The impact of sagittal balance on clinical results after posterior interbody fusion for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis: A Pilot study  

PubMed Central

Background Comparatively little is known about the relation between the sagittal vertical axis and clinical outcome in cases of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. The objective of this study was to determine whether lumbar sagittal balance affects clinical outcomes after posterior interbody fusion. This series suggests that consideration of sagittal balance during posterior interbody fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis can yield high levels of patient satisfaction and restore spinal balance Methods A retrospective study of clinical outcomes and a radiological review was performed on 18 patients with one or two level degenerative spondylolisthesis. Patients were divided into two groups: the patients without improvement in pelvic tilt, postoperatively (Group A; n = 10) and the patients with improvement in pelvic tilt postoperatively (Group B; n = 8). Pre- and postoperative clinical outcome surveys were administered to determine Visual Analogue Pain Scores (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI). In addition, we evaluated full spine radiographic films for pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), pelvic incidence (PI), thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), sacrofemoral distance (SFD), and sacro C7 plumb line distance (SC7D) Results All 18 patients underwent surgery principally for the relief of radicular leg pain and back pain. In groups A and B, mean preoperative VAS were 6.85 and 6.81, respectively, and these improved to 3.20 and 1.63 at last follow-up. Mean preoperative ODI were 43.2 and 50.4, respectively, and these improved to 23.6 and 18.9 at last follow-up. In spinopelvic parameters, no significant difference was found between preoperative and follow up variables except PT in Group A. However, significant difference was found between the preoperative and follows up values of PT, SS, TK, LL, and SFD/SC7D in Group B. Between parameters of group A and B, there is borderline significance on preoperative PT, preoperative LL and last follow up SS. Correlation analysis revealed the VAS improvements in Group A were significantly related to postoperative lumbar lordosis (Pearson's coefficient = -0.829; p = 0.003). Similarly, ODI improvements were also associated with postoperative lumbar lordosis (Pearson's coefficient = -0.700; p = 0.024). However, in Group B, VAS and ODI improvements were not found to be related to postoperative lumbar lordosis and to spinopelvic parameters. Conclusion In the current series, patients improving PT after fusion were found to achieve good clinical outcomes in degenerative spondylolisthesis. Overall, our findings show that it is important to quantify sagittal spinopelvic parameters and promote sagittal balance when performing lumbar fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis.

2011-01-01

66

Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Perspective on Current Evidence and Clinical Knowledge  

PubMed Central

This paper reviews the current published data regarding open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in relation to minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF). Introduction. MI-TLIF, a modern method for lumbar interbody arthrodesis, has allowed for a minimally invasive method to treat degenerative spinal pathologies. Currently, there is limited literature that compares TLIF directly to MI-TLIF. Thus, we seek to discuss the current literature on these techniques. Methods. Using a PubMed search, we reviewed recent publications of open and MI-TLIF, dating from 2002 to 2012. We discussed these studies and their findings in this paper, focusing on patient-reported outcomes as well as complications. Results. Data found in 14 articles of the literature was analyzed. Using these reports, we found mean follow-up was 20 months. The mean patient study size was 52. Seven of the articles directly compared outcomes of open TLIF with MI-TLIF, such as mean duration of surgery, length of post-operative stay, blood loss, and complications. Conclusion. Although high-class data comparing these two techniques is lacking, the current evidence supports MI-TLIF with outcomes comparable to that of the traditional, open technique. Further prospective, randomized studies will help to further our understanding of this minimally invasive technique.

Habib, Ali; Smith, Zachary A.; Lawton, Cort D.; Fessler, Richard G.

2012-01-01

67

Management of sagittal balance in adult spinal deformity with minimally invasive anterolateral lumbar interbody fusion: a preliminary radiographic study.  

PubMed

Object Minimally invasive (MI) fusion and instrumentation techniques are playing a new role in the treatment of adult spinal deformity. The open pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) and Smith-Petersen osteotomy (SPO) are proven segmental methods for improving regional lordosis and global sagittal parameters. Recently the MI anterior column release (ACR) was introduced as a segmental method for treating sagittal imbalance. There is a paucity of data in the literature evaluating the alternatives to PSO and SPO for sagittal balance correction. Thus, the authors conducted a preliminary retrospective radiographic review of prospectively collected data from 2009 to 2012 at a single institution. The objectives of this study were to: 1) investigate the radiographic effect of MI-ACR on spinopelvic parameters, 2) compare the radiographic effect of MI-ACR with PSO and SPO for treatment of adult spinal deformity, and 3) investigate the radiographic effect of percutaneous posterior spinal instrumentation on spinopelvic parameters when combined with MI transpsoas lateral interbody fusion (LIF) for adult spinal deformity. Methods: Patient demographics and radiographic data were collected for 36 patients (9 patients who underwent MI-ACR and 27 patients who did not undergo MI-ACR). Patients included in the study were those who had undergone at least a 2-level MI-LIF procedure; adequate preoperative and postoperative 36-inch radiographs of the scoliotic curvature; a separate second-stage procedure for the placement of posterior spinal instrumentation; and a diagnosis of degenerative scoliosis (coronal Cobb angle > 10° and/or sagittal vertebral axis > 5 cm). Statistical analysis was performed for normality and significance testing. Results Percutaneous transpedicular spinal instrumentation did not significantly alter any of the spinopelvic parameters in either the ACR group or the non-ACR group. Lateral MI-LIF alone significantly improved coronal Cobb angle by 16°, and the fractional curve significantly improved in a subgroup treated with L5-S1 transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. Fifteen ACRs were performed in 9 patients and resulted in significant coronal Cobb angle correction, lumbar lordosis correction of 16.5°, and sagittal vertebral axis correction of 4.8 cm per patient. Segmental analysis revealed a 12° gain in segmental lumbar lordosis and a 3.1-cm correction of the sagittal vertebral axis per ACR level treated. Conclusions The lateral MI-LIF with ACR has the ability to powerfully restore lumbar lordosis and correct sagittal imbalance. This segmental MI surgical technique boasts equivalence to SPO correction of these global radiographic parameters while simultaneously creating additional disc height and correcting coronal imbalance. Addition of posterior percutaneous instrumentation without in situ manipulation or overcorrection does not alter radiographic parameters when combined with the lateral MI-LIF. PMID:24628129

Manwaring, Jotham C; Bach, Konrad; Ahmadian, Amir A; Deukmedjian, Armen R; Smith, Donald A; Uribe, Juan S

2014-05-01

68

A radiological and cadaveric study of oblique lumbar interbody fixation in patients with normal spinal anatomy.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine whether it would be feasible to use oblique lumbar interbody fixation for patients with degenerative lumbar disease who required a fusion but did not have a spondylolisthesis. A series of CT digital images from 60 patients with abdominal disease were reconstructed in three dimensions (3D) using Mimics v10.01: a digital cylinder was superimposed on the reconstructed image to simulate the position of an interbody screw. The optimal entry point of the screw and measurements of its trajectory were recorded. Next, 26 cadaveric specimens were subjected to oblique lumbar interbody fixation on the basis of the measurements derived from the imaging studies. These were then compared with measurements derived directly from the cadaveric vertebrae. Our study suggested that it is easy to insert the screws for L1/2, L2/3 and L3/4 fixation: there was no significant difference in measurements between those of the 3-D digital images and the cadaveric specimens. For L4/5 fixation, part of L5 inferior articular process had to be removed to achieve the optimal trajectory of the screw. For L5/S1 fixation, the screw heads were blocked by iliac bone: consequently, the interior oblique angle of the cadaveric specimens was less than that seen in the 3D digital images. We suggest that CT scans should be carried out pre-operatively if this procedure is to be adopted in clinical practice. This will assist in determining the feasibility of the procedure and will provide accurate information to assist introduction of the screws. PMID:23814253

Wu, A M; Tian, N F; Wu, L J; He, W; Ni, W F; Wang, X Y; Xu, H Z; Chi, Y L

2013-07-01

69

Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Correction of Spondylolisthesis and Adult Degenerative Scoliosis in High-Risk Patients: Early Radiographic Results and Complications  

PubMed Central

Background Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is not associated with many of the complications seen in other interbody fusion techniques. This study used computed tomography (CT) scans, the radiographic gold standard, to assess interbody fusion rates achieved utilizing the LLIF technique in high-risk patients. Methods We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent LLIF between January 2008 and July 2013. Forty-nine patients underwent nonstaged or staged LLIF on 119 levels with posterior correction and augmentation. Per protocol, patients received CT scans at their 1-year follow-up. Of the 49 patients, 21 patients with LLIF intervention on 54 levels met inclusion criteria. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists and the senior surgeon (JZ) assessed fusion. Results Of the 21 patients, 6 patients had had previous lumbar surgery, and the cohort's comorbidities included osteoporosis, diabetes, obesity, and smoking, among others. Postoperative complications occurred in 12 (57.1%) patients and included anterior thigh pain and weakness in 6 patients, all of which resolved by 6 months. Two cases of proximal junctional kyphosis occurred, along with 1 case of hardware pullout. Two cases of abdominal atonia occurred. By CT scan assessment, each radiologist found fusion was achieved in 53 of 54 levels (98%). The radiologists' findings were in agreement with the senior surgeon. Conclusion Several studies have evaluated LLIF fusion and reported fusion rates between 88%-96%. Our results demonstrate high fusion rates using this technique, despite multiple comorbidities in the patient population. Spanning the ring apophysis with large LLIF cages along with supplemental posterior pedicle screw augmentation can enhance stability of the fusion segment and increase fusion rates.

Waddell, Brad; Briski, David; Qadir, Rabah; Godoy, Gustavo; Houston, Allison Howard; Rudman, Ernest; Zavatsky, Joseph

2014-01-01

70

Painful Schmorl's node treated by lumbar interbody fusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study design: A case report of painful lumbar Schmorl's node is presented.Objective: To describe diagnostic evidence and the result of surgical treatment of a rare case of painful Schmorl's node.Setting: Niigata, Japan.Case report: A 55-year-old housewife was diagnosed with painful Schmorl's node of L3 by discography, which depicted leakage of the contrast medium into the L3 vertebra through a disruption

K Hasegawa; A Ogose; T Morita; Y Hirata

2004-01-01

71

The axial transsacral approach to interbody fusion at L5-S1.  

PubMed

Lumbosacral interbody fusion may be indicated to treat degenerative disc disease at L5-S1, instability or spondylolisthesis at that level, and severe neural foraminal stenosis resulting from loss of disc space height. In addition, L5-S1 interbody fusion may provide anterior support to a long posterior fusion construct and help offset the stresses experienced by the distal-most screws. There are 3 well-established techniques for L5-S1 interbody fusion: anterior lumbar interbody fusion, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. Each of these has advantages and pitfalls. A more recently described axial transsacral technique, utilizing the presacral corridor, may represent a minimally invasive approach to obtaining lumbosacral interbody arthrodesis. Biomechanical studies demonstrate that the stiffness of the axial rod is comparable to existing fixation devices, suggesting that, biomechanically, it may be a good implant for obtaining lumbosacral interbody fusion. Clinical studies have demonstrated good early results with the use of the axial transsacral approach in obtaining lumbosacral interbody fusion for degenerative disc disease, spondylolisthesis, and below long posterior fusion constructs. The technique is exacting and complications can be major, including rectal perforation and fistula, loss of correction, and pseudarthrosis. PMID:24785490

Issack, Paul S; Kotwal, Suhel Y; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba

2014-05-01

72

A randomized double-blind prospective study of the efficacy of pulsed electromagnetic fields for interbody lumbar fusions  

SciTech Connect

A randomized double-blind prospective study of pulsed electromagnetic fields for lumbar interbody fusions was performed on 195 subjects. There were 98 subjects in the active group and 97 subjects in the placebo group. A brace containing equipment to induce an electromagnetic field was applied to patients undergoing interbody fusion in the active group, and a sham brace was used in the control group. In the active group there was a 92% success rate, while the control group had a 65% success rate (P greater than 0.005). The effectiveness of bone graft stimulation with the device is thus established.

Mooney, V. (Univ. of California, Irvine (USA))

1990-07-01

73

Spinal shortening and monosegmental posterior spondylodesis in the management of dorsal and lumbar unstable injuries  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Patients with spinal injuries have been treated in the past by laminectomy in an attempt to decompress the spinal cord. The results have shown insignificant improvement or even a worsening of neurologic function and decreased stability without effectively removing the anterior bone and disc fragments compressing the spinal cord. The primary indication for anterior decompression and grafting is narrowing of the spinal canal with neurologic deficits that cannot be resolved by any other approach. One must think of subsequent surgical intervention for increased stability and compressive posterior fusion with short-armed internal fixators. Aim: To analyze the results and efficacy of spinal shortening combined with interbody fusion technique for the management of dorsal and lumbar unstable injuries. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three patients with traumatic fractures and or fracture-dislocation of dorsolumbar spine with neurologic deficit are presented. All had radiologic evidence of spinal cord or cauda equina compression, with either paraplegia or paraparesis. Patients underwent recapping laminoplasty in the thoracic or lumbar spine for decompression of spinal cord. The T-saw was used for division of the posterior elements. After decompression of the cord and removal of the extruded bone fragments and disc material, the excised laminae were replaced exactly in situ to their original anatomic position. Then application of a compression force via monosegmental transpedicular fixation was done, allowing vertebral end-plate compression and interbody fusion. Results: Lateral Cobb angle (T10–L2) was reduced from 26 to 4 degrees after surgery. The shortened vertebral body united and no or minimal loss of correction was seen. The preoperative vertebral kyphosis averaged +17 degrees and was corrected to +7 degrees at follow-up with the sagittal index improving from 0.59 to 0.86. The segmental local kyphosis was reduced from +15 degrees to ?3 degrees. Radiography demonstrated anatomically correct reconstruction in all patients, as well as solid fusion. Conclusion: This technique permits circumferential decompression of the spinal cord through a posterior approach and posterior interbody fusion.

Aly, Tarek A

2011-01-01

74

Intraspinal metalloma causing lumbar stenosis after interbody fusion with cylindrical titanium cages.  

PubMed

Intraspinal metallomas are rare. The authors present a case after implantation of two titanium threaded interbody cages at the L4L5 level, without posterior instrumentation. To their knowledge this is the first case due to intervertebral cages. The lack of additional instrumentation had probably allowed the cages to make contact. Subsequently, friction generated wear debris, which led to the formation of a granuloma, responsible for compression of the dural sac. Intraspinal metallosis should be kept in mind as an infrequent cause of delayed neurological symptoms after spinal surgery with metallic instrumentation. PMID:23409582

Fernández-Baíllo, Nicomedes; Sánchez Marquez, José Miguel; Conde Gallego, Esther; Martín Esteban, Ana

2012-12-01

75

Transforaminal versus Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Long Deformity Constructs: a matched cohort analysis.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT: Study Design. Prospectively-enrolled, retrospectively analyzed matched cohort analysis.Objective. Evaluate the relative merits of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) when used in long deformity constructs.Summary of Background Data. Interbody fusion is frequently employed at the caudal levels of long-segment spinal deformity instrumentation constructs in order to protect the sacral implants and enhance fusion rates. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding which technique is more efficacious.Methods. 42 TLIF and 42 ALIF patients were matched with respect to age, gender, comorbidities, curve magnitude, fusion length, and ALIF/TLIF level. Radiographs and clinical outcomes were compared at minimum 2-year follow-up.Results. Age averaged 54.0 years and instrumented vertebrae averaged 13.6. TLIFs had less operative time (481 vs. 595 minutes, P = 0.0007), but greater blood loss (2011 vs. 1281 mL, P = 0.0002). Overall complications (TLIF 12/42 vs. ALIF 15/42) and neurologic complications (TLIF 4/42 vs. ALIF 3/42) did not differ. One pseudarthrosis occurred at an ALIF level, with none at TLIF levels. ALIF patients began with lower SRS scores but improved more (44.4 to 70.7 vs. 58.6 to 70.6, P = 0.0043). ODI scores in both groups improved similarly. Regionally, ALIFs engendered more lordosis than TLIFs at L3-S1 (gain of 6.9° vs. -2.6°, P<0.0001) but not T12-S1 (gain of 11.5° vs. 7.9°, P = 0.29). Locally, ALIFs created more lordosis at L4-5 (gain of 5.6° vs. -1.7°, P<0.0001) and L5-S1 (gain of 2.5° vs. -1.4°, P = 0.022), but not at L3-4 (gain of 5.3° vs. 4.0°, P = 0.65). TLIF patients obtained greater correction of AP Cobb angles in lumbar (reduction of 22.4° vs. 9.9°, P<0.0001) and fractional lumbosacral curves (reduction of 10.3° vs. 3.4°, P<0.0001).Conclusion. Spinal deformity surgery utilizing TLIFs rather than ALIFs resulted in shorter operative time with no difference in complication rates. ALIFs provided more segmental lordosis, while TLIFs afforded better correction of scoliotic curves. PMID:23442780

Dorward, Ian G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Bridwell, Keith H; O?leary, Patrick T; Stoker, Geoffrey E; Pahys, Joshua M; Kang, Matthew M; Sides, Brenda A; Koester, Linda A

2013-02-25

76

Axial lumbar interbody fusion: a 6-year single-center experience  

PubMed Central

Introduction The aim of this study is to report our 6-year single-center experience with L5–S1 axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF). Methods A total of 131 patients with symptomatic degenerative disc disease refractory to nonsurgical treatment were treated with AxiaLIF at L5–S1, and were followed for a minimum of 1 year (mean: 21 months). Main outcomes included back and leg pain severity, Oswestry Disability Index score, working status, analgesic medication use, patient satisfaction, and complications. Computed tomography was used to determine postoperative fusion status. Results No intraoperative complications, including vascular, neural, urologic, or bowel injuries, were reported. Back and leg pain severity decreased by 51% and 42%, respectively, during the follow-up period (both P < 0.001). Back function scores improved 50% compared to baseline. Clinical success, defined as improvement ?30%, was 67% for back pain severity, 65% for leg pain severity, and 71% for back function. The employment rate increased from 47% before surgery to 64% at final follow-up (P < 0.001). Less than one in four patients regularly used analgesic medications postsurgery. Patient satisfaction with the AxiaLIF procedure was 83%. The fusion rate was 87.8% at final follow-up. During follow-up, 17 (13.0%) patients underwent 18 reoperations on the lumbar spine, including pedicle screw fixation (n = 10), total disc replacement of an uninvolved level (n = 3), facet screw fixation (n = 3), facet screw removal (n = 1), and interbody fusion at L4–L5 (n = 1). Eight (6.1%) reoperations were at the index level. Conclusion Single-level AxiaLIF is a safe and effective means to achieve lumbosacral fusion in patients with symptomatic degenerative disc disease.

Zeilstra, Dick J; Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E

2013-01-01

77

A novel synthetic material for spinal fusion: a prospective clinical trial of porous bioactive titanium metal for lumbar interbody fusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to establish the efficacy and safety of porous bioactive titanium metal for use in a spinal\\u000a fusion device, based on a prospective human clinical trial. A high-strength spinal interbody fusion device was manufactured\\u000a from porous titanium metal. A bioactive surface was produced by simple chemical and thermal treatment. Five patients with\\u000a unstable lumbar spine

Shunsuke FujibayashiMitsuru; Mitsuru Takemoto; Masashi Neo; Tomiharu Matsushita; Tadashi Kokubo; Kenji Doi; Tatsuya Ito; Akira Shimizu; Takashi Nakamura

78

Durotomy repair in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion by nonpenetrating clips  

PubMed Central

Background: Closure of the dura defect may be easy to perform in open lumbar surgery but could be difficult in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusions (MIS-TLIF) since MIS-TLIF was done through a small tube, which limited the use of standard dural repair instruments. We used nonpenetrating titanium clips that were originally designed for the vascular anastomoses to repair the dura defect, which is never described in the literature. Methods: We presented a case of spinal stenosis with incidental durotomy while performing MIS-TLIF. We closed the dura laceration with three medium-sized nonpenetrating titanium clips (AnastoClip Vessel Closure System, LeMaitre Vascular, Inc., Burlington, MA). Results: Nonpenetrating titanium clips have the benefits of being technically easy to use, reduced durotomy repair time, decreased bed rest due to related medical complications, superior postoperation with immediate hydrostatic strength, and better reapproximation if it fails to clip successfully. As for the postoperation follow up, clips are tiny and reveal no obvious artifact, especially in cases where the pedicle screws are already causing much artifact. Conclusion: Primary dural closure during MIS-TLIF with clips is an effective way in cases that involve limited tubular space.

Cheng, Yen-Po; Lin, Ping-Yi; Huang, Abel Po-Hao; Cheng, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Min; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

2014-01-01

79

Comparison of SpineJet(TM) XL and Conventional Instrumentation for Disk Space Preparation in Unilateral Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion  

PubMed Central

Objective Although unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is widely used because of its benefits, it does have some technical limitations. Removal of disk material and endplate cartilage is difficult, but essential, for proper fusion in unilateral surgery, leading to debate regarding the surgery's limitations in removing the disk material on the contralateral side. Therefore, authors have conducted a randomized, comparative cadaver study in order to evaluate the efficiency of the surgery when using conventional instruments in the preparation of the disk space and when using the recently developed high-pressure water jet system, SpineJet™ XL. Methods Two spine surgeons performed diskectomies and disk preparations for TLIF in 20 lumbar disks. All cadaver/surgeon/level allocations for preparation using the SpineJet™ XL (HydroCision Inc., Boston, MA, USA) or conventional tools were randomized. All assessments were performed by an independent spine surgeon who was unaware of the randomizations. The authors measured the areas (cm2) and calculated the proportion (%) of the disk surfaces. The duration of the disk preparation and number of instrument insertions and withdrawals required to complete the disk preparation were recorded for all procedures. Results The proportion of the area of removed disk tissue versus that of potentially removable disk tissue, the proportion of the area of removed endplate cartilage, and the area of removed disk tissue in the contralateral posterior portion showed 74.5 ± 17.2%, 18.5 ± 12.03%, and 67.55 ± 16.10%, respectively, when the SpineJet™ XL was used, and 52.6 ± 16.9%, 22.8 ± 17.84%, and 51.64 ± 19.63%, respectively, when conventional instrumentations were used. The results also showed that when the SpineJet™ XL was used, the proportion of the area of removed disk tissue versus that of potentially removable disk tissue and the area of removed disk tissue in the contralateral posterior portion were statistically significantly high (p < 0.001, p < 0.05, respectively). Also, compared to conventional instrumentations, the duration required to complete disk space preparation was shorter, and the frequency of instrument use and the numbers of insertions/withdrawals were lower when the SpineJet™ XL was used. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that hydrosurgery using the SpineJet™ XL unit allows for the preparation of a greater portion of disk space and that it is less traumatic and allows for more precise endplate preparation without damage to the bony endplate. Furthermore, the SpineJet™ XL appears to provide tangible benefits in terms of disk space preparation for graft placement, particularly when using the unilateral TLIF approach.

Huh, Han-Yong; Ji, Cheol; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik

2010-01-01

80

Anterior dislodgement of a fusion cage after transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis.  

PubMed

Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is commonly used procedure for spinal fusion. However, there are no reports describing anterior cage dislodgement after surgery. This report is a rare case of anterior dislodgement of fusion cage after TLIF for the treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis with lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV). A 51-year-old man underwent TLIF at L4-5 with posterior instrumentation for the treatment of grade 1 isthmic spondylolisthesis with LSTV. At 7 weeks postoperatively, imaging studies demonstrated that banana-shaped cage migrated anteriorly and anterolisthesis recurred at the index level with pseudoarthrosis. The cage was removed and exchanged by new cage through anterior approach, and screws were replaced with larger size ones and cement augmentation was added. At postoperative 2 days of revision surgery, computed tomography (CT) showed fracture on lateral pedicle and body wall of L5 vertebra. He underwent surgery again for paraspinal decompression at L4-5 and extension of instrumentation to S1 vertebra. His back and leg pains improved significantly after final revision surgery and symptom relief was maintained during follow-up period. At 6 months follow-up, CT images showed solid fusion at L4-5 level. Careful cage selection for TLIF must be done for treatment of spondylolisthesis accompanied with deformed LSTV, especially when reduction will be attempted. Banana-shaped cage should be positioned anteriorly, but anterior dislodgement of cage and reduction failure may occur in case of a highly unstable spine. Revision surgery for the treatment of an anteriorly dislodged cage may be effectively performed using an anterior approach. PMID:24175028

Oh, Hyeong Seok; Lee, Sang-Ho; Hong, Soon-Woo

2013-08-01

81

Anterior Dislodgement of a Fusion Cage after Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Isthmic Spondylolisthesis  

PubMed Central

Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is commonly used procedure for spinal fusion. However, there are no reports describing anterior cage dislodgement after surgery. This report is a rare case of anterior dislodgement of fusion cage after TLIF for the treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis with lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV). A 51-year-old man underwent TLIF at L4-5 with posterior instrumentation for the treatment of grade 1 isthmic spondylolisthesis with LSTV. At 7 weeks postoperatively, imaging studies demonstrated that banana-shaped cage migrated anteriorly and anterolisthesis recurred at the index level with pseudoarthrosis. The cage was removed and exchanged by new cage through anterior approach, and screws were replaced with larger size ones and cement augmentation was added. At postoperative 2 days of revision surgery, computed tomography (CT) showed fracture on lateral pedicle and body wall of L5 vertebra. He underwent surgery again for paraspinal decompression at L4-5 and extension of instrumentation to S1 vertebra. His back and leg pains improved significantly after final revision surgery and symptom relief was maintained during follow-up period. At 6 months follow-up, CT images showed solid fusion at L4-5 level. Careful cage selection for TLIF must be done for treatment of spondylolisthesis accompanied with deformed LSTV, especially when reduction will be attempted. Banana-shaped cage should be positioned anteriorly, but anterior dislodgement of cage and reduction failure may occur in case of a highly unstable spine. Revision surgery for the treatment of an anteriorly dislodged cage may be effectively performed using an anterior approach.

Oh, Hyeong Seok; Lee, Sang-Ho

2013-01-01

82

Harvesting local cylinder autograft from adjacent vertebral body for anterior lumbar interbody fusion: surgical technique, operative feasibility and preliminary clinical results  

PubMed Central

Autogenous iliac crest has long served as the gold standard for anterior lumbar arthrodesis although added morbidity results from the bone graft harvest. Therefore, femoral ring allograft, or cages, have been used to decrease the morbidity of iliac crest bone harvesting. More recently, an experimental study in the animal showed that harvesting local bone from the anterior vertebral body and replacing the void by a radio-opaque ?-tricalcium phosphate plug was a valid concept. However, such a concept precludes theoretically the use of posterior pedicle screw fixation. At one institution a consecutive series of 21 patients underwent single- or multiple-level circumferential lumbar fusion with anterior cages and posterior pedicle screws. All cages were filled with cancellous bone harvested from the adjacent vertebral body, and the vertebral body defect was filled with a ?-tricalcium phosphate plug. The indications for surgery were failed conservative treatment of a lumbar degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to report on the surgical technique, operative feasibility, safety, benefits, and drawbacks of this technique with our primary clinical experience. An independent researcher reviewed all data that had been collected prospectively from the onset of the study. The average age of the patients was 39.9 (26–57) years. Bone grafts were successfully harvested from 28 vertebral bodies in all but one patient whose anterior procedure was aborted due to difficulty in freeing the left common iliac vein. This case was converted to a transforaminal interbody fusion (TLIF). There was no major vascular injury. Blood loss of the anterior procedure averaged 250 ml (50–350 ml). One tricalcium phosphate bone plug was broken during its insertion, and one endplate was broken because of wrong surgical technique, which did not affect the final outcome. One patient had a right lumbar plexopathy that was not related to this special technique. There was no retrograde ejaculation, infection or pseudoarthrosis. One patient experienced a deep venous thrombosis. At the last follow up (mean 28 months) all patients had a solid lumbar spine fusion. At the 6-month follow up, the pain as assessed on the visual analog scale (VAS) decreased from 6.9 to 4.5 (33% decrease), and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) reduced from 48.0 to 31.7 with a 34% reduction. However, at 2 years follow up there was a trend for increase in the ODI (35) and VAS (5). The data in this study suggest that harvesting a cylinder of autograft from the adjacent vertebral body is safe and efficient. Filling of the void defect with a ?-tricalcium phosphate plug does not preclude the use of posterior pedicle screw stabilization.

Jiang, Liang; Steffen, Thomas; Ouellet, Jean; Reindl, Rudy; Aebi, Max

2006-01-01

83

Posterior instrumentation and transpedicular interbody fusion. Clinical and radiological results with utilization of CT scans after implant removal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  \\u000a The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the late result after operative treatment of acute thoracolumbar fractures\\u000a and fracture dislocations. 29 patients, treated between 1988 and 1995 at the Department of Trauma Surgery, Hannover Medical\\u000a School with posterior stabilization and interbody fusion with transpedicular cancellous bone grafting, were reexamined 3 1\\/2\\u000a years after surgery. The incorporation and

C. Knop; L. Bastian; U. Lange; M. Blauth

1999-01-01

84

Mid-term Clinical Outcomes of Stand-alone Posterior Interbody Fusion with Rectangular Cages: A 4-year-minimum Follow-up  

PubMed Central

Objective We sought to determine minimum 4 years of clinical outcomes including fusion rate, revision rate and complications of patients who underwent placement of rectangular stand-alone cages. Methods Thirty-three cases of degenerative spine that had been followed for at least 4-years were reviewed retrospectively. Cages were inserted at L4-L5 level or L5-S1 in 27 or in 6 cases respectively. Visual analogue scale (VAS), Odom's criteria, fusion rate, intervertebral disc height and lumbar lordosis were determined pre- and post-operatively on standing x-rays. Amount of intra- and postoperative blood loss, total volume transfused, duration of surgery and perioperative complications were also evaluated. Results The mean VAS score of back pain and sciatica were improved from 8.0 and 7.0 points to 3.4 and 2.4 during 1 years follow-up visit and the scores was raised gradually. Also, during the follow-up, 94% of patients showed excellent or good outcomes by the Odom's criteria. Intervertebral disc height was increased from 8.2±1.4mm to 9.2±1.9mm at the first year of follow-up, however, found to be decreased and stabilized to 8.3±1.8mm after 2 years. The fusion rate was approximately 91% after 4 year postoperative. The segmental angle of lordosis was increased significantly by two years but it was not maintained after four years. A statistically insignificant change in total lumbar lordosis was also observed. Three patients (9%) had experienced perioperative complications. Conclusion The use of rectangular stand-alone cages for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) resulted in a various degree of subsidence and demonstrate very low complication rate, high functional stability and improved clinical outcomes in patients with degenerative lumbar disc disease.

Cho, Kyung Rae; Lee, Sun-Ho; Kim, Eun Sang

2013-01-01

85

Surgical management of minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion with stand-alone interbody cage for L4-5 degenerative disorders: clinical and radiographic findings.  

PubMed

Surgical treatment for degenerative spinal disorders is controversial, although lumbar fusion is considered an acceptable option for disabling lower back pain. Patients underwent instrumented minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (mini-ALIF) using a retroperitoneal approach except for requiring multilevel fusions, severe spinal canal stenosis, high-grade spondylolisthesis, and a adjacent segments disorders. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records and radiographs of 142 patients who received mini-ALIF for L4-5 degenerative lumbar disorders between 1998 and 2010. We compared preoperative and postoperative clinical data and radiographic measurements, including the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, visual analog scale (VAS) score for back and leg pain, disc height (DH), whole lumbar lordosis (WL), and vertebral wedge angle (WA). The mean follow-up period was 76 months. The solid fusion rate was 90.1% (128/142 patients). The average length of hospital stay was 6.9 days (range, 3-21 days). The mean blood loss was 63.7 ml (range, 10-456 ml). The mean operation time was 155.5 min (range, 96-280 min). The postoperative JOA and VAS scores for back and leg pain were improved compared with the preoperative scores. Radiological analysis showed significant postoperative improvements in DH, WL, and WA, and the functional and radiographical outcomes improved significantly after 2 years. The 2.8% complication rate included cases of wound infection, liquorrhea, vertebral body fractures, and a misplaced cage that required revision. Mini-ALIF was found to be associated with improved clinical results and radiographic findings for L4-5 disorders. A retroperitoneal approach might therefore be a valuable treatment option. PMID:24140782

Hironaka, Yasuo; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakase, Hiroyuki

2013-01-01

86

One-Stage Posterior Debridement and Transpedicular Screw Fixation for Treating Monosegmental Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Tuberculosis in Adults  

PubMed Central

Spinal tuberculosis is still prevalent in some developing countries. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy and safety of one-stage posterior debridement, autogenous bone grafting, and transpedicular screw fixation in treating monosegmental thoracic and lumbar tuberculosis in adults. 37 patients were retrospectively reviewed in this study. The data of images, operative time and blood loss volume, perioperative complications, time to achieve bony fusion, VAS score, and neurologic function preoperatively and postoperatively were collected. The mean follow-up period was 21.5 ± 3.5 months. The tuberculosis was cured after surgery in all patients, and no recurrence was observed. Bony fusion was achieved in all patients with a mean time of 5.6 ± 2.5 months. Neurological outcome did not change in one case with grade A, and increased by 1–3 grades in the other patients with nerve deficit. The average preoperative and postoperative VAS scores were 5.5 ± 2.23 and 1.5 ± 1.22, respectively; the difference was significant (P < 0.05). There were three perioperative complications (8.1%, 3/37) observed in this study. In conclusion, the procedure of one-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion with autogenous bone grafting, and posterior fixation with pedicle screw is effective and safe for treating monosegmental thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis in adults.

Liu, Zhili; Peng, Aifeng; Long, Xinhua; Yang, Dong; Huang, Shanhu

2014-01-01

87

One-stage posterior debridement and transpedicular screw fixation for treating monosegmental thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis in adults.  

PubMed

Spinal tuberculosis is still prevalent in some developing countries. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy and safety of one-stage posterior debridement, autogenous bone grafting, and transpedicular screw fixation in treating monosegmental thoracic and lumbar tuberculosis in adults. 37 patients were retrospectively reviewed in this study. The data of images, operative time and blood loss volume, perioperative complications, time to achieve bony fusion, VAS score, and neurologic function preoperatively and postoperatively were collected. The mean follow-up period was 21.5 ± 3.5 months. The tuberculosis was cured after surgery in all patients, and no recurrence was observed. Bony fusion was achieved in all patients with a mean time of 5.6 ± 2.5 months. Neurological outcome did not change in one case with grade A, and increased by 1-3 grades in the other patients with nerve deficit. The average preoperative and postoperative VAS scores were 5.5 ± 2.23 and 1.5 ± 1.22, respectively; the difference was significant (P < 0.05). There were three perioperative complications (8.1%, 3/37) observed in this study. In conclusion, the procedure of one-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion with autogenous bone grafting, and posterior fixation with pedicle screw is effective and safe for treating monosegmental thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis in adults. PMID:24701134

Liu, Zhili; Liu, Jiaming; Peng, Aifeng; Long, Xinhua; Yang, Dong; Huang, Shanhu

2014-01-01

88

Active thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis in children with kyphotic deformity treated by one-stage posterior instrumentation combined anterior debridement: preliminary study.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the safety, feasibility and efficacy of one-stage posterior instrumentation combined anterior debridement and interbody fusion for treatment of active thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) in children with kyphotic deformity. A total of 20 children (12 boys, 8 girls) were enrolled in this study from January 2006 to January 2011. All patients underwent one-stage posterior instrumentation combined anterior debridement and interbody fusion. Clinical and radiographic results were analyzed. Patients were followed up for 28.9 months on average. Improvement was shown in all patients with neurologic dysfunction according to American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale. The mean preoperative angle of kyphosis was 35.2° ± 6.8° (range 26°-47°), which reduced to 9.7° ± 1.8° (range 6°-13°) postoperatively. The mean angle of kyphosis at the last follow-up was 12.0° ± 1.9° (range 9°-15°). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein returned to normal in all patients within 6 months after surgery. All patients acquired bony fusion, and no major complications were observed through the final follow-up visit. One-stage posterior instrumentation combined anterior debridement and fusion were demonstrated to be a safe and effective method to achieve spinal decompression and kyphosis correction in children with thoracic and lumbar spinal TB. PMID:24700338

Hu, Jianzhong; Li, Dongzhe; Kang, Yijun; Pang, Xiaoyang; Wu, Tianding; Duan, Chunyue; Cao, Yong

2014-07-01

89

Posterior short segment pedicle screw fixation and TLIF for the treatment of unstable thoracolumbar/lumbar fracture  

PubMed Central

Background Currently, Posterior Short Segment Pedicle Screw Fixation is a popular procedure for treating unstable thoracolumbar/lumbar burst fracture. But progressive kyphosis and a high rate of hardware failure because of lack of the anterior column support remains a concern. The efficacy of different methods remains debatable and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. Methods A consecutive series of 20 patients with isolated thoracolumbar/lumbar burst fractures were treated by posterior short segment pedicle screw fixation and transforaminal thoracolumbar/lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) between January 2005 and December 2007. All patients were followed up for a minimum of 2 years. Demographic data, neurologic status, anterior vertebral body heights, segmental Cobb angle and treatment-related complications were evaluated. Results The mean operative time was 167 minutes (range, 150–220). Blood loss was 450 ~ 1200 ml, an average of 820 ml. All patients recovered with solid fusion of the intervertebral bone graft, without main complications like misplacement of the pedicle screw, nerve or vessel lesion or hard ware failure. The post-operative radiographs demonstrated a good fracture reduction and it was well maintained until the bone graft fusion. Neurological recovery of one to three Frankel grade was seen in 14 patients with partial neurological deficit, three grades of improvement was seen in one patient, two grades of improvement was observed in 6 patients and one grade of improvement was found in 6 patients. All the 6 patients with no paraplegia on admission remained neurological intact, and in one patient with Frankel D on admission no improvement was observed. Conclusion Posterior short-segment pedicle fixation in conjunction with TLIF seems to be a feasible option in the management of selected thoracolumbar/lumbar burst fractures, thereby addressing all the three columns through a single approach with less trauma and good results.

2014-01-01

90

Radiographic Results of Single Level Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spine Disease: Focusing on Changes of Segmental Lordosis in Fusion Segment  

PubMed Central

Background To assess the radiographic results in patients who underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), particularly the changes in segmental lordosis in the fusion segment, whole lumbar lordosis and disc height. Methods Twenty six cases of single-level TLIF in degenerative lumbar diseases were analyzed. The changes in segmental lordosis, whole lumbar lordosis, and disc height were evaluated before surgery, after surgery and at the final follow-up. Results The segmental lordosis increased significantly after surgery but decreased at the final follow-up. Compared to the preoperative values, the segmental lordosis did not change significantly at the final follow-up. Whole lumbar lordosis at the final follow-up was significantly higher than the preoperative values. The disc height was significantly higher in after surgery than before surgery (p = 0.000) and the disc height alter surgery and at the final follow-up was similar. Conclusions When performing TLIF, careful surgical techniques and attention are needed to restore and maintain the segmental lordosis at the fusion level.

Kim, Sang-Bum; Heo, Youn-Moo; Lee, Woo-Suk; Yi, Jin-Woong; Kim, Tae-Kyun; Hwang, Cheol-Mog

2009-01-01

91

Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation: Comparison between Primary and Revision Surgery  

PubMed Central

Minimally invasive surgery with a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) is an important minimally invasive fusion technique for the lumbar spine. Lumbar spine reoperation is challenging and is thought to have greater complication risks. The purpose of this study was to compare MIS TLIF with unilateral screw fixation perioperative results between primary and revision surgeries. This was a prospective study that included 46 patients who underwent MIS TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw. The patients were divided into two groups, primary and revision MIS TLIF, to compare perioperative results and complications. The two groups were similar in age, sex, and level of operation, and were not significantly different in the length of follow-up or clinical results. Although dural tears were more common with the revision group (primary 1; revision 4), operation time, blood loss, total perioperative complication, and fusion rates were not significantly different between the two groups. Both groups showed substantial improvements in VAS and ODI scores one year after surgical treatment. Revision MIS TLIF performed by an experienced surgeon does not necessarily increase the risk of perioperative complication compared with primary surgery. MIS TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw fixation is a valuable option for revision lumbar surgery.

Kang, Moo Sung; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

2014-01-01

92

Osteolysis in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with bone morphogenetic protein-2.  

PubMed

STUDY DESIGN.: Retrospective radiographic review. OBJECTIVE.: To determine the incidence of osteolysis, graft subsidence, and cage migration after recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) use with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Osteolysis after TLIF is a recently described phenomenon associated with rhBMP-2 use. Although this is typically a self-limiting condition, complications such as graft subsidence and cage migration have been described. The incidence of this is not well defined and most studies use plain radiographs for diagnosis rather than more advanced imaging. This study serves to quantify the risk of osteolysis and its associated graft complications with routine use of computed tomography. METHODS.: A total of 58 patients who underwent primary TLIF from a single surgeon between 2004 and 2007 underwent routine postoperative computed tomographic scan. Seventy-seven levels of fusion were evaluated for osteolysis. All patients received the same dose of rhBMP-2 of 5 mg per level. Imaging was performed immediately postoperative and again at an average of 4.3 months postoperative (range = 2.4-9.0 months). These images were evaluated for the presence of osteolysis, graft subsidence, and cage migration. These changes were then graded according to their severity. RESULTS.: Osteolysis was found in 16 of the 58 (27.6%) patients and 19 of the 77 (24.7%) levels treated. No significant difference was found between single and two-level fusions. The degree of osteolysis ranged from 3 to 20 mm with an average of 12.5 mm. The osteolysis was characterized as severe (>1 cm) in 12 of the 19 levels. Of the patients with osteolysis, 31.6% demonstrated graft subsidence all of which occurred with severe osteolytic defects. Migration of the intervertebral cage was found in 8.8% of patients. CONCLUSION.: rhBMP-2 use with TLIF is associated with a significant risk of postoperative osteolysis. Patients who demonstrated postoperative osteolysis were associated with significant risk of subsidence or migration of the intervertebral cage. The clinical implications of these changes are not currently known. PMID:21217443

Knox, Jeffrey B; Dai, Joseph M; Orchowski, Joseph

2011-04-15

93

Allogeneic morphogenetic protein vs. recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in lumbar interbody fusion procedures: a radiographic and economic analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Since the introduction of rhBMP-2 (Infuse®) in 2002, surgeons have had an alternative substitute to autograft and its related donor site morbidity. Recently, the prevalence of reported adverse events and complications related to the use of rhBMP-2 has raised many ethical and legal concerns for surgeons. Additionally, the cost and decreasing reimbursement landscape of rhBMP-2 use have required identification of a viable alternative. Osteo allogeneic morphogenetic protein (OsteoAMP®) is a commercially available allograft-derived growth factor rich in osteoinductive, angiogenic, and mitogenic proteins. This study compares the radiographic fusion outcomes between rhBMP-2 and OsteoAMP allogeneic morphogenetic protein in lumbar interbody fusion spine procedures. Methods Three hundred twenty-one (321) patients from three centers underwent a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) or lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) procedure and were assessed by an independent radiologist for fusion and radiographically evident complications. The independent radiologist was blinded to the intervention, product, and surgeon information. Two hundred and twenty-six (226) patients received OsteoAMP with autologous local bone, while ninety-five (95) patients received Infuse with autologous local bone. Patients underwent radiographs (x-ray and/or CT) at standard postoperative follow-up intervals of approximately 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Fusion was defined as radiographic evidence of bridging across endplates, or bridging from endplates to interspace disc plugs. Osteobiologic surgical supply costs were also analyzed to ascertain cost differences between OsteoAMP and rhBMP-2. Results OsteoAMP produced higher rates of fusion at 6, 12, and 18 months (p???0.01). The time required for OsteoAMP to achieve fusion was approximately 40% less than rhBMP-2 with approximately 70% fewer complications. Osteobiologic supply costs were 80.5% lower for OsteoAMP patients (73.7% lower per level) than for rhBMP-2. Conclusions Results of this study indicate that OsteoAMP is a viable alternative to rhBMP-2 both clinically and economically when used in TLIF and LLIF spine procedures.

2013-01-01

94

Double-segment Wilhelm Tell technique for anterior lumbar interbody fusion in unstable isthmic spondylolisthesis and adjacent segment discopathy.  

PubMed

The Wilhelm Tell technique is a novel instrumented anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) procedure using a specially designed composite carbon fibre cage and a single short-threaded cancellous screw that obliquely passes through the upper adjacent vertebral body, the interbody cage itself and through the lower adjacent vertebral body. This single-stage fusion method, which is in principle a combination of the Louis technique and modern cage surgery, is reported to have a lower rate of pseudoarthrosis formation than stand-alone cage techniques. In addition, it eliminates both the surgical trauma of paravertebral muscle retraction and the risk of neural damage by poorly located pedicular screws. This anterior approach allows decompression of neural structures within the anterior part of the spinal canal and the foraminal region. It is the purpose of this case report, to present the successful application of this novel technique in a 32-year-old woman who concurrently suffered from severe instability-related back pain from L4/5 isthmic spondylolisthesis and marked L5/S1 degenerative disc disease. PMID:16459090

Wenger, Markus; Vogt, Emanuel; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

2006-02-01

95

Analysis of spinal lumbar interbody fusion cage subsidence using Taguchi method, finite element analysis, and artificial neural network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subsidence, when implant penetration induces failure of the vertebral body, occurs commonly after spinal reconstruction. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) cages may subside into the vertebral body and lead to kyphotic deformity. No previous studies have utilized an artificial neural network (ANN) for the design of a spinal interbody fusion cage. In this study, the neural network was applied after initiation from a Taguchi L 18 orthogonal design array. Three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to address the resistance to subsidence based on the design changes of the material and cage contact region, including design of the ridges and size of the graft area. The calculated subsidence is derived from the ANN objective function which is defined as the resulting maximum von Mises stress (VMS) on the surface of a simulated bone body after axial compressive loading. The ANN was found to have minimized the bone surface VMS, thereby optimizing the ALIF cage given the design space. Therefore, the Taguchi-FEA-ANN approach can serve as an effective procedure for designing a spinal fusion cage and improving the biomechanical properties.

Nassau, Christopher John; Litofsky, N. Scott; Lin, Yuyi

2012-09-01

96

Cortical blindness following posterior lumbar decompression and fusion.  

PubMed

Perioperative vision loss following non-ocular surgery is a well-documented phenomenon. In particular, perioperative vision loss has been frequently cited following spinal surgery. Although the rate of vision compromise in spinal surgery is relatively low, the consequences can be quite severe and devastating for the patient. We report a 60-year-old woman who initially presented with back and left leg pain as well as paraparesis. Imaging studies of the lumbar spine showed bony erosion consistent with tumor infiltration of the L3 and L4 spinal segments. Laminectomy at the L2-L4 levels for decompression of the intraspinal tumor was performed. Pathology of the resected bone was consistent with metastatic adenocarincoma. Postoperatively, the patient suffered severe anemia and bilateral infarctions of the posterior cerebral arteries and occipital lobes resulting in vision compromise. Although a definitive pathogenesis remains unknown, preoperative cardiovascular issues and intraoperative hemodynamic instabilities have typically been implicated as high risk factors. High risk factors for this novel clinical presentation of visual compromise following posterior lumbar laminectomy with decompression for an intraspinal tumor are reported. PMID:23791834

Agarwal, Nitin; Hansberry, David R; Goldstein, Ira M

2014-01-01

97

Vascular anatomy anterior to lumbosacral transitional vertebrae and implications for anterior lumbar interbody fusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background context: Anterior approaches to the lumbosacral spine afford the ideal window to the disc for interbody fusion. Vascular injuries represent the most feared complications of such approaches. Unfortunately, the combination of more procedures being performed, more surgeons at the beginning of the learning curve and less invasive techniques of approach combine to increase the risk of vascular injury in

Bradley K Weiner; Matthew Walker; Robert D Fraser

2001-01-01

98

Clinical outcomes of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis treated with lumbar decompression and the Cosmic “semi-rigid” posterior system  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAlthough some investigators believe that the rate of postoperative instability is low after lumbar spinal stenosis surgery, the majority believe that postoperative instability usually develops. Decompression alone and decompression with fusion have been widely used for years in the surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. Nevertheless, in recent years several biomechanical studies have shown that posterior dynamic transpedicular stabilization provides

Tuncay Kaner; Mehdi Sasani; Tunc Oktenoglu; Ahmet Levent Aydin; Ali Fahir Ozer

2010-01-01

99

Cost effectiveness of disc prosthesis versus lumbar fusion in patients with chronic low back pain: randomized controlled trial with 2-year follow-up  

Microsoft Academic Search

This randomized controlled health economic study assesses the cost-effectiveness of the concept of total disc replacement\\u000a (TDR) (Charité\\/Prodisc\\/Maverick) when compared with the concept of instrumented lumbar fusion (FUS) [posterior lumbar fusion\\u000a (PLF) \\/posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF)]. Social and healthcare perspectives after 2 years are reported. In all, 152\\u000a patients were randomized to either TDR (n = 80) or lumbar FUS (n = 72). Cost

Peter Fritzell; Svante Berg; Fredrik Borgström; Tycho Tullberg; Hans Tropp

100

3:57 Transpedicular lumbar interbody fusion by means of an osteogenic protein–1 (bone morphogenic protein–7)–enhanced hydroxyapatite cement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose of study: In a sheep model, we developed a posterior approach method to treat burst fractures, providing primary stability for axial loading in a sheep model. Using this model and method we tested the efficacy of the osteogenic protein (OP)-1–enhanced hydroxyapatite cement to form an interbody fusion.Methods used: In 36 sheep, L4–L6 were instrumented posteriorly, intervertebral disc L4–L5 was

Thomas Blattert; Guenter Delling; Paresh Dalal; Carol Toth; Arnulf Weckbach

2002-01-01

101

CT of adult lumbar disc herniations mimicking posterior apophyseal ring fractures.  

PubMed

This report concerns 35 adult patients with lumbar or sciatic pain and axial CT findings reportedly associated with posterior apophyseal ring fractures. Review of the CT images suggested two pathophysiologic categories. (1) Posterior Schmorl--A posterior intravertebral disc herniation with posterior displacement of a fractured or remodelled vertebral margin. (2) Calcified subligamentous--Reactive annular and or posterior longitudinal ligament calcification at the periphery of a herniated disc with or without remodelling and anterior displacement of the posterior vertebral margin. PMID:1749472

Gomori, J M; Floman, Y; Liebergall, M

1991-01-01

102

The Memory Metal Minimal Access Cage: A New Concept in Lumbar Interbody Fusion--A Prospective, Noncomparative Study to Evaluate the Safety and Performance  

PubMed Central

Study Design/Objective. A single-centre, prospective, non-comparative study of 25 patients to evaluate the performance and safety of the Memory Metal Minimal Access Cage (MAC) in Lumbar Interbody Fusion. Summary of Background Data. Interbody fusion cages in general are designed to withstand high axial loads and in the meantime to allow ingrowth of new bone for bony fusion. In many cages the contact area with the endplate is rather large leaving a relatively small contact area for the bone graft with the adjacent host bone. MAC is constructed from the memory metal Nitinol and builds on the concept of sufficient axial support in combination with a large contact area of the graft facilitating bony ingrowth and ease in minimal access implantation due to its high deformability. Methods. Twenty five subjects with a primary diagnosis of disabling back and radicular leg pain from a single level degenerative lumbar disc underwent an interbody fusion using MAC and pedicle screws. Clinical performance was evaluated prospectively over 2 years using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. The interbody fusion status was assessed using conventional radiographs and CT scan. Safety of the device was studied by registration of intra- and post-operative adverse effects. Results. Clinical performance improved significantly (P < .0018), CT scan confirmed solid fusion in all 25 patients at two year follow-up. In two patients migration of the cage occurred, which was resolved uneventfully by placing a larger size at the subsequent revision. Conclusions. We conclude that the Memory Metal Minimal Access Cage (MAC) resulted in 100% solid fusions in 2 years and proved to be safe, although two patients required revision surgery in order to achieve solid fusion.

Kok, D.; Donk, R. D.; Wapstra, F. H.; Veldhuizen, A. G.

2012-01-01

103

The memory metal minimal access cage: a new concept in lumbar interbody fusion-a prospective, noncomparative study to evaluate the safety and performance.  

PubMed

Study Design/Objective. A single-centre, prospective, non-comparative study of 25 patients to evaluate the performance and safety of the Memory Metal Minimal Access Cage (MAC) in Lumbar Interbody Fusion. Summary of Background Data. Interbody fusion cages in general are designed to withstand high axial loads and in the meantime to allow ingrowth of new bone for bony fusion. In many cages the contact area with the endplate is rather large leaving a relatively small contact area for the bone graft with the adjacent host bone. MAC is constructed from the memory metal Nitinol and builds on the concept of sufficient axial support in combination with a large contact area of the graft facilitating bony ingrowth and ease in minimal access implantation due to its high deformability. Methods. Twenty five subjects with a primary diagnosis of disabling back and radicular leg pain from a single level degenerative lumbar disc underwent an interbody fusion using MAC and pedicle screws. Clinical performance was evaluated prospectively over 2 years using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. The interbody fusion status was assessed using conventional radiographs and CT scan. Safety of the device was studied by registration of intra- and post-operative adverse effects. Results. Clinical performance improved significantly (P < .0018), CT scan confirmed solid fusion in all 25 patients at two year follow-up. In two patients migration of the cage occurred, which was resolved uneventfully by placing a larger size at the subsequent revision. Conclusions. We conclude that the Memory Metal Minimal Access Cage (MAC) resulted in 100% solid fusions in 2 years and proved to be safe, although two patients required revision surgery in order to achieve solid fusion. PMID:22567409

Kok, D; Donk, R D; Wapstra, F H; Veldhuizen, A G

2012-01-01

104

CT navigated lateral interbody fusion.  

PubMed

Lateral interbody fusion techniques are heavily reliant on fluoroscopy for retractor docking and graft placement, which expose both the patient and surgeon to high doses of radiation. Use of image-guided technologies with CT-based images, however, can eliminate this radiation exposure for the surgeon. We describe the surgical technique of performing lateral lumbar interbody fusion using CT navigation. PMID:23931938

Drazin, Doniel; Liu, John C; Acosta, Frank L

2013-10-01

105

Screw Placement Accuracy for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery: A Study on 3-D Neuronavigation-Guided Surgery  

PubMed Central

Purpose?The aim of this study was to assess the impact of 3-D navigation for pedicle screw placement accuracy in minimally invasive transverse lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF). Methods?A retrospective review of 52 patients who had MIS-TLIF assisted with 3D navigation is presented. Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analog Scales (VAS), and MacNab scores. Radiographic outcomes were assessed using X-rays and thin-slice computed tomography. Result?The mean age was 56.5 years, and 172 screws were implanted with 16 pedicle breaches (91.0% accuracy rate). Radiographic fusion rate at a mean follow-up of 15.6 months was 87.23%. No revision surgeries were required. The mean improvement in the VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, and ODI at 11.3 months follow-up was 4.3, 4.5, and 26.8 points, respectively. At last follow-up the mean postoperative disc height gain was 4.92?mm and the mean postoperative disc angle gain was 2.79 degrees. At L5–S1 level, there was a significant correlation between a greater disc space height gain and a lower VAS leg score. Conclusion?Our data support that application of 3-D navigation in MIS-TLIF is associated with a high level of accuracy in the pedicle screw placement.

Torres, Jorge; James, Andrew R.; Alimi, Marjan; Tsiouris, Apostolos John; Geannette, Christian; Hartl, Roger

2012-01-01

106

Biomechanical comparison of unilateral and bilateral pedicle screws fixation for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion after decompressive surgery -- a finite element analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known about the biomechanical effectiveness of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) cages in different positioning and various posterior implants used after decompressive surgery. The use of the various implants will induce the kinematic and mechanical changes in range of motion (ROM) and stresses at the surgical and adjacent segments. Unilateral pedicle screw with or without supplementary facet screw fixation in the minimally invasive TLIF procedure has not been ascertained to provide adequate stability without the need to expose on the contralateral side. This study used finite element (FE) models to investigate biomechanical differences in ROM and stress on the neighboring structures after TLIF cages insertion in conjunction with posterior fixation. Methods A validated finite-element (FE) model of L1-S1 was established to implant three types of cages (TLIF with a single moon-shaped cage in the anterior or middle portion of vertebral bodies, and TLIF with a left diagonally placed ogival-shaped cage) from the left L4-5 level after unilateral decompressive surgery. Further, the effects of unilateral versus bilateral pedicle screw fixation (UPSF vs. BPSF) in each TLIF cage model was compared to analyze parameters, including stresses and ROM on the neighboring annulus, cage-vertebral interface and pedicle screws. Results All the TLIF cages positioned with BPSF showed similar ROM (<5%) at surgical and adjacent levels, except TLIF with an anterior cage in flexion (61% lower) and TLIF with a left diagonal cage in left lateral bending (33% lower) at surgical level. On the other hand, the TLIF cage models with left UPSF showed varying changes of ROM and annulus stress in extension, right lateral bending and right axial rotation at surgical level. In particular, the TLIF model with a diagonal cage, UPSF, and contralateral facet screw fixation stabilize segmental motion of the surgical level mostly in extension and contralaterally axial rotation. Prominent stress shielded to the contralateral annulus, cage-vertebral interface, and pedicle screw at surgical level. A supplementary facet screw fixation shared stresses around the neighboring tissues and revealed similar ROM and stress patterns to those models with BPSF. Conclusions TLIF surgery is not favored for asymmetrical positioning of a diagonal cage and UPSF used in contralateral axial rotation or lateral bending. Supplementation of a contralateral facet screw is recommended for the TLIF construct.

2012-01-01

107

Clinical outcomes after posterior dynamic transpedicular stabilization with limited lumbar discectomy: Carragee classification system for lumbar disc herniations  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe observed rate of recurrent disc herniation after limited posterior lumbar discectomy is highest in patients with posterior wide annular defects, according to the Carragee classification of type II (fragment-defect) disc hernia. Although the recurrent herniation rate is lower in both type III (fragment-contained) and type IV (no fragment-contained) patients, recurrent persistent sciatica is observed in both groups. A higher

Tuncay Kaner; Mehdi Sasani; Tunc Oktenoglu; Murat Cosar; Ali Fahir Ozer

2010-01-01

108

Biomechanical comparison of a new stand-alone anterior lumbar interbody fusion cage with established fixation techniques - a three-dimensional finite element analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Initial promise of a stand-alone interbody fusion cage to treat chronic back pain and restore disc height has not been realized. In some instances, a posterior spinal fixation has been used to enhance stability and increase fusion rate. In this manuscript, a new stand-alone cage is compared with conventional fixation methods based on the finite element analysis, with a focus on investigating cage-bone interface mechanics and stress distribution on the adjacent tissues. Methods Three trapezoid 8° interbody fusion cage models (dual paralleled cages, a single large cage, or a two-part cage consisting of a trapezoid box and threaded cylinder) were created with or without pedicle screws fixation to investigate the relative importance of the screws on the spinal segmental response. The contact stress on the facet joint, slip displacement of the cage on the endplate, and rotational angle of the upper vertebra were measured under different loading conditions. Results Simulation results demonstrated less facet stress and slip displacement with the maximal contact on the cage-bone interface. A stand-alone two-part cage had good slip behavior under compression, flexion, extension, lateral bending and torsion, as compared with the other two interbody cages, even with the additional posterior fixation. However, the two-part cage had the lowest rotational angles under flexion and torsion, but had no differences under extension and lateral bending. Conclusion The biomechanical benefit of a stand-alone two-part fusion cage can be justified. This device provided the stability required for interbody fusion, which supports clinical trials of the cage as an alternative to circumferential fixations.

Chen, Shih-Hao; Tai, Ching-Lung; Lin, Chien-Yu; Hsieh, Pang-Hsing; Chen, Weng-Pin

2008-01-01

109

Minimally Invasive Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Clinical and Radiographic Outcome at a Minimum 2-year Follow-up.  

PubMed

STUDY DESIGN:: Retrospective case series. OBJECTIVE:: To determine the clinical and radiographic outcomes of patients undergoing minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) with a minimum 2-year follow-up. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:: Minimally invasive LLIF is performed through a lateral, retroperitoneal, transpsoas approach. This procedure is characterized by the use of a tubular retractor to minimize tissue damage and real-time neuromonitoring to ensure safe passage through the psoas muscle. To date, advantages of minimal invasive LLIF, compared to open procedures, has been limited to early postoperative outcomes and complications, with the longest mean follow-up duration of 22 months. METHODS:: 118 patients who underwent minimally invasive LLIF with a minimum of 2 years follow-up were included in this study. Clinical outcomes were determined by using Visual Analog Score (VAS) for the degree of pain (trunk or lower extremity), and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Short Form-12 (SF-12) scoring methods for patient function. Radiographic evaluations included (i) disc height, (ii) segmental coronal angulation, (iii) segmental lordotic angulation, (iv) Cobb angle, (v) cage subsidence, and (vi) fusion status. Data were statistically tested using either paired Students-t-test or Wilcoxon matched pair test. Significance levels was set at P<0.05. RESULTS:: We found (i) that the VAS for pain, Oswestry Disability Index and the physical components summary, but not the mental components summary of Short Form-12 improved significantly at the follow-up, (ii) that disc height, coronal angulation, and lordotic angulation at each level and the Cobb angle were restored at the statistically significant extent, (iii) that successful fusion was achieved in 209 levels (88%), and (iv) that transient thigh pain was the most frequent complications seen in 36% of the patients. Conclusions. Our results support the efficacy of minimally invasive LLIF in improvements of clinical and radiographic features. PMID:22964885

Kotwal, Suhel; Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Lebl, Darren; Hughes, Alexander; Huang, Russel; Sama, Andrew; Cammisa, Frank; Girardi, Federico

2012-09-01

110

Surgeons' Exposure to Radiation in Single- and Multi-Level Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion; A Prospective Study  

PubMed Central

Although minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) has widely been developed in patients with lumbar diseases, surgeons risk exposure to fluoroscopic radiation. However, to date, there is no studies quantifying the effective dose during MIS-TLIF procedure, and the radiation dose distribution is still unclear. In this study, the surgeons' radiation doses at 5 places on the bodies were measured and the effective doses were assessed during 31 consecutive 1- to 3-level MIS-TLIF surgeries. The operating surgeon, assisting surgeon, and radiological technologist wore thermoluminescent dosimeter on the unshielded thyroid, chest, genitals, right middle finger, and on the chest beneath a lead apron. The doses at the lens and the effective doses were also calculated. Mean fluoroscopy times were 38.7, 53.1, and 58.5 seconds for 1, 2, or 3 fusion levels, respectively. The operating surgeon's mean exposures at the lens, thyroid, chest, genitals, finger, and the chest beneath the shield, respectively, were 0.07, 0.07, 0.09, 0.14, 0.32, and 0.05 mSv in 1-level MIS-TLIF; 0.07, 0.08, 0.09, 0.18, 0.34, and 0.05 mSv in 2-level; 0.08, 0.09, 0.14, 0.15, 0.36, and 0.06 mSv in 3-level; and 0.07, 0.08, 0.10, 0.15, 0.33, and 0.05 mSv in all cases. Mean dose at the operating surgeon's right finger was significantly higher than other measurements parts (P<0.001). The operating surgeon's effective doses (0.06, 0.06, and 0.07 mSv for 1, 2, and 3 fusion levels) were low, and didn't differ significantly from those of the assisting surgeon or radiological technologist. Revision MIS-TLIF was not associated with higher surgeons' radiation doses compared to primary MIS-TLIF. There were significantly higher surgeons' radiation doses in over-weight than in normal-weight patients. The surgeons' radiation exposure during MIS-TLIF was within the safe level by the International Commission on Radiological Protection's guidelines. The accumulated radiation exposure, especially to surgeon's hands, should be carefully monitored.

Funao, Haruki; Ishii, Ken; Momoshima, Suketaka; Iwanami, Akio; Hosogane, Naobumi; Watanabe, Kota; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

2014-01-01

111

Posterior decompression with transforaminal interbody fusion for thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and the ligamentum flavum at the same level.  

PubMed

Our objective was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and feasibility of posterior decompression with transforaminal thoracic interbody fusion (PTTIF) for thoracic myelopathy caused by ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) at the same level. Between March 2004 and December 2008, 13 patients (five men and eight women, average age: 56years, range: 39-72years) who underwent PTTIF for concurrent OLF and OPLL were studied retrospectively. The clinical efficacy, operative time, blood loss, sagittal alignment and complications were investigated. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in three patients, all of whom healed well after repair. One patient developed a urinary tract infection and one developed a wound infection, but both were cured with appropriate antibiotic therapy. Neurological symptom deterioration occurred in one patient, but she returned to her preoperative baseline after completing methylprednisolone therapy. After an average 36.8months follow up, the mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score significantly increased from 4.3±1.3 preoperatively to 7.2±1.8 at 3months after the operation and 8.5±1.7 at the final follow-up (P<0.01), with an overall recovery rate of 63.2±21.8%. Postoperative imaging demonstrated an improvement in the local kyphosis (P<0.01), and as of the final follow up no cases of spinal instability or instrument loosening had occurred. We conclude that PTTIF provides satisfactory neurological recovery and stabilises the thoracic fusion through a single posterior approach. However, this procedure is not complication free and demands advanced technical expertise on the part of practitioners, particularly to avoid catastrophic spinal cord injuries. PMID:23313526

Liu, Fa-Jing; Chai, Yi; Shen, Yong; Xu, Jia-Xin; Du, Wei; Zhang, Peng

2013-04-01

112

Anatomy of the posterior approach to the lumbar plexus block  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to describe the relation of the lumbar plexus with the psoas major and with the superficial\\u000a and deep landmarks close to it. Four cadavers were dissected and 22 computed tomography files of the lumbosacral region studied.\\u000a Cadaver dissections demonstrated that the lumbar plexus, at the level of L5, is within the substance of the

Juliana Farny; Pierre Drolet; Michel Girard

1994-01-01

113

Posterior approach to the lumbar plexus combined with a sciatic nerve block using lidocaine  

Microsoft Academic Search

A combination of lumbar plexus block, by a posterior technique, and sciatic nerve block can be a useful technique for outpatient\\u000a anaesthesia. The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical characteristics of these blocks using lidocaine and to\\u000a measure the serum lidocaine concentrations. Forty-five patients, undergoing lower extremity surgery, were studied. Sciatic\\u000a nerve and lumbar plexus blocks were

Juliana Farny; Michel Girard; Pierre Drolet

1994-01-01

114

Lymphatic fluid fistula: an extremely rare complication of posterior lumbar transpedicular screw fixation. Case report.  

PubMed

The authors describe the unique case of a patient who had undergone posterior stabilization of the lumbar spine complicating the course of a lymphatic fistula. A lymphatic fistula is a rare complication of posterior lumbar surgery. Predisposing factors include individual anatomy, scarring adherences due to previous abdominal operations or surgical maneuvers deep in the plane of the transverse processes. Because the onset of lymphatic fistulas is subtle, and because they are associated with a high mortality rate and require multidisciplinary treatment, care is needed to avoid misdiagnosing these lesions as the more common cerebrospinal fluid fistula. PMID:16703912

Raco, Antonino; Russo, Natale; Landi, Alessandro; Dazzi, Mauro; Carlesimo, Bruno

2006-05-01

115

Segmental mobility of the lumbar spine during a posterior to anterior mobilization: assessment using dynamic MRI  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To quantify segmental mobility of the lumbar spine during a posterior to anterior spinal mobilization procedure.Design. Descriptive study using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging.Background. The posterior to anterior spinal mobilization procedure is frequently used in the assessment and management of spinal dysfunction. How this procedure influences segmental spinal motion however, is not known.Methods. Eleven asymptomatic subjects were positioned prone within

Christopher M. Powers; Kornelia Kulig; James Harrison; Gabrielle Bergman

2003-01-01

116

A modification of the standard midline posterior approach to the intertransverse area of the lumbar spine  

PubMed Central

A midline approach to the lumbar region is most frequently used for posterior lumbar spine surgery. The exposure of the deeper layer of muscles, however, is imprecise and can entail substantial tissue damage and blood loss. During 10 years of operative surgical experience, we have developed an improved and less traumatic technique for exposure of the lumbar transverse processes and intertransverse region in which the tendons of multifidus and longissimus muscles are isolated at every level and divided laterally to the facet joints. This method eases identification and accurate cauterisation of the subjacent arteries, thereby reducing tissue damage and blood loss. It takes no more time and clarifies the exposure of the lumbar transverse processes and intertransverse region. Cadaveric dissection confirms the muscular and arterial anatomy of the region. We recommend use of this modified approach to improve standard practice.

Weatherley, Christopher Roy; Emran, Ihab Mohammad; Newell, Richard Leonard Martyn

2010-01-01

117

Ganglion cyst of the posterior longitudinal ligament causing lumbar radiculopathy: case report.  

PubMed

We describe a man aged 26 years who presented with a neurological syndrome, which was found on lumbar radioculopathy to be due to a ganglion cyst originating from the posterior longitudinal ligament. Based on MRI findings, cystic lesion was suspected, a round lesion at L4 level with no connection to the adjacent facet or to the dura matter. During surgery, a liquid-containing cystic lesion was found to originate from the posterior longitudinal ligament at L4 level. The resected cyst was diagnosed histologically as a ganglion cyst. A complete cure was established after surgery and no recurrence was noted at a follow-up 1.7 years postoperatively. A ganglion cyst of the posterior longitudinal ligament should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a cyst in the lumbar region causing neurological complications. PMID:9300974

Baba, H; Furusawa, N; Maezawa, Y; Uchida, K; Kokubo, Y; Imura, S; Noriki, S

1997-09-01

118

Sequestrated lumbar intervertebral disc in the posterior epidural space: a report on two cases and review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPosterior epidural migration is an interesting but rare path taken by a prolapsed intervertebral disc fragment. There are only seven cases reported of a similar migration of the disc fragment in the lumbar spine.

Palaniappan Lakshmanan; Sashin Ahuja; Kathleen Lyons; John Howes; Paul Rhys Davies

2006-01-01

119

Long-term results after posterior fixation of thoraco-lumbar burst fractures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current concepts of treating thoraco-lumbar burst-compression injuries are based on posterior transpedicular fixation techniques which are angular stable. However, the long-term results of this approach are controversial due to inconsistent reports and due to a paucity of data on late outcome. In the present study we analyzed 50 patients retrospectively who had an unstable burst-compression injury at T 11–L 2

H.-J Andress; H Braun; T Helmberger; M Schürmann; H Hertlein; W. H Hartl

2002-01-01

120

Quality-of-Life Outcomes With Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Based on Long-Term Analysis of 304 Consecutive Patients  

PubMed Central

Study Design. This was a prospective clinical study that took place in an outpatient spine clinic. Objective. To demonstrate the short-/long-term outcomes from a large cohort of patients undergoing minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MITLIF). Summary of Background Data. Long-term prospective outcomes in patients undergoing minimally invasive spinal fusion for debilitating back pain has not been well studied. Methods. Presenting diagnosis was determined from clinical findings and radiographical (radiograph, magnetic resonance image, computed tomographic scan) evaluations preoperatively. Patients were assessed with outcome measures preoperatively, and postoperatively at 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months, and annually 2 to 7 years (mean follow-up: 47 mo) final follow-up. The rate of postoperative complications and reoperations at the initial level of MITLIF and adjacent level(s) were followed. Fusion rates were assessed blinded and independently by radiograph. Results. Visual analogue scale scores decreased significantly from 7.0 preoperatively to 3.5 at mean 47-month follow-up. Oswestry Disability Index scores declined from 43.1 preoperatively to 28.2 at mean 47-month follow-up. Short-Form 36 mental component scores increased from 43.8 preoperatively to 49.7 at 47-month follow-up. Short-Form 36 physical component scores increased from 30.6 preoperatively to 39.6 at 47-month follow-up (P < 0.05). Conclusion. This prospectively collected outcomes study shows long-term statistically significant clinical outcomes improvement after MITLIF in patients with clinically symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease with or without stenosis. MITLIF resulted in a high rate of spinal fusion and very low rate of interbody fusion failure and/or adjacent segment disease requiring reoperation while reducing postoperative complications. Level of Evidence: 3

Hussain, Namath S.; White, G. Zachary; Begun, Evan M.; Collins, Robert A.; Fahim, Daniel K.; Hiremath, Girish K.; Adbi, Fadumo M.; Yacob, Sammy A.

2014-01-01

121

Noncontiguous lumbar vertebral hemangiomas treated by posterior decompression, intraoperative kyphoplasty, and segmental fixation.  

PubMed

Vertebral hemangiomas are benign lesions and are often asymptomatic. Most vertebral hemangiomas that cause cord compression and neurological symptoms are located in the thoracic spine and involve a single vertebra. The authors report the rare case of lumbar hemangiomas in a 60-year-old woman presenting with severe back pain and rapidly progressive neurological signs attributable to 2 noncontiguous lesions. After embolization of the feeding arteries, no improvement was noted. Thus, the authors performed open surgery using a combination of posterior decompression, intraoperative kyphoplasty, and segmental fixation. The patient experienced relief from back and leg pain immediately after surgery. At 3 months postoperatively, her symptoms and neurological deficits had improved completely. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of 2 noncontiguous extensive lumbar hemangiomas presenting with neurological symptoms managed by such combined treatment. The combined management seems to be an effective method for treating symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas. PMID:24236666

Yu, Bin; Wu, Desheng; Shen, Bin; Zhao, Weidong; Huang, Yufeng; Zhu, Jianguang; Qi, Dongduo

2014-01-01

122

Minimum 10-Year Follow-up Study of Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: Progressive Pattern of the Adjacent Disc Degeneration  

PubMed Central

Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose The aims of the current study are to evaluate the minimum 10-year follow-up clinical results of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for degenerative spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature ALIF has been widely used as a treatment regimen in the management of lumbar spondylolisthesis. Still much controversy exists regarding the factors that affect the postoperative clinical outcomes. Methods The author performed a retrospective review of 20 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis treated with ALIF (follow-up, 16.4 years). The clinical results were assessed by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score for low back pain, vertebral slip and disc height index on the radiographs. Results The mean preoperative JOA score was 7.1 ± 1.8 points (15-point-method). At 1 year, 5 years, and 10 years or more after surgery, the JOA scores were assessed as 12.4 ± 2.2 points, 12.7 ± 2.6 points, 12.0 ± 2.5 points, respectively (excluding the data of reoperated cases). The adjacent disc degeneration developed in all cases during the long-term follow-up. The progressive pattern of disc degeneration was divided into three types. Initially, disc degeneration occurred due to disc space narrowing. After that, the intervertebral discs showed segmental instability with translation at the upper level. But the lower discs showed osteophyte formation, and occasionally lead to the collapse or spontaneous union. Conclusions The clinical results of the long-term follow-up data after ALIF became worse due to the adjacent disc degeneration. The progressive pattern of disc degeneration was different according to the adjacent levels.

Yasuda, Taketoshi; Hori, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kayo; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu

2012-01-01

123

Minimally Invasive Versus Open Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis Grades 1-2: Patient-Reported Clinical Outcomes and Cost-Utility Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is the standard surgical treatment for patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis who do not respond to a 6-week course of conservative therapy. A number of morbidities are associated with the conventional open-TLIF method, so minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques for TLIF (MIS-TLIF) have been introduced to reduce the trauma to paraspinal muscles and hasten postoperative recovery. Because providing cost-effective medical treatment is a core initiative of healthcare reforms, a comparison of open-TLIF and MIS-TLIF must include a cost-utility analysis in addition to an analysis of clinical effectiveness. Methods We compared patient-reported clinical functional outcomes and hospital direct costs in age-matched patients treated surgically with either open-TLIF or MIS-TLIF. Patients were followed for at least 1 year, and patient scores on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog scale (VAS) were analyzed at 6 weeks, 6 months, and ?1 year postoperatively in the 2 treatment groups. Results Compared to their preoperative scores, patients in both the open-TLIF and MIS-TLIF groups had significant improvements in the ODI and VAS scores at each follow-up point, but no significant difference in functional outcome occurred between the open-TLIF and MIS-TLIF groups (P=0.46). However, open-TLIF is significantly more costly compared to MIS-TLIF (P=0.0002). Conclusion MIS-TLIF is a more cost-effective treatment than open-TLIF for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis and is equally effective as the conventional open-TLIF procedure, although further financial analysis—including an analysis of indirect costs—is needed to better understand the full benefit of MIS-TLIF.

Sulaiman, Wale A. R.; Singh, Manish

2014-01-01

124

Postoperative sudden sensorineural hearing loss after posterior lumbar decompression: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  We report a case in which a patient sustained a durai tear during spinal surgery under general anesthesia complicated by a\\u000a severe and persistent unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Clinical findings  A 51 -yr-old man with no previous otological history underwent a posterior lumbar decompression surgery in the prone position\\u000a under general anesthesia. A small durai tear was discovered intra-operatively and was

Peter H. K. Mak; Paul S. Tumber

2003-01-01

125

The SNAP trial: a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial of a silicon nitride versus a PEEK cage in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders: study protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages have been widely used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disc disorders, and show good clinical results. Still, complications such as subsidence and migration of the cage are frequently seen. A lack of osteointegration and fibrous tissues surrounding PEEK cages are held responsible. Ceramic implants made of silicon nitride show better biocompatible and osteoconductive qualities, and therefore are expected to lower complication rates and allow for better fusion. Purpose of this study is to show that fusion with the silicon nitride cage produces non-inferior results in outcome of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire at all follow-up time points as compared to the same procedure with PEEK cages. Methods/Design This study is designed as a double blind multi-center randomized controlled trial with repeated measures analysis. 100 patients (18–75 years) presenting with symptomatic lumbar degenerative disorders unresponsive to at least 6 months of conservative treatment are included. Patients will be randomly assigned to a PEEK cage or a silicon nitride cage, and will undergo a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation. Primary outcome measure is the functional improvement measured by the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Secondary outcome parameters are the VAS leg, VAS back, SF-36, Likert scale, neurological outcome and radiographic assessment of fusion. After 1 year the fusion rate will be measured by radiograms and CT. Follow-up will be continued for 2 years. Patients and clinical observers who will perform the follow-up visits will be blinded for type of cage used during follow-up. Analyses of radiograms and CT will be performed independently by two experienced radiologists. Discussion In this study a PEEK cage will be compared with a silicon nitride cage in the treatment of symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled trial in which the silicon nitride cage is compared with the PEEK cage in patients with symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disorders. Trial registration NCT01557829

2014-01-01

126

Clinical and Radiologic Analysis of Posterior Apophyseal Ring Separation Associated with Lumbar Disc Herniation  

PubMed Central

Objective We analyzed the clinical and radiologic features of posterior apophyseal ring separation (PARS) with lumbar disc herniation and suggest the proper management options according to the PARS characteristics. Methods We reviewed case series of patients with PARS who underwent surgery of lumbar disc herniation. Preoperative symptoms, neurologic status, Body Mass Index, preoperative and postoperative Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Korean-Oswestry Disability Index (K-ODI) scores, operation types were obtained. PARS size, locations, the degree of resection were assessed. Results PARS was diagnosed in 109 (7.5%) patients among 1448 patients given surgical treatment for single level lumbar disc herniation. There were 55 (50.5%) small PARS and 54 (49.5%) large PARS. Among the large PARS group, 15 (27.8%) had lower endplate PARS of upper vertebra at the level of disc herniation. Thirty-nine (72.2%) were upper endplate PARS of lower vertebra. Among the group with upper endplate PARS of lower vertebra, unresected PARS was diagnosed in 12 (30.8%) cases and resected PARS was diagnosed in 27 (69.2%) cases. VAS and K-ODI scores changes were 3.6±2.9 and 5.4±6.4 in the unresected PARS group, 5.8±2.1 and 11.3±7.1 in the resected PARS group. The group with upper endplate PARS of lower vertebra showed significant difference of VAS (p=0.01) and K-ODI (p=0.013) score changes between unresected and resected PARS groups. Conclusion The large PARS of upper endplate in lower vertebra should be removed during the surgery of lumbar disc herniation. High level or bilateral side of PARS should be widely decompressed and arthrodesis procedures are necessary if there is a possibility of secondary instability.

Bae, Jung-Sik; Rhee, Woo-Tack; Kim, Woo-Jae; Ha, Seong-Il; Lim, Jae-Hyeon

2013-01-01

127

Continuous Femoral Versus Posterior Lumbar Plexus Nerve Blocks for Analgesia After Hip Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Controlled Study  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Hip arthroplasty frequently requires potent postoperative analgesia, often provided with an epidural or posterior lumbar plexus local anesthetic infusion. However, American Society of Regional Anesthesia guidelines now recommend against epidural and continuous posterior lumbar plexus blocks during administration of various perioperative anticoagulants often administered after hip arthroplasty. A continuous femoral nerve block is a possible analgesic alternative, but whether it provides comparable analgesia to a continuous posterior lumbar plexus block after hip arthroplasty remains unclear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that differing the catheter insertion site (femoral versus posterior lumbar plexus) after hip arthroplasty has no impact on postoperative analgesia. METHODS Preoperatively, subjects undergoing hip arthroplasty were randomly assigned to receive either a femoral or posterior lumbar plexus stimulating catheter inserted 5 to 15 cm or 0 to 1 cm past the needletip, respectively. Postoperatively, patients received perineural ropivacaine, 0.2% (basal 6 mL/hour, bolus 4 mL, 30 min lockout) for at least two days. The primary end point was the average daily pain scores as measured with a numeric rating scale (0–10) recorded in the 24-h period beginning at 07:30 the morning after surgery, excluding twice-daily physical therapy sessions. Secondary end points included pain during physical therapy, ambulatory distance, and supplemental analgesic requirements during the same 24-h period, as well as satisfaction with analgesia during hospitalization. RESULTS The mean (SD) pain scores for subjects receiving a femoral infusion (n = 25) were 3.6 (1.8) versus 3.5 (1.8) for patients receiving a posterior lumbar plexus infusion (n = 22) resulting in a group difference of 0.1 (95% confidence interval ?0.9 to 1.2; P = 0.78). Because the confidence interval was within a prespecified ?1.6 to 1.6 range, we conclude that the effect of the two analgesic techniques on postoperative pain was equivalent. Similarly, we detected no differences between the two treatments with respect to the secondary end points, with one exception: subjects with a femoral catheter ambulated a median (10th–90th percentiles) 2 (0–17) m the morning after surgery, compared with 11 (0–31) m for subjects with a posterior lumbar plexus catheter (data nonparametric; P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS After hip arthroplasty, a continuous femoral nerve block is an acceptable analgesic alternative to a continuous posterior lumbar plexus block when using a stimulating perineural catheter. However, early ambulatory ability suffers with a femoral infusion.

Ilfeld, Brian M.; Mariano, Edward R.; Madison, Sarah J.; Loland, Vanessa J.; Sandhu, NavParkash S.; Suresh, Preetham J.; Bishop, Michael L.; Kim, T. Edward; Donohue, Michael C.; Kulidjian, Anna A.; Ball, Scott T.

2011-01-01

128

Clinical and radiographic assessment of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using HEALOS collagen-hydroxyapatite sponge with autologous bone marrow aspirate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background contextStudies have suggested that the use of bone marrow aspirate (BMA) with HEALOS (DePuy Spine, Raynham, MA), a collagen-hydroxyapatite sponge (CHS), is an effective substitute for autologous iliac crest bone graft when used in fusion procedures of the lumbar spine.

Jason D. Carter; Alan B. Swearingen; Christopher D. Chaput; Mark D. Rahm

2009-01-01

129

The accuracy of 3D image navigation with a cutaneously fixed dynamic reference frame in minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.  

PubMed

Objective: In contrast to preoperative image-based 3D navigation systems, which require surgeon-dependent registration, an intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (cb-CT) image-based 3D navigation system allows automatic registration during the acquisition of 3D images intraoperatively. Thus, the need for spinal exposure for point matching is obviated, making a cb-CT image-based navigation system ideal for use in minimally invasive spinal procedures. Conventionally, the dynamic reference frame (DRF) is mounted to an adjacent spinous process or iliac bone through a separate incision. However, the close proximity of the DRF to the surgical area may result in its interfering with the surgical procedure or causing streak artifacts on the navigation images. Cutaneous placement of the DRF overlying the sacral hiatus is one possible solution to these problems, but such a placement does not provide a solid bony fixation point and is distant from the surgical area, both of which factors may hinder the accuracy of the navigation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a novel idea for DRF placement in a series of mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) procedures performed with intraoperative cb-CT image-based 3D navigation. Methods: From June 2009 to December 2009, 20 patients underwent mini-open TLIF for a total 82 pedicle screws placed in the lumbar spine with cutaneous placement of the DRF overlying the sacral hiatus. The pedicle screws were inserted under navigational guidance using cb-CT data acquired intraoperatively with a Medtronic O-arm. Screw positions were subsequently checked with a final intraoperative cb-CT scan. Nineteen patients underwent single-level fusion (8 at L4-5, 6 at L5-S1, 4 at L3-4, and 1 at L2-3) and one patient underwent two-level fusion (from L3-5). Results: There were 4 (4.9%) pedicle perforations greater than 2?mm out of the 82 pedicle screw insertions in the 20 patients. Two of these breached screws were repositioned and confirmed to be in place with a final intraoperative cb-CT. There were no complications of neural injury associated with these perforations. Conclusion: A cutaneously mounted DRF overlying the sacral hiatus provides accuracy in intraoperative 3D image guided navigation for mini-open TLIF that is comparable to that obtained in other reported series using a fixed bony attachment point for the DRF. PMID:23098190

Cho, Ji Young; Chan, Chee Keong; Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Ho-Yeon

2012-01-01

130

Traumatic Posterior L4-L5 Fracture Dislocation of the Lumbar Spine: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Study Design?Case report. Objective?The diagnosis and surgical management of a patient with traumatic bilateral posterior dislocation of L4–L5 is presented with a thorough review of the existing literature. Summary of Background Data?Traumatic dislocation of L4–L5 has been reported in the English literature in only five cases; of these, only two were retrolisthesis. Methods?A 20-year-old patient was involved in a high-energy vehicular accident and presented with back pain and inability to ambulate. Neurological assessment showed motor strength grade 2/5 in the proximal lower-extremity muscle groups (L1–L3 myotomes) and 0/5 strength distally (L4–S1 myotomes); in addition, incontinence of sphincters was found. X-rays and computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a three-column ligamentous injury with posterior fracture-dislocation of the L4 vertebral body with complete posterior displacement of L4 to L5 vertebral body. The patient underwent posterior approach with reduction, transpedicular fixation, and posterolateral fusion with autologous bone graft. Results?At 1-year follow-up, the patient had recovered muscular strength in proximal lower-extremities muscle groups, sphincter function had fully recovered, and he was able to ambulate with crutches. There was no recovery of distal extremity sensorimotor function. Plain radiograph and CT scan showed good alignment and progressive maturation of his fusion procedure. Conclusion?Traumatic retrolisthesis of L4–L5 is a high-energy unstable fracture; reduction of the dislocation is challenging because of the heavy forces acting in the lower lumbar spine. Instrumented fusion restores alignment and maintains segmental stability.

Zarate-Kalfopulos, Baron; Romero-Vargas, Samuel; Alcantara-Canseco, Cesar; Rosales-Olivarez, Luis Miguel; Alpizar-Aguirre, Armando; Reyes-Sanchez, Alejandro

2012-01-01

131

Sleep apnoea adversely affects the outcome in patients who undergo posterior lumbar fusion: a population-based study.  

PubMed

Despite the increasing prevalence of sleep apnoea, little information is available regarding its impact on the peri-operative outcome of patients undergoing posterior lumbar fusion. Using a national database, patients who underwent lumbar fusion between 2006 and 2010 were identified, sub-grouped by diagnosis of sleep apnoea and compared. The impact of sleep apnoea on various outcome measures was assessed by regression analysis. The records of 84,655 patients undergoing posterior lumbar fusion were identified and 7.28% (n = 6163) also had a diagnostic code for sleep apnoea. Compared with patients without sleep apnoea, these patients were older, more frequently female, had a higher comorbidity burden and higher rates of peri-operative complications, post-operative mechanical ventilation, blood product transfusion and intensive care. Patients with sleep apnoea also had longer and more costly periods of hospitalisation. In the regression analysis, sleep apnoea emerged as an independent risk factor for the development of peri-operative complications (odds ratio (OR) 1.50, confidence interval (CI) 1.38;1.62), blood product transfusions (OR 1.12, CI 1.03;1.23), mechanical ventilation (OR 6.97, CI 5.90;8.23), critical care services (OR 1.86, CI 1.71;2.03), prolonged hospitalisation and increased cost (OR 1.28, CI 1.19;1.37; OR 1.10, CI 1.03;1.18). Patients with sleep apnoea who undergo posterior lumbar fusion pose significant challenges to clinicians. PMID:24493191

Stundner, O; Chiu, Y-L; Sun, X; Ramachandran, S-K; Gerner, P; Vougioukas, V; Mazumdar, M; Memtsoudis, S G

2014-02-01

132

Conservative management of psoas haematoma following complex lumbar surgery  

PubMed Central

We report psoas hematoma communicating with extradural hematoma and compressing on lumbar nerve roots during the postoperative period in a patient who underwent L3/4 level dynamic stabilization and L4/5 and L5/S1 posterior lumbar interbody fusion. Persistent radicular symptoms occurring soon after posterior lumbar surgery are not an unknown entity. However, psoas hematoma communicating with the extradural hematoma and compressing on L4 and L5 nerve roots soon after surgery, leading to radicular symptoms has not been reported. In addition to the conservative approach in managing such cases, this case report also emphasizes the importance of clinical evaluation and utilization of necessary imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to diagnose the cause of persistent severe radicular pain in the postoperative period.

Lakkol, Sandesh; Sarda, Praveen; Karpe, Prasad; Krishna, Manoj

2014-01-01

133

A higher frequency of lumbar ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in elderly in an outpatient clinic in Japan  

PubMed Central

Purpose Little is known about the prevalence and epidemiological characteristics of lumbar ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). We analyzed the rate of lumbar OPLL in an outpatient unit where primary care physicians are working in Japan, to better understand the epidemiological characteristics of the disease. Methods We analyzed consecutive, first-time visiting outpatients who received abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) scan at the Department of General Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University Hospital, Japan, between April 2009 and March 2012. Each parameter such as age, sex, and clinical presentation was investigated. Results Out of 393 patients who underwent abdominal and pelvic CT scan, 33 (8.4%) were diagnosed as lumbar OPLL. When compared with patients without lumbar OPLL (n = 360), there was no significant difference in gender, body mass index (BMI), presence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus or hyperlipidemia, and smoking habit, while the age in patients with lumbar OPLL was significantly higher. Conclusion These results suggest for the first time that lumbar OPLL is frequently observed in elderly people in the primary care setting, in Japan.

Okumura, Toshikatsu; Ohhira, Masumi; Kumei, Shima; Nozu, Tsukasa

2013-01-01

134

Current concepts on spinal arthrodesis in degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine  

PubMed Central

Back pain is a common chronic disorder that represents a large burden for the health care system. There is a broad spectrum of available treatment options for patients suffering from chronic lower back pain in the setting of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, including both conservative and operative approaches. Lumbar arthrodesis techniques can be divided into sub-categories based on the part of the vertebral column that is addressed (anterior vs posterior). Furthermore, one has to differentiate between approaches aiming at a solid fusion in contrast to motion-sparing techniques with the proposed advantage of a reduced risk of developing adjacent disc disease. However, the field of application and long-term outcomes of these novel motion-preserving surgical techniques, including facet arthroplasty, nucleus replacement, and lumbar disc arthroplasty, need to be more precisely evaluated in long-term prospective studies. Innovative surgical treatment strategies involving minimally invasive techniques, such as lateral lumbar interbody fusion or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, as well as percutaneous implantation of transpedicular or transfacet screws, have been established with the reported advantages of reduced tissue invasiveness, decreased collateral damage, reduced blood loss, and decreased risk of infection. The aim of this study was to review well-established procedures for lumbar spinal fusion with the main focus on current concepts on spinal arthrodesis and motion-sparing techniques in degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine.

Lykissas, Marios G; Aichmair, Alexander

2013-01-01

135

Combined posterior lumbar plexus-sciatic nerve block versus combined femoral-obturator-sciatic nerve block for ACL reconstruction  

PubMed Central

Background We compared the efficacy of combined posterior lumbar plexus–sciatic nerve block with that of combined femoral–obturator–sciatic nerve block as anesthesia for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery, because both block combinations have been recommended for lower limb arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery. Methods Forty-eight patients undergoing elective unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction under local anesthesia were randomized to undergo either combined posterior lumbar plexus–sciatic nerve block (Group 1), or combined femoral–obturator–sciatic nerve block (Group 2). Blocks were performed using nerve stimulation and bupivacaine 0.5% mixed with lignocaine 2%. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, and pulse oximetry were recorded. Quality of anesthesia, motor and sensory block, time to first analgesic use, sedation, and need for general anesthesia were recorded, along with verbal postoperative pain scores, and side effects. Results No patient in Group 1 and two patients in Group 2 needed general anesthesia. Complete sensory blockade was higher in Group 1 than in Group 2. However, complete motor blockade was similar in both groups. In Group 1, verbal pain scores were lower than in Group 2. Time to first analgesic was similar between the two groups. Total analgesic consumption was lower in Group 1. No significant differences were found for heart rate, pulse oximetry, or systolic and diastolic blood pressure between the groups, and no signs of toxicity were encountered. Conclusion Combined posterior lumbar plexus–sciatic nerve block provided more comfortable intraoperative anesthesia and better postoperative analgesia than combined femoral–obturator–sciatic nerve block for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery.

Tharwat, Ayman I

2011-01-01

136

Lumbar Laminectomy and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

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137

Caudal Vertebral Body Fractures Following Lateral Interbody Fusion in Nonosteoporotic Patients  

PubMed Central

Background The minimally invasive lateral transpsoas approach for lumbar fusions has become increasingly popular. However, vertebral body fractures have been reported after this procedure, particularly in patients with osteoporosis and patients undergoing multilevel fusions. We evaluated the risk factors for caudal vertebral body fractures in 2 nonosteoporotic patients with single-level disease. Case Reports Two patients presented with several years' history of incapacitating chronic low back pain and intermittent radicular pain. Diagnostic imaging in both cases demonstrated grade 1 degenerative spondylolisthesis. The patients underwent a lateral transpsoas interbody fusion, with lateral plate fixation in 1 patient and standalone lateral fusion in the other. The operations were performed without any incidents and both patients experienced immediate symptom relief. Both patients returned several weeks later with excruciating low back pain, without any postoperative history of trauma or heavy lifting. Diagnostic imaging in both patients showed a coronal fracture of the inferior vertebral body. The patients underwent urgent revision surgery involving posterior supplementation with pedicle screw and rod constructs and posterolateral fusion. Conclusion Caudal vertebral body fracture in patients with normal bone quality is a major potential complication after the minimally invasive lateral approach for lumbar fusions. Risk factors may include placement of a lateral plate, the size of the smaller anteroposterior cage, endplate violation, and oblique placement of the interbody cage.

Tender, Gabriel C.

2014-01-01

138

Time-sequential changes of differentially expressed miRNAs during the process of anterior lumbar interbody fusion using equine bone protein extract, rhBMP-2 and autograft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The precise mechanism of bone regeneration in different bone graft substitutes has been well studied in recent researches. However, miRNAs regulation of the bone formation has been always mysterious. We developed the anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model in pigs using equine bone protein extract (BPE), recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS), and autograft as bone graft substitute, respectively. The miRNA and gene expression profiles of different bone graft materials were examined using microarray technology and data analysis, including self-organizing maps, KEGG pathway and Biological process GO analyses. We then jointly analyzed miRNA and mRNA profiles of the bone fusion tissue at different time points respectively. Results showed that miRNAs, including let-7, miR-129, miR-21, miR-133, miR-140, miR-146, miR-184, and miR-224, were involved in the regulation of the immune and inflammation response, which provided suitable inflammatory microenvironment for bone formation. At late stage, several miRNAs directly regulate SMAD4, Estrogen receptor 1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C for bone formation. It can be concluded that miRNAs play important roles in balancing the inflammation and bone formation.

Chen, Da-Fu; Zhou, Zhi-Yu; Dai, Xue-Jun; Gao, Man-Man; Huang, Bao-Ding; Liang, Tang-Zhao; Shi, Rui; Zou, Li-Jin; Li, Hai-Sheng; Bünger, Cody; Tian, Wei; Zou, Xue-Nong

2014-04-01

139

Time-sequential changes of differentially expressed miRNAs during the process of anterior lumbar interbody fusion using equine bone protein extract, rhBMP-2 and autograft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The precise mechanism of bone regeneration in different bone graft substitutes has been well studied in recent researches. However, miRNAs regulation of the bone formation has been always mysterious. We developed the anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model in pigs using equine bone protein extract (BPE), recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS), and autograft as bone graft substitute, respectively. The miRNA and gene expression profiles of different bone graft materials were examined using microarray technology and data analysis, including self-organizing maps, KEGG pathway and Biological process GO analyses. We then jointly analyzed miRNA and mRNA profiles of the bone fusion tissue at different time points respectively. Results showed that miRNAs, including let-7, miR-129, miR-21, miR-133, miR-140, miR-146, miR-184, and miR-224, were involved in the regulation of the immune and inflammation response, which provided suitable inflammatory microenvironment for bone formation. At late stage, several miRNAs directly regulate SMAD4, Estrogen receptor 1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C for bone formation. It can be concluded that miRNAs play important roles in balancing the inflammation and bone formation.

Chen, Da-Fu; Zhou, Zhi-Yu; Dai, Xue-Jun; Gao, Man-Man; Huang, Bao-Ding; Liang, Tang-Zhao; Shi, Rui; Zou, Li-Jin; Li, Hai-Sheng; Bünger, Cody; Tian, Wei; Zou, Xue-Nong

2014-03-01

140

Impact of total disc arthroplasty on the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease: Analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2000 to 2008  

PubMed Central

Background: Spinal fusion is the most rapidly increasing type of lumbar spine surgery for various lumbar degenerative pathologies. The surgical treatment of lumbar spine degenerative disc disease may involve decompression, stabilization, or arthroplasty procedures. Lumbar disc athroplasty is a recent technological advance in the field of lumbar surgery. This study seeks to determine the clinical impact of anterior lumbar disc replacement on the surgical treatment of lumbar spine degenerative pathology. This is a retrospective assessment of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Methods: The NIS was searched for ICD-9 codes for lumbar and lumbosacral fusion (81.06), anterior lumbar interbody fusion (81.07), and posterolateral lumbar fusion (81.08), as well as for procedure codes for revision fusion surgery in the lumbar and lumbosacral spine (81.36, 81.37, and 81.38). To assess lumbar arthroplasty, procedure codes for the insertion or replacement of lumbar artificial discs (84.60, 84.65, and 84.68) were queried. Results were assayed from 2000 through 2008, the last year with available data. Analysis was done using the lme4 package in the R programming language for statistical computing. Results: A total of nearly 300,000 lumbar spine fusion procedures were reported in the NIS database from 2000 to 2008; assuming a representative cross-section of the US health care market, this models approximately 1.5 million procedures performed over this time period. In 2005, the first year of its widespread use, there were 911 lumbar arthroplasty procedures performed, representing 3% of posterolateral fusions performed in this year. Since introduction, the number of lumbar spine arthroplasty procedures has consistently declined, to 653 total procedures recorded in the NIS in 2008. From 2005 to 2008, lumbar arthroplasties comprised approximately 2% of lumbar posterolateral fusions. Arthroplasty patients were younger than posterior lumbar fusion patients (42.8 ± 11.5 vs. 55.9 ± 15.1 years, P < 0.0000001). The distribution of arthroplasty procedures was even between academic and private urban facilities (48.5% and 48.9%, respectively). While rates of posterolateral lumbar spine fusion steadily grew during the period (OR 1.06, 95% CI: 1.05-1.06, P < 0.0000001), rates of revision surgery and anterior spinal fusion remained static. Conclusions: The impact of lumbar arthroplasty procedures has been minimal. Measured as a percentage of more common lumbar posterior arthrodesis procedures, lumbar arthroplasty comprises only approximately 2% of lumbar spine surgeries performed in the United States. Over the first 4 years following the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, the frequency of lumbar disc arthroplasty has decreased while the number of all lumbar spinal fusions has increased.

Awe, Olatilewa O.; Maltenfort, Mitchel G.; Prasad, Srinivas; Harrop, James S.; Ratliff, John K

2011-01-01

141

Bilateral spondylolysis of inferior articular processes of the fourth lumbar vertebra: a case report.  

PubMed

Lumbar spondylolysis, a well known cause of low back pain, usually affects the pars interarticularis of a lower lumbar vertebra and rarely involves the articular processes. We report a rare case of bilateral spondylolysis of inferior articular processes of L4 vertebra that caused spinal canal stenosis with a significant segmental instability at L4/5 and scoliosis. A 31-year-old male who had suffered from low back pain since he was a teenager presented with numbness of the right lower leg and scoliosis. Plain X-rays revealed bilateral spondylolysis of inferior articular processes of L4, anterolisthesis of the L4 vertebral body, and right lateral wedging of the L4/5 disc with compensatory scoliosis in the cephalad portion of the spine. MR images revealed spinal canal stenosis at the L4/5 disc level. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion of the L4/5 was performed, and his symptoms were relieved. PMID:22111522

Koakutsu, Tomoaki; Morozumi, Naoki; Hoshikawa, Takeshi; Ogawa, Shinji; Ishii, Yushin; Itoi, Eiji

2012-03-01

142

Unilateral psoas abscess following posterior transpedicular stabilization of the lumbar spine  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case of unilateral psoas abscess in a 58-year-old patient, shortly after posterior lower spine stabilization and fusion\\u000a for spinal stenosis using transpedicular spine fixation is reported. The diagnosis was delayed because the patient’s symptoms\\u000a were referred to the thigh and the plain roentgenograms were negative for pathology. The technetium scintigram and computed\\u000a tomography (CT) helped localization, diagnosis and treatment

Panagiotis Korovessis; Giorgos Petsinis; Zisis Papazisis

2000-01-01

143

Clinical Outcomes of Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion in the Treatment of Adult Degenerative Scoliosis  

PubMed Central

Introduction. The use of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) and other lateral access surgery is rapidly increasing in popularity. However, limited data is available regarding its use in scoliosis surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of adults with degenerative lumbar scoliosis treated with XLIF. Methods. Thirty consecutive patients with adult degenerative scoliosis treated by a single surgeon at a major academic institution were followed for an average of 14.3 months. Interbody fusion was completed using the XLIF technique with supplemental posterior instrumentation. Validated clinical outcome scores were obtained on patients preoperatively and at most recent follow-up. Complications were recorded. Results. The study group demonstrated improvement in multiple clinical outcome scores. Oswestry Disability Index scores improved from 24.8 to 19.0 (P?

Caputo, Adam M.; Michael, Keith W.; Chapman, Todd M.; Massey, Gene M.; Howes, Cameron R.; Isaacs, Robert E.; Brown, Christopher R.

2012-01-01

144

Protecting the genitofemoral nerve during direct/extreme lateral interbody fusion (DLIF/XLIF) procedures.  

PubMed

A 77-year-old male presented with a history of severe lower back pain for 10 years with radiculopathy, positive claudication type symptoms in his calf with walking, and severe "burning" in his legs bilaterally with walking. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed lumbar stenosis at the L3-L4 and L4-L5 levels. During the direct or extreme lateral interbody fusion (DLIF/XLIF) procedure, bilateral posterior tibial, femoral, and ulnar nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) were recorded with good morphology of waveforms observed. Spontaneous electromyography (S-EMG) and triggered electromyography (T-EMG) were recorded from cremaster and ipsilateral leg muscles. A left lateral retroperitoneal transpsoas approach was used to access the anterior disc space for complete discectomy, distraction, and interbody fusion. T-EMG ranging from 0.05 to 55.0 mA with duration of 200 microsec was used for identification of the genitofemoral nerve using a monopolar stimulator during the approach. The genitofemoral nerve (L1-L2) was identified, and the guidewire was redirected away from the nerve. Post-operatively, the patient reported complete pain relief and displayed no complications from the procedure. Intraoperative SSEPs, S-EMG, and T-EMG were utilized effectively to guide the surgeon's approach in this DLIF thereby preventing any post-operative neurological deficits such as damage to the genitofemoral nerve that could lead to groin pain. PMID:21313792

Jahangiri, Faisal R; Sherman, Jonathan H; Holmberg, Andrea; Louis, Robert; Elias, Jeff; Vega-Bermudez, Francisco

2010-12-01

145

Anterior Decompression and Shortening Reconstruction with a Titanium Mesh Cage through a Posterior Approach Alone for the Treatment of Lumbar Burst Fractures  

PubMed Central

Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose To examine the efficacy and safety for a posterior-approach circumferential decompression and shortening reconstruction with a titanium mesh cage for lumbar burst fractures. Overview of Literature Surgical decompression and reconstruction for severely unstable lumbar burst fractures requires an anterior or combined anteroposterior approach. Furthermore, anterior instrumentation for the lower lumbar is restricted through the presence of major vessels. Methods Three patients with an L1 burst fracture, one with an L3 and three with an L4 (5 men, 2 women; mean age, 65.0 years) who underwent circumferential decompression and shortening reconstruction with a titanium mesh cage through a posterior approach alone and a 4-year follow-up were evaluated regarding the clinical and radiological course. Results Mean operative time was 277 minutes. Mean blood loss was 471 ml. In 6 patients, the Frankel score improved more than one grade after surgery, and the remaining patient was at Frankel E both before and after surgery. Mean preoperative visual analogue scale was 7.0, improving to 0.7 postoperatively. Local kyphosis improved from 15.7° before surgery to -11.0° after surgery. In 3 cases regarding the mid to lower lumbar patients, local kyphosis increased more than 10° by 3 months following surgery, due to subsidence of the cages. One patient developed severe tilting and subsidence of the cage, requiring additional surgery. Conclusions The results concerning this small series suggest the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of this treatment for unstable lumbar burst fractures. This technique from a posterior approach alone offers several advantages over traditional anterior or combined anteroposterior approaches.

Abe, Eiji; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Murai, Hajime; Kobayashi, Takashi; Abe, Toshiki; Kikuchi, Kazuma; Shimada, Yoichi

2012-01-01

146

Unstable burst fractures of the thoraco-lumbar junction: treatment by posterior bisegmental correction\\/fixation and staged anterior corpectomy and titanium cage implantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Background. Controversy exists about the best treatment of unstable thoraco-lumbar (TL) burst fractures. Kyphosis correction and canal\\u000a decompression in case of a neurological deficit are recognized treatment objectives, and various conservative and surgical\\u000a strategies have been proposed. This prospective observational study evaluates the benefits and risks of a posterior bisegmental\\u000a transpedicular correction\\/fixation and staged anterior corpectomy and titanium cage implantation

M. Payer

2006-01-01

147

Review of integrated neuromusculoskeletal release and the novel application of a segmental anterior/posterior approach in the thoracic, lumbar, and sacral regions.  

PubMed

Integrated neuromusculoskeletal release (INR) using a segmental anterior/posterior approach is an osteopathic manipulative treatment technique that is easily learned and applied. The segmental anterior/posterior approach to INR was developed as a practical osteopathic manipulative treatment procedure for the inpatient setting, but also has equal efficacy in the outpatient setting. It builds on the principles of INR and myofascial release techniques, as well as other techniques. This approach focuses on both the anterior and posterior connectivity of the body through the neuromusculoskeletal system and uses this connectivity to effectively treat somatic dysfunctions. The principles of INR are discussed, as well as the role of INR in the diagnosis and treatment of somatic dysfunctions in the thoracic, lumbar, and sacral regions. PMID:14740981

Danto, Jay B

2003-12-01

148

A Comparison of the Effect of Epidural Patient-Controlled Analgesia with Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia on Pain Control after Posterior Lumbar Instrumented Fusion  

PubMed Central

Objective Retrospective analysis to compare the effect and complication of epidural patient-controlled analgesia (epidural PCA) with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) for the treatment of the post-operative pain after posterior lumbar instrumented fusion. Methods Sixty patients who underwent posterior lumbar instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disease at our institution from September 2007 to January 2008 were enrolled in this study. Out of sixty patients, thirty patients received IV PCA group and thirty patients received epidural PCA group. The pain scale was measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS) score. Results There were no significant difference between IV PCA group and epidural PCA group on the PCA related complications (p=0.7168). Ten patients in IV PCA group and six patients in epidural PCA group showed PCA related complications. Also, there were no significant differences in reduction of VAS score between two groups on postoperative 2 hours (p=0.9618) and 6 hours (p=0.0744). However, postoperative 12 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours showed the significant differences as mean of reduction of VAS score (p=0.0069, 0.0165, 0.0058 respectively). Conclusion The epidural PCA is more effective method to control the post-operative pain than IV PCA after 12 hours of spinal fusion operation. However, during the first twelve hours after operation, there were no differences between IV PCA and epidural PCA.

Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Cheong, Seong-Mee; Kim, Sumi; Kooh, Mirang

2011-01-01

149

Biomechanical comparison between lumbar disc arthroplasty and fusion.  

PubMed

The artificial disc is a mobile implant for degenerative disc replacement that attempts to lessen the degeneration of the adjacent elements. However, inconsistent biomechanical results for the neighboring elements have been reported in a number of studies. The present study used finite element (FE) analysis to explore the biomechanical differences at the surgical and both adjacent levels following artificial disc replacement and interbody fusion procedures. First, a three-dimensional FE model of a five-level lumbar spine was established by the commercially available medical imaging software Amira 3.1.1, and FE software ANSYS 9.0. After validating the five-level intact (INT) model with previous in vitro studies, the L3/L4 level of the INT model was modified to either insert an artificial disc (ProDisc II; ADR) or incorporate bilateral posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) cages with a pedicle screw fixation system. All models were constrained at the bottom of the L5 vertebra and subjected to 150N preload and 10Nm moments under four physiological motions. The ADR model demonstrated higher range of motion (ROM), annulus stress, and facet contact pressure at the surgical level compared to the non-modified INT model. At both adjacent levels, ROM and annulus stress were similar to that of the INT model and varied less than 7%. In addition, the greatest displacement of posterior annulus occurred at the superior-lateral region. Conversely, the PLIF model showed less ROM, less annulus stress, and no facet contact pressure at the surgical level compared to the INT model. The adjacent levels had obviously high ROM, annulus stress, and facet contact pressure, especially at the adjacent L2/3 level. In conclusion, the artificial disc replacement revealed no adjacent-level instability. However, instability was found at the surgical level, which might accelerate degeneration at the highly stressed annulus and facet joint. In contrast to disc replacement results, the posterior interbody fusion procedure revealed possibly accelerative degeneration of the annulus and facet joint at both adjacent levels. PMID:18760654

Chen, Shih-Hao; Zhong, Zheng-Cheng; Chen, Chen-Sheng; Chen, Wen-Jer; Hung, Chinghua

2009-03-01

150

Transfacet decompression with dowel fixation: a new technique for lumbar lateral spinal stenosis.  

PubMed

Auto-stabilization consequent to spinal segment instability involves osteophyte formation. The most common lumbar spinal stenoses are due to uncinate process spurs at L 5. These spurs inaccessibly lie ventral to the facet joints. Most surgical methods for lateral stenotic lesions do not address the incipient instability. Facet destructive approaches further destabilize the segment. The new decompressive technique here preserves and stabilizes posterior supporting structures: ligaments are left intact; laminas (and facets) are distracted; 11 mm transfacet holes are bored, exactly dorsal to both the spurs and entrapped ganglia; the entrapment (even a lateral herniated disc) is decompressed through the drilled hole. 12 mm bone dowels are then driven into the holes, immediately stabilizing the segment. The dura is not exposed. Reviewed are fifty transfacet cases. In four, a posterior interbody fusion was performed via the transfacet holes. The procedure presents a new window to spinal lesions. PMID:3063077

Ray, C D

1988-01-01

151

Biomechanics of Lateral Interbody Spacers: Going Wider for Going Stiffer  

PubMed Central

This study investigates the biomechanical stability of a large interbody spacer inserted by a lateral approach and compares the biomechanical differences with the more conventional transforaminal interbody fusion (TLIF), with and without supplemental pedicle screw (PS) fixation. Twenty-four L2-L3 functional spinal units (FSUs) were tested with three interbody cage options: (i) 18?mm XLIF cage, (ii) 26?mm XLIF cage, and (iii) 11?mm TLIF cage. Each spacer was tested without supplemental fixation, and with unilateral and bilateral PS fixation. Specimens were subjected to multidirectional nondestructive flexibility tests to 7.5?N·m. The range of motion (ROM) differences were first examined within the same group (per cage) using repeated-measures ANOVA, and then compared between cage groups. The 26?mm XLIF cage provided greater stability than the 18?mm XLIF cage with unilateral PS and 11?mm TLIF cage with bilateral PS. The 18?mm XLIF cage with unilateral PS provided greater stability than the 11?mm TLIF cage with bilateral PS. This study suggests that wider lateral spacers are biomechanically stable and offer the option to be used with less or even no supplemental fixation for interbody lumbar fusion.

Pimenta, Luiz; Turner, Alexander W. L.; Dooley, Zachary A.; Parikh, Rachit D.; Peterson, Mark D.

2012-01-01

152

Long-term results in patients treated with posterior instrumentation and fusion for degenerative scoliosis of the lumbar spine.  

PubMed

The authors report a homogeneously investigated and surgically treated series of 40 patients with degenerative scoliosis of the lumbar spine. The series included 22 females and 18 males with a mean age of 62.8 years. The clinical presentation, the diagnostic work-up, the indication for surgery, the surgical techniques and results are reported. Final evaluation was possible in 30 patients at a mean period of observation of 59.5 months. Following a very precise diagnostic and therapeutic protocol excellent, good and satisfactory surgical results were obtained in 13 (43.3%), 16 (53.3%) and 1 (3.3%) patients, respectively. While scoliosis was converted from a mean preoperative Cobb angle of 18.7 degrees to 7.6 degrees mean pre-operative lumbar lordosis was slightly augmented from 37 degrees to 41.5 degrees. The results suggest that maintainance or correction of lumbar lordosis is more important than the conversion of the scoliotic deformity which is probably treated sufficiently by partial correction and stabilization. Observation over time indicates that the degenerative cascade evolves despite internal fixation and fusion in the majority of the patients until a stable state is reached. This stable state is probably rather the result of ankylosis of the facet joints than the effect of posterolateral fusion. PMID:10071682

Zurbriggen, C; Markwalder, T M; Wyss, S

1999-01-01

153

Multidirectional flexibility analysis of anterior and posterior lumbar artificial disc reconstruction: in vitro human cadaveric spine model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The in vitro multidirectional flexibility analysis was conducted to investigate the initial biomechanical effect of biomimetic artificial intervertebral disc replacement from either anterior or posterior approach in a cadaveric lumbosacral spine model. Two designs of anterior total and posterior subtotal artificial discs were developed using bioactive three-dimensional fabric and bioresorbable hydroxyapatite\\/poly-l-lactide material (3DF disc). Both models were designed to obtain

Yoshihisa Kotani; Bryan W. Cunningham; Kuniyoshi Abumi; Anton E. Dmitriev; Niabin Hu; Manabu Ito; Yasuo Shikinami; Paul C. McAfee; Akio Minami

2006-01-01

154

Biomechanical comparison of three stand-alone lumbar cages -- a three-dimensional finite element analysis  

PubMed Central

Background For anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), stand-alone cages can be supplemented with vertebral plate, locking screws, or threaded cylinder to avoid the use of posterior fixation. Intuitively, the plate, screw, and cylinder aim to be embedded into the vertebral bodies to effectively immobilize the cage itself. The kinematic and mechanical effects of these integrated components on the lumbar construct have not been extensively studied. A nonlinearly lumbar finite-element model was developed and validated to investigate the biomechanical differences between three stand-alone (Latero, SynFix, and Stabilis) and SynCage-Open plus transpedicular fixation. All four cages were instrumented at the L3-4 level. Methods The lumbar models were subjected to the follower load along the lumbar column and the moment at the lumbar top to produce flexion (FL), extension (EX), left/right lateral bending (LLB, RLB), and left/right axial rotation (LAR, RAR). A 10 Nm moment was applied to obtain the six physiological motions in all models. The comparison indices included disc range of motion (ROM), facet contact force, and stresses of the annulus and implants. Results At the surgical level, the SynCage-open model supplemented with transpedicular fixation decreased ROM (>76%) greatly; while the SynFix model decreased ROM 56-72%, the Latero model decreased ROM 36-91%, in all motions as compared with the INT model. However, the Stabilis model decreased ROM slightly in extension (11%), lateral bending (21%), and axial rotation (34%). At the adjacent levels, there were no obvious differences in ROM and annulus stress among all instrumented models. Conclusions ALIF instrumentation with the Latero or SynFix cage provides an acceptable stability for clinical use without the requirement of additional posterior fixation. However, the Stabilis cage is not favored in extension and lateral bending because of insufficient stabilization.

2013-01-01

155

Lumbar ADR: a triumph of technology over reason?  

PubMed

The many unanswered questions surrounding ADR beget the question of whether patients would ultimately be better managed with lumbar fusion surgery or even no surgery at all. Lumbar fusion technology has made advances in recent years with the advent of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and the use of bone morphogenetic proteins. With a TLIF procedure, spine surgeons are able to obtain a 360-degree fusion through a single posterior incision with more predictable long-term results, especially when patients have confounding issues. Although early clinical results show ADR to be a promising alternative to current surgical options, long-term results are needed to adequately assess the procedure's efficacy. There will always be a demand for new technology. Cost, quality, and access are performance benchmarks for hospital survival in the current health care industry. Today's health care environment forces surgeons to be fiscally responsible while still providing the best quality care possible. Therefore, the cost of ADR compared to a traditional pedicle screw instrumentation (about $12,000 per segment vs $3,500 per segment) must be taken into consideration. Is the additional cost of ADR justified when studies so far fail to show a statistically significant difference in long-term outcomes? How do we justify the added cost when conventional lumbar fusion, the gold standard for intractable cases, has more predictable outcomes? Ultimately, ADR may be a more promising alternative to spinal fusion for patients with multilevel DDD (ie, a three-segment lumbar disk replacement) because it can spare disk decompensation of the adjacent segments. PMID:17847648

Madonia-Barr, Jennifer R

2007-08-01

156

Posterior fusion and implantation of the SOCON-SRI system in the treatment of adult spondylolisthesis.  

PubMed

Surgery for adult patients with lumbar and lumbosacral spondylolisthesis is reserved for those with intractable radiculopathy, claudication, or symptomatic spinal instability. Internal fixation, in which posterior fusion, transpedicular screw fixation, and implantation of titanium devices are performed, has been advocated to improve fusion rates and clinical results. Fourteen consecutive patients with Grade II to III lumbar and lumbosacral spondylolisthesis who underwent posterior decompression, reduction, autologous posterior facet joint arthrodesis, and SOCON-SRI implantation are retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent complete preoperative clinical and neuroradiological evaluation. Treatment consisted of posterior decompressive surgery and implantation of the SOCON-SRI system (transpedicular screws, prebent longitudinal rods, and one locking-screw clamps). Distraction of the interbody space and rotation were performed to achieve an optimum spinal realignment. The facet joints were fused by using autologous bone graft. The authors obtained detailed clinical, functional, economic, and neuroradiological follow-up data for up to 14 months (range 8-18 months). The efficacy of the treatment was evaluated by comparing pre- and postoperative data. Pain was decreased in all cases, neurological dysfunction ameliorated in 50%, and functional and economic status was improved in 78% and 100%, respectively. No cases of fusion failure or instrumentation-related complications occurred. The authors describe their results of treating patients with spondylolisthesis in the light of the rationale for surgery and the more recent pertinent literature. PMID:16918204

La Rosa, G; Germano, A; Conti, A; Cacciola, F; Caruso, G; Tomasello, F

1999-12-15

157

Infection with bacteroides thetaiotaomicron during posterior decompression and dynamic stabilization of the lumbar spine: a case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Patient and surgical risk factors have often been implicated for postoperative posterior spinal wound infection. A 56-year-old male with widely disseminated multiple myeloma presented with severe back pain and lower extremity weakness as a result of fracture and collapse of the L4 vertebral body. Posterior decompression involving bilateral pedicle resection and partial L4 corpectomy was performed. Stabilization was performed by Dynesys instrumentation of L3-5, screw supplementation with polymethylmethacrylate, and posterolateral fusion was performed. Postoperatively, the patient suffered from multiple infections, including Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which were eventually resolved with antibiotic as well as incision and debridement treatment regimens. In cases with numerous perioperative risk factors for infections, the best therapeutic approach may be a preventative one. An understanding of the relevant risk factors may enable the physician to facilitate a perioperative condition best suited for optimal treatment. A case report of infection with Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron during lumbar decompression and dynamic stabilization as well as a review of the literature regarding infection risk factors are presented. PMID:24320995

Agarwal, Nitin; Hansberry, David R; Goldstein, Ira M

2014-08-01

158

Magnetoneurographic registration of propagating magnetic fields in the lumbar spine after stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve has been associated with different somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) recorded along the spine and thorax. The aim of this study was to register and describe the magnetic fields corresponding to different components of spinal SEP after stimulation of tibial nerves. In nine healthy subjects, right and left posterior tibial nerves were transcutaneously electrostimulated at the ankles. Neuromagnetic fields were registered over a circular 800 cm2 area of the lumbosacral spine using a 61-channel biomagnetometer. Magnetic field maps were constructed and examined visually for dipolar patterns. Equivalent current dipoles (ECD) were calculated for each somatosensory evoked field (SEF) using a least-squares fit in a spherical model. In seven subjects dipolar SEF were detected over the lower back at two separate latencies and locations and propagating ECD could be localized. Both the first and second components found agreed anatomically and functionally with respect to propagation in the underlying nerve fibers. It was possible to record and identify SEF which correspond to the SEP described in the literature. Dipole localization based on an equivalent current dipole model allowed a basic evaluation of the plausibility of the measurements with respect to the processes being examined.

Klein, Anita; van Leeuwen, Peter; Hoormann, Jörg; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

2006-06-01

159

V-rod technique for direct repair surgery of pediatric lumbar spondylolysis combined with posterior apophyseal ring fracture.  

PubMed

We report a pediatric baseball player having both a fracture of the posterior ring apophysis and spondylolysis. He was presented to a primary care physician complaining of back pain and leg pain. Despite conservative treatment for 3 months, the pain did not subside. He was referred to our clinic, and surgical intervention was carried out. First, a bony fragment of the caudal L5 apophyseal ring was removed following fenestration at the L5-S interlaminal space, bilaterally: and decompression of the bilateral S1 nerve roots was confirmed. Next, pseudoarthrosis of the L5 pars was refreshed and pedicle screws were inserted bilaterally. A v-shaped rod was inserted beneath the L5 spinous process, which stabilized the pars defects. After the surgery, back pain and leg pain completely disappeared. In conclusion, the v-rod technique is appropriate for the spondylolysis direct repair surgery, especially, in case the loose lamina would have a partial laminotomy. PMID:23741549

Sumita, Takayuki; Sairyo, Koichi; Shibuya, Isao; Kitahama, Yoshihiro; Kanamori, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hironori; Koga, Soichi; Kitagawa, Yasuhiro; Dezawa, Akira

2013-06-01

160

Interbody Fusion in Thoracolumbar Fractures (T11-L2) Using the Percutaneous Dorsolateral Technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The authors' concept of reduction and stabilization of thoracolumbar fractures has become more sophisticated. Depending upon the fracture classification, a posterior transpedicular, an isolated anterior or a combined approach is used. Fractures with a low degree of vertebral body comminution and only one-space disk injury are reduced and stabilized by the transpedicular approach. For reliable anterior interbody fusion, the

Peter Wendsche; Ján Ko?iš; Petr Viš?a; Vladimír Mužík

2002-01-01

161

Kinematic evaluation of the adjacent segments after lumbar instrumented surgery: a comparison between rigid fusion and dynamic non-fusion stabilization.  

PubMed

The aim of the current study was to evaluate changes in lumbar kinematics after lumbar monosegmental instrumented surgery with rigid fusion and dynamic non-fusion stabilization. A total of 77 lumbar spinal stenosis patients with L4 degenerative spondylolisthesis underwent L4-5 monosegmental posterior instrumented surgery. Of these, 36 patients were treated with rigid fusion (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion) and 41 with dynamic stabilization [segmental spinal correction system (SSCS)]. Lumbar kinematics was evaluated with functional radiographs preoperatively and at final follow-up postoperatively. We defined the contribution of each segmental mobility to the total lumbar mobility as the percent segmental mobility [(sagittal angular motion of each segment in degrees)/(total sagittal angular motion in degrees) × 100]. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all patients preoperatively and at final follow-up postoperatively. The discs were classified into five grades based on the previously reported system. We defined the progress of disc degeneration as (grade at final follow-up) - (grade at preoperatively). No significant kinematical differences were shown at any of the lumbar segments preoperatively; however, significant differences were observed at the L2-3, L4-5, and L5-S1 segments postoperatively between the groups. At final follow-up, all of the lumbar segments with rigid fusion demonstrated significantly greater disc degeneration than those with dynamic stabilization. Our results suggest that the SSCS preserved 14% of the kinematical operations at the instrumented segment. The SSCS may prevent excessive effects on adjacent segmental kinematics and may prevent the incidence of adjacent segment disorder. PMID:21301893

Morishita, Yuichiro; Ohta, Hideki; Naito, Masatoshi; Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki; Huang, George; Tatsumi, Masato; Takemitsu, Yoshiharu; Kida, Hirotaka

2011-09-01

162

Cost effectiveness of disc prosthesis versus lumbar fusion in patients with chronic low back pain: randomized controlled trial with 2-year follow-up.  

PubMed

This randomized controlled health economic study assesses the cost-effectiveness of the concept of total disc replacement (TDR) (Charité/Prodisc/Maverick) when compared with the concept of instrumented lumbar fusion (FUS) [posterior lumbar fusion (PLF) /posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF)]. Social and healthcare perspectives after 2 years are reported. In all, 152 patients were randomized to either TDR (n = 80) or lumbar FUS (n = 72). Cost to society (total mean cost/patient, Swedish kronor = SEK, standard deviation) for TDR was SEK 599,560 (400,272), and for lumbar FUS SEK 685,919 (422,903) (ns). The difference was not significant: SEK 86,359 (-45,605 to 214,332). TDR was significantly less costly from a healthcare perspective, SEK 22,996 (1,202 to 43,055). Number of days on sick leave among those who returned to work was 185 (146) in the TDR group, and 252 (189) in the FUS group (ns). Using EQ-5D, the total gain in quality adjusted life years (QALYs) over 2 years was 0.41 units for TDR and 0.40 units for FUS (ns). Based on EQ-5D, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of using TDR instead of FUS was difficult to analyze due to the "non-difference" in treatment outcome, which is why cost/QALY was not meaningful to define. Using cost-effectiveness probabilistic analysis, the net benefit (with CI) was found to be SEK 91,359 (-73,643 to 249,114) (ns). We used the currency of 2006 where 1 EURO = 9.26 SEK and 1 USD = 7.38 SEK. It was not possible to state whether TDR or FUS is more cost-effective after 2 years. Since disc replacement and lumbar fusion are based on different conceptual approaches, it is important to follow these results over time. PMID:21053028

Fritzell, Peter; Berg, Svante; Borgström, Fredrik; Tullberg, Tycho; Tropp, Hans

2011-07-01

163

[Complications of a transpedicular stabilization of thoraco-lumbar burst fractures].  

PubMed

Complications of transpedicular stabilizations of thoraco-lumbar burst fractures are presented on the basis of literature review and own experiences. Unstable thoraco-lumbar burst fractures create the most difficult biomechanical conditions for a stabilizer. A literature review was done to estimate the effectiveness of vertebral body height restoration and its maintenance, the effectiveness of transpedicular grafting, the fusion rate and the implant-related complications rate. Transpedicular stabilization systems demonstrate a marked stiffness in all directions which is greater than in the case of other posterior stabilization systems. During the postero-lateral spondylodesis the transpedicular stabilizer is gradually unburdened but it is still loaded even after the completion of the bone fusion. A support of the anterior spinal column markedly diminishes the loads of the stabilizer and improves the segmental stability. Long-term follow-up studies of transpedicularly stabilized burst fractures reveal a deterioration of primarily good corrections. In some cases the correction returns to the level from before the operation in spite of transpedicular bone grafting. The implant-related complications rate (screw or rod breakages and a loss of interconnections) reaches up to 28 % of cases. In order to improve the anterior column stability and limit late kyphotization, as well as avoid implant-related complications, some authors additionally recommend performing a posterior interbody fusion (PLIF) or an anterior corpectomy with stabilization. Posterior transpedicular stabilization of thoraco-lumbar burst fractures does not provide a complete stabilization of the anterior spinal column, which results in a recurrence of spine kyphotization and implant-related complications. In selected cases, the application of an additional anterior column support markedly relieves the transpedicular fixator and reduces the pseudoarthrosis rate, late kyphotization and implant-related complications simultaneously. PMID:16628510

Hakalo, Jerzy; Wro?ski, Jerzy

2006-01-01

164

An open, minimally invasive approach to the lumbar spine.  

PubMed

A minimum 2-year follow-up retrospective review was undertaken to assess our experience with an anterior paramedian muscle-sparing approach to the lumbar spine for anterior spinal fusion (ASF). The records of 28 patients (November 1991 through January 1996) undergoing ASF via a left lower quadrant transverse skin incision (6-10 cm) with a paramedian anterior rectus fascial Z-plasty retroperitoneal approach were reviewed. Diagnosis, number, and level of lumbar interspaces fused, types of fusion, estimated blood loss, length of procedure, length of hospital stay, and complications were analyzed. All cases were completed as either a same-day anterior/posterior (24 of 28) or as a staged procedure at least 1 week after posterior fusion (4 of 28). The General Surgery service performed the muscle-sparing approach, whereas the Orthopedic Spine service performed the ASF. There were 14 men and 14 women, with a mean age of 35.5 years (range, 11-52 years). Diagnoses included spondylolisthesis in 20 cases (including four grade III or IV slips), segmental instability (degenerative or postsurgical) in 7, and 1 flatback deformity. A single level was fused in 20 cases (L4/5 in 4 and L5/S1 in 16), two levels were fused in 5 cases (L4/5 and L5/S1) and three levels were fused in 2 cases (L3/4, L4/5, and L5/S1). The mean length of stay was 7.4 days (range, 5-12 days). The mean estimated blood loss was 300 mL for the anterior procedure alone and 700 ml for both anterior/posterior procedures on the same day. The mean length of operating room time for the anterior approach and fusion was 117 minutes (range, 60-330 minutes). Posterior instrumentation was used in all cases. Anterior interbody struts used included 19 autogenous tricortical grafts, 4 fresh-frozen allografts (2 femoral rings and 2 iliac crests), 3 carbon fiber cages packed with autogenous bone, and a Harms titanium cage with autograft. There was one L5 corpectomy for which a large tricortical allograft strut was utilized. There were no vascular, visceral, or urinary tract injuries. In three cases a mild ileus developed, which resolved spontaneously. We conclude that the anterior paramedian muscle-sparing retroperitoneal approach is safe, uses a small skin incision, avoids cutting abdominal wall musculature, and allows for multiple-level anterior spinal fusions by a variety of interbody fusion techniques. This approach does not require transperitoneal violation or added endoscopic instrumentation, nor does it limit fusion level and technique of fusion, as is the case with the recently popularized laparoscopic approach to the lumbar spine. PMID:9915535

Dewald, C J; Millikan, K W; Hammerberg, K W; Doolas, A; Dewald, R L

1999-01-01

165

Evaluation of unilateral cage-instrumented fixation for lumbar spine  

PubMed Central

Background To investigate how unilateral cage-instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) affects the three-dimensional flexibility in degenerative disc disease by comparing the biomechanical characteristics of unilateral and bilateral cage-instrumented PLIF. Methods Twelve motion segments in sheep lumbar spine specimens were tested for flexion, extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending by nondestructive flexibility test method using a nonconstrained testing apparatus. The specimens were divided into two equal groups. Group 1 received unilateral procedures while group 2 received bilateral procedures. Laminectomy, facectomy, discectomy, cage insertion and transpedicle screw insertion were performed sequentially after testing the intact status. Changes in range of motion (ROM) and neutral zone (NZ) were compared between unilateral and bilateral cage-instrumented PLIF. Results Both ROM and NZ, unilateral cage-instrumented PLIF and bilateral cage-instrumented PLIF, transpedicle screw insertion procedure did not revealed a significant difference between flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial rotation direction except the ROM in the axial rotation. The bilateral group's ROM (-1.7 ± 0. 8) of axial rotation was decreased significantly after transpedicle screw insertion procedure in comparison with the unilateral group (-0.2 ± 0.1). In the unilateral cage-instrumented PLIF group, the transpedicle screw insertion procedure did not demonstrate a significant difference between right and left side in the lateral bending and axial rotation direction. Conclusions Based on the results of this study, unilateral cage-instrumented PLIF and bilateral cage-instrumented PLIF have similar stability after transpedicle screw fixation in the sheep spine model. The unilateral approach can substantially reduce exposure requirements. It also offers the biomechanics advantage of construction using anterior column support combined with pedicle screws just as the bilateral cage-instrumented group. The unpleasant effect of couple motion resulting from inherent asymmetry was absent in the unilateral group.

2010-01-01

166

Cerebral Palsy Spasticity. Selective Posterior Rhizotomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have performed selective posterior rhizotomies on 60 children with cerebral palsy. The procedure involves lumbar laminectomy with stimulation of the rootlets (fascicles) of the second lumbar to the first sacral posterior roots bilaterally; those rootlets associated with an abnormal motor response, as evidenced by sustained or diffused muscular contraction, are divided leaving intact rootlets associated with a brief localized

Warwick J. Peacock; Leila J. Arens; Barbara Berman

1987-01-01

167

Computed tomography-guided percutaneous facet screw fixation in the lumbar spine. Technical note.  

PubMed

The authors describe a new minimally invasive technique for posterior supplementation using percutaneous translaminar facet screw (TFS) fixation with computed tomography (CT) guidance. Oblique axial images were used to determine facet screw fixation sites. After the induction of local anesthesia and conscious sedation, a guide pin was inserted and guided with a laser mounted on the CT gantry. Cannulated TFSs were placed via a percutaneous approach. From December 2002 to August 2003, 18 patients underwent CT-guided TFS. In 17 of these patients this procedure was supplementary to anterior lumbar interbody fusion, which had been performed several days earlier; in the remaining patient, CT-guided TFS fixation was undertaken as the primary therapy. Twelve patients had painful degenerative disc disease or unstable degenerative spondylolisthesis, three had infections, and three had deformities. All screws were inserted accurately and there were no complications. This new minimally invasive surgical technique may offer an alternative to pedicle screw fixation as a method of posterior supplementation. PMID:17633496

Kang, Ho Yeong; Lee, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Sang Hyeop; Shin, Song-Woo

2007-07-01

168

The Combined Use of a Posterior Dynamic Transpedicular Stabilization System and a Prosthetic Disc Nucleus Device in Treating Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease With Disc Herniations  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundProsthetic replacement of spinal discs is emerging as a treatment option for degenerative disc disease. Posterior dynamic transpedicular stabilization (PDTS) and prosthetic disc nucleus (PDN) devices have been used sporadically in spinal surgery.

Mehdi Sasani; Ahmet Levent Aydin; Tunc Oktenoglu; Murat Cosar; Yaprak Ataker; Tuncay Kaner; Ali Fahir Ozer

2008-01-01

169

Randomized trial demonstrates that extended-release epidural morphine may provide safe pain control for lumbar surgery patients  

PubMed Central

Background: Safe and effective postoperative pain control remains an issue in complex spine surgery. Spinal narcotics have been used for decades but have not become commonplace because of safety or re-dosing concerns. An extended release epidural morphine (EREM) preparation has been used successfully in obstetric, abdominal, thoracic, and extremity surgery done with epidural anesthesia. This has not been studied in open spinal surgery. Methods: Ninety-eight patients having complex posterior lumbar surgery were enrolled in a partially randomized clinical trial (PRCT) of low to moderate doses of EREM. Surgery included levels from L3 to S1 with procedures involving combinations of decompression, instrumented arthrodesis, and interbody grafting. The patients were randomized to receive either 10 or 15 mg of EREM through an epidural catheter placed under direct vision at the conclusion of surgery. Multiple safety measures were employed to prevent or detect respiratory depression. Postoperative pain scores, narcotic utilization, and adverse events were recorded. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups as to supplemental narcotic requirements, pain scores, or adverse events. There were no cases of respiratory depression. The epidural narcotic effect persisted from 3 to 36 hours after the injection. Conclusion: By utilizing appropriate safety measures, EREM can be used safely for postoperative pain control in lumbar surgery patients. As there was no apparent advantage to the use of 15 mg, the lower 10 mg dose should be used.

Offley, Sarah C.; Coyne, Ellen; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Rubery, Paul T.; Zeidman, Seth M; Rechtine, Glenn R.

2013-01-01

170

Unusual branching in lumbar plexus: case report.  

PubMed

This article describes a complex bilateral variation in the formation of lumbar plexus in a 32 year old male cadaver. On the left side the plexus was postfixed and located posterior to the psoas major muscle. The femoral nerve was formed by the union of anterior rami of the second, third, fourth and fifth lumbar spinal nerves. On the right side, the lumbar plexus was prefixed. The lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh was formed by the union of the anterior rami of the first and second lumbar spinal nerves. The femoral nerve formed by branches from the first, second, third and fifth lumbar spinal nerves while the obturator nerve was formed by the union of the first, second and third lumbar spinal nerves. The right lumbar plexus was located in the substance of the psoas major muscle. In the present case, the formation of branches of the lumbar plexus were different from the previous data present in the literature. PMID:10409846

Erbil, K M; Ondero?lu, S; Ba?ar, R

1999-05-01

171

Unusual branching in lumbar plexus. Case report.  

PubMed

This article describes a complex bilateral variation in the formation of lumbar plexus in a 32 year old male cadaver. On the left side the plexus was postifixed and located posterior to the psoas major muscle. The femoral nerve was formed by the union of anterior rami of the second, third, fourth and fifth lumbar spinal nerves. On the right side, the lumbar plexus was prefixed. The lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh was formed. By the union of the anterior rami of the first and second lumbar spinal nerves. The femoral nerve formed by branches from the first, second, third and fifth lumbar spinal nerves while the obturator nerve was formed by the union of the first, second and third lumbar spinal nerves. The right lumbar plexus was located in the substance of the psoas major muscle. In the present case, the formation of branches of the lumbar plexus were different from the previous data present in the literature. PMID:10437316

Mine Erbil, K; Ondero?lu, S; Ba?ar, R

1998-01-01

172

Allograft Cellular Bone Matrix in Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion: Preliminary Radiographic and Clinical Outcomes  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) is a minimally disruptive alternative for anterior lumbar interbody fusion. Recently, synthetic and allograft materials have been increasingly used to eliminate donor-site pain and complications secondary to autogenous bone graft harvesting. The clinical use of allograft cellular bone graft has potential advantages over autograft by eliminating the need to harvest autograft while mimicking autograft's biologic function. The objective of this study was to examine 12-month radiographic and clinical outcomes in patients who underwent XLIF with Osteocel Plus, one such allograft cellular bone matrix. Methods. Forty (40) patients were treated at 61 levels with XLIF and Osteocel Plus and included in the analysis. Results. No complications were observed. From preoperative to 12-month postoperative followup, ODI improved 41%, LBP improved 55%, leg pain improved 43.3%, and QOL (SF-36) improved 56%. At 12 months, 92% reported being “very” or “somewhat” satisfied with their outcome and 86% being either “very” or “somewhat likely” to choose to undergo the procedure again. Complete fusion was observed in 90.2% (55/61) of XLIF levels. Conclusions. Complete interbody fusion with Osteocel Plus was shown in 90.2% of XLIF levels, with the remaining 9.8% being partially consolidated and progressing towards fusion at 12 months.

Tohmeh, Antoine G.; Watson, Blake; Tohmeh, Mirna; Zielinski, Xavier J.

2012-01-01

173

Spine interbody implants: material selection and modification, functionalization and bioactivation of surfaces to improve osseointegration.  

PubMed

The clinical outcome of lumbar spinal fusion is correlated with achievement of bony fusion. Improving interbody implant bone on-growth and in-growth may enhance fusion, limiting pseudoarthrosis, stress shielding, subsidence and implant failure. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and titanium (Ti) are commonly selected for interbody spacer construction. Although these materials have desirable biocompatibility and mechanical properties, they require further modification to support osseointegration. Reports of extensive research on this topic are available in biomaterial-centric published reports; however, there are few clinical studies concerning surface modification of interbody spinal implants. The current article focuses on surface modifications aimed at fostering osseointegration from a clinician's point of view. Surface modification of Ti by creating rougher surfaces, modifying its surface topography (macro and nano), physical and chemical treatment and creating a porous material with high interconnectivity can improve its osseointegrative potential and bioactivity. Coating the surface with osteoconductive materials like hydroxyapatite (HA) can improve osseointegration. Because PEEK spacers are relatively inert, creating a composite by adding Ti or osteoconductive materials like HA can improve osseointegration. In addition, PEEK may be coated with Ti, effectively bio-activating the coating. PMID:24890288

Rao, Prashanth J; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R; Mobbs, Ralph J

2014-05-01

174

Intradiscal pressure measurements in normal discs, compressed discs and compressed discs treated with axial posterior disc distraction: an experimental study on the rabbit lumbar spine model.  

PubMed

Intervertebral disc (IVD) pressure measurement is an appropriate method for characterizing spinal loading conditions. However, there is no human or animal model that provides sufficient IVD pressure data. The aim of our study was to establish physiological pressure values in the rabbit lumbar spine and to determine whether temporary external disc compression and distraction were associated with pressure changes. Measurements were done using a microstructure-based fibreoptic sensor. Data were collected in five control rabbits (N, measurement lying prone at segment L3/4 at day 28), five rabbits with 28 days of axial compression (C, measurement at day 28) and three rabbits with 28 days of axial compression and following 28 days of axial distraction (D, measurement at day 56). Disc compression and distraction was verified by disc height in lateral radiographs. The controls (N) showed a level-related range between 0.25 MPa-0.45 MPa. The IVD pressure was highest at level L3/4 (0.42 MPa; range 0.38-0.45) with a decrease in both cranial and caudal adjacent segments. The result for C was a significant decrease in IVD pressure (0.31 MPa) when compared with controls (P=0.009). D showed slightly higher median IVD pressure (0.32 MPa) compared to C, but significantly lower levels when compared with N (P=0.037). Our results indicate a high range of physiological IVD pressure at different levels of the lumbar rabbit spine. Temporary disc compression reduces pressure when compared with controls. These data support the hypothesis that temporary external compression leads to moderate disc degeneration as a result of degradation of water-binding disc matrix or affected active pumping mechanisms of nutrients into the disc. A stabilization of IVD pressure in discs treated with temporary distraction was observed. PMID:16133080

Guehring, Thorsten; Unglaub, Frank; Lorenz, Helga; Omlor, Georg; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Kroeber, Markus W

2006-05-01

175

Anterior lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of low back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose of study: The spectrum of discogenic pain syndrome ranges from internal disc disruption (IDD), degenerative disc disease (DDD) and segmental instability. After failure of conservative treatment, surgical options would include fusion. This study was performed to determine whether the results of fusion differ between IDD and DDD.Methods used: Patient and radiographic data were entered prospectively on 118 patients who

Ashraf Ragab; Mark Flanum; Charles Galanis; Thomas Zdeblick

2002-01-01

176

Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for detecting posterior ligamentous complex injuries of the thoracic and lumbar spine: A systematic review and meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background: Posterior ligamentous complex injuries of the thoracolumbar (TL) spine represent a major consideration during surgical decision-making. However, X-ray and computed tomography imaging often does not identify those injuries and sometimes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not available or is contraindicated. Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the ultrasound for detecting posterior ligamentous complex injuries in the TL spine. Materials and Methods: A systematic review was carried out through four international databases and proceedings of scientific meetings. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, diagnostic odds ratio, and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated, by using weighted averages according to the sample size of each study. Summary receiver operating characteristic was also estimated. Results: A total of four articles were included in the meta-analysis, yielding a summary estimate: Sensitivity, 0.89 (95% CI, 0.86-0.92); specificity, 1.00 (95% CI, 0.98-1.00); positive likelihood ratio, 224.49 (95% CI, 30.43-1656.26); negative likelihood ratio, 0.11 (95% CI, 0.05-0.19); and diagnostic odds ratio, 2,268.13 (95% CI, 265.84-19,351.24). There was no statistically significant heterogeneity among results of included studies. Summary: Receiver operating characteristic (±standard error) was 0.928 ± 0.047. Conclusion and Recommendation: The present meta-analysis showed that ultrasound has a high accuracy for diagnosing posterior ligamentous complex injuries in patients with flexion distraction, compression, or burst TL fractures. On the basis of present results, ultrasound may be considered as a useful alternative when magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is unavailable or contraindicated, or when its results are inconclusive.

Gabriel, Alcala-Cerra; Angel, J. Paternina-Caicedo; Juan, J. Gutierrez-Paternina; Luis, R. Moscote-Salazar; Hernando, R. Alvis-Miranda; Ruben, Sabogal-Barrios

2013-01-01

177

The Effect of Body Mass Index on Intra-Abdominal Pressure and Blood Loss in Lumbar Spine Surgery  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of body mass index (BMI) on intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and intraoperative blood loss (IBL) during lumbar spinal surgery. Methods Thirty patients scheduled for single level posterior lumbar interbody fusion were allocated equally to a normal group (Group 1, BMI;18.5-22.9 kg/m2), an overweight group (Group 2, BMI; 23-24.9 kg/m2), and an obese group (Group 3, BMI; 25.0-29.9 kg/m2) according to BMI. IAP was measured using a urinary bladder catheter; 1) supine after anesthesia induction, 2) prone at skin incision, 3) prone at the end of surgery. In addition, IBL was also measured in the three groups. Results IAP in the supine position was not significantly different in groups 1, 2, and 3 (2.7 mm Hg, 3.0 mm Hg, and 4.2 mm Hg, respectively) (p=0.258), and IAP in the prone position at incision increased to 7.8 mm Hg, 8.2 mm Hg, and 10.4 mm Hg, respectively, in the three groups, and these intergroup differences were significant, especially for Group 3 (p=0.000). IAP at the end of surgery was slightly lower (7.0 mm Hg, 7.7 mm Hg, and 9.2 mm Hg, respectively). IBLs were not significantly different between the three groups. However, IBLs were found to increase with IAP in the prone position (p=0.022) and BMI (p<0.05). Conclusion These results show that BMI affects IAP in the prone position more than in the supine position during lumbar spinal surgery. In addition, IBLs were found to increase with IAP in the prone position and with BMI. Thus, IBLs can be expected to be higher in morbidly obese patients due to an increased IAP.

Han, In Ho; Nam, Kyoung Hyup; Choi, Byung Kwan; Song, Geun Sung

2012-01-01

178

The efficacy and complications of posterior hemivertebra resection.  

PubMed

There have been several reports on hemivertebra resection via a posterior-only procedure. However, the number of reported cases is small, and various types of instrumentation have been used. In our study, we retrospectively investigated 56 consecutive cases of congenital scoliosis that were treated by posterior hemivertebra resection with transpedicular instrumentation. Radiographs were reviewed to determine the type and location of the hemivertebra, the coronal curve magnitude and the sagittal alignment pre-operatively, post-operatively and at the latest follow-up. Radiographs were also used to assess implant failure and inter-body fusion. Surgical reports and patient charts were reviewed to record any peri-operative complications. Fifty-eight posterior hemivertebrae resections from 56 patients aged 1.5-17 years with fully segmented non-incarcerated hemivertebra were evaluated. The average age at surgery was 9.9 years (1.5-17 years). The average follow-up was 32.9 months (24-58 months). The mean fusion level was 5.0 segments (2-11 segments). There was a mean improvement of 72.9% in the segmental scoliosis, from 42.4° before surgery to 12.3° at the time of the latest follow-up, and there was a mean improvement of 70% in segmental kyphosis from 42.0° to 14.5° over the same time period. The thoracic kyphosis (T5-T12) averaged 10.8° before surgery and 23.9° at the latest follow-up. The lumbar lordosis (L1-S1) averaged -52.8° before surgery and -51.6° at the latest follow-up. Two cases with neurological claudications had complete recovery immediately after the surgery. There was one case of delayed wound healing, two fractures of the pedicle at the instrumented level, two rod breakages and one proximal junction kyphosis that required revision. There were no neurological complications. Radiolucent gaps were found in the residual space after resection on the lateral view in five cases, without any sign of implant failure or correction loss. Our results show that one-stage posterior hemivertebra resection with transpedicular instrumentation can achieve excellent correction, 360° decompression and short fusion without neurological complications. Pedicle cutting still remains a challenge in younger children when using bisegmental instrumentation. In addition, the radiolucent gaps in the residual space require further investigation. PMID:21318279

Zhang, Jianguo; Shengru, Wang; Qiu, Guixing; Yu, Bin; Yipeng, Wang; Luk, Keith D K

2011-10-01

179

Laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of lumbar hernia  

PubMed Central

Lumbar hernia is a rare surgical entity without a standard method of repair. With advancements in laparoscopic techniques, successful lumbar herniorrhaphy can be achieved by the creation of a completely extraperitoneal working space and secure fixation of a wide posterior mesh. We present a total extraperitoneal laparoendoscopic repair of lumbar hernia, which allowed for minimal invasiveness while providing excellent anatomical identification, easy mobilization of contents and wide secure mesh fixation. A total extraperitoneal method of lumbar hernia repair by laparoscopic approach is feasible and may be an ideal option.

Lim, Man Sup; Lee, Hae Wan; Yu, Chang Hee

2011-01-01

180

Mechanics of interbody spinal fusion. Analysis of critical bone graft area.  

PubMed

Bone graft subsidence is a serious complication of interbody spinal fusion. In this study, 66 mechanical tests were performed on 35 thoracic vertebral bodies to investigate the in situ mechanics of interbody spinal fusion. The relationships among trabecular bone density, bone strength, and size of bone graft area were analyzed. All vertebral bodies were scanned by quantitative computer tomography (QCT) to determine their bone density before mechanical testing. The decorticated trabecular beds of the vertebral bodies, void of all posterior elements, were loaded in a manner similar to that which occurs after surgical interbody fusion. That is, rectangular blocks of polymethylmethacrylate, representing bone grafts, were used to transfer controlled compressive loads to the decorticated vertebral trabecular surface. Both destructive and nondestructive tests were performed. The relationship between QCT bone density and trabecular bone strength was related by a power function, and, on average, the bone density and trabecular bone strength were 0.137 g/cm3 and 3.97 MPa, respectively. Eighty percent of the vertebral bodies with graft covering 25% of the total end plate area or less failed at loads less than 600 N, while 88% of the vertebral bodies with 30% or greater covered were able to carry a load greater than 600 N. The results suggest that the intrinsic behavior of trabecular bone loaded within the vertebral body is little different from the behavior of the whole body, that QCT bone density is indicative of bone strength, and that interbody graft area should be significantly greater than 30% of the total end plate area to provide a margin of safety.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8367768

Closkey, R F; Parsons, J R; Lee, C K; Blacksin, M F; Zimmerman, M C

1993-06-15

181

Posterior thoracic osteotomies.  

PubMed

Spinal osteotomies are used to treat partially flexible and fixed deformities. Fixed thoracic spinal deformities have been traditionally treated with anterior release and posterior correction with fusion. In recent decades, it has been shown that posterior-only osteotomies might be sufficient to achieve proper deformity correction with lower complication rates than with combined anterior and posterior procedures. Different types of osteotomies have been described to treat spinal deformities through a single posterior approach. These include posterior column osteotomies such as the Smith-Petersen osteotomy and the Ponte osteotomy, and three-column osteotomies such as the pedicle subtraction osteotomy, the posterior vertebral column resection and the posterior vertebral column decancellation. In general, three-column osteotomies are most commonly performed in the lumbar spine, where the vast majority of reports have focused on. They can also be performed in the thoracic spine in the setting of rigid thoracic deformity. A progressive increase in complications has been reported with more aggressive osteotomies. The aim of this article was to describe the most common posterior spinal osteotomies used to treat adult thoracic spinal deformities, with special emphasis on the technical aspects, complications and outcomes, based on current publications and European Spine Study Group (ESSG) data. PMID:24781506

Pellisé, Ferran; Vila-Casademunt, Alba

2014-07-01

182

Fracture of the L-4 vertebral body after use of a stand-alone interbody fusion device in degenerative spondylolisthesis for anterior L3-4 fixation.  

PubMed

Many studies attest to the excellent results achieved using anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) for degenerative spondylolisthesis. The purpose of this report is to document a rare instance of L-4 vertebral body fracture following use of a stand-alone interbody fusion device for L3-4 ALIF. The patient, a 55-year-old man, had suffered intractable pain of the back, right buttock, and left leg for several weeks. Initial radiographs showed Grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis, with instability in the sagittal plane (upon 15° rotation) and stenosis of central and both lateral recesses at the L3-4 level. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion of the affected vertebrae was subsequently conducted using a stand-alone cage/plate system. Postoperatively, the severity of spondylolisthesis diminished, with resolution of symptoms. However, the patient returned 2 months later with both leg weakness and back pain. Plain radiographs and CT indicated device failure due to anterior fracture of the L-4 vertebral body, and the spondylolisthesis had recurred. At this point, bilateral facetectomies were performed, with reduction/fixation of L3-4 by pedicle screws. Again, degenerative spondylolisthesis improved postsurgically and symptoms eased, with eventual healing of the vertebral body fracture. This report documents a rare instance of L-4 vertebral body fracture following use of a stand-alone device for ALIF at L3-4, likely as a consequence of angular instability in degenerative spondylolisthesis. Under such conditions, additional pedicle screw fixation is advised. PMID:24725181

Kwon, Yoon-Kwang; Jang, Ju-Hee; Lee, Choon-Dae; Lee, Sang-Ho

2014-06-01

183

Construct Rigidity after Fatigue Loading in Pedicle Subtraction Osteotomy with or without Adjacent Interbody Structural Cages.  

PubMed

Introduction?Studies document rod fracture in pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) settings where disk spaces were preserved above or adjacent to the PSO. This study compares the multidirectional bending rigidity and fatigue life of PSO segments with or without interbody support. Methods?Twelve specimens received bilateral T12-S1 posterior fixation and L3 PSO. Six received extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) cages in addition to PSO at L2-L3 and L3-L4; six had PSO only. Flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation (AR) tests were conducted up to 7.5 Newton-meters (Nm) for groups: (1) posterior fixation, (2) L3 PSO, (3) addition of cages (six specimens). Relative motion across the osteotomy (L2-L4) and entire fixation site (T12-S1) was measured. All specimens were then fatigue tested for 35K cycles. Results?Regardingmultiaxial bending, there was a significant 25.7% reduction in AR range of motion across L2-L4 following addition of cages. Regarding fatigue bending, dynamic stiffness, though not significant (p?=?0.095), was 22.2% greater in the PSO?+?XLIF group than in the PSO-only group. Conclusions?Results suggest that placement of interbody cages in PSO settings has a potential stabilizing effect, which is modestly evident in the acute setting. Inserting cages in a second-stage surgery remains a viable option and may benefit patients in terms of recovery but additional clinical studies are necessary to confirm this. PMID:24353970

Deviren, Vedat; Tang, Jessica A; Scheer, Justin K; Buckley, Jenni M; Pekmezci, Murat; McClellan, R Trigg; Ames, Christopher P

2012-12-01

184

Construct Rigidity after Fatigue Loading in Pedicle Subtraction Osteotomy with or without Adjacent Interbody Structural Cages  

PubMed Central

Introduction?Studies document rod fracture in pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) settings where disk spaces were preserved above or adjacent to the PSO. This study compares the multidirectional bending rigidity and fatigue life of PSO segments with or without interbody support. Methods?Twelve specimens received bilateral T12–S1 posterior fixation and L3 PSO. Six received extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) cages in addition to PSO at L2–L3 and L3–L4; six had PSO only. Flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation (AR) tests were conducted up to 7.5 Newton-meters (Nm) for groups: (1) posterior fixation, (2) L3 PSO, (3) addition of cages (six specimens). Relative motion across the osteotomy (L2–L4) and entire fixation site (T12–S1) was measured. All specimens were then fatigue tested for 35K cycles. Results?Regardingmultiaxial bending, there was a significant 25.7% reduction in AR range of motion across L2–L4 following addition of cages. Regarding fatigue bending, dynamic stiffness, though not significant (p?=?0.095), was 22.2% greater in the PSO?+?XLIF group than in the PSO-only group. Conclusions?Results suggest that placement of interbody cages in PSO settings has a potential stabilizing effect, which is modestly evident in the acute setting. Inserting cages in a second-stage surgery remains a viable option and may benefit patients in terms of recovery but additional clinical studies are necessary to confirm this.

Deviren, Vedat; Tang, Jessica A.; Scheer, Justin K.; Buckley, Jenni M.; Pekmezci, Murat; McClellan, R. Trigg; Ames, Christopher P.

2012-01-01

185

Inferior Lumbar Triangle Hernia as a Rarely Report Cause of Low Back Pain: A Report of 4 Cases.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Lumbar triangle hernias are rarely reported causes of low back pain. We describe the symptoms, signs, and anatomical location of 2 possible defects in the posterior abdominal wall where lumbar hernias may appear. The clinical diagnosis was challenging, an...

E. Deppert G. R. Lillie

2010-01-01

186

Rationale of revision lumbar spine surgery.  

PubMed

Revision lumbar spine surgeries are technically challenging with inconstant outcome results. This article discusses the preoperative, intraoperative, as well as postoperative management in these difficult patients. Successful intervention requires a detailed history and physical examination and carefully chosen diagnostic tests. Preoperative planning is paramount in these cases. The decision-making process should address the timing of the surgery, surgical approach, level of interbody fusion required, correction of sagittal imbalance, type of osteotomy, location of the osteotomy, and the end of the construct. Surgeons should be prepared to manage associated complications such as dural tear and massive blood loss. The use of autograft and/or biologic graft is necessary to help in achieving a successful fusion. Postoperative management includes prophylactic antibiotic, anticoagulation, nutritional support, and brace. PMID:24353940

Elgafy, Hossein; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Chapman, Jens R; Dvorak, Marcel F

2012-03-01

187

Rationale of Revision Lumbar Spine Surgery  

PubMed Central

Revision lumbar spine surgeries are technically challenging with inconstant outcome results. This article discusses the preoperative, intraoperative, as well as postoperative management in these difficult patients. Successful intervention requires a detailed history and physical examination and carefully chosen diagnostic tests. Preoperative planning is paramount in these cases. The decision-making process should address the timing of the surgery, surgical approach, level of interbody fusion required, correction of sagittal imbalance, type of osteotomy, location of the osteotomy, and the end of the construct. Surgeons should be prepared to manage associated complications such as dural tear and massive blood loss. The use of autograft and/or biologic graft is necessary to help in achieving a successful fusion. Postoperative management includes prophylactic antibiotic, anticoagulation, nutritional support, and brace.

Elgafy, Hossein; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Chapman, Jens R.; Dvorak, Marcel F.

2012-01-01

188

9:34 Comparison of impacted femoral ring allografts, threaded cortical bone dowels and titanium cages in lumbar fusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose of study: To test the efficacy of recombinant human bone morphogenic protein (rhBMP-2), we compared clinical and radiographic outcomes in patients who underwent a single-level anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and were treated with impacted femoral rings and autogenous bone graft, threaded cortical allograft dowels or titanium cages. Patients who received dowels or titanium cages were randomized to receive

Kenneth Burkus; John Dorchak

2002-01-01

189

[Intradural lumbar disk hernia].  

PubMed

Intradural disc herniation is a rare complication of degenerative disc disease. A correct diagnosis of this process is frequently difficult. If this entity is not preoperatively diagnosed and is omitted at surgery, severe neurologic sequels may be provoked. We report a case of a pathologically proven intradural disc herniation preoperatively diagnosed by MR imaging. Clinically, it was manifested by sudden onset of right leg ciatalgia and progressive right lower extremity weakness. The patient also referred a one-month history of sexual dysfunction. MR imaging revealed interruption of the low signal of the anulus fibrosus and of the posterior longitudinal ligament at L2-L3 level and a voluminous disc fragment migrated in the dural sac that showed rim enhancement with gadolinium.The clinical, neuroradiological, and surgical management of lumbar intradural disc herniation are reviewed. PMID:11412713

Alonso-Bartolomé, P; Canga, A; Vázquez-Barquero, A; García-Valtuille, R; Abascal, F; Cerezal, L

2001-04-01

190

Biomechanical evaluation of a new AxiaLIF technique for two-level lumbar fusion  

PubMed Central

Single level axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF) using a transsacral rod through a paracoccygeal approach has been developed with promising early clinical results and biomechanical stability. Recently, the transsacral rod has been extended to perform a two-level fusion at both L4–L5 and L5–S1 levels (AxiaLIF II). No biomechanical studies have been conducted on multilevel fusion using the AxiaLIF technique. In this study, the biomechanics of L4–S1 motion segments instrumented with the AxiaLIF II transsacral rod was evaluated. Six human cadaveric lumbosacral spine segments from L4 to S1 were used (age ranges 46–74 years). Unconstrained and non-destructive pure moments in axial torsion, lateral bending, and flexion extension were applied to each specimen following intact, standalone AxiaLIF II, and AxiaLIF II with two posterior fixation options: facet screws and pedicle screws with rods. Range of motion was calculated from the raw data collected with an optical motion tracking system. The two-level transsacral rod was successfully inserted in all the specimens. At L4–L5 level in axial torsion (AT) and flexion extension (FE), none of the surgical treatments showed statistically significant difference between the procedures (all P > 0.05) although facet screws and pedicle screws had higher stability on average. In lateral bending (LB), the two posterior fixation techniques had significantly higher construct stability (P < 0.05) than the standalone rod. No significant difference was found between facet screws and pedicle screws (P = 0.821). At L5–S1 level in AT and LB, none of the surgical treatments were found to be statistically significant (all P > 0.05). In FE, standalone two-level transsacral rod had significantly higher range of motion (ROM) compared with the posterior fixation techniques (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the standalone rod reduced intact ROM significantly. Supplementary fixations including facet screws and pedicle screws are required to achieve higher construct stability for successful fusion. Further clinical studies are essential to evaluate the practical success of this technique.

Erkan, Serkan; Mehbod, Amir A.; Hsu, Brian; Pahl, Douglas W.; Transfeldt, Ensor E.

2009-01-01

191

A meta-analysis of artificial total disc replacement versus fusion for lumbar degenerative disc disease  

PubMed Central

Lumbar fusion has been developed for several decades and became the standard surgical treatment for symptomatic lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). Artificial total disc replacement (TDR), as an alternative for spinal arthrodesis, is becoming more commonly employed treating lumbar DDD. It is still uncertain whether TDR is more effective and safer than lumbar fusion. To systematically compare the effectiveness and safety of TDR to that of the fusion for the treatment of lumbar DDD, we performed a meta-analysis. Cochrane review methods were used to analyze all relevant randomized controlled trials published up to July 2009. Five relevant randomized controlled trials involving 837 patients were identified. Patients in TDR group have sightly better functioning and less back or leg pain without clinical significance, and significantly higher satisfaction status in TDR group compared with lumbar fusion group at the 2-year follow-up. But these outcomes are highly influenced by the study with BAK cage interbody fusion, the function/pain and patient satisfaction status are no longer significantly different between two groups after excluding this study. At 5 years, these outcomes are not significantly different between comparing groups. The complication and reoperation rate of two groups are similar both at 2 and at 5 years. In conclusion, TDR does not show significant superiority for the treatment of lumbar DDD compared with fusion. The benefits of motion preservation and the long-term complications are still unable to be concluded. More high-quality RCTs with long-term follow-up are needed.

Yajun, Wu; Xiuxin, Han; Cui, Cui

2010-01-01

192

Applying hierarchical task analysis to improving the patient positioning for direct lateral interbody fusion in spinal surgery.  

PubMed

The present study brings together for the first time the techniques of hierarchical task analysis (HTA), human error identification (HEI), and business process management (BPM) to select practices that can eliminate or reduce potential errors in a surgical setting. We applied the above approaches to the improvement of the patient positioning process for lumbar spine surgery referred to as 'direct lateral interbody fusion' (DLIF). Observations were conducted to gain knowledge on current DLIF positioning practices, and an HTA was constructed. Potential errors associated with the practices specific to DLIF patient positioning were identified. Based on literature review and expert views alternative practices are proposed aimed at improving the DLIF patient positioning process. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to use BPM in association with HEI/HTA for the purpose of improving the performance and safety of a surgical process - with promising results. PMID:24332824

Al-Hakim, Latif; Maiping, Tanaphon; Sevdalis, Nick

2014-07-01

193

Cervical disc prosthesis replacement and interbody fusion: a comparative study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this paper is to compare the new functional intervertebral cervical disc prosthesis replacement and the classical interbody fusion operation, including the clinical effect and maintenance of the stability and segmental motion of cervical vertebrae. Twenty-four patients with single C5-6 intervertebral disk hernias were specifically selected and divided randomly into two groups: One group underwent artificial cervical disc replacement and the other group received interbody fusion. All patients were followed up and evaluated. The operation time for the single disc replacement was (130 +/- 50) minutes and interbody fusion was (105 +/- 53) minutes. Neurological or vascular complications were not observed during or after operation. There was no prosthesis subsidence or extrusion. The JOA score of the group with prosthesis replacement increased from an average of 8.6 to 15.8. The JOA score of the group with interbody fusion increased from an average of 9 to 16.2. The clinical effect and the ROM of the adjacent space of the two groups showed no statistical difference. The short follow-up time does not support the advantage of the cervical disc prosthesis. The clinical effect and the maintenance of the function of the motion of the intervertebral space are no better than the interbody fusion. At least 5 years of follow-up is needed to assess the long-term functionality of the prosthesis and the influence on adjacent levels. PMID:17180356

Peng-Fei, Sun; Yu-Hua, Jia

2008-02-01

194

A practical laboratory study simulating the lumbar microdiscectomy: training model in fresh cadaveric sheep spine.  

PubMed

Laboratory training models are essential for developing and refining surgical skills prior to clinical application of spinal surgery. A simple simulation model is needed for young residents to learn how to handle instruments and to perform safe lumbar approaches. Our aim is to present a practical laboratory model using a fresh sheep lumbar spine that allows to simulate lumbar microdiscectomy in humans. The material consists of a fresh cadaveric spine from a 2-year-old sheep. The surgical steps for lumbar microdiscectomy were conducted under the magnification of the operating microscope. The cadaveric sheep spine represents a useful model to train posterior lumbar microdiscectomy. PMID:23397126

Suslu, Hikmet Turan; Tatarli, Necati; Karaaslan, Alp; Demirel, Nail

2014-05-01

195

Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation.  

PubMed

Intraradicular lumbar disc herniation is a rare complication of disc disease that is generally diagnosed only during surgery. The mechanism for herniated disc penetration into the intradural space is not known with certainty, but adhesion between the radicular dura and the posterior longitudinal ligament was suggested as the most important condition. The authors report the first case of an intraradicular lumbar disc herniation without subdural penetration; the disc hernia was lodged between the two radicular dura layers. The patient, a 34-year-old soldier, was admitted with a 12-month history of low back pain and episodic left sciatica. Neurologic examination showed a positive straight leg raising test on the left side without sensory, motor or sphincter disturbances. Spinal CT scan and MRI exploration revealed a left posterolateral osteophyte formation at the L5-S1 level with an irregular large disc herniation, which migrated superiorly. An intradural extension was suspected. A left L5 hemilaminectomy and S1 foraminotomy were performed. The exploration revealed a large fragment of disc material located between the inner and outer layers of the left S1 radicular dura. The mass was extirpated without cerebrospinal fluid outflow. The postoperative course was uneventful. Radicular interdural lumbar disc herniation should be suspected when a swollen, hard and immobile nerve root is present intraoperatively. PMID:19888608

Akhaddar, Ali; Boulahroud, Omar; Elasri, Abad; Elmostarchid, Brahim; Boucetta, Mohammed

2010-07-01

196

Role of femoral ring allograft in anterior interbody fusion of the spine.  

PubMed

A review was carried out on 59 patients (10 males and 49 females) who had anterior interbody fusion performed with femoral ring allograft packed with autograft bone chips with a minimum follow up of 2 years. The average age at the time of surgery was 49.1 year old (26 to 75). The total number of levels grafted was 141. The diagnosis consisted of multiple degenerative disease in 6, degenerative change below the long segment of fusion for scoliosis in 9, osteoporosis with collapsed fracture in 3, pseudarthrosis after posterior laminectomy and fusion in 35, congenital scoliosis in 3, scoliosis in 2 and paralytic scoliosis due to multiple sclerosis in one. The distribution of levels fused was T12-L1 in 6, L1-2 in 12, L2-3 in 17, L3-4 in 22, L4-5 in 35 and L5-S1 in 39. The remaining 10 levels were in the lower thoracic areas (T7-T12). The operations were performed as anterior fusion alone in 13 patients, one-stage anterior and posterior fusion in 26 patients and two-stage surgery in 20 patients. Anterior instrumentation was used in all 141 levels. At average follow-up (33.7 months) there was no significant change in allograft angles (average = 1.6 degrees ). Fusion of the allograft was classified by Bridwell's grading system. At 24 months of the follow up, 97 % of the allografts were in grade I (fully incorporated) and 3% were in grade II (partially incorporated). Compared to 12 months follow-up only 76.2% of the grafts were in grade I, 28 % were in grade II and 0.8% were in grade III. Two patients had deep posterior infections which required further surgery (without resorption of the allograft anteriorly). One patient had a screw migration anteriorly which required removal. Three patients had persistence of radiolucent line at one of the vertebral end plates - graft interfaces but no subsidence of the graft or pain. In conclusion, the femoral ring allograft appeared to benefit the anterior interbody fusion in complex spinal surgery. PMID:12118123

Chotivichit, Areesak; Fujita, Takuya; Wong, Tze-Hong; Kostuik, John P; Sieber, Ann N

2001-12-01

197

Clinical Outcome and Fusion Rates after the First 30 Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusions  

PubMed Central

Introduction. The lateral transpsoas approach for lumbar interbody fusion (XLIF) is gaining popularity. Studies examining a surgeon's early experience are rare. We aim to report treatment, complication, clinical, and radiographic outcomes in an early series of patients. Methods. Prospective data from the first thirty patients treated with XLIF by a single surgeon was reviewed. Outcome measures included pain, disability, and quality of life assessment. Radiographic assessment of fusion was performed by computed tomography. Results. Average follow-up was 11.5 months, operative time was 60 minutes per level and blood loss was 50?mL. Complications were observed: clinical subsidence, cage breakage upon insertion, new postoperative motor deficit and bowel injury. Approach side-effects were radiographic subsidence and anterior thigh sensory changes. Two patients required reoperation; microforaminotomy and pedicle screw fixation respectively. VAS back and leg pain decreased 63% and 56%, respectively. ODI improved 41.2% with 51.3% and 8.1% improvements in PCS and MCS. Complete fusion (last follow-up) was observed in 85%. Conclusion. The XLIF approach provides superior treatment, clinical outcomes and fusion rates compared to conventional surgical approaches with lowered complication rates. Mentor supervision for early cases and strict adherence to the surgical technique including neuromonitoring is essential.

Malham, Gregory M.; Ellis, Ngaire J.; Parker, Rhiannon M.; Seex, Kevin A.

2012-01-01

198

Biomechanical effects of polyaxial pedicle screw fixation on the lumbosacral segments with an anterior interbody cage support  

PubMed Central

Background Lumbosacral fusion is a relatively common procedure that is used in the management of an unstable spine. The anterior interbody cage has been involved to enhance the stability of a pedicle screw construct used at the lumbosacral junction. Biomechanical differences between polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws linked with various rod contours were investigated to analyze the respective effects on overall construct stiffness, cage strain, rod strain, and contact ratios at the vertebra-cage junction. Methods A synthetic model composed of two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene blocks was used with four titanium pedicle screws (two in each block) and two rods fixation to build the spinal construct along with an anterior interbody cage support. For each pair of the construct fixed with polyaxial or monoaxial screws, the linked rods were set at four configurations to simulate 0°, 7°, 14°, and 21° lordosis on the sagittal plane, and a compressive load of 300 N was applied. Strain gauges were attached to the posterior surface of the cage and to the central area of the left connecting rod. Also, the contact area between the block and the cage was measured using prescale Fuji super low pressure film for compression, flexion, lateral bending and torsion tests. Results Our main findings in the experiments with an anterior interbody cage support are as follows: 1) large segmental lordosis can decrease the stiffness of monoaxial pedicle screws constructs; 2) polyaxial screws rather than monoaxial screws combined with the cage fixation provide higher compression and flexion stiffness in 21° segmental lordosis; 3) polyaxial screws enhance the contact surface of the cage in 21° segmental lordosis. Conclusion Polyaxial screws system used in conjunction with anterior cage support yields higher contact ratio, compression and flexion stiffness of spinal constructs than monoaxial screws system does in the same model when the spinal segment is set at large lordotic angles. Polyaxial pedicle screw fixation performs nearly equal percentages of vertebra-cage contact among all constructs with different sagittal alignments, therefore enhances the stabilization effect of interbody cages in the lumbosacral area.

Chen, Shih-Hao; Mo Lin, Ruey; Chen, Hsiang-Ho; Tsai, Kai-Jow

2007-01-01

199

Slip Reduction Rate between Minimal Invasive and Conventional Unilateral Transforaminal Interbody Fusion in Patients with Low-Grade Isthmic Spondylolisthesis  

PubMed Central

Objective To compare the slip reduction rate and clinical outcomes between unilateral conventional transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (conventional TLIF) and unilateral minimal invasive TLIF (minimal TLIF) with pedicle screw fixation for treatment of one level low-grade symptomatic isthmic spondylolisthesis. Methods Between February 2008 and April 2012, 25 patients with low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis underwent conventional TLIF (12 patients) and minimal TLIF (13 patients) in single university hospital by a single surgeon. Lateral radiographs of lumbar spine were taken 12 months after surgery to analyze the degree of slip reduction and the clinical outcome. All measurements were performed by a single observer. Results The demographic data between conventional TLIF and minimal TLIF were not different. Slip percentage was reduced from 15.00% to 8.33% in conventional TLIF, and from 14.15% to 9.62% in minimal TLIF. In both groups, slip percentage was significantly improved postoperatively (p=0.002), but no significant intergroup differences of slip percentage in preoperative and postoperative were found. The reduction rate also not different between conventional TLIF (45.41±28.80%) and minimal TLIF (32.91±32.12%, p=0.318). Conclusion Conventional TLIF and minimal TLIF with pedicle screw fixation showed good slip reduction in patients with one level low-grade symptomatic isthmic spondylolisthesis. The slip percentage and reduction rate were similar in the conventional TLIF and minimal TLIF.

Oh, Chang Hyun; Ji, Gyu Yeul; Jeon, Jae Kyun; Lee, Junho; Hyun, Dong Keun

2013-01-01

200

Alternative management of iliac vein injury during anterior lumbar spine exposure.  

PubMed

Vascular injuries are, unfortunately, common complications during anterior approach to lumbar spine, with venous injuries occurring most frequently. The L4-L5 level of exposure is associated most commonly with venous injuries because it requires significant mobilization of the vascular structures. We present two cases of left common iliac vein tears encountered during redo anterior exposure for spine revision. This was in the setting of an anterior lumbar interbody fusion at the L4-L5 level and for the repeat disc arthroplasty at the L5-S1 level. We describe the endovascular technique used to successfully repair venous tear with the deployment of a covered stent across the injury, preventing the ligation of the left common iliac vein. PMID:22079459

Zahradnik, Vladimir; Kashyap, Vikram S

2012-02-01

201

Lumbar Position Sense with Extreme Lumbar Angle  

PubMed Central

Tasks involving flexed torso postures have a high incidence of low back injuries. Changes in the ability to sense and adequately control low back motion may play a role in these injuries. Previous studies examining position sense errors of the lumbar spine with torso flexion found significant increases in error with flexion. However, there has been little research on the effect of lumbar angle. In this study, the aim of the study was to examine how position sense errors would change with torso flexion as a function of the target lumbar angle. Fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to assume three different lumbar angles (maximum, minimum and mid-range) at three different torso flexion angles. A reposition sense protocol was used to determine a subject's ability to reproduce the target lumbar angles. Reposition sense error was found to increase 69% with increased torso flexion for mid-range target curvatures. With increasing torso flexion, the increase in reposition sense errors suggests a reduction in sensation and control in the lumbar spine that may increase risk of injury. However, the reposition error was smaller at high torso flexion angles in the extreme target curvatures. Higher sensory feedback at extreme lumbar angles would be important in preventing over-extension or over-flexion. These results suggest that proprioceptive elements in structures engaged at limits (such as the ligaments and facet joints), may provide a role in sensing position at extreme lumbar angles. Sensory elements in the muscles crossing the joint may also provide increased feedback at the edges of the range of motion.

Maduri, A.; Wilson, S. E.

2009-01-01

202

Extended Posterior Circumferential Approach to Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Spine  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Abstract\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective\\u000a   Posterior spinal surgical approach to achieve a retropleural\\/ retroperitoneal corpectomy with circumferential spinal cord\\u000a decompression following subtotal vertebrectomy, posterior instrumentation and interbody spacer placement under compression\\u000a as well as kyphosis correction with spinal column shortening.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Indications\\u000a   Infective, traumatic or neoplastic lesions of the vertebral body that lead to vertebral body destruction, instability and\\u000a neurologic deficit.\\u000a \\u000a Need for immediate

Gabriel D. Sundararaj; Krishnan Venkatesh; Parasa Narendra Babu; Rohit Amritanand

2009-01-01

203

Posterior Hip Pain in an Athletic Population  

PubMed Central

Context: Posterior hip pain is a relatively uncommon but increasingly recognized complaint in the orthopaedic community. Patient complaints and presentations are often vague or nonspecific, making diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions difficult. The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy and pathophysiology related to posterior hip pain in the athletic patient population. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature via a MEDLINE search of all relevant articles between 1980 and 2010. Results: Many patients who complain of posterior hip pain actually have pain referred from another part of the body—notably, the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint. Treatment options for posterior hip pain are typically nonoperative; however, surgery is warranted in some cases. Conclusions: Recent advancements in the understanding of hip anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment options have enabled physicians to better diagnosis athletic hip injuries and select patients for appropriate treatment.

Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Grumet, Robert C.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

2010-01-01

204

Lumbar pedicle: surgical anatomic evaluation and relationships.  

PubMed

Although several clinical applications of transpedicular screw fixation in the lumbar spine have been documented for many years, few anatomic studies concerning the lumbar pedicle and adjacent neural structures have been published. The lumbar pedicle and its relationships to adjacent neural structures were investigated through an anatomic study. Our objective is to highlight important considerations in performing transpedicular screw fixation in the lumbar spine. Twenty cadavers were used for observation of the lumbar pedicle and its relations. After removal of whole posterior bony elements including spinous processes, laminae, lateral masses, and inferior and superior facets, the isthmus of the pedicle was exposed. Pedicle width and height (PW and PH), interpedicular distance (IPD), pedicle-inferior nerve root distance (PIRD), pedicle-superior nerve root distance (PSRD), pedicle-dural sac distance (PDSD), root exit angle (REA), and nerve root diameter (NRD) were measured. The results indicated that the average distance from the lumbar pedicle to the adjacent nerve roots superiorly, inferiorly and to the dural sac medially at all levels ranged from 2.9 to 6.2 mm, 0.8 to 2.8 mm, and 0.9 to 2.1 mm, respectively. The mean PH and PW at L1-L5 ranged from 10.4 to 18.2 mm and 5.9 to 23.8 mm, respectively. The IPD gradually increased from L1 to L5. The mean REA increased consistently from 35 degrees to 39 degrees. The NRD was between 3.3 and 3.9 mm. Levels of significance were shown for the P < 0.05 and P < 0.01 levels. On the basis of this study, we can say that improper placement of the pedicle screw medially and inferiorly should be avoided. PMID:11276829

Attar, A; Ugur, H C; Uz, A; Tekdemir, I; Egemen, N; Genc, Y

2001-02-01

205

The rising psoas sign: an analysis of preoperative imaging characteristics of aborted minimally invasive lateral interbody fusions at L4-5.  

PubMed

Minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion for the treatment of degenerative disc disease, spondylolisthesis, or scoliosis is becoming increasingly popular. The approach at L4-5 carries the highest risk of nerve injury given the proximity of the lumbar plexus and femoral nerve. The authors present 3 cases that were aborted during the approach because of pervasive electromyography responses throughout the L4-5 disc space. Preoperative imaging characteristics of psoas muscle anatomy in all 3 cases are analyzed and discussed. In all cases, the psoas muscle on axial views was rising away from the vertebral column as opposed to its typical location lateral to it. Preoperative evaluation of psoas muscle anatomy is important. A rising psoas muscle at L4-5 on axial imaging may complicate a lateral approach. PMID:24606002

Voyadzis, Jean-Marc; Felbaum, Daniel; Rhee, Jay

2014-05-01

206

Lumbar radiculopathy caused by a tunneling transvertebral Schmorl's node  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a rare case of lumbar spinal radiculopathy caused by a tunneling Schmorl's node originating from the superior endplate of the L3 vertebra of a 75-year-old patient and penetrating the spinal canal through the posterior wall of this vertebra. This case highlights recent reports emphasizing the clinical pain syndromes possibly associated with Schmorl's nodes.

B. Coulier; J. Ghosez

2002-01-01

207

Spinaplasty following lumbar laminectomy for multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis to prevent iatrogenic instability  

PubMed Central

Background: Iatrogenic instability following laminectomy occurs in patients with degenerative lumbar canal stenosis. Long segment fusions to obviate postoperative instability result in loss of motion of lumbar spine and predisposes to adjacent level degeneration. The best alternative would be an adequate decompressive laminectomy with a nonfusion technique of preserving the posterior ligament complex integrity. We report a retrospective analysis of multilevel lumbar canal stenosis that were operated for posterior decompression and underwent spinaplasty to preserve posterior ligament complex integrity for outcome of decompression and iatrogenic instability. Materials and Methods: 610 patients of degenerative lumbar canal stenosis (n=520) and development spinal canal stenosis (n=90), with a mean age 58 years (33–85 years), underwent multilevel laminectomies and spinaplasty procedure. At followup, changes in the posture while walking, increase in the walking distance, improvement in the dysesthesia in lower limb, the motor power, capability to negotiate stairs and sphincter function were assessed. Forward excursion of vertebrae more than 4 mm in flexion–extension lateral X-ray of the spine as compared to the preoperative movements was considered as the iatrogenic instability. Clinical assessment was done in standing posture regarding active flexion–extension movement, lateral bending and rotations Results: All patients were followed up from 3 to 10 years. None of the patients had neurological deterioration or pain or catch while movement. Walking distance improved by 5–10 times, with marked relief (70–90%) in neurogenic claudication and preoperative stooping posture, with improvement in sensation and motor power. There was no significant difference in the sagittal alignment as well as anterior translation. Two patients with concomitant scoliosis and one with cauda equine syndrome had incomplete recovery. Two patients who developed disc protrusion, underwent a second operation for a symptomatic disc prolapse. Conclusion: Spinaplasty following posterior decompression for multilevel lumbar canal stenosis is a simple operation, without any serious complications, retaining median structures, maintaining the tension band and the strength with least disturbance of kinematics, mobility, stability and lordosis of the lumbar spine.

Tuli, Surendra Mohan; Kapoor, Varun; Jain, Anil K; Jain, Saurabh

2011-01-01

208

Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using a Modified Distractor Handle: A Midterm Clinicoradiological Follow-Up Study  

PubMed Central

In current TLIF practice, the choice of the cage size is empirical and primarily depends on the case volume and experience of the surgeon. We used a self-made modified distractor handle in TLIF procedure with the goal of standardizing the intervertebral space tension and determining the proper cage size.

Rewuti, Abuduaini; Chen, Zixian; Feng, Zhenzhou; Cao, Yuanwu; Jiang, Xiaoxing; Jiang, Chun

2013-01-01

209

Limitations of dorsal transpedicular stabilization in unstable fractures of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine: an analysis of 133 patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The optimal treatment of thoracic and lumbar fractures remains controversial. While many authors recommend dorsal instrumentation with an internal fixator, others favour an anterior approach. To evaluate the posterior approach and to identify conditions under which an anterior approach should be preferred, 133 patients with unstable thoracic and lumbar fractures of the spine who underwent dorsal instrumentation with an

J. Oertel; W.-R. Niendorf; N. Darwish; H. W. S. Schroeder; M. R. Gaab

2004-01-01

210

Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture  

PubMed Central

Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture is one of the most commonly performed invasive tests in clinical medicine. Evaluation of an acute headache and investigation of inflammatory or infectious disease of the nervous system are the most common indications. Serious complications are rare, and correct technique will minimise diagnostic error and maximise patient comfort. We review the technique of diagnostic Lumbar Puncture including anatomy, needle selection, needle insertion, measurement of opening pressure, Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) specimen handling and after care. We also make some quality improvement suggestions for those designing services incorporating diagnostic Lumbar Puncture.

Doherty, Carolynne M; Forbes, Raeburn B

2014-01-01

211

Comparison of the biomechanical effects of posterior and anterior spine-stabilizing implants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Posteriorly and anteriorly fixed implants for stabilizing unstable spines are available on the market. Differences in the biomechanical behavior of these implant types are not yet fully clear. They were investigated using three-dimensional nonlinear finite element models of the lumbar spine in an intact state, with an anteriorly fixed MACS-TL implant and with posteriorly fixed internal fixators. The bisegmental implants

Antonius Rohlmann; T. Zander; G. Bergmann

2005-01-01

212

Lumbar (Open) Microscopic Discectomy  

MedlinePLUS

Open Discectomy Open discectomy is the most common surgical treatment for ruptured or herniated discs of the lumbar spine. When the outer wall ... area and into one or both legs. Open discectomy uses surgery to remove part of the damaged ...

213

The cortical and cerebellar representation of the lumbar spine.  

PubMed

Eight decades after Penfield's discovery of the homunculus only sparse evidence exists on the cortical representation of the lumbar spine. The aim of our investigation was the description of the lumbar spine's cortical representation in healthy subjects during the application of measured manual pressure. Twenty participants in the prone position were investigated during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). An experienced manual therapist applied non-painful, posterior-to-anterior (PA) pressure on three lumbar spinous processes (L1, L3, and L5). The pressure (30 N) was monitored and controlled by sensors. The randomized stimulation protocol consisted of 68 pressure stimuli of 5 s duration. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses were analyzed in relation to the lumbar stimulations. The results demonstrate that controlled PA pressure on the lumbar spine induced significant activation patterns. The major new finding was a strong and consistent activation bilaterally in the somatosensory cortices (S1 and S2). In addition, bilateral activation was located medially in the anterior cerebellum. The activation pattern also included other cortical areas probably related to anticipatory postural adjustments. These revealed stable somatosensory maps of the lumbar spine in healthy subjects can subsequently be used as a baseline to investigate cortical and subcortical reorganization in low back pain patients. Hum Brain Mapp 35:3962-3971, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24464423

Boendermaker, Bart; Meier, Michael L; Luechinger, Roger; Humphreys, B Kim; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina

2014-08-01

214

Direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) at the lumbosacral junction L5-S1.  

PubMed

The direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF), a minimally invasive lateral approach for placement of an interbody fusion device, does not require nerve root retraction or any contact with the great vessels and can lead to short operative times with little blood loss. Due to anatomical restrictions, this procedure has not been used at the lumbosacral (L5-S1) junction. Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV), a structural anomaly of the lumbosacral spine associated with low back pain, can result in a level being wrongly identified pre-operatively due to misnumbering of the vertebral levels. To our knowledge, use of the DLIF graft in this patient is the first report of an interbody fusion graft being placed at the disc space between the LSTV and S1 via the transpsoas route. We present a review of the literature regarding the LSTV variation as well as the lateral placement of interbody fusion grafts at the lumbosacral junction. PMID:22551586

Shirzadi, Ali; Birch, Kurtis; Drazin, Doniel; Liu, John C; Acosta, Frank

2012-07-01

215

Percutaneous lumbar discectomy in the treatment of lumbar discitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lumbar disc infection, either after surgical discectomy or caused by haematogenous spread from other infection sources, is a severe complication. Specific antibiotic treatment has to be started as soon as possible to obtain satisfactory results in conservative treatment or operative fusion. The aim of this study was to analyse 16 cases of lumbar disc infection, treated with percutaneous lumbar discectomy

R. G. Haaker; M. Senkal; T. Kielich; J. Krämer

1997-01-01

216

Traumatic lumbar hernia: can't afford to miss.  

PubMed

We describe the radiological and surgical correlation of an uncommon case of a traumatic lumbar hernia in a 22-year-old man presenting to the emergency department following a motor vehicle accident. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed a right-sided traumatic inferior lumbar hernia containing a small amount of fat through the posterior lateral internal oblique muscle with hematoma in the subcutaneous fat and adjacent abdominal wall musculature, which was repaired surgically via primary closure on emergent basis. The purpose of this article is to emphasize the importance of diagnosing traumatic lumbar hernia on CT and need for urgent repair to avoid potential complications of bowel incarceration and strangulation. PMID:24424984

Saboo, Sachin S; Khurana, Bharti; Desai, Naman; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Landman, Wendy; Sodickson, Aaron; Gates, Jonathan

2014-06-01

217

Lumbar Disc Herniation in Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lumbar disc herniation very rarely occurs in adolescence. The aim of this study was to assess the radiological, clinical and surgical features and case outcomes for adolescents with lumbar disc herniation, and to compare with adult cases. The cases of 17 adolescents (7 girls and 10 boys, age range 13–17 years) who were surgically treated for lumbar disc herniation in

Serdar Ozgen; Deniz Konya; O. Zafer Toktas; Adnan Dagcinar; M. Memet Ozek

2007-01-01

218

The lateral transpsoas approach to the lumbar and thoracic spine: A review  

PubMed Central

Background: In the last several years, the lateral transpsoas approach to the thoracic and lumbar spine, also known as extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) or direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF), has become an increasingly common method to achieve fusion. Several recent large series describe several advantages to this approach, including less tissue dissection, smaller incisions, decreased operative time, blood loss, shorter hospital stay, reduced postoperative pain, enhanced fusion rates, and the ability to place instrumentation through the same incision. Indications for this approach have expanded and now include degenerative disease, tumor, deformity, and infection. Methods: A lateral X-ray confirms that the patient is in a truly lateral position. Next, a series of tubes and dilators are used, along with fluoroscopy, to identify the mid-position of the disk to be incised. After continued dilation, the optimal site to enter the disk space is the midpoint of the disk, or a position slightly anterior to the midpoint of the disk. XLIF typically allows for a larger implant to be inserted compared to TLIF or PLIF, and, if necessary, instrumentation can be inserted percutaneously, which would allow for an overall minimally invasive procedure. Results: Fixation techniques appear to be equal between XLIF and more traditional approaches. Some caution should be exercised because common fusion levels of the lumbar spine, including L4-5 and L4-S1, are often inaccessible. In addition, XLIF has a unique set of complications, including neural injuries, psoas weakness, and thigh numbness. Conclusion: Additional studies are required to further evaluate and monitor the short and long-term safety, efficacy, outcomes, and complications of XLIF procedures.

Arnold, Paul M.; Anderson, Karen K.; McGuire, Robert A.

2012-01-01

219

Experience with transforaminal interbody fusion in corrective surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.  

PubMed

One of the surgical goals during the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is to preserve segments and thus mobility while achieving a well-balanced spine on all planes. The transforaminal interbody fusion (TLIF) technique allows for a significant degree of rotational correction and thus may allow for preservation of more mobile segments. This retrospective study analyzed the use of TLIF in AIS patients who underwent surgery between 2006 and 2009 at a single center, and discusses the degree of curve correction, complications and outcomes. All curves were classified using the Lenke classification system. Standing posterior-anterior Cobb angle, sagittal and coronal balance, percent correction, and end/stable/neutral/apical vertebra were determined on preoperative, postoperative and follow-up radiographs. Nine patients were identified (eight women and one man) ranging in age from 11.6-18 years. All TLIF procedures were performed at the L2/3 level. Lenke curves included 5CN (n=5), 5BN (n=2), and 6CN (n=2). Average follow-up was 27.4 months (range, 12-57 months). Average postoperative curve correction was 79%. One patient underwent revision surgery. All patients remained stable from a clinical and radiographic standpoint on their last follow-up visit. TLIF is an important adjunct in the surgical management of select AIS patients. By allowing for greater rotational correction, it may be possible to preserve one more mobile segment without decompensation or overcorrection. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of TLIF in AIS. Future studies are warranted in determining those who will maximally benefit from this technique. PMID:23702374

Barami, Kaveh; Lincoln, Todd; Bains, Ravinder

2013-09-01

220

Vascular Injury Complicating Lumbar Disc Surgery. A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: to review the literature concerning the early and late vascular complications of lumbar disc surgery.Methods: using the MEDLINE database, we reviewed all reports of vascular complications associated with surgical excision of a prolapsed disc via a posterior approach reported in the English literature since 1965.Results: we identified 98 cases of vascular complications for an incidence of 1–5 in 10000

S. Papadoulas; D. Konstantinou; H. P. Kourea; N. Kritikos; N. Haftouras; J. A. Tsolakis

2002-01-01

221

Lumbar hernia: a diagnostic dilemma.  

PubMed

Lumbar hernia is one of the rare cases that most surgeons are not exposed to. Hence the diagnosis can be easily missed. This leads to delay in the treatment causing increased morbidity. We report a case of lumbar hernia in a middle-aged woman. It was misdiagnosed as lipoma by another surgeon. It was a case of primary acquired lumbar hernia in the superior lumbar triangle. Clinical and MRI findings were correlated to reach the diagnosis. We also highlight the types, the process of diagnosis and the surgical repair of lumbar hernias. We wish to alert our fellow surgeons to keep the differential diagnosis of the lumbar hernia in mind before diagnosing any lumbar swelling as lipoma. PMID:24810439

Ahmed, Syed Tausif; Ranjan, Rajeeva; Saha, Subhendu Bikas; Singh, Balbodh

2014-01-01

222

Biomechanical comparison of lumbar spine instability between laminectomy and bilateral laminotomy for spinal stenosis syndrome – an experimental study in porcine model  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The association of lumbar spine instability between laminectomy and laminotomy has been clinically studied, but the corresponding in vitro biomechanical studies have not been reported. We investigated the hypothesis that the integrity of the posterior complex (spinous process-interspinous ligament-spinous process) plays an important role on the postoperative spinal stability in decompressive surgery. METHODS: Eight porcine lumbar spine specimens were

Ching-Lung Tai; Pang-Hsing Hsieh; Weng-Pin Chen; Lih-Huei Chen; Wen-Jer Chen; Po-Liang Lai

2008-01-01

223

Iatrogenic lumbar pseudomeningocele.  

PubMed

The authors describe two cases of pseudomeningocele after surgery for herniated lumbar disc. In order to prevent this rare complication, they suggest to suture the dura and to put on it oxycel or gelfoam every time there is a fluid leakage. The patient has to be placed in Trendelenburg's position for about seven days. PMID:3564761

Rocca, A; Turtas, S; Pirisi, A; Agnetti, V

1986-01-01

224

Traumatic lumbar visceral herniation in a young woman?  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Lumbar herniation is uncommon, with traumatic etiology being rare. Traumatic lumbar hernias are usually caused by seatbelt injury in motor vehicle accidents. It is exceedingly uncommon to see lumbar hernias in an unrestrained passenger of a motor vehicle accident. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a case of a traumatic inferior lumbar hernia in a young woman who was an unrestrained driver of a vehicle involved in a high-speed collision, with multiple rollover and ejection. CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis suggested soft tissue injury involving muscles in the left lower posterior flank with traumatic herniation of the colon and small bowel. Emergent midline abdominal laparotomy confirmed herniation in the left lower quadrant. After abdominal closure, in the prone position, an extensive laceration over the left flank also confirmed herniation. Due to its dirty nature, the wound was irrigated, lavaged and covered with wound vacuum-assisted closure placement. The decision was made in favor of delayed elective hernia repair. DISCUSSION Lumbar hernias are usually caused by sudden force to the abdomen, leading to increased intra-abdominal pressure. This pressure combined with areas of weakness in the superior and/or inferior triangle lead to herniation. Uncommonly, the contents of lumbar hernias can strangulate or incarcerate leading to bowel obstruction. This can often be prevented by detection with CT and laparotomy. CONCLUSION Lumbar herniation of traumatic etiology is rare. Early detection with CT and/or exploratory laparotomy is important to avoid increases in size of the defect and bowel strangulation and incarceration.

Woolbert, Ashley; Calasanz, Emily R.; Nazim, Muhammad

2013-01-01

225

Inherent stiffness of three different posterior transpedicular fixation instrumentation. A mechanical comparative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Instrumented lumbar fusion with posterior pedicle screw systems enhances fusion rate. Although rigid pedicle-screw instrumentation\\u000a increases fusion rate, recently many adverse effects have been reported in lumbar spinal fusion augmented with rigid instrumentation.\\u000a This study compares static, non-destructive mechanical “in vitro” properties of three different systems [segmental contouring\\u000a system (SCS), Claris and Twinflex], to investigate the inherent stiffness of these

Panagiotis Korovessis; Despina Deligianni; Dimosthenis Mavrilas; Georgios Petsinis

2007-01-01

226

Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 16: Bone graft extenders and substitutes as an adjunct for lumbar fusion.  

PubMed

In an attempt to enhance the potential to achieve a solid arthrodesis and avoid the morbidity of harvesting autologous iliac crest bone (AICB) for a lumbar fusion, numerous alternatives have been investigated. The use of these fusion adjuncts has become routine despite a lack of convincing evidence demonstrating a benefit to justify added costs or potential harm. Potential alternatives to AICB include locally harvested autograft, calcium-phosphate salts, demineralized bone matrix (DBM), and the family of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). In particular, no option has created greater controversy than the BMPs. A significant increase in the number of publications, particularly with respect to the BMPs, has taken place since the release of the original guidelines. Both DBM and the calciumphosphate salts have demonstrated efficacy as a graft extender or as a substitute for AICB when combined with local autograft. The use of recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) as a substitute for AICB, when performing an interbody lumbar fusion, is considered an option since similar outcomes have been observed; however, the potential for heterotopic bone formation is a concern. The use of rhBMP-2, when combined with calcium phosphates, as a substitute for AICB, or as an extender, when used with local autograft or AICB, is also considered an option as similar fusion rates and clinical outcomes have been observed. Surgeons electing to use BMPs should be aware of a growing body of literature demonstrating unique complications associated with the use of BMPs. PMID:24980593

Kaiser, Michael G; Groff, Michael W; Watters, William C; Ghogawala, Zoher; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dailey, Andrew T; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Eck, Jason C; Sharan, Alok; Wang, Jeffrey C; Dhall, Sanjay S; Resnick, Daniel K

2014-07-01

227

Stress in Lumbar Intervertebral Discs during Distraction  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND CONTEXT The intervertebral disc is a common source of low back pain. Prospective studies suggest that treatments that intermittently distract the disc might be beneficial for chronic low back pain. Although the potential exists for distraction therapies to affect the disc biomechanically their effect on intradiscal stress is debated. PURPOSE To determine if distraction alone, distraction combined with flexion or distraction combined with extension can reduce nucleus pulposus pressure and posterior anulus compressive stress in cadaveric lumbar discs compared to simulated standing or lying. STUDY DESIGN Laboratory study using single cadaveric motion segments. OUTCOME MEASURES Strain gauge measures of nucleus pulposus pressure and compressive stress in the anterior and posterior annulus fibrosus METHODS Intradiscal stress profilometry was performed on 15 motion segments during 5 simulated conditions: standing, lying, and 3 distracted conditions. Disc degeneration was graded by inspection from 1 (normal) to 4 (severe degeneration). RESULTS All distraction conditions markedly reduced nucleus pressure compared to either simulated standing or lying. There was no difference between distraction with flexion and distraction with extension in regard to posterior annulus compressive stress. Discs with little or no degeneration appeared to distributed compressive stress differently than those with moderate or severe degeneration. CONCLUSIONS Distraction appears to predictably reduce nucleus pulposus pressure. The effect of distraction therapy on the distribution of compressive stress may be dependent in part on the health of the disc.

Gay, Ralph E.; Ilharreborde, Brice; Zhao, Kristin D.; Berglund, Lawrence J.; Bronfort, Gert; An, Kai-Nan

2008-01-01

228

Posterior knee pain  

PubMed Central

Posterior knee pain is a common patient complaint. There are broad differential diagnoses of posterior knee pain ranging from common causes such as injury to the musculotendinous structures to less common causes such as osteochondroma. A precise understanding of knee anatomy, the physical examination, and of the differential diagnosis is needed to accurately evaluate and treat posterior knee pain. This article provides a review of the anatomy and important aspects of the history and physical examination when evaluating posterior knee pain. It concludes by discussing the causes and management of posterior knee pain.

Perret, D.

2010-01-01

229

Congenital lumbar hernia.  

PubMed

Congenital lumbar hernia (CLH) is a rare anomaly with only 45 cases reported in the English-language literature. This paper describes nine patients with CLH treated in our unit. Unusual features included the relatively high incidence of inferior lumbar hernia, presentation at the age of 6 years in one case, and an association with hydrometrocolpos and anorectal malformation, which is hitherto unreported. In seven patients the hernia could be repaired successfully. One patients' parents refused surgery for the CLH after treatment of a hydrometrocolpos and another died of fulminant pneumonia before the operation. Early operation is the treatment of choice, and repair with local tissues is preferable. The need for prosthetic material arises when the size of the defect is large. A successful operation offers a good quality of life. PMID:10663870

Wakhlu, A; Wakhlu, A K

2000-01-01

230

Complications associated with posterior approaches in minimally invasive spine decompression.  

PubMed

Posterior approaches for decompression in minimally invasive spine surgery are increasingly used for a wide range of pathology. Surgeons and patients must understand these risks in order to identify, manage, and ideally prevent complications. Technical intraoperative complications, recurrences and reoperations, infections, and medical complications associated with the surgery are considered for common posterior minimally invasive decompression procedures of the cervical and lumbar spine. Methods of possibly avoiding these complications are also discussed. This article then aggregates the relevant data to allow concise understanding of the complications associated with these procedures. PMID:24703443

Stadler, James A; Wong, Albert P; Graham, Randall B; Liu, John C

2014-04-01

231

Lumbar spinal stenosis.  

PubMed

Lumbar spinal stenosis may be congenital or acquired. A classic clinical presentation is described as neurogenic claudication. Physical signs of sensory loss, weakness, and attenuation of reflexes often are mild and limited in distribution. Neuroimaging of the lumbosacral spine with MRI and electrodiagnostic (electromyographic [EMG]) tests are the most informative diagnostic modalities. Conservative management often is successful, but surgical decompression may be indicated in refractory cases. PMID:17445736

Chad, David A

2007-05-01

232

Efficacy of percutaneous laser disc decompression on lumbar spinal stenosis.  

PubMed

The objective of this study is to observe the effect of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) on lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Thirty-two LSS patients were treated using pulsed Nd: YAG laser, of which 21 cases (11 males and 10 females with an average age of 64 years old) were followed up for 2 years. All of the 21 patients had intermittent claudication with negative straight leg raising test results. Fifteen patients suffered from anterior central disc herniation which often compressed the cauda equina but seldom compressed the posterior part; six patients suffered from posterior ligamentum flavum hypertrophy which often compressed the cauda equina but seldom compressed the anterior part. The efficacy was evaluated 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery on 21 patients using the performance evaluation criteria of the lumbago treatment by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA 29 scores). The fineness (i.e. excellent and good treatment outcome) rate 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after the operation were 46.7 %, 66.7 %, 66.7 %, 66.7 % and 66.7 %, respectively, in patients with severe anterior compression and 16.7 %, 33.3 %, 33.3 %, 33.3 % and 33.3 %, respectively, in patients with severe posterior compression. PLDD had certain positive efficacy on the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis, which was more significant on LSS dominated by the anterior compression than that by the posterior compression. PMID:23996073

Ren, Longxi; Han, Zhengfeng; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Tongtong; Yin, Jian; Liang, Xibin; Guo, Han; Zeng, Yanjun

2014-05-01

233

Lumbar spinal surgery - series (image)  

MedlinePLUS

... of bones (vertebrae) separated by soft cushions (intervertebral discs). ... Lumbar (lower back) spine disease is usually caused by herniated ... bodies (osteophytes), which compress spinal nerves, trauma, and ...

234

Surgical management of multilevel lumbar spondylolysis: a case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Multilevel lumbar spondylolysis accounts for less than 6% of the cases of lumbar spondylolysis and its treatment, as reported in the literature, has not been consistent. Fewer than ten cases presenting triple lumbar spondylosis have been published. We describe the case of a 33-year-old male presenting bilateral L3, L4, and L5 isthmic lysis with no spondylolisthesis or disc degeneration. The MRI and CT of the lumbar spine were decisive elements in the therapeutic choice and the surgical treatment performed was bilateral L3 and L4 isthmic repair via a combined anterior and posterior L5S1 approach. The clinical and radiological results were good at the last follow-up visit. PMID:24657151

Darnis, A; Launay, O; Perrin, G; Barrey, C

2014-05-01

235

Access related complications during anterior exposure of the lumbar spine  

PubMed Central

The new millennium has witnessed the emergence of minimally invasive, non-posterior based surgery of the lumbar spine, in particular via lateral based methodologies to discectomy and fusion. In contrast, and perhaps for a variety of reasons, anterior motion preservation (non-fusion) technologies are playing a comparatively lesser, though incompletely defined, role at present. Lateral based motion preservation technologies await definition of their eventual role in the armamentarium of minimally invasive surgical therapies of the lumbar spine. While injury to the major vascular structures remains the most serious and feared complication of the anterior approach, this occurrence has been nearly eliminated by the use of lateral based approaches for discectomy and fusion cephalad to L5-S1. Whether anterior or lateral based, non-posterior approaches to the lumbar spine share certain access related pitfalls and complications, including damage to the urologic and neurologic structures, as well as gastrointestinal and abdominal wall issues. This review will focus on the recognition, management and prevention of these anterior and lateral access related complications.

Fantini, Gary A; Pawar, Abhijit Y

2013-01-01

236

Anterior instrumentation for the treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine  

PubMed Central

Anterior radical debridement and bone grafting is popular in the treatment of pyogenic infection of the spine, but there remains great concern of placing instrumentation in the presence of infection because of the potentiality of infection recurrence after surgery. The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of anterior instrumentation in patients who underwent simultaneous anterior debridement and autogenous bone grafting for the treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis. The series consisted of 22 consecutive patients who were treated with anterior debridement, interbody fusion with autogenous bone grafting and anterior instrumentation for pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine. The patients were prospectively followed up for a minimum of 3 years (average 46.1 months; range 36–74 months). Data were obtained for assessing clinically the neurological function and pain and radiologically the spinal alignment and fusion progress as well as recurrence of the infection. All the patients experienced complete or significant relief of back pain with rapid improvement of neurological function. Kyphosis was improved with an average correction rate of 93.1% (range 84–100%). Solid fusion and healing of the infection was achieved in all the patients without any evidence of recurrent or residual infection. The study shows that combined with perioperative antibiotic regimen, anterior instrumentation is effective and safe in the treatment of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis of thoracic and lumbar spine directly following radical debridement and autogenous bone grafting.

Chen, Wei-Hua; Jiang, Lei-Sheng

2008-01-01

237

Lumbar Extension during Stoop Lifting is Delayed by the Load and Hamstring Tightness.  

PubMed

[Purpose] This study investigated the relationship between lumbar pelvic rhythm and the physical characteristics of stoop lifting. [Subjects and Methods] Participants performed a stoop lifting task under two conditions: with and without load. We assessed the lumbar kyphosis and sacral inclination angles using the SpinalMouse(®) system, as well as hamstring flexibility. During stoop lifting, surface electromyograms and the lumbar and sacral motions were recorded using a multi-channel telemetry system and flexible electrogoniometers. [Results] In the initial phase of lifting, lumbar extension was delayed by load; the delay showed a negative correlation with sacral inclination angle at trunk flexion, whereas a positive correlation was observed with electromyogram activity of the lumbar multifidus. Additionally, a positive correlation was observed between sacral inclination angle and hip flexion range of motion during the straight leg raise test. [Conclusion] We found that a disorder of the lumbar pelvic rhythm can be caused by both load and hamstring tightness. In the initial phase of stoop lifting, delayed lumbar extension is likely to lead to an increase in spinal instability and stress on the posterior ligamentous system. This mechanism shows that stoop lifting of a load may be harmful to the lower back of people with hamstring tightness. PMID:24567676

Iwasaki, Risa; Yokoyama, Ginga; Kawabata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tomotaka

2014-01-01

238

Posterior form sympathetic ophthalmia.  

PubMed Central

Two cases of posterior form sympathetic ophthalmia are presented. The histologic abnormalities in one of them are described. Based on findings in these two cases and other descriptions of posterior form sympathetic ophthalmia in the literature, the authors conclude that except for absence of anterior uveal tract involvement, there is no histopathologic difference between posterior form sympathetic ophthalmia and classical sympathetic ophthalmia. Although there is disagreement in the literature, the authors also conclude that the therapy and prognosis of posterior form sympathetic ophthalmia does not differ from that of classical sympathetic ophthalmia. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B

McPherson, S D; Dalton, H T

1975-01-01

239

Posterior mediastinal goiter.  

PubMed

Because of their tendency to progressively enlarge with compression of adjacent structures, as well as the small chance of malignancy, most intrathoracic goiters should be excised surgically. Most anterior substernal goiters and some ipsilateral posterior mediastinal goiters can be removed safely through a cervical incision. Large posterior mediastinal goiters, contralateral retrotracheal or retroesophageal posterior mediastinal goiters, and isolated mediastinal goiters with no significant cervical connection are best removed through a combined cervical and thoracic approach. The Lahey Clinic experience with three patients with posterior mediastinal goiter is described. PMID:3409742

Shahian, D M; Rossi, R L

1988-09-01

240

POSTERIOR COMPOSITE RESTORATIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY The increasing demand of esthetics and the progressive advances in restorative dentistry leads the utilization of restoration of the posterior teeth by esthetic restorative materials. The major problem that the clinicians face when restoring posterior teeth by resin composites is the polimerization contraction and the subsequent formation of microleakage. The studies of reducing these polimerization contraction involves both the

Serdar ARIKAN

241

Posterior mediastinal goiter.  

PubMed

Most mediastinal goiters are retrosternally situated in the anterior mediastinal compartment. Posterior mediastinal goiters, either retrotracheal or retroesophageal, are rare. We herein describe a case involving a retrotracheal goiter in the right posterior mediastinum, which was excised using a combined cervico-partial sternotomy and right thoracotomy approach. PMID:15353470

Chong, Chee-Fui; Cheah, Wei-Keat; Sin, Fai-Lam; Wong, Poo-Sing

2004-09-01

242

Multiple Levels of Lumbar Spondylolysis - A Case Report -  

PubMed Central

We report here on an unusual case of multiple levels of asymmetric lumbar spondylolysis in a 19-year-old woman. The patient had severe low back pain of increasing intensity with lumbar instability, which was evident on the dynamic radiographs. MRI demonstrated the presence of abnormalities and the three dimensional CT scan revealed asymmetric complete spondylolysis at the left L2, L3 and L4 levels and the right L1, L2 and L3 levels. This case was treated surgically by posterior and posterolateral fusion at L2-3-4 with intersegmental fixation using pedicle screws and an auto iliac bone graft. The patient was relieved of her low back pain after the surgery.

Park, Kwang-Hwan; Ha, Joong-Won; Kim, Hak-Sun; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kim, Ju-Young

2009-01-01

243

Lumbar synovial cysts.  

PubMed

Synovial spinal cysts are typically found in the lumbar spine, most often at the L4-L5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging is the diagnostic imaging of choice in the workup of suspected synovial cysts. This study consisted of 24 patients with lumbar synovial cysts treated by cyst excision and nerve root decompression through partial or complete facetectomy and primary posterolateral fusion. The most common location of the cysts was the L4-L5 segment. Synovial tissue was found in histological sections of 18 cysts. At a mean follow-up of 12 (range, 8 to 24) months, 20 patients (83%) had excellent or good results; two patients (8.3%) had fair and two patients (8.3%) had poor improvement. Operative complications included dural tear in two patients and postoperative wound dehiscence in one patient, which were treated accordingly. To eliminate the risk of recurrence synovial cyst excision through partial or complete facetectomy is required. In addition, since synovial cysts reflect disruption of the facet joint and some degree of instability, primary spinal fusion is recommended. PMID:23327848

Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Sapkas, George S; Korres, Demetrios S; Pneumaticos, Spyridon G

2012-01-01

244

Bilateral implantation of low-profile interbody fusion cages: subsidence, lordosis, and fusion analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: The use of interbody fusion cages as a treatment for degenerative disc disease has become widespread. Low-profile cages have been developed to allow a closer fit when implanting bilateral cages in patients with smaller vertebral bodies. Some surgeons feel the open design also allows better bone contact and visualization. This is particularly true when two low-profile cages are

Michael Schiffman; Salvador A Brau; Robin Henderson; Gwen Gimmestad

2003-01-01

245

Human lumbar apophyseal joint damage and intervertebral disc degeneration.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES--To record the extent and location of lumbar apophyseal cartilage damage, and to ascertain if the extent of damage is correlated with the grade of disc degeneration, age, or both. METHODS--The extent and location of fibrillated areas of the apophyseal cartilage of the joint surfaces of 29 lumbar motion segments were examined using computer aided image processing of Indian ink stained areas, and degeneration of the associated intervertebral discs graded using the method of Nachemson. RESULTS--It was found that these joints showed a greater extent and prevalence of cartilage fibrillation than the knee, hip or ankle, with significant damage in specimens younger than 30 years. Damage was predominantly located peripherally, superiorly, and posteriorly in the concave superior apophyseal surfaces, and was predominantly peripheral and posterior in the inferior surfaces, with a tendency to be located inferiorly. There was a weak correlation between apophyseal joint damage and the intervertebral disc degenerative grade, but this was inconclusive, as both increased with age. CONCLUSIONS--The pattern of damage exhibited by superior joint surfaces is most probably caused by tension on collagenous joint capsule fibres which insert into the surfaces posteriorly, so producing an area of fibrocartilage unsuited to loadbearing. Tension on such fibres would be greatest during spinal flexion. The pattern of damage of the inferior surfaces lends some support to the hypothesis that their apices impact the laminae of the lumbar vertebra inferior to them, consequent upon the degeneration and narrowing of the associated intervertebral disc. The predominantly peripheral location of fibrillation of both superior and inferior surfaces may be associated with inadequate mechanical conditioning of marginal joint areas. Disc degeneration cannot be the initial cause of apophyseal fibrillation in most specimens. The study indicates a need for regular spinal exercise, starting at a young age.

Swanepoel, M W; Adams, L M; Smeathers, J E

1995-01-01

246

Outcome of Salvage Lumbar Fusion after Lumbar Arthroplasty  

PubMed Central

Study Design Retrospective review. Purpose This study aims to define the role of lumbar fusion for persistent back pains after the lumbar disc replacement. Overview of Literature Little is written about lumbar fusion after optimally placed lumbar arthroplasty in patients with persistent lower back pains. Methods Retrospective review of cases of lumbar artificial disc requiring subsequent fusion because of persistent back pains despite optimally placed artificial discs. Outcomes were evaluated using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analogue scale (VAS). Clinical improvements indicated 25% improvement in ODI and VAS values. Results Five patients met the study criteria. The mean baseline ODI for the five patients was 52. The mean baseline VAS scores for back and leg pains were 76 and 26, respectively. All the five patients had optimally placed prosthesis. The indication for surgery was the constant low back pains found in all the patients. Revision surgery involved disc explantation and fusion in two of the patients and posterolateral fusion without removing the prosthesis in three. None of the patients achieved adequate pain control after the revision surgery despite the solid bony fusion documented by postoperative computed tomography. The mean ODI value after the fusion was 55. The mean values for back and leg pains VAS were 72 and 30, respectively. Conclusions Lack of good pain relief after successful lumbar artifical disc replacements may indicate different etiology for the back pains. The spine-treating surgeons should have a high threshold level to perform salvage fusion at that level.

Deutsch, Harel

2014-01-01

247

Occult lumbar spinal stenosis.  

PubMed Central

Twenty-eight patients presenting with low back pain, associated with sciatic or femoral neuropathy, were found to have lateral recess stenosis occurring as a result of hypertrophy of the facet joints, with preservation within normal limits of the sagittal AP diameter of the lumbar canal. Pathology was believed to be traumatic in origin, and the variable nature of the adhesions suggested recurrent inflammation; the hypertrophy of the facet joints may have been the result of traumatic inflammatory hyperaemia. Radiological investigations were unhelpful. The diagnosis of the condition was made at the time of surgical exploration by the findings of alteration of the facet joints, adhesions and fixity of the nerve roots, normal sagittal AP diameter of the canal, and absence of other significant lesions. Gratifying results were obtained with decompression by wide laminectomy with excision of overhanging facet joints and release of adhesions.

Choudhury, A R; Taylor, J C

1977-01-01

248

Lumbar spondylolysis: a review.  

PubMed

Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its epidemiology, pathogenesis, and general treatment guidelines, as well as a detailed review and discussion of the imaging principles for the diagnosis and follow-up of this condition. PMID:20440613

Leone, Antonio; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo

2011-06-01

249

Intraspinal arachnoiditis and hydrocephalus after lumbar myelography using methylglucamine iocarmate.  

PubMed Central

A 35 year old woman developed a severe meningeal reaction after lumbar myelography using the water-soluble contrast medium methylglucamine iocarmate. Three months after myelography the findings were a transverse spinal cord syndrome corresponding to the middle thoracic segments resulting from well developed leptomeningeal adhesions. This was combined with a noncommunicating hydrocephalus, probably the result of leptomeningeal fibrosis in the posterior fossa. After treatment with a ventriculoatrial shunt the patient is almost free of symptoms. A possible pathogenetic relationship between the contrast medium, the chronic leptomeningeal changes, and the symptoms of our patient is discussed on the basis of the literature. Images

Jensen, T S; Hein, O

1978-01-01

250

Posterior urethral valves.  

PubMed

Posterior urethral valves represent the most common post-vesical obstructive malformation. They affect the male gender and appear as intraluminal folds located immediately proximal to the verumontanum. One of the most credited pathogenetic theories considers them an anomalous insertion of mesonephric duct into the cloaca or an incomplete involution of plicae colliculi. At present, the diagnosis of posterior urethral valves is prenatal and the pattern is characterized by detrusor hypertrophy and more or less marked hydroureteronephrosis. Urinary tract disorders that accompany posterior urethral valves include moderate hydroureteronephrosis to severe functional impairment of the entire urinary tract with consequent renal failure. Treatment of posterior urethral valves consists in their resection. At present, with miniaturized endoscopes, valve fulguration is feasible also in newborn infants. In low-weight patients or in case of poor general condition, temporary external urinary bypass (e.g. cystostomy) is feasible. PMID:12696266

Manzoni, Carlo; Valentini, Anna Lia

2002-01-01

251

Suction posterior capsulorhexis.  

PubMed

A technique for creating a posterior capsulorhexis during phacoemulsification is presented. It can be used in cases with posterior capsule tears or opacities. The free edge of the capsule is grasped with suction using a 2 mL syringe and a 27 gauge Rycroft cannula introduced via the paracentesis. The edge is then manipulated to produce a continuous curvilinear opening in the posterior capsule. The combination of a closed eye plus the use of a viscoelastic agent in the anterior chamber and capsular bag minimizes the possibility of vitreous prolapse during the maneuver. Occlusion of the cannula tip by the posterior capsule reduces the risk of vitreous aspiration. In-the-bag intraocular lens implantation is readily achieved. PMID:10476499

Hugkulstone, C E

1999-09-01

252

Hybrid construct for two levels disc disease in lumbar spine.  

PubMed

Prospective study. To study the validity of Hybrid construction (Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion) ALIF at one level and total disc arthroplasty (TDA) at adjacent, for two levels disc disease in lumbar spine as surgical strategy. With growing evidence that fusion constructs in the treatment of degenerative disc disease (DDD) may alter sagittal balance and contribute to undesirable complications in the long-term, total disc arthroplasty (TDA) slowly becomes an accepted treatment option for a selected group of patients. Despite encouraging early and intermediate term results of single-level total disc arthroplasty reported in the literature, there is growing evidence that two-level arthroplasty does not fare as well. Hybrid fusion is an attempt to address two-level DDD by combining the advantages of a single-level ALIF with those of a single-level arthroplasty. 42 patients (25 females and 17 males) underwent Hybrid fusion and had a median follow-up of 26.3 months. The primary functional outcomes were assessed before and after surgery with Oswestry Disability Index and the visual analogue score of the back and legs. Patients were divided into four groups according to the percentage improvement between preop and postop ODI scores. A total of 42 patients underwent a hybrid fusion as follows: 35 L5-S1 ALIF/L4-5 prosthesis, 3 L4-5 ALIF/L3-4 prosthesis, 2 L5-S1 ALIF/L4-5 prosthesis/L3-4 prosthesis, 1 L5-S1 prosthesis/L4-5 ALIF, and 1 L5-S1 ALIF/L4-5 ALIF/L3-4 prosthesis. At 2-years clinical outcomes, mean reduction in ODI is 24.9 points (53.0% improvement compared to preop ODI). The visual analogue score for the back is 64.6% improvement. At 2-year clinical outcomes, Hybrid fusion is a viable surgical alternative for the treatment of two-level DDD in comparison with two-level TDA and with two-level fusion. PMID:19888610

Aunoble, Stephane; Meyrat, Robert; Al Sawad, Yasser; Tournier, C; Leijssen, Philip; Le Huec, Jean-Charles

2010-02-01

253

Percutaneous treatment of lumbar compression fracture with canal stenosis and neurogenic intermittent claudication: combining kyphoplasty and interspinous spacer.  

PubMed

Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) can cause symptomatic spinal canal stenosis secondary to posterior wall retropulsion. This report describes four patients with VCF and lumbar stenosis secondary to posterior wall retropulsion who were treated with combined kyphoplasty and percutaneous interspinous spacer (IS) placement. Clinical and imaging follow-up ranged from 12-36 months. Outcomes were favorable. Combined kyphoplasty and percutaneous IS implant represents a minimally invasive, safe, and efficient option to treat VCF with symptomatic spinal stenosis. PMID:23101915

Bonaldi, Giuseppe; Cianfoni, Alessandro

2012-11-01

254

Long-Term Follow-Up Radiologic and Clinical Evaluation of Cylindrical Cage for Anterior Interbody Fusion in Degenerative Cervical Disc Disease  

PubMed Central

Objective Various procedures have been introduced for anterior interbody fusion in degenerative cervical disc disease including plate systems with autologous iliac bone, carbon cages, and cylindrical cages. However, except for plate systems, the long-term results of other methods have not been established. In the present study, we evaluated radiologic findings for cylindrical cervical cages over long-term follow up periods. Methods During 4 year period, radiologic findings of 138 patients who underwent anterior cervical fusion with cylindrical cage were evaluated at 6, 12, 24, and 36 postoperative months using plain radiographs. We investigated subsidence, osteophyte formation (anterior and posterior margin), cage direction change, kyphotic angle, and bone fusion on each radiograph. Results Among the 138 patients, a minimum of 36 month follow-up was achieved in 99 patients (mean follow-up : 38.61 months) with 115 levels. Mean disc height was 7.32 mm for preoperative evaluations, 9.00 for immediate postoperative evaluations, and 4.87 more than 36 months after surgery. Osteophytes were observed in 107 levels (93%) of the anterior portion and 48 levels (41%) of the posterior margin. The mean kyphotic angle was 9.87° in 35 levels showing cage directional change. There were several significant findings : 1) related subsidence [T-score (p=0.039) and anterior osteophyte (p=0.009)], 2) accompanying posterior osteophyte and outcome (p=0.05). Conclusion Cage subsidence and osteophyte formation were radiologically observed in most cases. Low T-scores may have led to subsidence and kyphosis during bone fusion although severe neurologic aggravation was not found, and therefore cylindrical cages should be used in selected cases.

Kim, Suhyeong; Yi, Hyeon-Joong; Bak, Koang Hum; Kim, Dong Won; Lee, Yoon Kyoung

2012-01-01

255

Lumbar Spinal Stenosis  

PubMed Central

Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is most commonly due to degenerative changes in older individuals. LSS is being more commonly diagnosed and may relate to better access to advanced imaging and to an aging population. This review focuses on radicular symptoms related to degenerative central and lateral stenosis and updates knowledge of LSS pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. Since patients with anatomic LSS can range from asymptomatic to severely disabled, the clinical diagnosis focuses on symptoms and examination findings associated with LSS. Imaging findings are helpful for patients with persistent, bothersome symptoms in whom invasive treatments are being considered. There is limited information from high quality studies about the relative benefits and harms of commonly used treatments. Interpreting and comparing results of available research is limited by a lack of consensus about the definition of LSS. Nevertheless, evidence supports decompressive laminectomy for patients with persistent and bothersome symptoms. Recommendations favor a shared decision making approach due to important trade-offs between alternative therapies and differences among patients in their preferences and values.

Genevay, Stephane

2009-01-01

256

Posterior nutcracker syndrome.  

PubMed

Renal vein compression syndromes are rare causes of hematuria and can be divided into anterior and posterior nutcracker syndrome. When the left renal vein is compressed between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery it causes anterior nutcracker syndrome. The posterior nutcracker syndrome is very rare and is considered when the left renal vein is compressed between the aorta and vertebral column. Symptoms of nutcracker syndromes may include intermittent left flank pain associated with hematuria, proteinuria, and sometimes with symptoms of pelvic congestion. Diagnosis is often difficult and plan for treatment is always challenging and requires careful evaluation of the patient's history and workup findings. We present a rare case report of a posterior nutcracker syndrome diagnosed in a young lady with long-standing symptoms that required surgical intervention. PMID:21890560

Skeik, Nedaa; Gloviczki, Peter; Macedo, Thanila A

2011-11-01

257

Arterio-venous fistula following a lumbar disc surgery.  

PubMed

Vascular complications during posterior lumbar disc surgery are rare and its presentation with varicose veins is even rarer. A 23 year-old male patient presented with large varicose veins in right lower limb. He underwent a posterior lumbar spine discectomy surgery. He noticed mild swelling of the distal third right lower limb 3 months after index surgery and reported 6 months later when he developed varicose veins. Duplex Doppler confirmed varicose veins of the long saphenous vein and its tributaries with a patent deep venous system. A digital subtraction angiogram demonstrated a large right common iliac artery (CIA) false aneurysm with an arteriovenous fistula between right common iliac vessels. He had a right CIA covered stent insertion with good results. Varicose veins were later managed with sapheno-femoral junction ligation and a below knee long saphenous vein stripping. At six month follow-up the lower limb swelling had completely recovered and duplex ultrasound did not show any recurrence of varicose veins. PMID:22144752

Mulaudzi, Thanyani V; Sikhosana, Mbokeleng H

2011-11-01

258

Pedicle-Screw-Based Dynamic Systems and Degenerative Lumbar Diseases: Biomechanical and Clinical Experiences of Dynamic Fusion with Isobar TTL  

PubMed Central

Dynamic systems in the lumbar spine are believed to reduce main fusion drawbacks such as pseudarthrosis, bone rarefaction, and mechanical failure. Compared to fusion achieved with rigid constructs, biomechanical studies underlined some advantages of dynamic instrumentation including increased load sharing between the instrumentation and interbody bone graft and stresses reduction at bone-to-screw interface. These advantages may result in increased fusion rates, limitation of bone rarefaction, and reduction of mechanical complications with the ultimate objective to reduce reoperations rates. However published clinical evidence for dynamic systems remains limited. In addition to providing biomechanical evaluation of a pedicle-screw-based dynamic system, the present study offers a long-term (average 10.2 years) insight view of the clinical outcomes of 18 patients treated by fusion with dynamic systems for degenerative lumbar spine diseases. The findings outline significant and stable symptoms relief, absence of implant-related complications, no revision surgery, and few adjacent segment degenerative changes. In spite of sample limitations, this is the first long-term report of outcomes of dynamic fusion that opens an interesting perspective for clinical outcomes of dynamic systems that need to be explored at larger scale.

Barrey, Cedric; Perrin, Gilles; Champain, Sabina

2013-01-01

259

Anterior Interbody Fusion with the BAK-Cage in Cervical Spondylosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary   BAK-C is a new autostabilizing interbody cage which is implanted during an anterior cervical procedure to provide stability\\u000a to the motion segment and allow fusion to occur. Special intrumentation is provided with a bone collecting reamer. The system\\u000a utilizes surgical site bone graft as the osteo-inductive material within the implant.\\u000a \\u000a Biomechanical testing indicates improved stability and animal studies show

G. Matge

1998-01-01

260

Lateral Interbody Fusion for Treatment of Discogenic Low Back Pain: Minimally Invasive Surgical Techniques  

PubMed Central

Low back pain is one of the most common ailments in the general population, which tends to increase in severity along with aging. While few patients have severe enough symptoms or underlying pathology to warrant surgical intervention, in those select cases treatment choices remain controversial and reimbursement is a substancial barrier to surgery. The object of this study was to examine outcomes of discogenic back pain without radiculopathy following minimally-invasive lateral interbody fusion. Twenty-two patients were treated at either one or two levels (28 total) between L2 and 5. Discectomy and interbody fusion were performed using a minimallyinvasive retroperitoneal lateral transpsoas approach. Clinical and radiographic parameters were analyzed at standard pre- and postoperative intervals up to 24 months. Mean surgical duration was 72.1 minutes. Three patients underwent supplemental percutaneous pedicle screw instrumentation. Four (14.3%) stand-alone levels experienced cage subsidence. Pain (VAS) and disability (ODI) improved markedly postoperatively and were maintained through 24 months. Segmental lordosis increased significantly and fusion was achieved in 93% of levels. In this series, isolated axial low back pain arising from degenerative disc disease was treated with minimally-invasive lateral interbody fusion in significant radiographic and clinical improvements, which were maintained through 24 months.

Marchi, Luis; Oliveira, Leonardo; Amaral, Rodrigo; Castro, Carlos; Coutinho, Thiago; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Pimenta, Luiz

2012-01-01

261

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries  

MedlinePLUS

... but is still able to help keep the knee joint stable. Grade 2 Sprains. A Grade 2 Sprain stretches the ligament to ... the ligament. Grade 3 Sprains. This type of sprain is most commonly ... and the knee joint is unstable. Posterior cruciate ligament tears tend ...

262

Posterior Cranial Fossa Meningiomas*  

PubMed Central

This study evaluated the outcomes, complications, and recurrence rates of posterior cranial fossa meningiomas. We retrospectively reviewed our surgical experience with 64 posterior cranial fossa meningiomas. Mean age was 56 years with a female preponderance (67.2%). Headache was the most common symptom. Retrosigmoid approach was the commonest surgical procedure (23.4%). The incidence of cranial nerve related complications was 28%. Postoperatively facial nerve weakness was observed in 11%. The incidence of cerebrospinal fluid leak was 4.6%. Gross total resection was achieved in 37 patients (58%). Sixteen patients (25%) with residual tumors underwent Gamma knife radiosurgery. Recurrence or tumor progression was observed in 12 patients (18.7%). Operative mortality was 3.1%. At their last follow-up, 93% of the cases achieved Glasgow Outcome Scale scores 4 or 5. Total excision is the ideal goal which can be achieved with meningiomas located in certain location, such as lateral convexity, but for other posterior fossa meningiomas the close proximity of critical structures is a major obstacle in achieving this goal. In practicality, a balance between good functional outcome and extent of resection is important for posterior cranial fossa meningiomas in proximity to critical structures.

Javalkar, Vijayakumar; Banerjee, Anirban Deep; Nanda, Anil

2012-01-01

263

Approximate Posterior Distributions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes the use of approximate posterior distributions resulting from operational prior distributions chosen with regard to the realized likelihood function. L.J. Savage's “precise measurement” is generalized for approximation in terms of an arbitrary operational prior density, including mixed-type prior distributions with positive probabilities on singular subsets. A new approximation is also given relating such distributions to absolutely continuous

James M. Dickey

1976-01-01

264

Posterior shape models.  

PubMed

We present a method to compute the conditional distribution of a statistical shape model given partial data. The result is a "posterior shape model", which is again a statistical shape model of the same form as the original model. This allows its direct use in the variety of algorithms that include prior knowledge about the variability of a class of shapes with a statistical shape model. Posterior shape models then provide a statistically sound yet easy method to integrate partial data into these algorithms. Usually, shape models represent a complete organ, for instance in our experiments the femur bone, modeled by a multivariate normal distribution. But because in many application certain parts of the shape are known a priori, it is of great interest to model the posterior distribution of the whole shape given the known parts. These could be isolated landmark points or larger portions of the shape, like the healthy part of a pathological or damaged organ. However, because for most shape models the dimensionality of the data is much higher than the number of examples, the normal distribution is singular, and the conditional distribution not readily available. In this paper, we present two main contributions: First, we show how the posterior model can be efficiently computed as a statistical shape model in standard form and used in any shape model algorithm. We complement this paper with a freely available implementation of our algorithms. Second, we show that most common approaches put forth in the literature to overcome this are equivalent to probabilistic principal component analysis (PPCA), and Gaussian Process regression. To illustrate the use of posterior shape models, we apply them on two problems from medical image analysis: model-based image segmentation incorporating prior knowledge from landmarks, and the prediction of anatomically correct knee shapes for trochlear dysplasia patients, which constitutes a novel medical application. Our experiments confirm that the use of conditional shape models for image segmentation improves the overall segmentation accuracy and robustness. PMID:23837968

Albrecht, Thomas; Lüthi, Marcel; Gerig, Thomas; Vetter, Thomas

2013-12-01

265

Minimally invasive spine surgery for adult degenerative lumbar scoliosis.  

PubMed

Object Historically, adult degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS) has been treated with multilevel decompression and instrumented fusion to reduce neural compression and stabilize the spinal column. However, due to the profound morbidity associated with complex multilevel surgery, particularly in elderly patients and those with multiple medical comorbidities, minimally invasive surgical approaches have been proposed. The goal of this meta-analysis was to review the differences in patient selection for minimally invasive surgical versus open surgical procedures for adult DLS, and to compare the postoperative outcomes following minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and open surgery. Methods In this meta-analysis the authors analyzed the complication rates and the clinical outcomes for patients with adult DLS undergoing complex decompressive procedures with fusion versus minimally invasive surgical approaches. Minimally invasive surgical approaches included decompressive laminectomy, microscopic decompression, lateral and extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF), and percutaneous pedicle screw placement for fusion. Mean patient age, complication rates, reoperation rates, Cobb angle, and measures of sagittal balance were investigated and compared between groups. Results Twelve studies were identified for comparison in the MIS group, with 8 studies describing the lateral interbody fusion or XLIF and 4 studies describing decompression without fusion. In the decompression MIS group, the mean preoperative Cobb angle was 16.7° and mean postoperative Cobb angle was 18°. In the XLIF group, mean pre- and postoperative Cobb angles were 22.3° and 9.2°, respectively. The difference in postoperative Cobb angle was statistically significant between groups on 1-way ANOVA (p = 0.014). Mean preoperative Cobb angle, mean patient age, and complication rate did not differ between the XLIF and decompression groups. Thirty-five studies were identified for inclusion in the open surgery group, with 18 studies describing patients with open fusion without osteotomy and 17 papers detailing outcomes after open fusion with osteotomy. Mean preoperative curve in the open fusion without osteotomy and with osteotomy groups was 41.3° and 32°, respectively. Mean reoperation rate was significantly higher in the osteotomy group (p = 0.008). On 1-way ANOVA comparing all groups, there was a statistically significant difference in mean age (p = 0.004) and mean preoperative curve (p = 0.002). There was no statistically significant difference in complication rates between groups (p = 0.28). Conclusions The results of this study suggest that surgeons are offering patients open surgery or MIS depending on their age and the severity of their deformity. Greater sagittal and coronal correction was noted in the XLIF versus decompression only MIS groups. Larger Cobb angles, greater sagittal imbalance, and higher reoperation rates were found in studies reporting the use of open fusion with osteotomy. Although complication rates did not significantly differ between groups, these data are difficult to interpret given the heterogeneity in reporting complications between studies. PMID:24785489

Dangelmajer, Sean; Zadnik, Patricia L; Rodriguez, Samuel T; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Sciubba, Daniel M

2014-05-01

266

Posterior microphthalmos pigmentary retinopathy syndrome.  

PubMed

Posterior Microphthalmos Pigmentary Retinopathy Syndrome (PMPRS). Posterior microphthalmos (PM) is a relatively infrequent type of microphthalmos where posterior segment is predominantly affected with normal anterior segment measurements. Herein, we report two siblings with posterior microphthalmos retinopathy syndrome with postulated autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A 13-year-old child had PM and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and his 7-year-old sister had PM, RP, and foveoschisis. The genetics of this syndrome and variable phenotype is discussed. Importance of being aware of posterior microphthalmos and its posterior segment associations is highlighted. PMID:21416382

Pehere, Niranjan; Jalali, Subhadra; Deshmukh, Himanshu; Kannabiran, Chitra

2011-04-01

267

Vertebral body replacement system Synex in unstable burst fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective longitudinal study was performed to evaluate the vertebral body replacement system Synex associated with posterior\\u000a fixation in unstable burst fractures of the lumbar and thoracic spine. Within 24 months, we treated 28 patients (average age,\\u000a 41 years; range, 22–64 years; 14 women, 14 men) with acute unstable burst fractures without osteoporosis of the thoracolumbar\\u000a region (n=16) and the

U. Vieweg

2007-01-01

268

Apophyseolysis of the fourth lumbar vertebra: an early postoperative complication following kyphectomy in myelomeningocele  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a report of a young girl with congenital kyphosis at the thoracolumbar spine in association with myelomeningocele.\\u000a Kyphectomy and posterior stabilisation extending from the eighth thoracic to the fourth lumbar vertebra was done. Apophyseolysis\\u000a occurred as an early postoperative complication at the level of the L4-L5 disc. This failure mode was treated by extending\\u000a the fusion to the

H. Böhm; Hesham ElSaghir

2000-01-01

269

Solitary lower lumbar osteochondroma (spinous process of L3 involvement): a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solitary osteochondromas, which are the most common benign bone tumors of long bones, are rarely found in the vertebral column. A 16-year-old female patient presented with a hard palpable mass at lower lumbar region like a congenital deformity. Plain radiography illustrated a well-defined solid mass arising from the posterior elements of the L3 and ruled out any congenital anomalies. A

Ebrahim Hassankhani

2009-01-01

270

Activity of thoracic and lumbar epaxial extensors during postural responses in the cat  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study examined the role of trunk extensor muscles in the thoracic and lumbar regions during postural adjustments in the freely standing cat. The epaxial extensor muscles participate in the rapid postural responses evoked by horizontal translation of the support surface. The muscles segregate into two regional groups separated by a short transition zone, according to the spatial pattern of the electromyographic (EMG) responses. The upper thoracic muscles (T5-9) respond best to posteriorly directed translations, whereas the lumbar muscles (T13 to L7) respond best to anterior translations. The transition group muscles (T10-12) respond to almost all translations. Muscles group according to vertebral level rather than muscle species. The upper thoracic muscles change little in their response with changes in stance distance (fore-hindpaw separation) and may act to stabilize the intervertebral angles of the thoracic curvature. Activity in the lumbar muscles increases along with upward rotation of the pelvis (iliac crest) as stance distance decreases. Lumbar muscles appear to stabilize the pelvis with respect to the lumbar vertebrae (L7-sacral joint). The transition zone muscles display a change in spatial tuning with stance distance, responding to many directions of translation at short distances and focusing to respond best to contralateral translations at the long stance distance.

Macpherson, J. M.; Fung, J.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

1998-01-01

271

Myelopathy due to lumbar disc herniation in the presence of a tethered cord.  

PubMed

Study design:Single case report.Objectives:To present a case of lumbar disc herniation causing compression of a tethered cord that was successfully treated with lumbar decompression and fusion.Background:A tethered cord is a rare pathology associated with a congenital spinal malformation, spinal dysraphism. Furthermore, myelopathy due to lumbar disc herniation in the presence of a tethered cord is extremely rare.Methods:Single case report.Results:A 43-year-old male with a history of spina bifida presented to our clinic for an evaluation of a progressive spastic gait disturbance and numbness in the lower limbs. A neurological examination revealed muscle weakness and pyramidal tract signs in the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine showed disc herniation at L2-3 causing compression of a low-lying cord. Surgical intervention, including herniotomy via a posterolateral approach and instrumented posterolateral fusion, was performed, and a good outcome was achieved 1 year after the surgery.Conclusion:The potential for lumbar disc herniation in the presence of a tethered cord should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of spinal pathologies causing spastic gait disturbances. Furthermore, posterior decompression and fusion is a useful treatment option in such cases. PMID:24902642

Endo, F; Iizuka, H; Iizuka, Y; Kobayashi, R; Mieda, T; Takagishi, K

2014-06-01

272

Surgical management of dumbbell and paraspinal tumors of the thoracic and lumbar spine.  

PubMed

The lateral extracavitary approach was used for single-staged tumor resection in 12 patients with complex dumbbell or paraspinal tumors of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Six women and six men (age, 28-72 yr) were treated between August 1990 and January 1994. The tumors included schwannoma (6 patients), malignant meningioma (1 patient), hemangioma (1 patient), chondrosarcoma (1 patient), osteocartilaginous exostosis (1 patient), radiation-induced osteogenic sarcoma (1 patient), and metastatic renal carcinoma (1 patient). Gross total resection was achieved in 11 patients. Radical subtotal removal was performed in the remaining patient, who had a malignant osteogenic sarcoma. Concomitant spinal stabilization with internal fixation and anterior interbody strut grafting was performed on two patients. No significant perioperative complications occurred. Ten patients were alive and clinically stable at follow-up visits ranging from 14 to 55 months. Two patients died from systemic tumor dissemination during the follow-up period. The lateral extracavitary approach is useful when extensive or difficult spinal and paraspinal exposure is required. The surgical aspects of these neoplasms and the technique of lateral extracavitary approach are described in detail. PMID:8747953

McCormick, P C

1996-01-01

273

Lumbar spine disc heights and curvature: upright posture vs. supine compression harness  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

INTRODUCTION: Spinal lengthening in microgravity is thought to cause back pain in astronauts. A spinal compression harness can compress the spine to eliminate lengthening but the loading condition with harness is different than physiologic conditions. Our purpose was to compare the effect of spine compression with a harness in supine position on disk height and spinal curvature in the lumbar spine to that of upright position as measured using a vertically open magnetic resonance imaging system. METHODS: Fifteen healthy subjects volunteered. On day 1, each subject lay supine for an hour and a baseline scan of the lumbar spine was performed. After applying a load of fifty percent of body weight with the harness for thirty minutes, the lumbar spine was scanned again. On day 2, after a baseline scan, a follow up scan was performed after kneeling for thirty minutes within the gap between two vertically oriented magnetic coils. Anterior and posterior disk heights, posterior disk bulging, and spinal curvature were measured from the baseline and follow up scans. RESULTS: Anterior disk heights increased and posterior disk heights decreased compared with baseline scans both after spinal compression with harness and upright posture. The spinal curvature increased by both loading conditions of the spine. DISCUSSION: The spinal compression with specially designed harness has the same effect as the physiologic loading of the spine in the kneeling upright position. The harness shows some promise as a tool to increase the diagnostic capabilities of a conventional MR system.

Lee, Shi-Uk; Hargens, Alan R.; Fredericson, Michael; Lang, Philipp K.

2003-01-01

274

Postoperative discitis following single-level lumbar discectomy: Our experience of 17 cases  

PubMed Central

Background: The established protocols of treatment of postoperative lumbar discitis have not been validated till date. We report a retrospective analysis of a series of patients with discitis following single level lumbar discectomy. We analyzed the outcome of conservative treatment of postoperative discitis with the objective to define when and what surgery was required when the conservative treatment failed. Materials and Methods: A total of 17 cases of postoperative discitis treated from 2002 to 2009 were followed up and evaluated clinically, radiologically and by laboratory investigations. All the patients were treated initially conservatively with rest and antibiotic therapy after diagnosis and those who did not respond to conservative treatment of at least 4 weeks were treated surgically. The cases were followed up with serial C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), X-ray, computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for at least 1 year. Results: The mean followup was 40.38 months (range 12-86 months). Four cases failed to respond to conservative therapy and were treated surgically. In three of these four cases, open debridement, transpedicular fixation and posterolateral fusion was performed, and in the fourth case percutaneous transpedicular fixation was done. In the former group, one case was diagnosed to be tubercular, in another case Staphylococcus aureus was cultured where as the third case culture was sterile. All operated patients showed evidence of interbody fusion at 1 year followup. Conclusions: Early detection and aggressive treatment are paramount in managing postoperative discitis and the majority do well with conservative treatment. Surgical management in the form of transpedicular fixation and debridement, when required, gives excellent results.

Basu, Saumyajit; Ghosh, Jay Deep; Malik, Farid H; Tikoo, Agnivesh

2012-01-01

275

Lumbar disc syndrome in Finland  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of lumbar disc syndrome (herniated disc or typical sciatica) and its consequences in terms of disability, handicap, and need for medical care were studied as part of the Mini-Finland Health Survey. A sample of 8000 persons representative of the Finnish population aged 30 or over was asked to come for examination, and 7217 (90%) participated. A diagnosis of

M Heliövaara; O Impivaara; K Sievers; T Melkas; P Knekt; J Korpi; A Aromaa

1987-01-01

276

Lumbar synovial or ganglion cysts.  

PubMed

Most reports regarding synovial cysts of the spinal canal have been presentations identifying an unusual pathological entity that is to be included in the differential diagnosis of cauda equina compression syndromes. Most of the 26 cases reported represent isolated examples of this pathological process. We present five cases of lumbar synovial cysts encountered in our practice in the past 8 years. Patients with lumbar synovial cysts do not demonstrate any predictable clinical picture. They may present with a unilateral sciatica or neurogenic claudication. Lumbar extension is usually restricted, whereas flexion is full. Mechanical signs of nerve root entrapment or lumbosacral plexus irritation are unimpressive. Neurological deficits are usually mild, if present. Radiological findings include degenerative spondylosis, spondylolisthesis, and a rounded posterolateral extradural mass of low attenuation value adjacent to a facet shown on computed tomographic scan. The etiology of lumbar synovial cysts is not known. Histological findings of myxoid degeneration, microcystic change, calcification, and hemosiderin deposits suggest that chronic microtrauma with occasional focal hemorrhage may play a major role in the etiology of the cysts. With resection of the cyst, the postoperative course is usually uneventful. Recurrences have not yet been encountered in our patients. PMID:3489903

Kjerulf, T D; Terry, D W; Boubelik, R J

1986-09-01

277

Effect of alendronate on bone ingrowth into porous tantalum and carbon fiber interbody devices: an experimental study on spinal fusion in pigs.  

PubMed

Recent studies have reported that bisphosphonates reduce the resorption of grafted bone and inhibit bone resorption at a bone-implant interface. However, it is not known whether bisphosphonates affect bone ingrowth into porous biomaterial or spine fusion interbody devices with an autograft. In this study, 18 pigs (9 in each group) underwent anterior intervertebral lumbar arthrodeses at L2-3, L4-5 and L6-7. Each level was randomly allocated to one of the 3 implants: a solid piece of porous tantalum (Hedrocel), a porous tantalum ring or a carbon fiber cage both packed with an autograft. Alendronate was given orally to one of the groups. The radiographic and histological findings in the two groups 3 months after operation were similar in these devices. Histological examination showed that the original graft was entirely replaced by new trabecular bone in both groups. On histomorphometric analysis, the bone volume fraction, both inside the central hole of porous tantalum ring and in the porous tantalum, was larger in the pigs given alendronate than in the controls, but the fraction inside and around the central hole of the carbon fiber cage was not affected by this treatment. Short-term alendronate treatment, in a relatively low dose, does not impair the formation of new bone, but increases bone ingrowth into the central hole of the porous tantalum ring and the pores of the porous tantalum in this porcine model. This may be an effective way to enhance early biologic fixation of porous intervertebral implants. PMID:14620983

Zou, Xuenong; Xue, Qingyun; Li, Haisheng; Bünger, Mathias; Lind, Martin; Bünge, Cody

2003-10-01

278

Posterior fossa arachnoid cysts.  

PubMed

Arachnoid cysts of the posterior fossa are rare lesions that are considered to be mostly congenital in origin. In this article, we retrospectively review 12 patients who underwent surgical treatment for their symptomatic posterior fossa arachnoid cysts. The most common presenting symptoms were gait disturbances and headache. The diagnosis was established on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Surgery consisted of cyst wall excision with fenestration in nine cases and shunting procedures in three cases. In all cases except one who-died, the postsurgical follow-up neuroradiological investigations showed that the cysts had decreased in size, the cerebellum had re-expanded, and if there was preoperative hydrocephalus, the ventricular size was decreased. The follow-up period ranged from 1 to 11 years. All surviving cases are free of symptoms and no arachnoid cysts recurred. The classification, pathophysiology, differential diagnosis and surgical treatment of infratentorial arachnoid cysts are discussed and the relevant literature is reviewed. PMID:10492679

Erdinçler, P; Kaynar, M Y; Bozkus, H; Ciplak, N

1999-02-01

279

Posterior calf injury.  

PubMed

Acute injuries of the Achilles tendon are common among athletes and non-athletes alike. Injuries of other posterior calf muscles are far less common but should be considered in the differential, to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment of patients with calf injuries. This article focuses on these calf injuries, including injuries of the gastrocnemius, plantaris, soleus, and flexor hallucis longus, which may occasionally be mistaken for Achilles tendon disorders. PMID:19857847

Campbell, John T

2009-12-01

280

The posterior Monteggia lesion.  

PubMed

Thirteen posterior Monteggia fracture-dislocations in adults were treated surgically at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 1980 to 1988. A characteristic lesion was observed, consisting of a proximal ulna fracture with a triangular or quandrangular fracture at or near the level of the coronoid, a posterior or posterolateral radiocapitellar dislocation, and, in 10 cases, a radial head fracture. Nine patients were women and four were men, with an average age of 56 years. Following reduction of the radiocapitellar dislocation, the ulnar fractures were treated with plates in each case. Seven fractured radial heads were excised, one replaced with a silicone prosthesis, and three treated by open reduction and internal fixation. The 11 surviving patients were observed using the performance index of Broberg and Morrey at an average follow-up time of 38.4 months. The conditions of three were rated excellent, three good, four fair, and one poor. Incomplete reduction of the ulnar fracture with residual posterior radiocapitellar subluxation was observed in four cases, all leading to loss of forearm supination. We believe this lesion to be more common than previously reported. Recognition of its specific anatomic features is essential to achieve a functional outcome. PMID:1761999

Jupiter, J B; Leibovic, S J; Ribbans, W; Wilk, R M

1991-01-01

281

Ogilvie's syndrome following posterior spinal arthrodesis for scoliosis  

PubMed Central

We report Ogilvie's syndrome following posterior spinal arthrodesis on a patient with thoracic and lumbar scoliosis associated with intraspinal anomalies. Postoperative paralytic ileus can commonly complicate scoliosis surgery. Ogilvie's syndrome as a cause of abdominal distension and pain has not been reported following spinal deformity correction and can mimic post-surgical ileus. 12 year old female patient with double thoracic and lumbar scoliosis associated with Arnold-Chiari 1 malformation and syringomyelia. The patient underwent posterior spinal fusion from T4 to L3 with segmental pedicle screw instrumentation and autogenous iliac crest grafting. She developed abdominal distension and pain postoperatively and this deteriorated despite conservative management. Repeat ultrasounds and abdominal computer tomography scans ruled out mechanical obstruction. The clinical presentation and blood parameters excluded toxic megacolon and cecal volvulus. As the symptoms persisted, a laparotomy was performed on postoperative day 16, which demonstrated ragged tears of the colon and cecum. A right hemi-colectomy followed by ileocecal anastomosis was required. The pathological examination of surgical specimens excluded inflammatory bowel disease and vascular abnormalities. The patient made a good recovery following bowel surgery and at latest followup 3.2 years later she had no abdominal complaints and an excellent scoliosis correction. Ogilvie's syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis of postoperative ileus in patients developing prolonged unexplained abdominal distension and pain after scoliosis correction. Early diagnosis and instigation of conservative management can prevent major morbidity and mortality due to bowel ischemia and perforation.

Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Sud, Alok

2013-01-01

282

Ogilvie's syndrome following posterior spinal arthrodesis for scoliosis.  

PubMed

We report Ogilvie's syndrome following posterior spinal arthrodesis on a patient with thoracic and lumbar scoliosis associated with intraspinal anomalies. Postoperative paralytic ileus can commonly complicate scoliosis surgery. Ogilvie's syndrome as a cause of abdominal distension and pain has not been reported following spinal deformity correction and can mimic post-surgical ileus. 12 year old female patient with double thoracic and lumbar scoliosis associated with Arnold-Chiari 1 malformation and syringomyelia. The patient underwent posterior spinal fusion from T4 to L3 with segmental pedicle screw instrumentation and autogenous iliac crest grafting. She developed abdominal distension and pain postoperatively and this deteriorated despite conservative management. Repeat ultrasounds and abdominal computer tomography scans ruled out mechanical obstruction. The clinical presentation and blood parameters excluded toxic megacolon and cecal volvulus. As the symptoms persisted, a laparotomy was performed on postoperative day 16, which demonstrated ragged tears of the colon and cecum. A right hemi-colectomy followed by ileocecal anastomosis was required. The pathological examination of surgical specimens excluded inflammatory bowel disease and vascular abnormalities. The patient made a good recovery following bowel surgery and at latest followup 3.2 years later she had no abdominal complaints and an excellent scoliosis correction. Ogilvie's syndrome should be included in the differential diagnosis of postoperative ileus in patients developing prolonged unexplained abdominal distension and pain after scoliosis correction. Early diagnosis and instigation of conservative management can prevent major morbidity and mortality due to bowel ischemia and perforation. PMID:23960287

Tsirikos, Athanasios I; Sud, Alok

2013-07-01

283

The influence of different magnitudes and methods of applying preload on fusion and disc replacement constructs in the lumbar spine: a finite element analysis.  

PubMed

In a finite element (FE) analysis of the lumbar spine, different preload application methods that are used in biomechanical studies may yield diverging results. To investigate how the biomechanical behaviour of a spinal implant is affected by the method of applying the preload, hybrid-controlled FE analysis was used to evaluate the biomechanical behaviour of the lumbar spine under different preload application methods. The FE models of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and artificial disc replacement (ADR) were tested under three different loading conditions: a 150 N pressure preload (PP) and 150 and 400 N follower loads (FLs). This study analysed the resulting range of motion (ROM), facet contact force (FCF), inlay contact pressure (ICP) and stress distribution of adjacent discs. The FE results indicated that the ROM of both surgical constructs was related to the preload application method and magnitude; differences in the ROM were within 7% for the ALIF model and 32% for the ADR model. Following the application of the FL and after increasing the FL magnitude, the FCF of the ADR model gradually increased, reaching 45% at the implanted level in torsion. The maximum ICP gradually decreased by 34.1% in torsion and 28.4% in lateral bending. This study concluded that the preload magnitude and application method affect the biomechanical behaviour of the lumbar spine. For the ADR, remarkable alteration was observed while increasing the FL magnitude, particularly in the ROM, FCF and ICP. However, for the ALIF, PP and FL methods had no remarkable alteration in terms of ROM and adjacent disc stress. PMID:22224913

Zhong, Zheng-Cheng; Hung, Chinghua; Lin, Hung-Ming; Wang, Ying-Hui; Huang, Chang-Hung; Chen, Chen-Sheng

2013-01-01

284

Lumbar spine in Marfan syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lumbar spine radiographs of 28 patients with Marfan syndrome and a gender and age-matched control group were evaluated for scoliosis and morphologic changes of the L2, L3, and L4 vertebrae. No patient or control subject had any serious low back problems. The Marfan patients showed a high incidence of scoliosis (64%). The incidence of lumbosacral transitional vertebra was also high

K. Tallroth; A. Malmivaara; M.-L. Laitinen; A. Savolainen; A. Harilainen

1995-01-01

285

Posterior Cortical Atrophy  

PubMed Central

Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management.

Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

2013-01-01

286

Laparoscopic transabdominal extraperitoneal mesh repair of lumbar hernia  

PubMed Central

Lumbar hernias are rare posterolateral abdominal wall defects that may be congenital or acquired. There are two types of lumbar hernia, the superior lumbar hernia through Grynfeltt triangle, and the inferior lumbar hernia through Petit triangle. Many techniques have been described for the surgical repair of lumbar hernias including primary repair, local tissue flaps, and conventional mesh repair. But these open techniques require a large skin incision. We report a case of superior lumbar hernia, which was successfully repaired using a laparoscopic approach.

Nam, Soon Young; Kee, Se Kook

2011-01-01

287

Lumbar instability: an evolving and challenging concept  

PubMed Central

Identification and management of chronic lumbar spine instability is a clinical challenge for manual physical therapists. Chronic lumbar instability is presented as a term that can encompass two types of lumbar instability: mechanical (radiographic) and functional (clinical) instability (FLI). The components of mechanical and FLI are presented relative to the development of a physical therapy diagnosis and management. The purpose of this paper is to review the historical framework of chronic lumbar spine instability from a physical therapy perspective and to summarize current research relative to clinical diagnosis in physical therapy.

Beazell, James R; Mullins, Melise; Grindstaff, Terry L

2010-01-01

288

Shape optimization for the subsidence resistance of an interbody device using simulation-based genetic algorithms and experimental validation.  

PubMed

Subsidence of interbody devices into the vertebral body might result in serious clinical problems, especially when the devices are not well designed and analyzed. Recently, some novel designs were proposed to reduce the risk of subsidence, but those designs are based on the researcher's experience. The purpose of this study was to discover the interbody device design with excellent subsidence resistance by changing the device's shape. The three-dimensional nonlinear finite element models, which consisted of the interbody device and vertebral body, were created first. Then, the simulation-based genetic algorithm, which combined the finite element model and the searching algorithm, was developed by using ANSYS® Parametric Design Language. Finally, the numerical results were carefully validated with the use of biomechanical tests. The optimum shape design obtained in this study looks like a flower with many petals and it has excellent subsidence resistance when compared with the other designs provided by the past studies. The results of the present study could help surgeons to understand the subsidence resistance of interbody devices in terms of their shapes and has directly provided the design rationales to engineers. PMID:23335363

Hsu, Ching-Chi

2013-07-01

289

Minimally invasive surgery through endoscopic laminotomy and foraminotomy for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis  

PubMed Central

Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common cause of radicular and generalized back pain among older adults. Endoscopic minimally invasive surgery, in contrast to open decompression, may provide the opportunity for a less invasive surgical intervention. Thus, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety (operative complications, estimated blood loss, operative room time) and effectiveness (pre- versus postoperative level of disability and pain severity) of minimally invasive surgery using endoscopic laminotomy and foraminotomy among a large sample of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods This study is composed of 320 consecutive patients with lumbar spinal stenosis who underwent posterior lumbar laminotomy and foraminotomy between 2008 and 2011. Outcome measures consisted of perioperative complications, estimated blood loss, operative room time, level of disability, and pain severity. Pain severity and level of disability were prospectively analyzed to an average of 18 months (12–36 months) post-surgery. Results There was an average estimated blood loss of 39.3 cc and a mean operative room time of 74 min. Seven patients experienced minor operative complications. All patients were discharged the same day as surgery and reported a significantly lower level of disability (p = 0.00) and pain severity (p = 0.00) postoperative compared to preoperative. Conclusions Minimally invasive surgery using endoscopy for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis has a short operative time, a low operative complication rate, and minimal estimated blood loss. This study also indicates that MIS for the treatment of LSS can significantly reduce pain and disability level. Thus, minimally invasive surgery using endoscopic laminotomy and foraminotomy appears to be a safe and effective alternative surgical treatment for open decompression surgery in adult patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

Polikandriotis, John A.; Hudak, Elizabeth M.; Perry, Michael W.

2013-01-01

290

Ultrasonography of the lumbar spine: sonoanatomy and practical applications.  

PubMed

Ultrasonography of the bones and joints has gained considerable ground in the field of rheumatology over the past decade and is now used in everyday practice both for diagnostic purposes and to guide local injections. However, the use of ultrasonography is virtually confined to the peripheral joints, whereas spinal diseases make a major contribution to rheumatology practice. Studies have established that ultrasonography of the lumbar spine is feasible. Adequate equipment and familiarity with spinal sonoanatomy are required. In this update, we suggest starting with a systematic examination of the lumbar spine to assess the various anatomic structures, from the thoracolumbar fascia superficially to the posterior part of the vertebras at the deepest level. The ligaments, erector spinae muscles, facet joints, and transverse processes can be visualized. Ultrasonography can serve to guide injections into the facet joints, about the nerve roots, and into the iliolumbar ligaments; as well as to identify relevant landmarks before epidural injection. Although diagnostic applications are more limited at present, systematic studies of abnormal ultrasonography findings will allow evaluations of the potential usefulness of ultrasonography for diagnosing spinal disorders. The depth of the spinal structures limits the ability to obtain high-resolution images. However, future technical improvements in ultrasound transducers and machines, together with the growing number of physicians trained in ultrasonography, can be expected to benefit the development of spinal ultrasonography in the near future. PMID:24618457

Darrieutort-Laffite, Christelle; Hamel, Olivier; Glémarec, Joëlle; Maugars, Yves; Le Goff, Benoit

2014-03-01

291

Percutaneous approach to the fifth lumbar and first sacral disc.  

PubMed

Reaching the L5-S1 disc space through a posterolateral percutaneous approach can be challenging and, at times, disappointing when the iliac crest is too high and the angle between the posterior rim of the iliac bone and the lumbar vertebral column is too acute. The authors are introducing a technique through which the two necessary caudal and axial angles of approach are measured and used for precise passage of the initial trocar into the L5-S1 disc space. Specific bony landmarks and their topographic reflection on the lumbar skin are used in finding the caudal angle and calculating the axial angle. The technique has been used in 43 patients with persistently symptomatic L5-S1 disc protrusions, 27 of whom had high iliac rims. Access to the disc space was achieved in a timely manner in 41 patients who subsequently had percutaneous discectomy. The two unsuccessful procedures were because of the blockage of the access tunnel by an extremely swollen nerve root in one patient and a very large transverse process in the other patient. There were no other complications. Because of its accuracy, although the technique can be used routinely for all the posterolateral percutaneous approaches to the L5-S1 disc space, it specifically is useful for patients with high iliac crests. PMID:11937875

Zahiri, Hormoz; Zahiri, Christopher A; Pourmand, Khashayar; Afzali, Reza

2002-02-01

292

Solitary Epidural Lipoma with Ipsilateral Facet Arthritis Causing Lumbar Radiculopathy  

PubMed Central

A 55-year-old obese man (body mass index, 31.6 kg/m2) presented radiating pain and motor weakness in the left leg. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an epidural mass posterior to the L5 vertebral body, which was isosignal to subcutaneous fat and it asymmetrically compressed the left side of the cauda equina and the exiting left L5 nerve root on the axial T1 weighted images. Severe arthritis of the left facet joint and edema of the bone marrow regarding the left pedicle were also found. As far as we know, there have been no reports concerning a solitary epidural lipoma combined with ipsilateral facet arthorsis causing lumbar radiculopathy. Solitary epidural lipoma with ipsilateral facet arthritis causing lumbar radiculopathy was removed after the failure of conservative treatment. After decompression, the neurologic deficit was relieved. At a 2 year follow-up, motor weakness had completely recovered and the patient was satisfied with the result. We recommend that a solitary epidural lipoma causing neurologic deficit should be excised at the time of diagnosis.

Kim, Hong Kyun; Koh, Sung Hye

2012-01-01

293

Postoperative cauda equina syndrome in trivial lumbar congenital kyphosis: a case report.  

PubMed

A 25-year old man presented with chronic low back pain for about 5 years due to mild congenital lumbar kyphosis (L1-L3 25° with congenital posterior wedge vertebra L2). Preoperative neurologic examination was normal. After posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation with moderate curve correction, the patient gradually developed the symptoms and signs of cauda equina syndrome due to intraoperative L2-3 disc herniation. After 5 days the patient underwent posterior decompression surgery and on the latest follow up visit at 2 years later, nearly all the motor power was recovered but the patient complained of occasional urinary incontinence and residual right leg paresthesia. In surgical treatment of congenital kyphosis, much attention should be paid to the presence of contemporaneous asymptomatic disc herniation. PMID:24390953

Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Ghayem Hasankhani, Ebrahim

2013-11-01

294

Total disc replacement surgery for symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disease: a systematic review of the literature  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of total disc replacement surgery compared with spinal fusion in patients with symptomatic lumbar disc degeneration. Low back pain (LBP), a major health problem in Western countries, can be caused by a variety of pathologies, one of which is degenerative disc disease (DDD). When conservative treatment fails, surgery might be considered. For a long time, lumbar fusion has been the “gold standard” of surgical treatment for DDD. Total disc replacement (TDR) has increased in popularity as an alternative for lumbar fusion. A comprehensive systematic literature search was performed up to October 2008. Two reviewers independently checked all retrieved titles and abstracts, and relevant full text articles for inclusion. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted relevant data and outcomes. Three randomized controlled trials and 16 prospective cohort studies were identified. In all three trials, the total disc replacement was compared with lumbar fusion techniques. The Charité trial (designed as a non-inferiority trail) was considered to have a low risk of bias for the 2-year follow up, but a high risk of bias for the 5-year follow up. The Charité artificial disc was non-inferior to the BAK® Interbody Fusion System on a composite outcome of “clinical success” (57.1 vs. 46.5%, for the 2-year follow up; 57.8 vs. 51.2% for the 5-year follow up). There were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Prodisc artificial disc (also designed as a non-inferiority trail) was found to be statistically significant more effective when compared with the lumbar circumferential fusion on the composite outcome of “clinical success” (53.4 vs. 40.8%), but the risk of bias of this study was high. Moreover, there were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Flexicore trial, with a high risk of bias, found no clinical relevant differences on pain and physical function when compared with circumferential spinal fusion at 2-year follow up. Because these are preliminary results, in addition to the high risk of bias, no conclusions can be drawn based on this study. In general, these results suggest that no clinical relevant differences between the total disc replacement and fusion techniques. The overall success rates in both treatment groups were small. Complications related to the surgical approach ranged from 2.1 to 18.7%, prosthesis related complications from 2.0 to 39.3%, treatment related complications from 1.9 to 62.0% and general complications from 1.0 to 14.0%. Reoperation at the index level was reported in 1.0 to 28.6% of the patients. In the three trials published, overall complication rates ranged from 7.3 to 29.1% in the TDR group and from 6.3 to 50.2% in the fusion group. The overall reoperation rate at index-level ranged from 3.7 to 11.4% in the TDR group and from 5.4 to 26.1% in the fusion group. In conclusion, there is low quality evidence that the Charité is non-inferior to the BAK cage at the 2-year follow up on the primary outcome measures. For the 5-year follow up, the same conclusion is supported only by very low quality evidence. For the ProDisc, there is very low quality evidence for contradictory results on the primary outcome measures when compared with anterior lumbar circumferential fusion. High quality randomized controlled trials with relevant control group and long-term follow-up is needed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of TDR.

van den Eerenbeemt, Karin D.; van Royen, Barend J.; Peul, Wilco C.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

2010-01-01

295

Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

Lacombe, Emmanuel

1992-08-01

296

Minimally invasive lumbar decompression for the treatment of spinal stenosis of the lumbar spine.  

PubMed

SUMMARY Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most common degenerative diseases of the elderly population, and a major cause of debilitating pain and decreased function. Lumbar spinal stenosis is almost always associated with neurogenic claudication characterized as pain worsened by standing or walking and relieved by lumbar flexion or sitting. While initial treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis may involve conservative therapies, as patients become more symptomatic the traditional treatment path has generally led to open laminectomy and other invasive, potentially destabilizing, procedures. More recently, less invasive alternatives to wide laminectomy have been developed. This article describes a new method of percutaneous lumbar decompression for treatment of neurogenic claudication secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis, the minimally invasive lumbar decompression procedure. We review the steps of successfully decompressing the hypertrophic ligamentum flavum and lamina, thereby alleviating pressure on neural structures. This is a major innovation in patient care and a step to reduce risks while minimizing costs. PMID:24645862

Deer, Timothy

2012-09-01

297

Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 4: Radiographic assessment of fusion status.  

PubMed

The ability to identify a successful arthrodesis is an essential element in the management of patients undergoing lumbar fusion procedures. The hypothetical gold standard of intraoperative exploration to identify, under direct observation, a solid arthrodesis is an impractical alternative. Therefore, radiographic assessment remains the most viable instrument to evaluate for a successful arthrodesis. Static radiographs, particularly in the presence of instrumentation, are not recommended. In the absence of spinal instrumentation, lack of motion on flexion-extension radiographs is highly suggestive of a successful fusion; however, motion observed at the treated levels does not necessarily predict pseudarthrosis. The degree of motion on dynamic views that would distinguish between a successful arthrodesis and pseudarthrosis has not been clearly defined. Computed tomography with fine-cut axial images and multiplanar views is recommended and appears to be the most sensitive for assessing fusion following instrumented posterolateral and anterior lumbar interbody fusions. For suspected symptomatic pseudarthrosis, a combination of techniques including static and dynamic radiographs as well as CT images is recommended as an option. Lack of facet fusion is considered to be more suggestive of a pseudarthrosis compared with absence of bridging posterolateral bone. Studies exploring additional noninvasive modalities of fusion assessment have demonstrated either poor potential, such as with (99m)Tc bone scans, or provide insufficient information to formulate a definitive recommendation. PMID:24980581

Choudhri, Tanvir F; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dhall, Sanjay S; Eck, Jason C; Groff, Michael W; Ghogawala, Zoher; Watters, William C; Dailey, Andrew T; Resnick, Daniel K; Sharan, Alok; Wang, Jeffrey C; Kaiser, Michael G

2014-07-01

298

Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 3: Assessment of economic outcome.  

PubMed

A comprehensive economic analysis generally involves the calculation of indirect and direct health costs from a societal perspective as opposed to simply reporting costs from a hospital or payer perspective. Hospital charges for a surgical procedure must be converted to cost data when performing a cost-effectiveness analysis. Once cost data has been calculated, quality-adjusted life year data from a surgical treatment are calculated by using a preference-based health-related quality-of-life instrument such as the EQ-5D. A recent cost-utility analysis from a single study has demonstrated the long-term (over an 8-year time period) benefits of circumferential fusions over stand-alone posterolateral fusions. In addition, economic analysis from a single study has found that lumbar fusion for selected patients with low-back pain can be recommended from an economic perspective. Recent economic analysis, from a single study, finds that femoral ring allograft might be more cost-effective compared with a specific titanium cage when performing an anterior lumbar interbody fusion plus posterolateral fusion. PMID:24980580

Ghogawala, Zoher; Whitmore, Robert G; Watters, William C; Sharan, Alok; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dailey, Andrew T; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Eck, Jason C; Groff, Michael W; Wang, Jeffrey C; Resnick, Daniel K; Dhall, Sanjay S; Kaiser, Michael G

2014-07-01

299

Spontaneous hemorrhage into a lumbar synovial cyst  

PubMed Central

Lumbar synovial cysts frequently present with back pain, chronic radiculopathy and/or progressive symptoms of spinal canal compromise. These cysts generally appear in the context of degenerative lumbar spinal disease. Few cases of spontaneous hemorrhage into synovial cysts have been reported in the literature.

Alen, Jose F.; Ramos, Ana; Lobato, Ramiro D.; Lagares, Alfonso

2010-01-01

300

Microendoscopic discectomy (MED) for lumbar disc prolapse  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microendoscopic discectomy (MED), which combines traditional lumbar microsurgical techniques with endoscopy, is being used as a minimally invasive procedure for lumbar disc herniation. We reviewed 30 patients who underwent MED at our institution and compared their outcome with that of patients subjected to the conventional method. Laboratory data suggested that MED was less invasive surgery. Moreover, MED allowed an early

Hiroyuki Nakagawa; Mikio Kamimura; Shigeharu Uchiyama; Kenji Takahara; Toshiro Itsubo; Tadaatsu Miyasaka

2003-01-01

301

Clinical, radiological and histological study of the failure of cervical interbody fusions with bone substitutes.  

PubMed

Few histological studies on bone substitutes in human cervical spine are available and the biological processes of bone substitutes are not well documented. The authors studied four failure cases of cervical interbody fusion: two cases with hydroxyapatite (HA), one case with beta-tricalcium phosphate ceramic (beta-TCP) and one case with xenograft (bovine bone). Clinical data showed that all the patients experienced neck pain with or without numbness of upper extremity due to fusion failure. Successful fusions were achieved after the salvage surgeries in which autograft were used. Radiographs showed that radiolucent lines were present in all cases. Two HA substitutes fractured without complications. One of them sank into the vertebral body. Some small beta-TCP fragments were found under the microscope. Histological study demonstrated only a few newly formed bones at the interface of the substitutes. The fragments of HA were encapsulated by fibrous tissue. The degradation process and bone regeneration were more active in beta-TCP than in HA. The intertrabecular spaces of bovine bone were filled with fibrous tissue. The results suggest that a porous calcium phosphate ceramic with special design might assure bone ingrowth and meet the mechanical requirements in cervical interbody fusion. The complications of these materials in the cervical spine should be highlighted. PMID:16429285

Xie, Youzhuan; Chopin, Daniel; Hardouin, Pierre; Lu, Jianxi

2006-08-01

302

Stand-Alone Lateral Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Low-Grade Degenerative Spondylolisthesis  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the stand-alone lateral interbody fusion as a minimally invasive option for the treatment of low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis with a minimum 24-month followup. Prospective nonrandomized observational single-center study. 52 consecutive patients (67.6 ± 10?y/o; 73.1% female; 27.4 ± 3.4?BMI) with single-level grade I/II single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis without significant spine instability were included. Fusion procedures were performed as retroperitoneal lateral transpsoas interbody fusions without screw supplementation. The procedures were performed in average 73.2 minutes and with less than 50cc blood loss. VAS and Oswestry scores showed lasting improvements in clinical outcomes (60% and 54.5% change, resp.). The vertebral slippage was reduced in 90.4% of cases from mean values of 15.1% preoperatively to 7.4% at 6-week followup (P < 0.001) and was maintained through 24 months (7.1%, P < 0.001). Segmental lordosis (P < 0.001) and disc height (P < 0.001) were improved in postop evaluations. Cage subsidence occurred in 9/52 cases (17%) and 7/52 cases (13%) spine levels needed revision surgery. At the 24-month evaluation, solid fusion was observed in 86.5% of the levels treated. The minimally invasive lateral approach has been shown to be a safe and reproducible technique to treat low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis.

Marchi, Luis; Abdala, Nitamar; Oliveira, Leonardo; Amaral, Rodrigo; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Pimenta, Luiz

2012-01-01

303

Endoscopic assisted lumbar microdecompressive spinal surgery with a new SMART endoscopic spine system.  

PubMed

In response to the rapid development and demand of outpatient endoscopic minimally invasive lumbar surgical technique, the SMART endoscopic spine system was developed for neurodecompression. This lumbar spine surgery is performed with a small skin incision, dilatation surgical technology, and an endoscopic-assisted spinal surgical system with progressive serial tubular retractors providing superior lighting and better visualization of the operative field for performing minimally invasive spinal surgery (MISS). The SMART system incorporates the advantages of posterior paramedian endoscopic assisted microdecompressive surgical spinal system and posterolateral endoscopic lumbar system. This versatile SMART endoscopic spine system with various sized working channels provides a generous and optimal access for endoscopic MISS of microdecompression of herniated lumbar disc, degenerative spinal disease, spinal stenosis, and removal of intraspinal lesions as well as creating an access for spinal arthroplasty and spinal fixation. With the unique features of the SMART system, the surgeon can take advantage of microscopic, endoscopic, or direct vision for microdecompressive spinal surgery, bridging endoscopic and conventional spinal surgery. It appears easy, safe, and efficacious. This less traumatic and easier outpatient MISS treatment leads to excellent result speedier recovery, and significant economic savings. The SMART endoscopic spine system, surgical indications, operative techniques, and the potential complications and their avoidance are described and discussed herein. PMID:17029182

Chiu, John C

2006-01-01

304

Posterior cerebral epilepsy: special considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surgical treatment for epileptic seizures emanating from the posterior cerebral cortex (occipital, parietal, posterior temporal areas) is less common than for seizures from the anterior temporal and frontal regions. The diagnosis entails integrating the combination of clinical, electrographical, neuropsychological, and imaging studies. Extremely important is the knowledge of the pathways of possible suprasylvian spread anteriorly toward the central sulcus of

Jack D. Grabow

2002-01-01

305

Imaging of tibialis posterior dysfunction.  

PubMed

Tibialis posterior dysfunction is a complex progressive condition caused primarily by injury to the tibialis posterior tendon, leading to acquired pes planus. The tibialis posterior is the most frequent ankle tendon to be injured, and the disorder commonly occurs in late middle-aged females. Degenerative, inflammatory, functional and post-traumatic aetiologies have all been proposed. Failure of the tibialis posterior tendon causes excessive load stress on the spring ligament and sinus tarsi ligaments. A wide spectrum of bony and soft-tissue abnormalities may be seen on plain radiographs, ultrasound and MRI, including malalignment, anatomical variants, and enthesopathic and tendinopathic changes. Knowledge of the anatomical and biomechanical considerations in tibialis posterior dysfunction allows the radiologist to diagnose injury to key structures and provide prognostic information that may assist with management options to prevent further flat foot deformity. PMID:18591197

Kong, A; Van Der Vliet, A

2008-10-01

306

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.  

PubMed

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a recently proposed cliniconeuroradiologic entity with several well-known causes, such as hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia, and the use of cytotoxic and immunosuppressive drugs, as well as some causes more recently described. PRES is characterized by neuroimaging findings of reversible vasogenic subcortical edema without infarction. The pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Two opposing hypotheses are commonly cited, but the issue is controversial: (1) the current more popular theory suggests that severe hypertension exceeds the limits of autoregulation, leading to breakthrough brain edema; (2) the earlier original theory suggests that hypertension leads to cerebral autoregulatory vasoconstriction, ischemia, and subsequent brain edema. The clinical syndrome of PRES typically involves headache, encephalopathy, visual symptoms, and seizures. The clinical presentation is often nonspecific, and therefore the diagnosis of PRES has come to increasingly rely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities consistent with PRES with documented recovery clinically and on repeated neuroimaging. The diagnosis has important therapeutic and prognostic implications because the reversibility of the clinical and radiologic abnormalities is contingent on the prompt control of blood pressure and/or discontinuing the offending drug. PMID:24365441

Lamy, C; Oppenheim, C; Mas, J L

2014-01-01

307

Biomechanics of lumbar spine injury in young Australian fast bowlers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cricket fast bowlers have a high incidence of serious lumbar injuries, such as lesions in the pars interarticularis. As lumbar loading is the causal mechanism of such injuries, the purpose of this study was to find relationships between lumbar spine kinetics, selected kinematic variables and the subsequent development of lumbar spine injury. At the beginning of the cricket season, the

René E D Ferdinands; Max Stuelcken; Andy Greene; Peter Sinclair; Richard Smith

2010-01-01

308

Removal of lumbar instrumentation for the treatment of recurrent low back pain in the absence of pseudarthrosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionRemoval of spine instrumentation for the treatment of recurrent low back pain remains controversial in the absence of pseudarthrosis and when no obvious pain generators are present. It is our practice to offer these patients surgical exploration and removal of instrumentation.Materials and methodsForty-five patients underwent an anterior and posterior lumbar spinal fusion. The removal of instrumentation was performed by the

Alexander Wild; Manuel R. Pinto; Lisa Butler; Clayton Bressan; Jill M. Wroblewski

2003-01-01

309

Dynamic Stabilization for Challenging Lumbar Degenerative Diseases of the Spine: A Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

Fusion and rigid instrumentation have been currently the mainstay for the surgical treatment of degenerative diseases of the spine over the last 4 decades. In all over the world the common experience was formed about fusion surgery. Satisfactory results of lumbar spinal fusion appeared completely incompatible and unfavorable within years. Rigid spinal implants along with fusion cause increased stresses of the adjacent segments and have some important disadvantages such as donor site morbidity including pain, wound problems, infections because of longer operating time, pseudarthrosis, and fatigue failure of implants. Alternative spinal implants were developed with time on unsatisfactory outcomes of rigid internal fixation along with fusion. Motion preservation devices which include both anterior and posterior dynamic stabilization are designed and used especially in the last two decades. This paper evaluates the dynamic stabilization of the lumbar spine and talks about chronologically some novel dynamic stabilization devices and thier efficacies.

Kaner, Tuncay; Ozer, Ali Fahir

2013-01-01

310

Surgical treatment of lumbar vertebral collapse in a patient with Parkinson's disease: a case report.  

PubMed

Parkinson's disease (PD) frequently develops postural abnormalities including extreme neck flexion and trunk flexion. Patients with PD sometimes have osteopenia and vertebral deformity due to the destruction of fragile bone can be also associated with the spinal deformity. Surgical treatment for these patients is very difficult. We encountered a patient with PD presenting severe trunk sagittal and frontal deformity. The patient had cauda equina syndrome due to progressive vertebral collapse of the lumbar spine. We performed anterior reconstruction surgery at first in order to achieve improved lordotic alignment of the lumbar spine. Then, we performed 2 posterior surgeries, resulting in total long fusion from T4 to S1. The clinical findings of this patient were presented, and the treatment options were discussed. PMID:23412270

Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Nakano, Masato; Seki, Shoji; Yasuda, Taketoshi; Hori, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kortarou; Kimura, Tomoatsu

2013-11-01

311

Comparison of traditional and intrafascial iliac crest bone-graft harvesting in lumbar spinal surgery.  

PubMed

We studied 117 adult patients undergoing posterior lumbar spinal fusion and instrumentation using bone grafts from the iliac crest between February 1999 and January 2001. All patients had degenerative disease of the lumbar spine, and all were operated upon by the same surgeon. Patients were randomized to have the iliac bone graft harvested either through a separate incision (traditional approach) or utilizing the same midline incision as used for the spinal surgery (intrafascial approach). Total volume of harvested graft, blood loss, pain, complications, and patient satisfaction were evaluated with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. There were no infections. The average volume of harvested bone was 17.2 cc versus 14.7 cc; total blood loss was 168 cc versus 96 cc; total complication rate was 20% versus 8%, and overall satisfaction rate was 81% versus 96%, respectively. The intrafascial graft harvesting technique minimizes morbidity and increases patient satisfaction compared with the traditional bone harvesting technique. PMID:15490164

Bezer, Murat; Kocao?lu, Bari?; Aydin, Nuri; Güven, Osman

2004-12-01

312

Classification of posterior vitreous detachment  

PubMed Central

Diagnosing a posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is important for predicting the prognosis and determining the indication for vitreoretinal surgery in many vitreoretinal diseases. This article presents both classifications of a PVD by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and of a shallow PVD by optical coherence tomography (OCT). By biomicroscopy, the vitreous condition is determined based on the presence or absence of a PVD. The PVD then is classified as either a complete posterior vitreous detachment (C-PVD) or a partial posterior vitreous detachment (P-PVD). A C-PVD is further divided into a C-PVD with collapse and a C-PVD without collapse, while a P-PVD is divided into a P-PVD with shrinkage of the posterior hyaloid membrane (P-PVD with shrinkage) and a P-PVD without shrinkage of the posterior hyaloid membrane (P-PVD without shrinkage). A P-PVD without shrinkage has a subtype characterized by vitreous gel attachment through the premacular hole in a posterior hyaloid membrane to the macula (P-PVD without shrinkage [M]). By OCT, a shallow PVD is classified as the absence of a shallow PVD or as a shallow PVD. A shallow PVD is then subclassified as a shallow PVD without shrinkage of the posterior vitreous cortex, a shallow PVD with shrinkage of the posterior vitreous cortex, and a peripheral shallow PVD. A shallow PVD without shrinkage of the posterior vitreous cortex has two subtypes: an age-related shallow PVD and a perifoveal PVD associated with a macular hole.

Kakehashi, Akihiro; Takezawa, Mikiko; Akiba, Jun

2014-01-01

313

Jogging Kinematics After Lumbar Paraspinal Muscle Fatigue  

PubMed Central

Abstract Context: Isolated lumbar paraspinal muscle fatigue causes lower extremity and postural control deficits. Objective: To describe the change in body position during gait after fatiguing lumbar extension exercises in persons with recurrent episodes of low back pain compared with healthy controls. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Motion analysis laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-five recreationally active participants with a history of recurrent episodes of low back pain, matched by sex, height, and mass with 25 healthy controls. Intervention(s): We measured 3-dimensional lower extremity and trunk kinematics before and after fatiguing isometric lumbar paraspinal exercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): Measurements were taken while participants jogged on a custom-built treadmill surrounded by a 10-camera motion analysis system. Results: Group-by-time interactions were observed for lumbar lordosis and trunk angles (P < .05). A reduced lumbar spine extension angle was noted, reflecting a loss of lordosis and an increase in trunk flexion angle, indicating increased forward trunk lean, in healthy controls after fatiguing lumbar extension exercise. In contrast, persons with a history of recurrent low back pain exhibited a slight increase in spine extension, indicating a slightly more lordotic position of the lumbar spine, and a decrease in trunk flexion angles after fatiguing exercise. Regardless of group, participants experienced, on average, greater peak hip extension after lumbar paraspinal fatigue. Conclusions: Small differences in response may represent a necessary adaptation used by persons with recurrent low back pain to preserve gait function by stabilizing the spine and preventing inappropriate trunk and lumbar spine positioning.

Hart, Joseph M.; Kerrigan, D. Casey; Fritz, Julie M.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

2009-01-01

314

Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after 'Ecstasy' abuse.  

PubMed

Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or 'Ecstasy' has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting 'Ecstasy'. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2?mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. 'Ecstasy' can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision. PMID:24994748

Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

2014-01-01

315

Primary posterior mediastinum hydatid cyst.  

PubMed

Primary posterior mediastinal hydatid cyst is a serious health problem for the Mediterranean countries. We diagnosed a case of a 46-year-old female with a primary posterior mediastinum hydatid cyst on CT and MRI. It was provisionally identified as either a hydatid cyst or bronchogenic cyst or neuroenteric cyst. CT guided aspiration with 18 gauge needle confirmed as hydatid sand. This is very rare in this population but it should be kept in mind when one is looking at any cyst in the posterior mediastinum. PMID:24709247

Ahmed, Mughis Uddin; Eid, Ahmed Fathi; Al-Hawashim, Nadia; Sheikh, Mohammed Younus; Yiannakou, Nearchos

2014-04-01

316

Posterior sampling with improved efficiency  

SciTech Connect

The Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique provides a means to generate a random sequence of model realizations that sample the posterior probability distribution of a Bayesian analysis. That sequence may be used to make inferences about the model uncertainties that derive from measurement uncertainties. This paper presents an approach to improving the efficiency of the Metropolis approach to MCMC by incorporating an approximation to the covariance matrix of the posterior distribution. The covariance matrix is approximated using the update formula from the BFGS quasi-Newton optimization algorithm. Examples are given for uncorrelated and correlated multidimensional Gaussian posterior distributions.

Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.

1998-12-01

317

Is that lumbar disc symptomatic? Herniated lumbar disc associated with contralateral radiculopathy.  

PubMed

Herniated lumbar disc may be asymptomatic or associated with lower limb radiculopathy. Most spinal surgeons would offer surgery following a period of conservative measures if the radiological and clinical findings correlate. However, the existing dictum that lumbar radiculopathy should correlate with ipsilateral lumbar disc herniation may not be accurate as it can rarely present with contralateral sciatica. Literature regarding this phenomenon is scarce. Therefore, we report a patient with herniated lumbar disc presenting with predominantly contralateral motor weakness radiculopathy, which resolved after discectomy. PMID:24811105

Abdul Jalil, Muhammad Fahmi; Lam, Miu Fei; Wang, Yi Yuen

2014-01-01

318

Decision-making in burst fractures of the thoracolumbar and lumbar spine  

PubMed Central

The most common site of injury to the spine is the thoracolumbar junction which is the mechanical transition junction between the rigid thoracic and the more flexible lumbar spine. The lumbar spine is another site which is more prone to injury. Absence of stabilizing articulations with the ribs, lordotic posture and more sagitally oriented facet joints are the most obvious explanations. Burst fractures of the spine account for 14% of all spinal injuries. Though common, thoracolumbar and lumbar burst fractures present a number of important treatment challenges. There has been substantial controversy related to the indications for nonoperative or operative management of these fractures. Disagreement also exists regarding the choice of the surgical approach. A large number of thoracolumbar and lumbar fractures can be treated conservatively while some fractures require surgery. Selecting an appropriate surgical option requires an in-depth understanding of the different methods of decompression, stabilization and/or fusion. Anterior surgery has the advantage of the greatest degree of canal decompression and offers the benefit of limiting the number of motion segments fused. These advantages come at the added cost of increased time for the surgery and the related morbidity of the surgical approach. Posterior surgery enjoys the advantage of being more familiar to the operating surgeons and can be an effective approach. However, the limitations of this approach include inadequate decompression, recurrence of the deformity and implant failure. Though many of the principles are the same, the treatment of low lumbar burst fractures requires some additional consideration due to the difficulty of approaching this region anteriorly. Avoiding complications of these surgeries are another important aspect and can be achieved by following an algorithmic approach to patient assessment, proper radiological examination and precision in decision-making regarding management. A detailed understanding of the mechanism of injury and their unique biomechanical propensities following various forms of treatment can help the spinal surgeon manage such patients effectively and prevent devastating complications.

Heary, Robert F; Kumar, Sanjeev

2007-01-01

319

Allogenic versus autologous cancellous bone in lumbar segmental spondylodesis: a randomized prospective study  

PubMed Central

The current gold standard in lumbar fusion consists of transpedicular fixation in combination with an interbody interponate of autologous bone from iliac crest. Because of the limited availability of autologous bone as well as the still relevant donor site morbidity after iliac crest grafting the need exists for alternative grafts with a comparable outcome. Forty patients with degenerative spinal disease were treated with a monosegmental spondylodesis (ventrally, 1 PEEK-cage; dorsally, a screw and rod system), and randomly placed in two groups. In group 1, autogenous iliac crest cancellous bone was used as a cage filling. In group 2 the cages were filled with an allogenic cancellous bone graft. Following 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, the clinical outcome was determined on the basis of: the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire; patient satisfaction; patient willingness to undergo the operation again; and a visual analog scale for pain. The radiological outcome was based on both fusion rate (radiographs, computed tomography), and on the bone mineral density of the grafts. After 6 months, the X-rays of the patients in group 2 had a significantly lower rate of fusion. Aside from this, there were no further significant differences. After 12 months, radiological results showed a similar fusion rate in both groups. Donor site complications consisted of five patients with hematoma, and three patients with persistent pain in group 1. No implant complications were observed. If a bone bank is available for support and accepting the low risk of possible transmission of infectious diseases, freeze–dried allogenic cancellous bone can be used for monosegmental spondylodeses. The results demonstrated an equivalent clinical outcome, as well as similar fusion rates following a 12-month period. This is in despite of a delayed consolidation process.

Strube, Patrick; Funk, Julia F.; Gross, Christian; Monig, Hans-Joachim; Perka, Carsten; Pruss, Axel

2009-01-01

320

The ectopic posterior pituitary gland.  

PubMed

An ectopic posterior pituitary gland is a rare condition and may present with an empty pituitary fossa, hypoplasia or absence of the infundibular stalk and resultant short stature due to growth hormone deficiency. The location of the ectopic lobe can vary, but it is most commonly situated along the median eminence in the floor of the third ventricle. We report a case of an ectopic posterior pituitary gland, describe the causes and discuss the diagnostic imaging features. PMID:24209704

Mahomed, Nasreen; Motshudi, Thapelo

2013-11-01

321

Posterior femoral cutaneous nerve conduction.  

PubMed

The posterior femoral cutaneous nerve is a sensory nerve comprised of fibers originating from the anterior and posterior divisions of the first three sacral segments. It exists the pelvis distal to the piriformis muscle and proceeds distally, superficial to and between the medial and lateral hamstring musculature. The nerve's major cutaneous distribution is the posterior aspect of the thigh and a variable area of the posterior calf. An electrophysiologic technique to assess the peripheral axons of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve is described. A recording electrode is placed 6cm proximal to the midpopliteal fossa and the nerve is stimulated supramaximally 12cm proximally on a line between the active electrode and the ischial tuberosity. A ground electrode is placed just proximal to the active recording electrode. The lower extremities of 40 individuals with a mean age of 34 years (20 to 78 years) were examined. The mean peak latency of the response is 2.8 (2.3 to 3.4) msec +/- 0.2msec with a mean amplitude of 6.5 (4.1 to 12.0) microV +/- 1.5 microV. This technique may facilitate the proximal evaluation of lower extremity peripheral neuropathies, lesions of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve, or the assessment of the peripheral nervous system in persons with lower extremity amputations. PMID:2241545

Dumitru, D; Nelson, M R

1990-11-01

322

Blockade of the sinuvertebral nerve for the diagnosis of lumbar diskogenic pain: an exploratory study.  

PubMed

In this exploratory study we evaluated sensitivity and target specificity of sinuvertebral nerve block (SVNB) for the diagnosis of lumbar diskogenic pain. Diskography has been the diagnostic gold standard. Fifteen patients with positive diskography underwent SVNB via interlaminar approach to the posterior aspect of the disk. Success was defined as > or = 80% pain reduction or excellent relief of physical restrictions after the block. The sensitivity was 73.3% (95% CI: 50.9%-95.7%). The target specificity was 40% (15.2%-64.8%). The results indicate that SVNB cannot yet replace diskography but encourage future studies to improve its target specificity. PMID:20522701

Schliessbach, Juerg; Siegenthaler, Andreas; Heini, Paul; Bogduk, Nikolai; Curatolo, Michele

2010-07-01

323

Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Perineural Cyst  

PubMed Central

Lumbar epidural varices are rare and usually mimick lumbar disc herniations. Back pain and radiculopathy are the main symptoms of lumbar epidural varices. Perineural cysts are radiologically different lesions and should not be confused with epidural varix. A 36-year-old male patient presented to us with right leg pain. The magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic lesion at S1 level that was compressing the right root, and was interpreted as a perineural cyst. The patient underwent surgery via right L5 and S1 hemilaminectomy, and the lesion was coagulated and removed. The histopathological diagnosis was epidural varix. The patient was clinically improved and the follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed the absence of the lesion. Lumbar epidural varix should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of the cystic lesions which compress the spinal roots.

Pusat, Serhat; Kural, Cahit; Aslanoglu, Atilla; Kurt, Bulent

2013-01-01

324

Lumbar epidural varix mimicking perineural cyst.  

PubMed

Lumbar epidural varices are rare and usually mimick lumbar disc herniations. Back pain and radiculopathy are the main symptoms of lumbar epidural varices. Perineural cysts are radiologically different lesions and should not be confused with epidural varix. A 36-year-old male patient presented to us with right leg pain. The magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic lesion at S1 level that was compressing the right root, and was interpreted as a perineural cyst. The patient underwent surgery via right L5 and S1 hemilaminectomy, and the lesion was coagulated and removed. The histopathological diagnosis was epidural varix. The patient was clinically improved and the follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed the absence of the lesion. Lumbar epidural varix should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of the cystic lesions which compress the spinal roots. PMID:23741553

Pusat, Serhat; Kural, Cahit; Aslanoglu, Atilla; Kurt, Bulent; Izci, Yusuf

2013-06-01

325

One-stage posterior C2 and C3 pedicle screw fixation or combined anterior C2-C3 fusion for the treatment of unstable hangman's fracture  

PubMed Central

The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of using one-stage posterior C2 and C3 pedicle screw fixation or combined anterior C2-C3 fusion in the treatment of unstable hangman’s fracture. A total of 13 patients with unstable hangman’s fractures underwent C2 and C3 pedicle screw fixation, lamina interbody fusion or combined anterior C2-C3 fusion and imaging examinations to evaluate the fracture fixation and healing condition at three days and three months following surgery. Postoperative X-ray and computed tomography (CT) results showed high fracture reduction, good internal fixation position and reliable fracture fixation. The three-month postoperative CT showed good vertebral fracture healing. C2 and C3 pedicle screw fixation has a good curative effect in the treatment of unstable hangman’s fracture. The direct fixation of the fracture enables early ambulation by the patients.

LIU, JINGCHEN; LI, YE; WU, YUNTAO

2013-01-01

326

Comparison of Expandable and Fixed Interbody Cages in a Human Cadaver Corpectomy Model: Fatigue Characteristics.  

PubMed

STUDY DESIGN:: In vitro cadaver biomechanics study. OBJECTIVE:: The goal of this study is to compare the in situ fatigue life of expandable versus fixed interbody cage designs. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:: Expandable cages are becoming more popular due in large part to their versatility; however, subsidence and catastrophic failure remain a concern. This in vitro analysis investigates the fatigue life of expandable and fixed interbody cages in a single level human cadaver corpectomy model by evaluating modes of subsidence of expandable and fixed cages as well as change in stiffness of the constructs with cyclic loading. METHODS:: 19 specimens from ten human thoracolumbar spines (T10-L2, L3-L5) were biomechanically evaluated following a single level corpectomy that was reconstructed with an expandable or fixed cage and anterior dual rod instrumentation. All specimens underwent 98?K cycles to simulate 3 months of postoperative weight bearing. In addition, a third group with hyperlordotic cages was used to simulate catastrophic failure that is observed in clinical practice. RESULTS:: Three fixed and two expandable cages withstood the cyclic loading despite perfect sagittal and coronal plane fitting of the endcaps. The majority of the constructs settled in following initial subsidence. The catastrophic failures that were observed in clinical practice could not be reproduced with hyperlordotic cages. However, all cages in this group subsided, and 60% resulted in endplate fractures during deployment of the cage. CONCLUSIONS:: Despite greater surface contact area, expandable cages have a trend for higher subsidence rates when compared to fixed cages. When there is edge loading as in the hyperlordotic cage scenario, there is a higher risk of subsidence and intraoperative fracture during deployment of expandable cages. PMID:22925989

Pekmezci, Murat; Tang, Jessica Anne; Cheng, Liu; Modak, Ashin; McClellan, R Trigg; Buckley, Jenni M; Ames, Christopher P

2012-08-23

327

Design concepts in lumbar total disc arthroplasty  

Microsoft Academic Search

The implantation of lumbar disc prostheses based on different design concepts is widely accepted. This paper reviews currently\\u000a available literature studies on the biomechanics of TDA in the lumbar spine, and is targeted at the evaluation of possible\\u000a relationships between the aims of TDA and the geometrical, mechanical and material properties of the various available disc\\u000a prostheses. Both theoretical and

Fabio Galbusera; Chiara M. Bellini; Thomas Zweig; Stephen Ferguson; Manuela T. Raimondi; Claudio Lamartina; Marco Brayda-Bruno; Maurizio Fornari

2008-01-01

328

Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology  

SciTech Connect

The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae.

Tsuno, M.M.; Shu, G.J. (Cleveland Chiropractic College, Los Angeles, CA (USA))

1990-03-01

329

The effect of complex training on the children with all of the deformities including forward head, rounded shoulder posture, and lumbar lordosis  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of complex training on children with the deformities including forward head, rounded shoulder posture, and lumbar lordosis. The complex training program was performed for 6 month three times per week. The complex training improved posture as measured by forward head angle (FHA), forward shoulder angle (FSA), and angle between anterior superior iliac spine and posterior superior iliac spine (APA). In the present results, complex training might overcome vertebral deformity through decreasing forward head, rounded shoulder posture, and lumbar lordosis and increasing flexibility in the children.

Park, Hae-Chan; Kim, Yang-Soo; Seok, Sang-Hun; Lee, Soo-Kyung

2014-01-01

330

Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-Yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

2009-12-01

331

The Comprehensive Biomechanics and Load-Sharing of Semirigid PEEK and Semirigid Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Systems.  

PubMed

Alternatives to conventional rigid fusion have been proposed for several conditions related to degenerative disc disease when nonoperative treatment has failed. Semirigid fixation, in the form of dynamic stabilization or PEEK rods, is expected to provide compression under loading as well as an intermediate level of stabilization. This study systematically examines both the load-sharing characteristics and kinematics of these two devices compared to the standard of internal rigid fixators. Load-sharing was studied by using digital pressure films inserted between an artificially machined disc and two loading fixtures. Rigid rods, PEEK rods, and the dynamic stabilization system were inserted posteriorly for stabilization. The kinematics were quantified on ten, human, cadaver lumbosacral spines (L3-S1) which were tested under a pure bending moment, in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The magnitude of load transmission through the anterior column was significantly greater with the dynamic device compared to PEEK rods and rigid rods. The contact pressures were distributed more uniformly, throughout the disc with the dynamic stabilization devices, and had smaller maximum point-loading (pressures) on any particular point within the disc. Kinematically, the motion was reduced by both semirigid devices similarly in all directions, with slight rigidity imparted by a lateral interbody device. PMID:23984077

Sengupta, D K; Bucklen, Brandon; McAfee, Paul C; Nichols, Jeff; Angara, Raghavendra; Khalil, Saif

2013-01-01

332

The Comprehensive Biomechanics and Load-Sharing of Semirigid PEEK and Semirigid Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Systems  

PubMed Central

Alternatives to conventional rigid fusion have been proposed for several conditions related to degenerative disc disease when nonoperative treatment has failed. Semirigid fixation, in the form of dynamic stabilization or PEEK rods, is expected to provide compression under loading as well as an intermediate level of stabilization. This study systematically examines both the load-sharing characteristics and kinematics of these two devices compared to the standard of internal rigid fixators. Load-sharing was studied by using digital pressure films inserted between an artificially machined disc and two loading fixtures. Rigid rods, PEEK rods, and the dynamic stabilization system were inserted posteriorly for stabilization. The kinematics were quantified on ten, human, cadaver lumbosacral spines (L3-S1) which were tested under a pure bending moment, in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The magnitude of load transmission through the anterior column was significantly greater with the dynamic device compared to PEEK rods and rigid rods. The contact pressures were distributed more uniformly, throughout the disc with the dynamic stabilization devices, and had smaller maximum point-loading (pressures) on any particular point within the disc. Kinematically, the motion was reduced by both semirigid devices similarly in all directions, with slight rigidity imparted by a lateral interbody device.

Sengupta, D. K.; Bucklen, Brandon; McAfee, Paul C.; Nichols, Jeff; Angara, Raghavendra; Khalil, Saif

2013-01-01

333

Discoscopic Findings of High Signal Intensity Zones on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Lumbar Intervertebral Discs  

PubMed Central

A 32-year-old man underwent radiofrequency thermal annuloplasty (TA) with percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (PED) under local anesthesia for chronic low back pain. His diagnosis was discogenic pain with a high signal intensity zone (HIZ) in the posterior corner of the L4-5 disc. Flexion pain was sporadic, and steroid injection was given twice for severe pain. After the third episode of strong pain, PED and TA were conducted. The discoscope was inserted into the posterior annulus and revealed a migrated white nucleus pulposus which was stained blue. Then, after moving the discoscope to the site of the HIZ, a migrated slightly red nucleus pulposus was found, suggesting inflammation and/or new vessels penetrating the mass. After removing the fragment, the HIZ site was ablated by TA. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the discoscopic findings of HIZ of the lumbar intervertebral disc.

Sugiura, Kosuke; Tonogai, Ichiro; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakai, Toshinori; Suzue, Naoto; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Goda, Yuichiro; Sato, Ryosuke; Kondo, Kenji; Tezuka, Fumitake; Mineta, Kazuaki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Egawa, Hiroshi; Sairyo, Koichi

2014-01-01

334

Posterior crossbite - treatment and stability  

PubMed Central

Posterior crossbite is defined as an inadequate transversal relationship of maxillary and mandibular teeth. Even when eliminating the etiologic factors, this malocclusion does not have a spontaneous correction, and should be treated with maxillary expansion as early as possible. This treatment aims at providing a better tooth/skeletal relationship, thereby improving masticatory function, and establishing a symmetrical condyle/fossa relationship. Should posterior crossbite not be treated early, it may result in skeletal changes, demanding a more complex approach. Additionally, an overcorrection expansion protocol should be applied in order to improve the treatment stability. Although the literature has reported a high rate of relapse after maxillary expansion, the goal of this study was to demonstrate excellent stability of the posterior crossbite correction 21 years post treatment.

de ALMEIDA, Renato Rodrigues; de ALMEIDA, Marcio Rodrigues; OLTRAMARI-NAVARRO, Paula Vanessa Pedron; CONTI, Ana Claudia de Castro Ferreira; NAVARRO, Ricardo de Lima; MARQUES, Henry Victor Alves

2012-01-01

335

Isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury.  

PubMed

The patient was a 19-year-old male cadet at a military academy who was evaluated by a physical therapist in a direct-access capacity for a chief complaint of right knee pain and giving way after falling onto his right knee while snow sledding at a high rate of speed 2 weeks earlier. Knee radiographs were ordered by the physical therapist, which demonstrated a large suprapatellar joint effusion. Due to concern for a posterior cruciate ligament injury and to assess for concomitant injury, magnetic resonance imaging was ordered, which revealed disruption of the posterior cruciate ligament without injury to surrounding tissues. PMID:24256175

Glenesk, Kathleen; Fogarty, Brian T; Westrick, Richard B

2013-10-01

336

Morphometric analysis of the YESS and TESSYS techniques of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy.  

PubMed

Posterior lateral endoscopic nucleotomy is widely accepted as a minimally invasive surgery for lumbar disc herniation, but few studies have compared the transforaminal approach using two different techniques, YESS and TESSYS. One hundred and fifty lumbar IVFs of cadaveric spines were studied. Eighteen-gauge needles were inserted percutaneously toward IVFs into the discs by either YESS or TESSYS. The distances from the needle to the nerve root and from the needle to the spinal dura were measured and compared across different spinal segments. The incidence of nerve roots compression by the operating endoscope was measured. The mean distances from needle to the nerve root and spinal dura in YESS were 3.5?±?1.4 mm and 6.6?±?1.9 mm. The respective mean distances in TESSYS were 4.6?±?1.5 mm and 5.9?±?1.4 mm. The distance from needle to the nerve root was longer in TESSYS, while the distance from the needle to spinal dura was longer in YESS. The distance from needle to nerve was shorter in proximal segments. The incidence of operating endoscope compression of the nerve root was high in both of techniques. The difference in theory and design between YESS and TESSYS, "intradisc" versus "intracanal", was confirmed by comparison of anatomic distances from the needle to the nerve. Puncture of the annulus in the distal lumbar is safer than proximal puncture. The high incidence of endoscope compression of the nerve root may be related with the transient postoperative dysaesthesia. PMID:23824995

Xin, Gu; Shi-Sheng, He; Hai-Long, Zhang

2013-09-01

337

Intradural Migration of a Sequestrated Lumbar Disc Fragment Masquerading as a Spinal Intradural Tumor  

PubMed Central

Intervertebral intradural lumbar disc herniation (ILDH) is a quite rare pathology, and isolated intradural lumbar disc herniation is even more rare. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not be able to reveal ILDHs, especially if MRI findings show an intact lumbar disc annulus and posterior longitudinal ligament. Here, we present an exceedingly rare case of an isolated IDLH that we initially misidentified as a spinal intradural tumor, in a 54-year-old man hospitalized with a 2-month history of back pain and right sciatica. Neurologic examination revealed a positive straight leg raise test on the right side, but he presented no other sensory, motor, or sphincter disturbances. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI revealed what we believed to be an intradural extramedullary tumor compressing the cauda equina leftward in the thecal sac, at the L2 vertebral level. The patient underwent total L2 laminectomy, and we extirpated the intradural mass under microscopic guidance. Histologic examination of the mass revealed a degenerated nucleus pulposus.

Kim, Hyeong-Suk; Park, Jung-Soo

2012-01-01

338

Intradural migration of a sequestrated lumbar disc fragment masquerading as a spinal intradural tumor.  

PubMed

Intervertebral intradural lumbar disc herniation (ILDH) is a quite rare pathology, and isolated intradural lumbar disc herniation is even more rare. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not be able to reveal ILDHs, especially if MRI findings show an intact lumbar disc annulus and posterior longitudinal ligament. Here, we present an exceedingly rare case of an isolated IDLH that we initially misidentified as a spinal intradural tumor, in a 54-year-old man hospitalized with a 2-month history of back pain and right sciatica. Neurologic examination revealed a positive straight leg raise test on the right side, but he presented no other sensory, motor, or sphincter disturbances. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI revealed what we believed to be an intradural extramedullary tumor compressing the cauda equina leftward in the thecal sac, at the L2 vertebral level. The patient underwent total L2 laminectomy, and we extirpated the intradural mass under microscopic guidance. Histologic examination of the mass revealed a degenerated nucleus pulposus. PMID:23091677

Kim, Hyeong-Suk; Eun, Jong-Pil; Park, Jung-Soo

2012-08-01

339

Lateral Transpsoas Fusion: Indications and Outcomes  

PubMed Central

Spinal fusion historically has been used extensively, and, recently, the lateral transpsoas approach to the thoracic and lumbar spine has become an increasingly common method to achieve fusion. Recent literature on this approach has elucidated its advantage over more traditional anterior and posterior approaches, which include a smaller tissue dissection, potentially lower blood loss, no need for an access surgeon, and a shorter hospital stay. Indications for the procedure have now expanded to include degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, degenerative scoliosis, nonunion, trauma, infection, and low-grade spondylolisthesis. Lateral interbody fusion has a similar if not lower rate of complications compared to traditional anterior and posterior approaches to interbody fusion. However, lateral interbody fusion has unique complications that include transient neurologic symptoms, motor deficits, and neural injuries that range from 1 to 60% in the literature. Additional studies are required to further evaluate and monitor the short- and long-term safety, efficacy, outcomes, and complications of lateral transpsoas procedures.

Patel, Vishal C.; Park, Daniel K.; Herkowitz, Harry N.

2012-01-01

340

Three column stabilization through posterior approach alone: transpedicular placement of distractable cage with transpedicular screw fixation.  

PubMed

The combination of anterior and posterior instrumentation provides the most stable repair for burst fractures of the thoracolumbar spine. However, the use of both approaches on a trauma patient may increase morbidity. Stabilization of three columns through only one approach can provide an effective outcome. We treated eight patients with burst fracture involving the thoracic or lumbar vertebrae by the application of anterior and posterior stabilization instruments through only the posterior approach. The desired stabilization was obtained in all patients. The advantages are the absence of the risks of the anterior approach, facilitation of the placement of anterior and posterior stabilization devices through only one approach, preserving the unity of the anterior longitudinal ligament, the effect of the anterior corpus in preventing displacement of the cage, application of compression on the pedicle screw system to both decrease the kyphosis angulation due to collapse of vertebra and to help the stabilization of the cage, repair of the dural tears at the posterior side, prevention of cage displacement by distraction and thus leaning on the endplates, and ease of performance by a neurosurgeon alone. PMID:18219186

Ayberk, Giyas; Ozveren, Mehmet Faik; Altundal, Naci; Tosun, Hakan; Seckin, Zekai; Kilicarslan, Kasim; Kaplan, Metin

2008-01-01

341

Effect of short-term unloading on T2 relaxation time in the lumbar intervertebral disc--in vivo magnetic resonance imaging study at 3.0 tesla  

PubMed Central

Background context Diurnal changes in T2 values, indicative for changes in water content, have been reported in the lumbar intervertebral discs. However, data concerning short-term T2 changes are missing. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of unloading on T2 values in lumbar intervertebral discs in vivo. Study design Experimental study with repeated measurements of lumbar discs T2 relaxation time during a period of 38 minutes of supine posture. Patient sample Forty-one patients with acute or chronic low back pain (visual analog scale ?3). Outcome measures T2 relaxation time in the intervertebral disc, lumbar lordosis angle, and intervertebral disc height. Methods Forty-one patients (mean age, 41.6 years) were investigated in the supine position using a 3-tesla magnetic resonance system. Sagittal T2 mapping was performed immediately after unloading and after a mean delay of 38 minutes. No patient movement was allowed between the measurements. One region of interest (ROI) was manually placed in both the anterior and the posterior annulus fibrosus (AF) and three ROIs in the nucleus pulposus (NP). Results There was a statistically significant decrease in the anterior NP (?2.7 ms; p<.05) and an increase in T2 values in the posterior AF (+3.5 ms; p<.001). Discs with initially low T2 values in the NP showed minor increase in the posterior AF (+1.6 ms; p<.05), whereas a major increase in the posterior AF was found in discs with initially high T2 values in the NP (+6.8 ms; p=.001). Patients examined in the morning showed no differences, but those investigated in the afternoon showed a decrease in the anterior NP (?5.3 ms; p<.05) and an increase in the posterior AF (+7.8 ms; p=.002). No significant differences were observed in other regions. Correlation analysis showed moderate correlations between the time of investigation and T2 changes in the posterior AF (r=0.46; p=.002). Conclusions A shift of water from the anterior to the posterior disc regions seems to occur after unloading the lumbar spine in the supine position. The clinical relevance of these changes needs to be investigated.

Stelzeneder, David; Kovacs, Balazs K.; Goed, Sabine; Welsch, Goetz H.; Hirschfeld, Clemens; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana; Friedrich, Klaus M.; Mamisch, Tallal C.; Trattnig, Siegfried

2012-01-01

342

Controlled lumbar drainage in pediatric head injury.  

PubMed

A retrospective study of external lumbar subarachnoid drainage in 16 pediatric patients with severe head injuries is presented. All patients had Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 8 or lower at 6 hours postinjury and were initially treated with ventriculostomy. Five patients required surgical evacuation of focal mass lesions. All patients manifested high intracranial pressures (ICPs) refractory to aggressive therapy, including hyperventilation, furosemide, mannitol, and in some cases, artificially induced barbiturate coma. After lumbar drainage was instituted, 14 patients had an abrupt and lasting decrease in ICP, obviating the need for continued medical management of ICP. In no patient did transtentorial or cerebellar herniation occur as a result of lumbar drainage. It was also noted retrospectively that the patients in this study had discernible basilar cisterns on computerized tomography scans. Fourteen patients survived; eight made good recoveries, three are functional with disability, and three have severe disabilities. Two patients died, most likely from uncontrolled ICP before the lumbar drain was placed. It is concluded that controlled external lumbar subarachnoid drainage is a useful treatment for pediatric patients with severe head injury when aggressive medical therapy and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid evacuation have failed to control high ICP. Selected patients with elevated ICP, which may be a function of posttraumatic cerebrospinal fluid circulation disruption and/or white matter cerebral edema, can be treated with this modality, which accesses the cisternal spaces untapped by ventriculostomy. PMID:7666222

Levy, D I; Rekate, H L; Cherny, W B; Manwaring, K; Moss, S D; Baldwin, H Z

1995-09-01

343

Mini-open transpedicular lumbar vertebrectomy reconstructed with double cages and short segment fixation  

PubMed Central

Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of using dual expandable cages plus short segment posterior fixation for reconstruction of vertebral bodies following a mini-open transpedicular approach. Methods: A single posterior incision was used to perform a laminectomy of L2, a partial laminectomy of L1 and bilateral transpedicular approaches for a piecemeal vertebrectomy in a patient with spinal compression secondary to metastatic cancer. Subsequently, bilateral cages were placed through the transpedicular corridors and percutaneous pedicle screws were inserted a single level above and below the level of the vertebral column resection. Results: The bilateral transpedicular approach facilitated the use of a mini-open incision (6.0 cm) compared with the extensive dissection normally employed for a lateral extracavitary type approach in the lumbar region. The bilateral transpedicular approach at L2 allowed for a vertebrectomy and complete decompression of neurological elements. The use of expandable cages allowed the nerve roots to be preserved. Placement of the cages in the lateral position was straightforward despite minimal exposure. The reconstruction with double expandable cages appeared robust. Conclusions: In select patients requiring circumferential decompression of the lumbar spine, dual cage reconstruction decreases the technical difficulty of the operation and facilitates a mini-open approach. The durability of this construct will need biomechanical assessment and long-term clinical follow-up.

Jandial, Rahul; Chen, Mike Yue

2012-01-01

344

[Posterior ceramic bonded partial restorations].  

PubMed

Posterior ceramic bonded partial restorations are conservative and esthetic approaches for compromised teeth. Overlays constitute a less invasive alternative for tooth tissues than crown preparations. With inlays and onlays they are also indicated in case of full arch or quadrant rehabilitations including several teeth. This article screens indications and realization of this type of restorations. PMID:17432532

Mainjot, Amélie; Vanheusden, Alain

2006-01-01

345

Stereolithography for Posterior Fossa Cranioplasty  

PubMed Central

Posterior fossa cranioplasty has been suggested for improvement of neurological symptoms following craniectomy. However, there is no particular recommendation in the literature about techniques for prosthesis manufacture and implantation. We report our experience using rapid prototyping technology and stereolithography for pre-surgical implant design and production of cranioplasties. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5

Agner, Celso; Dujovny, Manuel; Evenhouse, Raymond; Charbel, Fady T.; Sadler, Lewis

1998-01-01

346

Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD)  

MedlinePLUS

The official consumer website of: Visit ACFAS.org | About ACFAS | Información en Español ... tendon serves as one of the major supporting structures of the foot, helping it to function while walking. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is a condition caused ...

347

Children's Understanding of Posterior Probability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Do young children have a basic intuition of posterior probability? Do they update their decisions and judgments in the light of new evidence? We hypothesized that they can do so extensionally, by considering and counting the various ways in which an event may or may not occur. The results reported in this paper showed that from the age of five,…

Girotto, Vittorio; Gonzalez, Michael

2008-01-01

348

Discal cyst of the lumbar spine: MR imaging features  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe MR imaging features of discal cyst of the lumbar spine in nine patients who presented with low back pain and leg pain.Discal cyst of the lumbar spine has characteristic MR imaging features different from other epidural cysts: a ventrolateral extradural cyst attached to a herniated lumbar disc, consisting of a thick fibrous capsule without disc material, and having

Ho Kyu Lee; Deok Hee Lee; Choong Gon Choi; Sang Joon Kim; Dae Chul Suh; Shin Kwang Kahng; Sung Woo Roh; Seung Chul Rhim

2006-01-01

349

Risk Factors for Traumatic or Unsuccessful Lumbar Punctures in Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study objective: Traumatic and unsuccessful lumbar punctures can cause substantial diagnostic ambiguity that may lead to unnecessary antibiotic use and hospitalization, in addition to patient discomfort. Risk factors for obtaining traumatic and unsuccessful lumbar punctures have been studied in a limited fashion only. We sought to determine patient, physician, and procedural factors associated with traumatic and unsuccessful lumbar punctures in

Lise E. Nigrovic

350

Reliability of a measure of total lumbar spine range of motion in individuals with low back pain.  

PubMed

Measuring lumbar spine range of motion (ROM) using multiple movements is impractical for clinical research, because finding statistically significant effects requires a large proportion of subjects to present with the same impairment. The purpose of this study was to develop a single measure representing the total available lumbar ROM. Twenty participants with low back pain performed three series of eight lumbar spine movements, in each of two sessions. For each series, an ellipse and a cubic spline were fit to the end-range positions, measured based on the position of the twelfth thoracic vertebra in the transverse plane of the sacrum. The area of each shape provides a measure of the total available ROM, whereas their center reflects the movements' symmetry. Using generalizability theory, the index of dependability for the area and anterior-posterior center position was found to be 0.90, but was slightly lower for the mediolateral center position. Slightly better values were achieved using the spline-fitting approach. Further analysis also indicated that excellent reliability, and acceptable minimal detectable change values, would be achieved with a single testing session. These data indicate that the proposed measure provides a reliable and easily interpretable measure of total lumbar spine ROM. PMID:23270840

Al-Zoubi, Fadi M; Preuss, Richard A

2013-12-01

351

Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: evaluation and management.  

PubMed

Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis is caused by mechanical factors and/or biochemical alterations within the intervertebral disk that lead to disk space collapse, facet joint hypertrophy, soft-tissue infolding, and osteophyte formation, which narrows the space available for the thecal sac and exiting nerve roots. The clinical consequence of this compression is neurogenic claudication and varying degrees of leg and back pain. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis is a major cause of pain and impaired quality of life in the elderly. The natural history of this condition varies; however, it has not been shown to worsen progressively. Nonsurgical management consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, and epidural steroid injections. If nonsurgical management is unsuccessful and neurologic decline persists or progresses, surgical treatment, most commonly laminectomy, is indicated. Recent prospective randomized studies have demonstrated that surgery is superior to nonsurgical management in terms of controlling pain and improving function in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:22855855

Issack, Paul S; Cunningham, Matthew E; Pumberger, Matthias; Hughes, Alexander P; Cammisa, Frank P

2012-08-01

352

Biomechanical implications of lumbar spinal ligament transection.  

PubMed

Many lumbar spine surgeries either intentionally or inadvertently damage or transect spinal ligaments. The purpose of this work was to quantify the previously unknown biomechanical consequences of isolated spinal ligament transection on the remaining spinal ligaments (stress transfer), vertebrae (bone remodelling stimulus) and intervertebral discs (disc pressure) of the lumbar spine. A finite element model of the full lumbar spine was developed and validated against experimental data and tested in the primary modes of spinal motion in the intact condition. Once a ligament was removed, stress increased in the remaining spinal ligaments and changes occurred in vertebral strain energy, but disc pressure remained similar. All major biomechanical changes occurred at the same spinal level as the transected ligament, with minor changes at adjacent levels. This work demonstrates that iatrogenic damage to spinal ligaments disturbs the load sharing within the spinal ligament network and may induce significant clinically relevant changes in the spinal motion segment. PMID:23477405

Von Forell, Gregory A; Bowden, Anton E

2014-11-01

353

Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniations  

PubMed Central

The most common complication after lumbar discectomy is reherniation. As the first step in reducing the rate of recurrence, many studies have been conducted to find out the factors that may increase the reherniation risk. Some reported factors are age, sex, the type of lumbar disc herniation, the amount of fragments removed, smoking, alcohol consumption and the length of restricted activities. In this review, the factors studied thus far are summarized, excepting factors which cannot be chosen or changed, such as age or sex. Apart from the factors shown here, many other risk factors such as diabetes, family history, history of external injury, duration of illness and body mass index are considered. Few are agreed upon by all. The reason for the diverse opinions may be that many clinical and biomechanical variables are involved in the prognosis following operation. For the investigation of risk factors in recurrent lumbar disc herniation, large-scale multicenter prospective studies will be required in the future.

2014-01-01

354

Underlay mesh repair for spontaneous lumbar hernia  

PubMed Central

INTRODUCTION Lumbar hernia is a rare condition with fewer than 300 cases reported in the literature. It arises through posterolateral abdominal wall defects, named the inferior triangle (Petit) and superior triangle (Grynfelt). It can be congenital or acquired, primary or secondary, peritoneal or extraperitoneal, reducible or complicated. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a 63 year old female patient who presented to our hospital with a reducible right superior lumbar hernia. She underwent repair with underlay mesh after inversion of the sac and had a smooth postoperative course. DISCUSSION In contrast to the classical procedure the underlay mesh modification saved us from enlarging the defect, and was quick and associated with minimal tissue injury. CONCLUSION Underlay mesh repair for spontaneous lumbar hernia is feasible when the defect is small.

Mismar, Ayman; Al-Ardah, Mahmoud; Albsoul, Nader; Younes, Nidal

2013-01-01

355

Toward a clinical lumbar CAD: herniation diagnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  A CAD system for lumbar disc degeneration and herniation based on clinical MR images can aid diagnostic decision-making provided\\u000a the method is robust, efficient, and accurate.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Material and methods  A Bayesian-based classifier with a Gibbs distribution was designed and implemented for diagnosing lumbar disc herniation.\\u000a Each disc is segmented with a gradient vector flow active contour model (GVF-snake) to extract shape

Raja’ S. Alomari; Jason J. Corso; Vipin Chaudhary; Gurmeet Dhillon

2011-01-01

356

Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy in the setting of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and hypertensive emergency.  

PubMed

We present the magnetic resonance imaging findings of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy in a patient with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome secondary to hypertensive emergency. PMID:24647142

Joos, Zachary P; Adesina, Ore-Ofe O; Katz, Bradley J

2014-06-01

357

How frequent is chronic lumbar arachnoiditis following intrathecal Myodil?  

PubMed

Chronic lumbar arachnoiditis has numerous causes, including the introduction of contrast media into the lumbar subarachnoid space. The oily contrast medium Myodil (iophendylate) is often cited but the true incidence of symptomatic lumbar arachnoiditis due solely to the presence of Myodil is unknown. A retrospective review of 98 patients in whom Myodil was introduced by ventriculography or cisternography, i.e. remote from the lumbar spine, revealed no cases of chronic lumbar arachnoiditis. All patients were monitored closely for periods ranging from 1 to 28 years. We conclude that, in these circumstances, it is rare for Myodil to produce symptomatic arachnoiditis. PMID:1393409

Hughes, D G; Isherwood, I

1992-09-01

358

Stepping-like movements in humans with complete spinal cord injury induced by epidural stimulation of the lumbar cord: electromyographic study of compound muscle action potentials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study design: It has been previously demonstrated that sustained nonpatterned electric stimulation of the posterior lumbar spinal cord from the epidural space can induce stepping-like movements in subjects with chronic, complete spinal cord injury. In the present paper, we explore physiologically related components of electromyographic (EMG) recordings during the induced stepping-like activity.Objectives: To examine mechanisms underlying the stepping-like movements activated

K Minassian; B Jilge; F Rattay; M M Pinter; H Binder; F Gerstenbrand; M R Dimitrijevic

2004-01-01

359

Anterior and posterior variations in mechanical properties of human vertebrae measured by nanoindentation.  

PubMed

Osteoporotic spinal fractures are a significant global public health issue affecting more than 200 million people. Local degradation of the mechanical properties of bone and changes in global spine curvature increase fracture risk. However, a gap in knowledge exists relating material properties of trabecular bone in different regions of the spine. The purpose of our project was to measure the intrinsic mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior regions of human vertebral bodies in the thoracic and lumbar spine. Nanoindentation was used to evaluate Young's modulus (E) and hardness (H) of anterior and posterior trabecular bone regions from each vertebra (T7, T8 and L4). One-way ANOVA and the Turkey-Kramer test were used to analyze significance between vertebrae and t-test was used to test for significance within vertebrae. There was no difference in (E) and (H) within vertebrae. Young's modulus in the anterior regions of T7 (19.8±1.3) and T8 (19.6±1.4) were statistically greater than that in L4 (17.6±0.5). There was no difference between the posterior regions of all the vertebrae. There was a statistical significant difference in hardness between the anterior regions of T7 and T8 compared to L4, while the posterior regions demonstrated no difference. The results presented in this study, for the first time, reveal the differences in bone properties between the kyphotic thoracic spine and lordotic lumbar spine regions. This information will be helpful in understanding vertebral body remodeling and adaption in different regions of the spine which may be associated with spinal curvature and loading conditions. PMID:23182219

Giambini, Hugo; Wang, Hua-Jun; Zhao, Chunfeng; Chen, Qingshan; Nassr, Ahmad; An, Kai-Nan

2013-02-01

360

Acute Sciatic Neuritis following Lumbar Laminectomy  

PubMed Central

It is commonly accepted that the common cause of acute/chronic pain in the distribution of the lumbosacral nerve roots is the herniation of a lumbar intervertebral disc, unless proven otherwise. The surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation is successful in radicular pain and prevents or limits neurological damage in the majority of patients. Recurrence of sciatica after a successful disc surgery can be due to many possible etiologies. In the clinical setting we believe that the term sciatica might be associated with inflammation. We report a case of acute sciatic neuritis presented with significant persistent pain shortly after a successful disc surgery. The patient is a 59-year-old female with complaint of newly onset sciatica after complete pain resolution following a successful lumbar laminectomy for acute disc extrusion. In order to manage the patient's newly onset pain, the patient had multiple pain management visits which provided minimum relief. Persistent sciatica and consistent physical examination findings urged us to perform a pelvic MRI to visualize suspected pathology, which revealed right side sciatic neuritis. She responded to the electrical neuromodulation. Review of the literature on sciatic neuritis shows this is the first case report of sciatic neuritis subsequent to lumbar laminectomy.

Hitchon, Patrick; Reddy, Chandan G.

2014-01-01

361

Development of pathological lumbar kyphosis in myelomeningocele  

Microsoft Academic Search

e analysed the cases of lumbar kyphosis in 151 (21%) of a series of 719 patients with myelomeningocele. Three different types were distinguished: paralytic, sharp-angled and congenital. In a cross-sectional and partly longitudinal study the size and magnitude of the kyphosis, the apex of the curve and the level of paralysis of each group were recorded and statistically analysed. Paralytic

Claus Carstens; Hannjörg Koch; Dario R. C. Brocai; Fritz U. Niethard

1996-01-01

362

Isolated posterior cruciate ligament injuries in athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The literature is divided as to the necessity of an intact posterior cruciate ligament for functional stability. Pre sented here is a prospective study of isolated posterior cruciate injuries seen in the acute stage in 13 patients, 6 males and 7 females. The diagnosis of posterior cruciate ligament tear was made clinically and con firmed by arthroscopy. The average age

P. J. Fowler; S. S. Messieh

1987-01-01

363

Posterior Fossa Dermoid Cysts Causing Cerebellar Abscesses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dermoid cysts are uncommon tumors, and posterior fossa dermoid cysts may rarely cause abscess formation or formation of daughter abscesses within the cerebellum. At present, there are only 16 cases with posterior fossa dermoid cysts causing cerebellar abscesses reported in the literature. Two cases, 22 and 14 months old, with posterior fossa dermoid cysts and dermal sinus causing multiple cerebellar

Feyza Karagöz Güzey; N. Serdar Bas; Altay Sencer; Erhan Emel; M. Kemal Hamamcioglu; Nezih Özkan; Kemal Hepgul; Abdurrahman Aycan

2007-01-01

364

Early outcomes and complications of posterior vertebral column resection.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Hyperkyphosis confers a significant risk for neurologic deterioration as well as compromised cardiopulmonary function. Posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR) is a challenging but effective technique for spinal cord decompression and deformity correction that even under the setting of limited resources can be performed to reduce the technical difficulties, the operating time, and possibly the complications of the traditional two-staged vertebral column resection (VCR). PURPOSE: To report on the results of VCR performed through a single posterior approach (PVCR) in the treatment of severe rigid kyphosis in a series of patients treated and followed at a Scoliosis Research Society Global Outreach Program site in West Africa. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case series. PATIENT SAMPLE: Forty-five consecutive patients treated with PVCR for correction of severe rigid kyphosis. OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical and radiographic outcomes and complications; Scoliosis Research Society outcome instrument (SRS-22). METHODS: From 2002 to 2009, 45 patients (20 male and 25 female) underwent PVCR for kyphosis from congenital deformity (nine) or secondary to tuberculosis of the spine (36). Preoperative demographics, preop and postop neurologic status, SRS-22 scores and complications were recorded; upright full spine X-rays were available in all patients. Mean age was 14 years (6-47 years); mean follow-up 27 months (2-79 months). Mean preoperative kyphosis measured 108°. The deformity apex was resected via a costotransverse (thoracic) or posterolateral (lumbar) approach; neurosurveillance with sensory (somatosensory-evoked potentials) and motor (motor-evoked potentials) potential was used in all cases. Posterior instrumentation was used in all patients, and anterior structural cage was used in 32 patients. RESULTS: Intraoperative monitoring changes occurred in 10 patients (22%), and one patient progressed to complete spinal cord injury. Average preoperative local kyphosis was 108° and corrected to 600 postoperatively. Postoperatively, no additional patient showed neurologic deterioration; of the 11 patients with preoperative gait disturbances, 4 improved to normal gait, 5 remained the same, and 2 showed deterioration of their walking ability to nonambulating level. Total SRS-22 scores improved from 3.18 to 3.54 (p=.01), primarily self-image domain. CONCLUSIONS: Posterior vertebral column resection was successfully undertaken for the management of thoracic and thoracolumbar hyperkyphosis, demonstrating improvements in overall kyphosis and clinical outcome. Neuromonitoring provided the required safety to perform these challenging complex spine deformity procedures. PMID:23623509

Papadopoulos, Elias C; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba; Hess, W Fred; Sanchez Perez-Grueso, Francisco J; Pellisé, Ferran; Gupta, Munish; Lonner, Baron; Paonessa, Kenneth; Faloon, Michael; Cunningham, Matthew E; Kim, Han Jo; Mendelow, Michael; Sacramento, Christina; Yazici, Muharrem

2013-04-25

365

The interspinous spacer: a new posterior dynamic stabilization concept for prevention of adjacent segment disease.  

PubMed

Introduction. Posterior Dynamic stabilization using the interspinous spacer device is a known to be used as an alternative to rigid fusion in neurogenic claudication patients in the absence of macro instability. Actually, it plays an important in the management of adjacent segment disease in previously fused lumbar spine. Materials and Method. We report our experience with posterior dynamic stabilization using an interspinous spacer. 134 cases performed in our institution between September 2008 and August 2012 with different lumbar spine pathologies. The ages of our patients were between 40 and 72 years, with a mean age of 57 years. After almost 4 years of follow up in our patient and comparing their outcome to our previous serious we found that in some case the interspinous distracter has an important role not only in the treatment of adjacent segment disease but also in its prevention. Results and Discussion. Clinical improvement was noted in ISD-treated patients, with high satisfaction rate. At first, radicular pain improves with more than 3/10 reduction of the mean score on visual analog scale (VAS). In addition, disability score as well as disc height and lordotic angle showed major improvement at 3 to 6 months post operatively. And, no adjacent segment disease was reported in the patient operated with interspinous spacer. Conclusion. The interspinous spacer is safe and efficient modality to be used not only as a treatment of adjacent segment disease but also as a preventive measure in patients necessitating rigid fusion. PMID:23662209

Nachanakian, Antoine; El Helou, Antonios; Alaywan, Moussa

2013-01-01

366

Posterior and Anterior Spinal Fusion for the Management of Deformities in Patients with Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Spinal scoliosis and kyphosis in elderly people sometimes cause severe low back pain. Surgical methods such as osteotomy are useful for correcting the deformity. However, complications during and after surgery are associated with the osteotomy procedure. In particular, it is difficult to manage deformity correction surgery for patients with Parkinson's disease. Here, we present two cases of combined anterior and posterior surgery for deformity in patients with adult scoliosis and kyphosis due to Parkinson's disease. Case Presentation. Two 70-year-old women had spinal scoliosis and kyphosis due to Parkinson's disease. They had severe low back pain, and conservative treatment was not effective for the pain. Surgery was planned to correct the deformity in both patients. We performed combined posterior and anterior correction surgery. At first, posterior fusions were performed from T4 to the ilium using pedicle screws. Next, cages and autograft from the iliac crest were used in anterior lumbar surgery. The patients became symptom free after surgery. Bony fusion was observed 12 months after surgery. Conclusions. Combined posterior and anterior fusion surgery is effective for patients who show scoliosis and kyphosis deformity, and symptomatic low back pain due to Parkinson's disease.

Sato, Masashi; Sainoh, Takeshi; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Aoki, Yasuchika; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Junichi; Takaso, Masashi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

2013-01-01

367

Posterior and anterior spinal fusion for the management of deformities in patients with Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

Introduction. Spinal scoliosis and kyphosis in elderly people sometimes cause severe low back pain. Surgical methods such as osteotomy are useful for correcting the deformity. However, complications during and after surgery are associated with the osteotomy procedure. In particular, it is difficult to manage deformity correction surgery for patients with Parkinson's disease. Here, we present two cases of combined anterior and posterior surgery for deformity in patients with adult scoliosis and kyphosis due to Parkinson's disease. Case Presentation. Two 70-year-old women had spinal scoliosis and kyphosis due to Parkinson's disease. They had severe low back pain, and conservative treatment was not effective for the pain. Surgery was planned to correct the deformity in both patients. We performed combined posterior and anterior correction surgery. At first, posterior fusions were performed from T4 to the ilium using pedicle screws. Next, cages and autograft from the iliac crest were used in anterior lumbar surgery. The patients became symptom free after surgery. Bony fusion was observed 12 months after surgery. Conclusions. Combined posterior and anterior fusion surgery is effective for patients who show scoliosis and kyphosis deformity, and symptomatic low back pain due to Parkinson's disease. PMID:24073349

Sato, Masashi; Sainoh, Takeshi; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Junichi; Takaso, Masashi; Inoue, Gen; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

2013-01-01

368

Approaches to a posterior polar cataract  

PubMed Central

Posterior polar cataracts present special challenges to the cataract surgeon. These are often associated with weakness/dehiscence of the posterior capsule and thus have a higher rate of intraoperative posterior capsule rupture. The surgeon needs to adhere to special surgical strategies to minimize the risk of a posterior capsule rupture. These include, adhering to the principles of closed chamber technique, avoiding hydrodissection – instead performing ‘inside-out’ hydrodelineation and using modest to low phaco parameters and reducing these stepwise. This article provides important pearls on how to approach a posterior polar cataract.

Vasavada, Abhay R.; Vasavada, Viraj A.; Raj, Shetal M.

2011-01-01

369

Treatment of an aneurysmal bone cyst of the lumbar spine in children and teenagers, about five cases.  

PubMed

The aneurysmal bone cyst is a rare tumor. Its treatment is complex when localized to the lumbar spine, with neurological, mechanical, and tumoral complications. The aim of this study is to describe these tumors, their treatment, and their long-term evolution, as well as to define an appropriate therapeutic strategy. Four of the five cysts had anterior and posterior extension. Three patients had neurological symptoms at diagnosis and two of them presented with pathological fracture. Surgical treatment was performed by intralesional resection. Long-term progress was always favorable, without recurrence or functional limitation. Two patients had a stable, mild spine deformity. PMID:22158055

Geffroy, Loïc; Hamel, Olivier; Odri, Guillaume Anthony; Guillard, Sophie; Passuti, Norbert; Gouin, François; Rogez, Jean-Michel; Hamel, Antoine

2012-05-01

370

Lumbar plexus injury in an anterior fracture dislocation of sacroiliac joint: a case report and review of literature.  

PubMed

Displaced unstable pelvic fractures are commonly associated with disruption of the osteoarticular junction of the sacroiliac joint. Posterior sacroiliac dislocation are commonly reported but there are only few reports the anterior type of sacroiliac dislocation where the iliac bone fractures and displaces anterior to sacrum, often in combination with fractures of pubic rami and symphyseal injuries. We present a case of an anterior type of sacroiliac fracture dislocation which was associated with a lumbar plexus injury involving both motor and sensory components. Preoperative neurological assessment was done by MRI scan. The tented nerve roots were explored and decompressed surgically, and sacroiliac fixation was done after reduction in the fracture and joint. PMID:24043609

Magu, Narender Kumar; Singla, Rohit; Gogna, Paritosh; Amanpreet; Jain, Nishant; Aggarwal, Shalini

2013-11-01

371

Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification  

PubMed Central

The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic.

Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

2011-01-01

372

Comparison of the biomechanical stability of dense cancellous allograft with tricortical iliac autograft and fibular allograft for cervical interbody fusion.  

PubMed

Several choices are available for cervical interbody fusion after anterior cervical discectomy. A recent option is dense cancellous allograft (CS) which is characterized by an open-matrix structure that may promote vascularization and cellular penetration during early osseous integration. However, the biomechanical stability of CS should be comparable to that of the tricortical iliac autograft (AG) and fibular allograft (FA) to be an acceptable alternative to these materials. The purpose of this study was to compare the initial biomechanical stability of CS to that of AG and FA in a one-level anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) model. Twelve human cervical spines (C3-T1) were loaded in six modes of motion and evaluated under three conditions: (1) intact, (2) after ACDF using CS, AG, and FA in alternating sequences, and (3) after ACDF with anterior plating. Three reflective markers were placed on the adjacent vertebral bodies. Intervertebral motion was measured with a video-based motion-capture system (MacReflex, Qualisys, Sweden). Torques were applied to a maximum of 2.0 N m. The range-of-motion and neutral-zone values measured in each loading mode were compared. No graft material displayed significant differences in biomechanical stability in any of the tested loading modes, suggesting that the initial stability of CS is comparable to that of AG and FA. Anterior cervical plating significantly increased biomechanical stability in all modes. PMID:16429289

Ryu, Stephen I; Lim, Jesse T; Kim, Sung-Min; Paterno, Josemaria; Willenberg, Rafer; Kim, Daniel H

2006-09-01

373

Comparison of the biomechanical stability of dense cancellous allograft with tricortical iliac autograft and fibular allograft for cervical interbody fusion  

PubMed Central

Several choices are available for cervical interbody fusion after anterior cervical discectomy. A recent option is dense cancellous allograft (CS) which is characterized by an open-matrix structure that may promote vascularization and cellular penetration during early osseous integration. However, the biomechanical stability of CS should be comparable to that of the tricortical iliac autograft (AG) and fibular allograft (FA) to be an acceptable alternative to these materials. The purpose of this study was to compare the initial biomechanical stability of CS to that of AG and FA in a one-level anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) model. Twelve human cervical spines (C3–T1) were loaded in six modes of motion and evaluated under three conditions: (1) intact, (2) after ACDF using CS, AG, and FA in alternating sequences, and (3) after ACDF with anterior plating. Three reflective markers were placed on the adjacent vertebral bodies. Intervertebral motion was measured with a video-based motion-capture system (MacReflex, Qualisys, Sweden). Torques were applied to a maximum of 2.0 N m. The range-of-motion and neutral-zone values measured in each loading mode were compared. No graft material displayed significant differences in biomechanical stability in any of the tested loading modes, suggesting that the initial stability of CS is comparable to that of AG and FA. Anterior cervical plating significantly increased biomechanical stability in all modes.

Lim, Jesse T.; Kim, Sung-Min; Paterno, Josemaria; Kim, Daniel H.

2006-01-01

374

Anoxic persistence of lumbar respiratory bursts and block of lumbar locomotion in newborn rat brainstem spinal cords.  

PubMed

The tolerance of breathing in neonates to oxygen depletion is reflected by persistence of inspiratory-related motor output during sustained anoxia in newborn rat brainstem preparations. It is not known whether lumbar motor networks innervating expiratory abdominal muscles are, in contrast, inhibited by anoxia similar to locomotor networks in neonatal mouse lumbar cords. To test this, we recorded inspiratory-related cervical/hypoglossal plus pre/postinspiratory lumbar/facial nerve activities and, sometimes simultaneously, locomotor rhythms in newborn rat brainstem-spinal cords. Chemical anoxia slowed 1 : 1-coupled cervical and lumbar respiratory rhythms and induced cervical burst doublets associated with depressed preinspiratory and augmented postinspiratory lumbar activities. Similarly, anoxia evoked repetitive hypoglossal bursts and shifted facial activity toward augmented postinspiratory bursting in medullas without spinal cord. Selective lumbar anoxia augmented pre/postinspiratory lumbar bursting without slowing the rhythm. This suggests a medullary origin of both anoxic inspiratory double bursts and preinspiratory depression, but a mixed medullary/lumbar origin of boosted postinspiratory lumbar activity. Lumbar respiratory rhythm is likely to be generated by the parafacial respiratory group expiratory centre as indicated by lack of normoxic and anoxic bursting following brainstem transection between the facial motonucleus and the more caudal pre-Bötzinger complex inspiratory centre. Opposed to sustained respiratory activities, anoxia reversibly abolished non-rhythmic spinal discharges and electrically or chemically evoked lumbar locomotor activities, followed by pronounced postanoxic spinal hyperexcitability. We hypothesize that (i) the anoxia tolerance of neonatal breathing includes pFRG-driven lumbar expiratory networks, (ii) the anoxic respiratory pattern transformation is due to disturbed inspiratory-expiratory centre interactions, and (iii) postanoxic lumbar hyperexcitability contributes to spasticity in cerebral palsy. PMID:17932145

Taccola, Giuliano; Secchia, Lucia; Ballanyi, Klaus

2007-12-01

375

3:35 Demographic influences on the outcome of spinal fusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose of study: To analyze the outcome of spinal fusion with respect to both surgical and nonmedical variables.Methods used: The first 82 patients treated at our institution with a combined posterior lumbar interbody fusion\\/bilateral lateral fusion\\/pedicle screw instrumentation technique were retrospectively studied. Sixty-nine (84%) of the patients were located, with results evaluated by a structured telephone interview by an investigator

Stephen Faust; Thomas Ducker; David Hatef

2002-01-01

376

Trumpet laminectomy for lumbar degenerative spinal stenosis.  

PubMed

The clinical and radiologic results of trumpet laminectomy, an improved method of extensive laminectomy preserving the facet joints (n = 35), and extensive laminectomy (n = 15) were compared in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. The results were evaluated using a rating system and serial radiographs and a follow-up of 2 to 10 1/2 years (mean, 5.2 years). The overall results corroborate the advantage of the trumpet laminectomy, demonstrating a lower incidence and lower grade of postoperative lumbar scoliosis as well as less symptom recurrence in the trumpet laminectomy group than in the extensive laminectomy group. Risk factors for postoperative spinal instability and scoliosis appear to be facet joint destruction and elderly females with a high level of physical activity. PMID:8347973

Kanamori, M; Matsui, H; Hirano, N; Kawaguchi, Y; Kitamoto, R; Tsuji, H

1993-06-01

377

Lumbar Incisional Hernia Repair After Iliac Crest Bone Graft  

PubMed Central

The iliac crest is a common donor site for autogenous bone grafts. Among the reported complications, lumbar hernias occur infrequently with a reported incidence of 5% to 9%. Surgical repair is advocated secondary to the risk of incarceration or strangulation. Computed tomography is the diagnostic study of choice. Various transabdominal, retroperitoneal, and laparoscopic approaches have been described for the repair of lumbar hernias. We describe a case of successful lumbar incisional hernia repair after iliac crest bone graft harvesting that used prosthetic mesh.

Do, Michael V.; Richardson, William S.

2012-01-01

378

Dynesys fixation for lumbar spine degeneration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dynamic fixation system Dynesys is utilized in the last 10 years for treatment of degenerative segmental disease of the\\u000a lumbar spine. Dynesys is a semi-rigid fixation system that allows minimal lengthening and shortening between two segmental\\u000a pedicle screws as opposed to a rigid metal bar. Thus, the system is regarded to maintain stability and near physiological\\u000a motion patterns of the

Matthias Bothmann; Erich Kast; Gerald Jens Boldt; Joachim Oberle

2008-01-01

379

Lumbar facet pain: biomechanics, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology.  

PubMed

Idiopathic low back pain has confounded health care practitioners for decades. Although there has been much advance in the understanding of the biomechanics of the lumbar spine over the past 25 years, the cellular and neural mechanisms that lead to facet pain are not well understood. An extensive series of experiments was undertaken to help elucidate these mechanisms and gain a better understanding of lumbar facet pain. Biomechanic and neuroanatomic studies were performed in human cadaveric facet joints and neurophysiologic studies were performed in New Zealand White rabbits. These studies provide the following evidence to help explain the mechanisms of lumbar facet pain: (1) The facet joint can carry a significant amount of the total compressive load on the spine when the human spine is hyperextended. (2) Extensive stretch of the human facet joint capsule occurs when the spine is in the physiologic range of extreme extension. (3) An extensive distribution of small nerve fibers and free and encapsulated nerve endings exists in the lumbar facet joint capsule, including nerves containing substance P, a putative neuromodulator of pain. (4) Low and high threshold mechanoreceptors fire when the facet joint capsule is stretched or is subject to localized compressive forces. (5) Sensitization and excitation of nerves in facet joint and surrounding muscle occur when the joint is inflamed or exposed to certain chemicals that are released during injury and inflammation. (6) Marked reduction in nerve activity occurs in facet tissue injected with hydrocortisone and lidocaine. Thus, the facet joint is a heavily innervated area that is subject to high stress and strain. The resulting tissue damage or inflammation is likely to cause release of chemicals irritating to the nerve endings in these joints, resulting in low back pain. PMID:8872268

Cavanaugh, J M; Ozaktay, A C; Yamashita, H T; King, A I

1996-09-01

380

Etiology of lumbar lordosis and its pathophysiology: a review of the evolution of lumbar lordosis, and the mechanics and biology of lumbar degeneration.  

PubMed

The goal of this review is to discuss the mechanisms of postural degeneration, particularly the loss of lumbar lordosis commonly observed in the elderly in the context of evolution, mechanical, and biological studies of the human spine and to synthesize recent research findings to clinical management of postural malalignment. Lumbar lordosis is unique to the human spine and is necessary to facilitate our upright posture. However, decreased lumbar lordosis and increased thoracic kyphosis are hallmarks of an aging human spinal column. The unique upright posture and lordotic lumbar curvature of the human spine suggest that an understanding of the evolution of the human spinal column, and the unique anatomical features that support lumbar lordosis may provide insight into spine health and degeneration. Considering evolution of the skeleton in isolation from other scientific studies provides a limited picture for clinicians. The evolution and development of human lumbar lordosis highlight the interdependence of pelvic structure and lumbar lordosis. Studies of fossils of human lineage demonstrate a convergence on the degree of lumbar lordosis and the number of lumbar vertebrae in modern Homo sapiens. Evolution and spine mechanics research show that lumbar lordosis is dictated by pelvic incidence, spinal musculature, vertebral wedging, and disc health. The evolution, mechanics, and biology research all point to the importance of spinal posture and flexibility in supporting optimal health. However, surgical management of postural deformity has focused on restoring posture at the expense of flexibility. It is possible that the need for complex and costly spinal fixation can be eliminated by developing tools for early identification of patients at risk for postural deformities through patient history (genetics, mechanics, and environmental exposure) and tracking postural changes over time. PMID:24785474

Sparrey, Carolyn J; Bailey, Jeannie F; Safaee, Michael; Clark, Aaron J; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank; Smith, Justin S; Ames, Christopher P

2014-05-01

381

Posterior muscle chain activity during various extension exercises: an observational study  

PubMed Central

Background Back extension exercises are often used in the rehabilitation of low back pain. However, at present it is not clear how the posterior muscles are recruited during different types of extension exercises. Therefore, the present study will evaluate the myoelectric activity of thoracic, lumbar and hip extensor muscles during different extension exercises in healthy persons. Based on these physiological observations we will make recommendations regarding the use of extensions exercises in clinical practice. Methods Fourteen healthy subjects performed four standardized extension exercises (dynamic trunk extension, dynamic-static trunk extension, dynamic leg extension, dynamic-static leg extension) in randomized order at an intensity of 60% of 1-RM (one repetition maximum). Surface EMG signals of Latissimus dorsi (LD), Longissimus thoracis pars thoracic (LTT) and lumborum (LTL), Iliocostalis lumborum pars thoracic (ILT) and lumborum (ILL), lumbar Multifidus (LM) and Gluteus Maximus (GM) were measured during the various exercises. Subsequently, EMG root mean square values were calculated and compared between trunk and leg extension exercises, as well as between a dynamic and dynamic-static performance using mixed model analysis. During the dynamic exercises a 2 second concentric contraction was followed by a 2 second eccentric contraction, whereas in the dynamic-static performance, a 5 second isometric interval was added in between the concentric and eccentric contraction phase. Results In general, the muscles of the posterior chain were recruited on a higher level during trunk extension (mean ± SD, 56.6 ± 30.8%MVC) compared to leg extension (47.4 ± 30.3%MVC) (p ? 0.001). No significant differences were found in mean muscle activity between dynamic and dynamic-static performances (p = 0.053). The thoracic muscles (LTT and ILT) were recruited more during trunk extension (64.9 ± 27.1%MVC) than during leg extension (54.2 ± 22.1%MVC) (p = 0.045) without significant differences in activity between both muscles (p = 0.138). There was no significant differences in thoracic muscle usage between the dynamic or dynamic-static performance of the extension exercises (p = 0.574). Lumbar muscle activity (LTT, ILL, LM) was higher during trunk extension (70.6?±?22.2%MVC) compared to leg extension (61.7?±?27.0%MVC) (p?=?0.047). No differences in myoelectric activity between the lumbar muscles could be demonstrated during the extension exercises (p?=?0.574). During each exercise the LD (19.2?±?13.9%MVC) and GM (28.2?±?14.6%MVC) were recruited significantly less than the thoracic and lumbar muscles. Conclusion The recruitment of the posterior muscle chain during different types of extension exercises was influenced by the moving body part, but not by the type of contraction. All muscle groups were activated at a higher degree during trunk extension compared to leg extension. Based on the recruitment level of the different muscles, all exercises can be used to improve the endurance capacity of thoracic muscles, however for improvement of lumbar muscle endurance leg extension exercises seem to be more appropriate. To train the endurance capacity of the LD and GM extension exercises are not appropriate.

2013-01-01

382

Design concepts in lumbar total disc arthroplasty  

PubMed Central

The implantation of lumbar disc prostheses based on different design concepts is widely accepted. This paper reviews currently available literature studies on the biomechanics of TDA in the lumbar spine, and is targeted at the evaluation of possible relationships between the aims of TDA and the geometrical, mechanical and material properties of the various available disc prostheses. Both theoretical and experimental studies were analyzed, by a PUBMED search (performed in February 2007, revised in January 2008), focusing on single level TDA. Both semi-constrained and unconstrained lumbar discs seem to be able to restore nearly physiological IAR locations and ROM values. However, both increased and decreased ROM was stated in some papers, unrelated to the clinical outcome. Segmental