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Sample records for posterior urethral strictures

  1. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  2. Posterior Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  3. Gossypiboma mimicking posterior urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bindey; Kumar, Prem; Sinha, Sanjay Kumar; Sinha, Neelam; Hasan, Zaheer; Thakur, Vinit Kumar; Anand, Utpal; Priyadarshi, Rajiv Nayan; Mandal, Manish

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Foreign bodies in the urogenital tract are not uncommon. Hairpins, glass rods, umbilical tapes, ball point pen are described in lower urogenital tract. Retained gauze piece (gossypiboma) in posterior urethra may cause diagnostic dilemma. Symptoms and investigations may mimic stricture of posterior urethra. PRESENTATION OF CASE Two cases of retained gauze pieces in the urethra are described here. The micturating cystourethrogram was suggestive of posterior urethral stricture. DISCUSSION Two cases described here had retained gauze piece as a cause of filling defect and abnormal appearance in the micturating cystourethrogram. Gossypiboma may be a possibility where posterior urethral stricture are seen after previous surgery in paediatric age group. CONCLUSION In the setting of previous urogenital surgery gossypiboma should be kept in the differential diagnosis where posterior urethral stricture are seen in the paediatric age group. PMID:23500749

  4. Anterior urethral stricture review

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Marshall J.

    2013-01-01

    Male anterior urethral stricture disease is a commonly encountered condition that presents to many urologists. According to a National Practice Survey of Board Certified Urologist in the United States most urologists treat on average 6-20 urethral strictures yearly. Many of those same urologists surveyed treat with repeated dilation or internal urethrotomy, despite continual recurrence of the urethral stricture. In point of fact, the urethroplasty despite its high success rate, is underutilized by many practicing urologists. Roughly half of practicing urologist do not perform urethroplasty in the United States. Clearly, the reconstructive ladder for urethral stricture management that was previously described in the literature may no longer apply in the modern era. The following article reviews the etiology, diagnosis, management and comparisons of treatment options for anterior urethral strictures. PMID:26816721

  5. Epidemiology of urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Blaschko, Sarah D.; McAninch, Jack W.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2014-01-01

    Urethral stricture disease is relatively common and is associated with a significant financial cost and potentially debilitating outcomes. Understanding urethral stricture epidemiology is important to identify risk factors associated with the etiology or progression of the disease. This understanding may lead to better treatments and preventative measures that could ameliorate disease severity, produce better health outcomes, and reduce expenditures. We performed a comprehensive review of urethral stricture disease based on available published case series, identified gaps in knowledge of this disease, and recommend future directions for research. PMID:26813256

  6. SIU/ICUD Consultation on Urethral Strictures: Posterior urethral stenosis after treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Herschorn, Sender; Elliott, Sean; Coburn, Michael; Wessells, Hunter; Zinman, Leonard

    2014-03-01

    Posterior urethral stenosis can result from radical prostatectomy in approximately 5%-10% of patients (range 1.4%-29%). Similarly, 4%-9% of men after brachytherapy and 1%-13% after external beam radiotherapy will develop stenosis. The rate will be greater after combination therapy and can exceed 40% after salvage radical prostatectomy. Although postradical prostatectomy stenoses mostly develop within 2 years, postradiotherapy stenoses take longer to appear. Many result in storage and voiding symptoms and can be associated with incontinence. The evaluation consists of a workup similar to that for lower urinary tract symptoms, with additional testing to rule out recurrent or persistent prostate cancer. Treatment is usually initiated with an endoscopic approach commonly involving dilation, visual urethrotomy with or without laser treatment, and, possibly, UroLume stent placement. Open surgical urethroplasty has been reported, as well as urinary diversion for recalcitrant stenosis. A proposed algorithm illustrating a graded approach has been provided. PMID:24361008

  7. Current management of urethral stricture disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Broadly defined, urethral strictures are narrowing of the urethral lumen that is surrounded by corpus spongiosum, i.e., urethral meatus through the bulbar urethra. Urethral stenosis is narrowing of the posterior urethra, i.e., membranous urethra through bladder neck/prostate junction, which is not enveloped by corpus spongiosum. The disease has significant quality of life ramifications because many times younger patients are affected by this compared to many other urological diseases. Methods: A review of the scientific literature concerning urethral stricture, stenosis, treatment, and outcomes was performed using Medline and PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health). Abstracts from scientific meetings were included in this review. Results: There is level 3 evidence regarding the etiology and epidemiology of urethral strictures, stenoses, and pelvic fracture urethral injuries. Outcomes data from literature regarding intervention for urethral stricture are largely limited to level 3 evidence and expert opinion. There is a single level 1 study comparing urethral dilation and direct vision internal urethrotomy. Urethroplasty outcomes data are limited to level 3 case series. Conclusions: Progress is being made toward consistent terminology, and nomenclature which will, in turn, help to standardize treatment within the field of urology. Treatment for urethral stricture and stenosis remains inconsistent between reconstructive and nonreconstructive urologists due to varying treatment algorithms and approaches to disease management. Tissue engineering appears to be future for reconstructive urethral surgery with reports demonstrating feasibility in the use of different tissue substitutes and grafts. PMID:26941491

  8. Management of urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Mundy, A R

    2006-01-01

    Controlled clinical trials are unusual in surgery, rare in urology, and almost non‐existent as far as the management of urethral stricture is concerned. What data there are come largely from so called “expert opinion” and the quality of this is variable. None the less, the number of so called experts, past and present, is comparatively small and in broad principle their views more or less coincide. Although this review is therefore inevitably biased, it is unlikely that expert opinion will take issue with most of the general points raised here. PMID:16891437

  9. Current Management of Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Ju

    2013-01-01

    The surgical treatment of urethral stricture diseases is continually evolving. Although various surgical techniques are available for the treatment of anterior urethral stricture, no one technique has been identified as the method of choice. This article provides a brief updated review of the surgical options for the management of different sites and different types of anterior urethral stricture. This review also covers present controversies in urethral reconstruction. Among the various procedures available for treating urethral stricture, one-stage buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty is currently widely used. The choice of technique for urethroplasty for an individual case largely depends on the expertise of the surgeon. Therefore, urologists working in this field should keep themselves updated on the numerous surgical techniques to deal with any condition of the urethra that might surface at the time of surgery. PMID:24044088

  10. [Endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures].

    PubMed

    Oosterlinck, W; Lumen, N

    2006-08-01

    The present article reviews the literature regarding the endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures. Only few prospective randomised clinical trials with sufficient power have been performed and most of the literature provides evidence of only level 3 and 4. Since length, location, extent and calibre of the urethral stricture have an important impact on prognosis, diagnosis and the role of ultrasonography are discussed. Pathophysiology of wound healing is discussed in relation to urethrotomy, as it explains the outcomes of the procedure. Operative techniques using cold knife and laser, use of endoprostheses, indications, complications, results and postoperative management are described. The possible role of urethral catheters, hydraulic dilatations and corticosteroid applications are discussed. PMID:16970069

  11. [Laser treatment of urethral strictures].

    PubMed

    Klammert, R; Schneede, P; Kriegmair, M

    1994-07-01

    Since the late 1970s different laser systems have been applied for the treatment of urethral strictures. Thermal effects adjacent on tissue have made the long term results of Nd:-YAG and Ar+ laser application discouraging. New laser systems (KTP, Excimer, Ho: YAG) still have to prove their efficacy in randomized clinical trials against cold knife urethrotomy. PMID:7941175

  12. Buccal mucosa urethroplasty for adult urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, W. Britt; Santucci, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Urethral strictures are difficult to manage. Some treatment modalities for urethral strictures are fraught with high patient morbidity and stricture recurrence rates; however, an extremely useful tool in the armamentarium of the Reconstructive Urologist is buccal mucosal urethroplasty. We like buccal mucosa grafts because of its excellent short and long-term results, low post-operative complication rate, and relative ease of use. We utilize it for most our bulbar urethral stricture repairs and some pendulous urethral stricture repairs, usually in conjunction with a first-stage Johanson repair. In this report, we discuss multiple surgical techniques for repair of urethral stricture disease. Diagnosis, evaluation of candidacy, surgical techniques, post-operative care, and complications are included. The goal is to raise awareness of buccal mucosa grafting for the management urethral stricture disease. PMID:22022061

  13. [Endoscopic management of urethral stricture].

    PubMed

    Rossi Neto, R; Tschirdewahn, S; Tschirderwahn, S; Rose, A; vom Dorp, F; Rübben, H

    2010-06-01

    Great progress has been seen in the treatment of urethral strictures since the first endoscopic urethrotomy was performed in 1893 by Felix Martin Oberländer in Dresden, Germany. With the introduction of endoscopic laser therapy and the variety of urethral reconstruction methods other ways to treat this important urologic entity became available. Despite this progress, urethrotomy still represents the preferred treatment concept for primary, short and bulbar urethral strictures. In this study we performed a 2-year retrospective analysis of 20 patients undergoing primary endoscopic urethrotomy by single bulbar or penile narrowing. A high incidence of recurrence was seen in 70% of the patients. Nevertheless, direct vision urethrotomy represented a safe and effective transitory method to treat these patients. Moreover, 80% of the patients preferred, in cases of recurrence, a repeated urethrotomy as the treatment of choice. Although the long-term results evidence high relapse rates after the first and second procedures, there have been no sufficient data in the literature which support the use of other methods. Furthermore, primary endoscopic management of urethral strictures remains a simple, safe, and cost-effective procedure that should be indicated before more invasive approaches are taken to provide relief to these patients from this limiting problem. PMID:20544332

  14. Male urethral strictures and their management

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Lindsay A.; McAninch, Jack W.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2014-01-01

    Male urethral stricture disease is prevalent and has a substantial impact on quality of life and health-care costs. Management of urethral strictures is complex and depends on the characteristics of the stricture. Data show that there is no difference between urethral dilation and internal urethrotomy in terms of long-term outcomes; success rates range widely from 8–80%, with long-term success rates of 20–30%. For both of these procedures, the risk of recurrence is greater for men with longer strictures, penile urethral strictures, multiple strictures, presence of infection, or history of prior procedures. Analysis has shown that repeated use of urethrotomy is not clinically effective or cost-effective in these patients. Long-term success rates are higher for surgical reconstruction with urethroplasty, with most studies showing success rates of 85–90%. Many techniques have been utilized for urethroplasty, depending on the location, length, and character of the stricture. Successful management of urethral strictures requires detailed knowledge of anatomy, pathophysiology, proper patient selection, and reconstructive techniques. PMID:24346008

  15. Holmium laser core through internal urethrotomy with explantation of UroLume stent. An ideal approach for a complicated posterior urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N P; Ansari, M S

    2004-05-01

    Although the UroLume wallstent has been proven effective in the treatment of recurrent urethral stricture, obstruction may recur in some cases. A likely cause of obstruction is hyperplastic tissue reaction, which may necessitate the removal of the stent. The hyperplastic tissue reaction may be severe, resulting in a completely obliterative stricture. Stent removal with a completely obliterative stricture and the stent in situ is a tedious job, as there is no lumen in which to place the laser fiber to cut the stent wires. We report on a patient in whom a UroLume urethral stent was placed one year ago for post-traumatic recurrent bulbomembranous urethral stricture. The stricture recurred in spite of the stent in place and the lumen was finally completely obliterated. A holmium laser was used for core through internal urethrotomy and the explantation of the stent. PMID:15147555

  16. Management of radiation-induced urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Matthias D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation as a treatment option for prostate cancer has been chosen by many patients. One of the side effects encountered are radiation-induced urethral strictures which occur in up to 11% of patients. Radiation damage has often left the irradiated field fibrotic and with poor vascularization which make these strictures a challenging entity to treat. The mainstay of urologic management remains an urethroplasty procedure for which several approaches exist with variable optimal indication. Excision and primary anastomoses are ideal for shorter bulbar strictures that comprise the majority of radiation-induced urethral strictures. One advantage of this technique is that it does not require tissue transfers and success rates of 70-95% have consistently been reported. Substitution urethroplasty using remote graft tissue such as buccal mucosa are indicated if the length of the stricture precludes a tension-free primary anastomosis. Despite the challenge of graft survival in radiation-damaged and poorly vascularized recipient tissue, up to 83% of patients have been treated successfully although the numbers described in the literature are small. The most extensive repairs involve the use of tissue flaps, for example gracilis muscle, which may be required if the involved periurethral tissue is unable to provide sufficient vascular support for a post-operative urethral healing process. In summary, radiation-induced urethral strictures are a challenging entity. Most strictures are amenable to excision and primary anastomosis (EPA) with encouraging success rates but substitution urethroplasty may be indicated when extensive repair is needed. PMID:26816812

  17. Holmium laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Hossain, A Z M Z; Khan, S A; Hossain, S; Salam, M A

    2004-08-01

    A prospective cross-sectional study was carried-out in the department of urology, Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH) to evaluate the outcome of Laser urethrotomy for the treatment of urethral stricture. For this purpose, 30 male patients aged 15 to 60 years with short segment anterior urethral stricture (>2cm) were treated by HO:YAG Laser. The energy used for this purpose was 0.8 to 1.5 joules by LISA 80 Watt Holmium Laser machine. All patients were catheterized for less than 24 hours and were followed up for 6 to 12 months postoperatively by uroflowmetry and by retrograde with voiding cystourethrogram 3 monthly. The study revealed that out of 30 patients, 27(90%) showed good flow of urine (Qave>16.0 ml/sec) and adequate caliber urethra in retrograde urethrogram (RGU). Only 3(10%) patients showed narrow stream of urine (Qave<8.0 ml/sec) and recurrent stricture in RGU which were managed by optical internal urethrotomy (OIU) and clean intermittent self catheterization (CISC). The study showed satisfactory results in 90% cases with short term follow up. The study concludes that HO:YAG Laser urethrotomy for the treatment of short segment urethral stricture is highly effective. The study further reveals that the method is simple, safe and thus, it can be considered favorably as a new therapeutic option for the treatment of urethral stricture. However, long term follow up is necessary for making a final comment on this issue. PMID:15813486

  18. [Perineal urethrostomy in complex anterior urethral stricture].

    PubMed

    Barbagli, G

    2010-06-01

    Staged urethroplasty is a well-known procedure for urethral reconstruction that had already been described by Russell in 1914 and was later popularized by Johanson, Turner-Warwick, Blandy, and Schreiter. It lends itself to the treatment of complex anterior urethral stricture in combination with lichen sclerosus, failed correction of hypospadias, fistula, via falsa, abscess, carcinoma, or previously unsuccessful urethroplasty. Perineal urethrostomy can be performed as a temporary or definitive measure. Some patients even decline further urethral reconstruction because they perceive subjective satisfaction after perineal urethrostomy that was originally intended to be temporary. PMID:20544335

  19. KTP-532 laser ablation of urethral strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Terrence R.

    1991-07-01

    In 1988, the KTP-532 laser was used to ablate a series of benign urethral strictures. Rather than using a single incision, as in urethrotomy, strictures were treated with a 360$DEG contact photoradiation. Thirty-one males, average age 53.2 years, received 37 treatments. Six patients underwent a second laser treatment. Stricture etiology was commonly iatrogenic (32%), traumatic (16%), and post-gonococcal (10%). Stricture location included mainly bulbar (49%), membranous (20%), and penile (12%) areas. The surgical technique consisted of a circumferential ablation followed by foley catheter placement (mean 10 days). Follow-up on 29 of 31 patients ranged from 1 to 16 months (mean 9.7) Complete success occurred in 17 patients (59%) who had no further symptoms or instrumentation. Partial success was seen in 6 patients (20.5%) with symptoms but no stricture recurrence. Six patients (20.5%) failed therapy requiring additional surgery or regular dilatations. No complications were encountered. Although longer assessment is required, KTP-532 laser ablation of urethral strictures appears efficacious.

  20. KTP-532 laser ablation of urethral strictures.

    PubMed

    Turek, P J; Malloy, T R; Cendron, M; Carpiniello, V L; Wein, A J

    1992-10-01

    In 1988 the KTP-532 laser was used to ablate a series of benign urethral strictures. Rather than using a single incision as in urethrotomy, strictures were treated with 360-degree contact photoradiation. Thirty-one male patients, average age 53.2 years, received thirty-seven treatments; 6 patients underwent a second laser treatment. Stricture etiology was commonly iatrogenic (32%), traumatic (16%), and postgonococcal (10%). Stricture location included mainly bulbar (49%), membranous (20%), and penile (12%) areas. The surgical technique consisted of circumferential ablation, followed by Foley catheter placement (mean, 10 days). Follow-up on 29 of 31 patients ranged from one to sixteen months (mean 9.7). Complete success occurred in 17 patients (59%) who had no further symptoms or instrumentation. Partial success was seen in 6 patients (20.5%) with symptom, but not stricture, recurrence. Six patients (20.5%) failed therapy, requiring additional surgery or regular dilations. No complications were seen. Although longer assessment is required, KTP-532 laser ablation of urethral strictures appears efficacious. PMID:1413350

  1. Bipolar plasma vaporization using plasma-cutting and plasma-loop electrodes versus cold-knife transurethral incision for the treatment of posterior urethral stricture: a prospective, randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wansong; Chen, Zhiyuan; Wen, Liping; Jiang, Xiangxin; Liu, Xiuheng

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the efficiency and safety of bipolar plasma vaporization using plasma-cutting and plasma-loop electrodes for the treatment of posterior urethral stricture. Compare the outcomes following bipolar plasma vaporization with conventional cold-knife urethrotomy. METHODS: A randomized trial was performed to compare patient outcomes from the bipolar and cold-knife groups. All patients were assessed at 6 and 12 months postoperatively via urethrography and uroflowmetry. At the end of the first postoperative year, ureteroscopy was performed to evaluate the efficacy of the procedure. The mean follow-up time was 13.9 months (range: 12 to 21 months). If re-stenosis was not identified by both urethrography and ureteroscopy, the procedure was considered “successful”. RESULTS: Fifty-three male patients with posterior urethral strictures were selected and randomly divided into two groups: bipolar group (n=27) or cold-knife group (n=26). Patients in the bipolar group experienced a shorter operative time compared to the cold-knife group (23.45±7.64 hours vs 33.45±5.45 hours, respectively). The 12-month postoperative Qmax was faster in the bipolar group than in the cold-knife group (15.54±2.78 ml/sec vs 18.25±2.12 ml/sec, respectively). In the bipolar group, the recurrence-free rate was 81.5% at a mean follow-up time of 13.9 months. In the cold-knife group, the recurrence-free rate was 53.8%. CONCLUSIONS: The application of bipolar plasma-cutting and plasma-loop electrodes for the management of urethral stricture disease is a safe and reliable method that minimizes the morbidity of urethral stricture resection. The advantages include a lower recurrence rate and shorter operative time compared to the cold-knife technique. PMID:26872076

  2. A new technique for the obliterative urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianguo; Wang, Kexiao; Ye, Yuanping; Hao, Zongyao; Zhou, Jun; Fan, Song; Shi, Haoqiang; Liang, Chaozhao

    2013-01-01

    There have been a troublesome problem to treat with obliterative urethral strictures, the challenge is how to reduce wound of surgery and improve therapeutic success rates. In this study, we reported single-hospital institution case-series including 97 patients with obliterative urethral strictures were enrolled with “three lines lie within one imaginary plane (TLLWOIP)” to treat with patients with the obliterative urethral strictures. Perioperative variables and success rates were evaluated. Urinary flow rate, residual urine (RU) volume and quality-of-life score (QoLs) of patients were analyzed. In the obliterative urethral strictures, postoperative maximum urinary flow rate was 24.36±10.69 ml, and postoperative RU volume and QoLs outcomes were significantly lower than preoperative outcomes with TLLWOIP. A total of success rate was 62.9% with TLLWOIP. Our results suggested that it was ideal candidates for initial treatment with TLLWOIP for the obliterative urethral strictures. PMID:24294387

  3. The morbidity of urethral stricture disease among male Medicare beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To date, the morbidity of urethral stricture disease among American men has not been analyzed using national datasets. We sought to analyze the morbidity of urethral stricture disease by measuring the rates of urinary tract infections and urinary incontinence among men with a diagnosis of urethral stricture. Methods We analyzed Medicare claims data for 1992, 1995, 1998, and 2001 to estimate the rate of dual diagnoses of urethral stricture with urinary tract infection and with urinary incontinence occurring in the same year among a 5% sample of beneficiaries. Male Medicare beneficiaries receiving co-incident ICD-9 codes indicating diagnoses of urethral stricture and either urinary tract infection or urinary incontinence within the same year were counted. Results The percentage of male patients with a diagnosis of urethral stricture who also were diagnosed with a urinary tract infection was 42% in 2001, an increase from 35% in 1992. Eleven percent of male Medicare beneficiaries with urethral stricture disease in 2001 were diagnosed with urinary incontinence in the same year. This represents an increase from 8% in 1992. Conclusions Among male Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with urethral stricture disease in 2001, 42% were also diagnosed with a urinary tract infection, and 11% with incontinence. Although the overall incidence of stricture disease decreased over this time period, these rates of dual diagnoses increased from 1992 to 2001. Our findings shed light into the health burden of stricture disease on American men. In order to decrease the morbidity of stricture disease, early definitive management of strictures is warranted. PMID:20167087

  4. Complex posterior urethral injury

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sanjay B.; Joshi, Pankaj M.; Hunter, Craig; Surana, Sandesh; Shahrour, Walid; Alhajeri, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess treatment strategies for seven different scenarios for treating complex pelvic fracture urethral injury (PFUI), categorised as repeat surgery for PFUI, ischaemic bulbar urethral necrosis (BUN), repair in boys and girls aged ⩽12 years, in patients with a recto-urethral fistula, or bladder neck incontinence, or with a double block at the bulbomembranous urethra and bladder neck/prostate region. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed the success rates and surgical procedures of these seven complex scenarios in the repair of PFUI at our institution from 2000 to 2013. Results In all, >550 PFUI procedures were performed at our centre, and 308 of these patients were classified as having a complex PFUI, with 225 patients available for follow-up. The overall success rates were 81% and 77% for primary and repeat procedures respectively. The overall success rate of those with BUN was 76%, using various methods of novel surgical techniques. Boys aged ⩽12 years with PFUI required a transpubic/abdominal approach 31% of the time, compared to 9% in adults. Young girls with PFUI also required a transpubic/abdominal urethroplasty, with a success rate of 66%. In patients with a recto-urethral fistula the success rate was 90% with attention to proper surgical principles, including a three-stage procedure and appropriate interposition. The treatment of bladder neck incontinence associated with the tear-drop deformity gave a continence rate of 66%. Children with a double block at the bulbomembranous urethra and at the bladder neck-prostate junction were all continent after a one-stage transpubic/abdominal procedure. Conclusion An understanding of complex pelvic fractures and their appropriate management can provide successful outcomes. PMID:26019978

  5. Urethral strictures after radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dal Pra, Alan; Furrer, Marc; Thalmann, George; Spahn, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stricture after radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer is a delicate problem as the decreased availability of tissue healing and the close relation to the sphincter complicates any surgical approach. We here review the pathophysiology, dosimetry, and the disease specific aspects of urethral strictures after radiotherapy. Moreover we discuss different treatment option such as direct vision internal urethrotomy as well as techniques for open reconstruction with and without tissue transfer.

  6. [Alternative endourologic methods for treatment of urethral stricture].

    PubMed

    Niesel, T; Moore, R G; Hofmann, R; Kavoussi, L R

    1998-01-01

    Advances in endoscopic instrumentation and techniques offer new alternatives for safe and effective treatment of urethral strictures. Visual internal urethrotomy, the standard treatment modality, is associated with new scar formation with stricture recurrence. This experience has led to the investigation of alternative techniques which would avoid or ameliorate this result. This article reviews the current literature and discusses these newer approaches, including balloon dilatation, laser urethrotomy, endoscopic urethroplasty, "cut to the light" and "core through" procedures, and urethral wallstent implantation. PMID:9540185

  7. Urethral strictures after radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Moltzahn, Felix; Dal Pra, Alan; Furrer, Marc; Thalmann, George; Spahn, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Urethral stricture after radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer is a delicate problem as the decreased availability of tissue healing and the close relation to the sphincter complicates any surgical approach. We here review the pathophysiology, dosimetry, and the disease specific aspects of urethral strictures after radiotherapy. Moreover we discuss different treatment option such as direct vision internal urethrotomy as well as techniques for open reconstruction with and without tissue transfer. PMID:27617311

  8. Management of the stricture of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shrawan K.; Agrawal, Santosh K.; Mavuduru, Ravimohan S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Management of distal anterior urethral stricture is a common problem faced by practicing urologists. Literature on urethral stricture mainly pertains to bulbar urethral stricture and pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect. The present article aims to review the management of the strictures of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethra. Materials and Methods: The literature in English language was searched from the National Library of Medicine database, using the appropriate key words for the period 1985-2010. Out of 475 articles, 115 were selected for the review based on their relevance to the topic. Results: Etiology of stricture is shifting from infective to inflammatory and iatrogenic causes. Stricture of fossa navicularis is most often caused by lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and instrumentation. Direct visual internal urethrotomy is limited to selected cases in the management of pendulous urethral stricture. With experience and identification of various prognostic factors, conservative management by dilatation and internal urethrotomy is being replaced by various reconstructive procedures, using skin flaps and grafts with high success rates. Single-stage urethroplasty is preferred over the 2-stage procedure as the latter disfigures the penis and poses sexual problems temporarily. Conclusions: Flaps or grafts are useful for single-stage reconstruction of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures. The buccal and lingual mucosa serves as a preferred resource material for providing the inner lining of the urethra. Off-the-shelf materials, such as acellular collagen matrix, are promising. PMID:22022062

  9. Approach to bulbar urethral strictures: Which technique and when?

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pankaj; Kaya, Cevdet; Kulkarni, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Bulbar urethra is the most common site of anterior urethral stricture and this stricture develops secondary to idiopathic (40%), iatrogenic (35%), inflammatory (10%), and traumatic (15%) causes. Various techniques and approaches with buccal mucosal graft have been described. We wanted to describe different techniques of repair with specific advantages. PMID:27274887

  10. On Demand Urethral Dilatation Versus Intermittent Urethral Dilatation: Results and Complications in Women With Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Fatemeh; Abbaszadeh, Shahin; Ghadian, Alireza; Tehrani Kia, Farahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background: The treatment of urethral stricture in female patients is through dilatation of the urethra by tubes of increasing diameter. There are two main methods: intermittent dilatation and on demand dilatation. Objectives: The main aim of this study was to compare the results of these two methods, and to determine the best one. Patients and Methods: In this clinical trial study, we reviewed the documents of women diagnosed with urethral stricture, who came to the Baqiyatallah Clinic from 2007 and 2012. According to the method of dilatation, the patients were divided into two groups: intermittent dilatation and on demand dilatation. Patients’ data were then collected and analyzed. Results: Eighty-six patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age of the participants was 48.13 years (between 44 and 79 years). The mean urinary residual and maximum urinary flow speed changes, before and after on demand dilatation, were higher than in the intermittent method. Conclusions: For treating urethral stricture, on demand urethral dilatation is more effective than intermittent dilatation. PMID:24783171

  11. Outcome of urethral strictures treated by endoscopic urethrotomy and urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tinaut-Ranera, Javier; Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Ángel; Merino-Salas, Sergio; Nogueras-Ocaña, Mercedes; López-León, Víctor Manuel; Palao-Yago, Francisco; Arrabal-Martín, Miguel; Lahoz-García, Clara; Alaminos, Miguel; Zuluaga-Gomez, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We analyze the outcomes of patients with urethral stricture who underwent surgical treatment within the past 5 years. Methods: This is a retrospective study of male patients who underwent surgery for urethral stricture at our service from January 2008 to June 2012. We analyzed the comorbidities, type, length and location of the stricture and the surgical treatment outcome after endoscopic urethrotomy, urethroplasty or both. Results: In total, 45 patients with a mean age of 53.7 ± 16.7 years underwent surgical treatment for urethral stricture. Six months after surgery, 46.7% of the patients had a maximum urinary flow greater than 15 mL/s, whereas 87.3% of the patients exhibited no stricture by urethrography after the treatment. The success rate in the patients undergoing urethrotomy was 47.8% versus 86.4% in those undergoing urethroplasty (p = 0.01). Twenty percent of the patients in whom the initial urethrotomy had failed subsequently underwent urethroplasty, thereby increasing the treatment success. Conclusion: In most cases, the treatment of choice for urethral stricture should be urethroplasty. Previous treatment with urethrotomy does not appear to produce adverse effects that affect the outcome of a urethroplasty if urethrotomy failed, so urethrotomy may be indicated in patients with short strictures or in patients at high surgical risk. PMID:24454595

  12. Cryptorchidism in boys with posterior urethral valves.

    PubMed

    Krueger, R P; Hardy, B E; Churchill, B M

    1980-07-01

    A review of 207 male children with poterior urethral valves revealed an over-all incidence of cryptorchidism of 12 per cent. This association of cryptorchidism in boys with posterior urethral valves has not been described previously. PMID:6106069

  13. Evaluation and management of anterior urethral stricture disease

    PubMed Central

    Mangera, Altaf; Osman, Nadir; Chapple, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stricture disease affects many men worldwide. Traditionally, the investigation of choice has been urethrography and the management of choice has been urethrotomy/dilatation. In this review, we discuss the evidence behind the use of ultrasonography in stricture assessment. We also discuss the factors a surgeon should consider when deciding the management options with each individual patient. Not all strictures are identical and surgeons should appreciate the poor long-term results of urethrotomy/dilatation for strictures longer than 2 cm, strictures in the penile urethra, recurrent strictures, and strictures secondary to lichen sclerosus. These patients may benefit from primary urethroplasty if they have many adverse features or secondary urethroplasty after the first recurrence. PMID:26918169

  14. SIU/ICUD Consultation on Urethral Strictures: Dilation, internal urethrotomy, and stenting of male anterior urethral strictures.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Jill C; Heyns, Chris; Gilling, Peter; Carney, Jeff

    2014-03-01

    Male urethral stricture is one of the oldest known urologic diseases, and continues to be a common and challenging urologic condition. Our objective was to review all contemporary and historial articles on the topic of dilation, internal urethrotomy, and stenting of male anterior urethral strictures. An extensive review of the scientific literature concerning anterior urethral urethrotomy/dilation/stenting was performed. Articles were included that met the criteria set by the International Consultation on Urological Diseases (ICUD) urethral strictures committee and were classified by level of evidence using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine criteria adapted from the work of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research as modified for use in previous ICUD projects. Using criteria set forth by the ICUD, a committee of international experts in urethral stricture disease reviewed the literature and created a consensus statement incorporating levels of evidence and expert opinion in regard to dilation, internal urethrotomy, and stenting of male anterior urethral strictures. PMID:24286602

  15. Use of overlapping buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty for complex anterior urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Complex anterior urethral stricture disease typically manifests as a symptomatic, severely narrowed, long stricture (or multiple strictures) in which conventional excision and/or augmentation is not feasible. Overlapping buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty (OBMGU) is an innovative hybrid technique, combining the well-established principles of dorsal and ventral graft augmentation to allow single stage reconstruction of complex anterior urethral strictures. In this review, we discuss the rationale, techniques, and outcomes of OBMGU for complex anterior urethral strictures. PMID:26813234

  16. Balanitis xerotica obliterans with urethral stricture after hypospadias repair.

    PubMed

    Uemura, S; Hutson, J M; Woodward, A A; Kelly, J H; Chow, C W

    2000-01-01

    Three cases of urethral stricture due to balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO) after hypospadias repair are reported. The first patient showed white, dense scarring on the prepuce before the hypospadias repair and developed a stricture of the urethra after the operation. The second and the third were uneventful for 6 and 2 years, respectively, after the hypospadias repair, and then developed urethral strictures. Pathologic diagnosis of the stenotic lesion is essential. Complete excision of the affected urethra with topical steroid ointment or sublesional triamcinolone injection is recommended for this condition. Although the complication of BXO after hypospadias repair is rare (3 out of 796 cases with hypospadias in our series), surgeons need to be aware of this condition as a cause for late onset of urethral problems. PMID:10663869

  17. Plastic end-to-end treatment of bulbar urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Amir; Behrendt, Wolf; Tietze, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    For bulbar urethral strictures up to 2.5 cm in length, the one-stage urethral plastic surgery with stricture excision and direct end-to-end anastomosis remains the best procedure to guarantee a high success rate. This retrospective review shows the results of 21 patients who underwent bulbar end-to-end anastomosis from 2010–2013. In 20 cases (95.3%) good results were archived. The criteria of success were identified by pre- and postoperative radiological diagnostics and uroflowmetry. PMID:26504704

  18. Case report: "Management of urethral stricture with Uttara Basti".

    PubMed

    Dudhamal, T S; Gupta, S K; Bhuyan, C

    2010-10-01

    A case of stricture of membranous urethra was treated with medicated oil used as Uttara Basti (administration of medicated oil through urethra) once daily for seven consecutive days. The treatment was repeated at a monthly interval for two months. The patient obtained remarkable improvement in his condition. This case highlights the fact that it is possible to treat the cases of urethral stricture with Uttara Basti. PMID:22557426

  19. An Unexpected Course after Simultaneous Urethral Repair and Reimplantation of Penile Prosthesis in a Patient with a Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yu Seob; Ko, Oh Seok; Zhang, Li Tao; Zhao, Chen

    2014-01-01

    We experienced the growth of urethral hair along the urethral stricture six years after simultaneous urethral repair and reimplantation of penile prosthesis (RPP) in a patient with a urethral stricture. We detected hair in the urethra with a stricture on the bulbous urethra. Further, we performed hair removal by using a pair of cystoscopic forceps and internal urethrotomy. Then, we performed RPP, and the patient voided well; the prosthesis worked very well and without any complications. One-stage urethroplasty with a pedicle island of the penile skin and RPP in a simultaneous stage may be an option for treating the long-segment urethral stricture in the penile prosthesis patient. However, we should pay attention to the urethral hair growth that can occur after urethral repair performed using a skin graft. PMID:25606569

  20. [Long-term results of endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures].

    PubMed

    Martov, A G; Ergakov, D V; Saliukov, R V; Fakhredinov, G A

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was assessment of efficacy of internal urethrotomies made in Research Institute of Urology and city urological hospital N 47. A total of 802 endoscopic operations were performed in 644 male patients aged from 16 to 89 years (mean age 58.6 years) with urethral stricture in 1994-2004. Internal optic urethrotomy was made in 733 cases with a cold knife, in 52--with electric knife and in 17 cases--with laser. Endoscopic urethral resection was conducted in 47 cases. The strictures (0.5-8 cm long, mean 1.4 cm) located most frequently in the bulbous urethra (n=426, 66.1%). Short-term results (12 months) of endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures showed that efficacy of the primary internal urethrotomy conducted according to the authors' technique reached 80.4%. Endoscopic reoperations (from 1 to 6) were performed in 98 (19.6%) patients. A complete rehabilitation (follow-up 9 years maximum) including stenting was achieved in 95.1% patients. In 32 (4.9%) patients endoscopic and rehabilitation measures failed to bring about satisfactory clinical outcomes. These patients were treated with open urethroplasty. Thus, internal optic urethrotomy is an effective therapeutic method. After primary urethrotomy recurrences of the strictures to be reoperated reach 19.6%. These can be successfully managed by endoscopic reoperations and rehabilitation measures. PMID:18254221

  1. The effect of urethral stricture on male fertility in Ife.

    PubMed

    Badejo, O A

    1990-01-01

    Twenty patients with Urethral stricture disease presenting with difficulty in micturition, azoospermia, and oligospermia were studied. Only 5% of our patients could firmly claim to be fertile at the time of presentation with a rise to 80% fertility rate at the end of management. Fifteen percent did not notice any change in their status. Surgical approach claimed better result over conservative management because of other complications following gonococcal infections. The need for a close forensic analysis in the determination of paternity in all cases of Urethral strictures was stressed while a treatment protocol of graft urethroplasty in all cases of traumatic rupture and dilatation in cases following inflammatory lesions of the urethra was established. PMID:2090990

  2. Dorsolateral onlay urethroplasty for pan anterior urethral stricture by a unilateral urethral mobilisation approach

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Ranjit; Jain, Nidhi; Singh, Kulwant; Bisoniya, Hari Singh; Chaudhary, Rahul; Biswas, Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    The preferred management of urethral strictures involving long segments of anterior urethra is dorsal onlay buccal mucosa augmentation urethroplasty. This requires circumferential mobilisation of the urethra, which might cause ischaemia of the urethra in addition to chordee. The authors managed a pan anterior urethral stricture, applying a dorsolateral free graft by unilateral urethral mobilisation through a perineal approach. This is a recently described surgical technique which preserves the lateral vascular supply on one side thereby minimising ischaemia. Since circumferential mobilisation of urethra is not carried out in this technique, there are no chances of developing a chordee. Entire procedure is carried out by a perineal incision and no incision is made on the penis except for meatotomy. The pendulous urethra is accessed by penile eversion through the perineal wound. Obviating penile incisions minimises chances of wound infection and fistula formation. PMID:22689855

  3. Alternative endoscopic management in the treatment of urethral strictures.

    PubMed

    Niesel, T; Moore, R G; Alfert, H J; Kavoussi, L R

    1995-02-01

    Advances in endoscopic instrumentation and techniques have expanded our armamentarium for safe and effective treatment of urethral strictures. Endoscopic incision or dilation should remain the preferred treatment for uncomplicated primary strictures. Balloon dilation can be useful in the treatment of dense strictures. Incision using laser energy has yet to provide better results than procedures employing a cold knife. As such, it would be difficult to justify the added expense of laser urethrotomy. Endoscopic placement of free skin grafts into the bed of the urethra after transurethral resection or deep incision of the stricture is a novel approach that has shown a great deal of promise. Endourethroplasty is a reasonable alternative to open urethroplasty when treating long strictures, as more than 90% of the reported patients have had a successful outcome with no recurrence. However, larger experience with this procedure is necessary to verify its efficacy and for greater acceptance. The placement of indwelling stents is another new promising treatment option. Overall short-term success rates range from 75% to 100%, but the follow-up period is short, and little is known about the long-term risks of an indwelling foreign body in the urethra. Endoscopic incision via "cut-to-the-light" or "core-through" procedures is an excellent alternative in patients with obliterative strictures. Data from several centers reveal that the majority of patients gain relief of obstruction while maintaining continence and erectile potency. However, at least 25% of these patients will need further endoscopic management to maintain urethral patency. PMID:7780428

  4. In-vivo laser induced urethral stricture animal model for investigating the potential of LDR-brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Lellig, Katja; Bader, Markus; Stief, Christian; Weidlich, Patrick; Wechsel, G.; Assmann, Walter; Becker, R.; Fedorova, O.; Khoder, Wael

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Treatment of urethral strictures is a major challenge in urology. For investigation of different treatment methods an animal model was developed by reproducible induction of urethral strictures in rabbits to mimic the human clinical situation. By means of this model the potential of endoluminal LDR brachytherapy using β-irradiation as prophylaxis of recurrent urethral strictures investigated. Material and Methods: A circumferential urethral stricture was induced by energy deposition using laser light application (wavelength λ=1470 nm, 10 W, 10 s, applied energy 100 J) in the posterior urethra of anaesthetized New Zealand White male rabbits. The radial light emitting fiber was introduced by means of a children resectoscope (14F). The grade of urethral stricture was evaluated in 18 rabbits using videourethroscopy and urethrography at day 28 after stricture induction. An innovative catheter was developed based on a β-irradiation emitting foil containing 32P, which was wrapped around the application system. Two main groups (each n=18) were separated. The "internal urethrotomy group" received after 28days of stricture induction immediately after surgical urethrotomy of the stricture the radioactive catheter for one week in a randomized, controlled and blinded manner. There were 3 subgroups with 6 animals each receiving 0 Gy, 15 Gy and 30 Gy. In contrast animals from the "De Nuovo group" received directly after the stricture induction (day 0) the radioactive catheter also for the duration of one week divided into the same dose subgroups. In order to determine the radiation tolerance of the urethral mucosa, additional animals without any stricture induction received a radioactive catheter applying a total dose of 30 Gy (n=2) and 15 Gy (n=1). Cystourethrography and endoscopic examination of urethra were performed on all operation days for monitoring treatment progress. Based on these investigation a classification of the stricture size was performed and

  5. Treatment of urethral strictures with the KTP 532 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidlin, Franz R.; Oswald, Michael; Iselin, Christoph E.; Jichlinski, Patrice; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg; Graber, Peter

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the safety and efficacy of the KTP 532 laser to direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU) in the management of urethral strictures. A total of 32 patients were randomized prospectively in this study, 14 DVIU and 18 KTP 532 laser. Patients were evaluated postoperatively with flowmetry and in the case of recurrence with cystourethrography at 3, 12, 24 weeks. With the KTP 532 laser complete symptomatic and urodynamic success was achieved in 15 (83%) patients at 12 and 24 weeks. Success rate was lower in the DVIU group with 9 (64%) patients at 12 weeks and 8 (57%) patients at 24 weeks. With the KTP mean preoperative peak-flow was improved from 6 cc/s to 20 cc/s at 3, 12 and 24 weeks. With DVIU mean preoperative peak-flow was improved from 5.5 cc/s to 20 cc/s at 3 weeks followed by a steady decrease to 13 cc/s at 12 weeks and to 12 cc/s 24 weeks. No complications were observed in either group of patients. Our results confirm that stricture vaporization with the KTP 532 laser is a safe and efficient procedure. It thus represents a valuable alternative in the endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures.

  6. Balloon dilatation for male urethral strictures “revisited”

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Jigish B.; Ganpule, Arvind P.; Muthu, Veermani; Sabnis, Ravindra B.; Desai, Mahesh R.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To analyze the results of balloon dilatation for short segment male urethral strictures. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was done of 120 patients undergoing urethral balloon dilatation since January 2004 to January 2012. The inclusion criteria for analysis was a short segment (less than 1.5 cm) stricture, exclusion criteria were pediatric, long (more than 1.5 cm), traumatic, malignant strictures. The parameters analyzed included presentation of patients, ascending urethrogram (AUG) and descending urethrogram findings, pre- and postoperative International prostate symptoms score (IPSS), uroflowmetry (Qmax), and post-void residue (PVR). Need for self calibration/ancillary procedures were assessed. Failure was defined as requirement for a subsequent endoscopic or open surgery. A urethral balloon catheter (Cook Urological, Spencer, Indiana) is passed over a guide wire after on table AUG and inflated till 180 psi for 5 minutes under fluoroscopy till waist disappears. Dilatation is followed by insertion of a Foley catheter. Patients were followed up at 1, 3, and 6 months. Results: Mean age was 49.86 years. Mean follow-up was 6 (2–60) months. IPSS improved from 21.6 preoperative to 5.6 postoperatively. Qmax increased from 5.7 to 19.1 and PVR decreased from 90.2 to 28.8 (P < 0.0001*) postoperatively. At 1, 3, and at 6 monthly follow-up, 69.2% (n = 82) patients were asymptomatic. Conclusions: Balloon dilation is a safe, well-tolerated procedure with minimal complications. Further randomized studies comparing balloon dilatation with direct internal visual urethrotomy are warranted. PMID:24311903

  7. Argon laser treatment of urethral stricture and vesical neck contracture.

    PubMed

    Adkins, W C

    1988-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the argon laser wavelength allow a precise incision with excellent hemostasis and negligible heating of adjacent tissues resulting in less scarring. These qualities are used to advantage in the treatment of strictures. The argon laser was used to perform 13 internal urethrotomies and ten vesical neck incisions. The operative method used is similar to optical internal urethrotomy. The argon probe incises hemostatically, reducing the need for extensive fulguration of tissues at the operative site and thereby reducing the tendency for more scar tissue to form and compromise the operation. The same hemostasis reduces the need for postoperative indwelling urethral catheterization. Utility of the argon device in most instances allows treatment to be conducted on an outpatient basis without general anesthesia and without use of postoperative urethral catheters, yielding an effective, cost-saving therapy. PMID:3210887

  8. Urethral Strictures and Stenoses Caused by Prostate Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mang L; Correa, Andres F; Santucci, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia is on the rise. As a result, the volume of prostate treatment and treatment-related complications is also increasing. Urethral strictures and stenoses are relatively common complications that require individualized management based on the length and location of the obstruction, and the patient's overall health, and goals of care. In general, less invasive options such as dilation and urethrotomy are preferred as first-line therapy, followed by more invasive substitution, flap, and anastomotic urethroplasty. PMID:27601967

  9. Urethral Strictures and Stenoses Caused by Prostate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mang L.; Correa, Andres F.; Santucci, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia is on the rise. As a result, the volume of prostate treatment and treatment-related complications is also increasing. Urethral strictures and stenoses are relatively common complications that require individualized management based on the length and location of the obstruction, and the patient’s overall health, and goals of care. In general, less invasive options such as dilation and urethrotomy are preferred as first-line therapy, followed by more invasive substitution, flap, and anastomotic urethroplasty. PMID:27601967

  10. Treatment of benign urethral strictures using a sapphire tipped neodymium:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A

    1989-11-01

    Sapphire tips increase the energy density and cutting effect of a neodymium:YAG laser. Sapphire tipped neodymium:YAG laser fibers were used to perform urethrotomy in 24 men with benign urethral strictures. The cutting effect was inadequate in 10 patients. Of the 24 patients 16 (67%) had a recurrent stricture within 1 year. Sapphire tipped neodymium:YAG laser fibers offer no apparent advantage over cold knife urethrotomy for treatment of benign urethral strictures. PMID:2810498

  11. Anterior urethral valve associated with posterior urethral valves.

    PubMed

    Kajbafzadeh, A M; Jangouk, P; Ahmadi Yazdi, C

    2005-12-01

    The association of anterior urethral valve (AUV) with posterior urethral valve (PUV) is rare. A 7-month-old infant was presented at a district hospital with episodes of acute pyelonephritis. He was treated medically and a voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) confirmed bilateral vesico-urethral reflux. The presence of concomitant AUV and PUV was not recognized. He underwent several surgical procedures, which failed. He had reflux recurrence following two antireflux procedures. He had urinary retention after each operation, which was managed by vesicostomy and perineal urethrostomy. At the age of 3.5 years, he was referred to our paediatric urology clinic. Noticing the AUV and PUV in the past VCUG, the valves were fulgurated. Urodynamic study before and 3 months after valve ablation showed a high voiding pressure. VCUG 6 months following ablation showed no reflux, but several uroflowmetric studies showed a staccato and interrupted pattern. Empirical treatment with an alpha-blocker was started. One year after treatment, a repeat VCUG showed no reflux. Uroflowmetry and urodynamic studies returned to normal. The perineal urethrostomy was closed. The child was asymptomatic after 9 months of follow up. PMID:18947585

  12. Orandi flap for penile urethral stricture: Polishing the gold standard

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Apul; Kumar, Manoj; Singh, Manmeet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We describe the combined use of the Orandi flap and the scrotal skin advancement flap to reduce complications for pendulous urethral stricture in men >40 years old. Methods: Over the last 40 months, 10 men underwent urethroplasty for pendulous stricture by the modified Orandi urethroplasty. In this, additionally, a midline hairless scrotal skin flap of the size of the ventral skin defect on the pendulous portion was raised based on the dartos fascia. This flap was mobilized so that it reached the pendulous portion without tension and covered the penile defect. The catheter was removed after 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 3 months using uroflowmetry and the American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score. Results: The mean age was 55.5. Of the 10 patients, the etiology was post-catheterization in 5 and idiopathic in the remaining 5. Three men also had stricture extending into the bulbous urethra (repaired using buccal graft). The mean additional time needed for the flap coverage was 36.2 minutes (range: 30–45). The median follow-up was 12 months (range: 3–40). The mean postoperative symptom score was 5.2 and the mean flow rate was 20.1 mL/sec. In 2 men, the meatus got retracted to the distal penile part (probably due to downward traction by scrotal skin). No patient complained of disfigurement. Two men reported recurrence (1 each in bulbous and penile urethra). The limitations are small number of patients and the observational nature of this study. Conclusions: The intermediate-term results show that the modified Orandi urethroplasty is an acceptable treatment option with acceptable cosmetic results. PMID:26085873

  13. Application of endoscopic Ho:YAG laser incision technique treating urethral strictures and urethral atresias in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Futao, Sun; Wentong, Zhang; Yan, Zhuang; Qingyu, Dong; Aiwu, Li

    2006-06-01

    Endoscopic holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser incision is a new method applied in pediatric urology recent years. To evaluate its therapeutic efficacy on treating the pediatric patients with urethral strictures and urethral atresias, a retrospective study was performed from June 2001 to July 2005 in a total of 28 pediatric patients who underwent endoscopic internal urethrotomy using Ho:YAG laser in our center. In these patients, 25 had urethral strictures and 3 urethral atresias. Follow-up was done ranging from 2 months to 4 years to assess the treatment. Of the 28 patients, 25 (89.3%) have achieved satisfied result without complications following initial incisions. Two patients with urethral atresias and another with long lesion of stricture (> 2 cm) have postoperative stenosis (10.7%). Among the three reoccurred patients, two were successfully reoperated by Ho:YAG laser and open end-to-end anastomosis, respectively. One patient failed to follow-up. With the advantages of safety, efficacy and minimal invasion, endoscopic Ho:YAG laser incision technique could be used as a primary treatment in urethral stricture patients and is worthy to be popularized further in pediatric surgery. PMID:16736220

  14. Early Experience With a Thermo-Expandable Stent (Memokath) for the Management of Recurrent Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Su; Kim, Joon Woo; Lee, Jun Nyung; Kim, Hyun Tae; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report our early experience with thermo-expandable urethral stents (Memokath) for the management of recurrent urethral stricture and to assess the efficacy of urethral stents. Materials and Methods Between March 2012 and February 2013, 13 patients with recurrent urethral stricture after several attempts with direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVIU) or failed urethroplasty underwent DVIU with thermally expandable, nickel-titanium alloy urethral stent (Memokath) insertion. Follow-up study time points were at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after stent insertion. Follow-up evaluation included uroflowmetry, retrograde urethrogram, plain radiography, and urinalysis. Results The mean patient age was 47.7 years (range, 18 to 74 years). The mean urethral stricture length was 5.54 cm (range, 1 to 12 cm). There were six patients with bulbar, four patients with proximal penile, one patient with distal penile, and two patients with whole penile urethral strictures, respectively. The overall success rate was 69% (9/13) and the mean postoperative peak flow rate was 17.7 mL/s (range, 6 to 28 mL/s). Major complications occurred in four patients including one patient (7.7%) with urethrocutaneous fistula induced by the stent and three patients with urethral hyperplasia. The mean follow-up duration was 8.4 months. Conclusions Our initial clinical experience indicates that thermo-expandable stents can be another temporary management option for recurrent urethral stricture patients who are unfit for or refuse urethroplasty. Distal or whole penile urethral stricture can be factors predicting poor results. PMID:24363867

  15. The long-term results of temporary urethral stent placement for the treatment of recurrent bulbar urethral stricture disease

    PubMed Central

    Temeltas, Gokhan; Ucer, Oktay; Yuksel, Mehmet Bilgehan; Gumus, Bilal; Tatli, Volkan; Muezzinoglu, Talha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To evaluate the long term outcomes of temporary urethral stent placement for the treatment of recurrent bulbar urethral stricture. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight patients who underwent temporary polymer coated urethral stent placement due to recurrent bulbar urethral stricture between 2010 and 2014 were enrolled in the study. The long term outcomes of the patients were analyzed. Results: The mean age of the patients was 62.3±6.4 (44–81). The overall clinical success was achieved in 18 (64.2%) of the 28 patients at a median (range) follow-up of 29 (7–46) months. No patient reported discomfort at the stent site. Stone formation was observed at the urethral stent implantation area only in one patient. Stenosis occurred in the distal end of the stents in two patients and took place in bulbar urethra in seven patients after removed the stents. The mean maximum urine flow rates were 6.24±2.81mL/sec and 19.12±4.31mL/sec before and at 3 months after the procedure, respectively. Conclusion: In this study, the success rate of temporary urethral stent placement has remained at 64.2% at a median follow-up of 29 months. Therefore, our outcomes have not achieved desired success rate for the standard treatment of recurrent bulbar urethral stricture. PMID:27256191

  16. Bulbar urethral stricture: How to optimise the use of buccal mucosal grafts.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jonathan N; Wisenbaugh, Eric S; Martins, Francisco E

    2016-06-01

    The use of buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty (BMGU) for bulbar urethral strictures has gained widespread popularity since the first report in 1996. Over the last two decades, there have been many modifications in the surgical technique. This, along with better understanding of urethral anatomy, has allowed the BMG to become the 'gold standard' in urethral substitution. The present article reviews the evolution and techniques of BMGU in order to answer the question - how do we optimise the use of BMGs? PMID:27489734

  17. The Use of Flaps and Grafts in the Treatment of Urethral Stricture Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wisenbaugh, Eric S.; Gelman, Joel

    2015-01-01

    The use of various grafts and flaps plays a critical role in the successful surgical management of urethral stricture disease. A thorough comprehension of relevant anatomy and principles of tissue transfer techniques are essential to understanding the appropriate use of grafts or flaps to optimize outcomes. We briefly review these principles and discuss which technique may be best suited for a given anterior urethral stricture, depending on the location and length of the stricture, the presence or absence of an intact corpus spongiosum, and the availability of adequate and healthy penile skin. PMID:26664357

  18. Use of an aortic stent graft extension for the treatment of urethral stricture in a dog.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jae Hyun; Kwon, Yong Hwan; Jung, Ye Chan; Jung, Ji Mo; Lee, Hae Beom; Lee, Ki Chang; Kim, Nam Soo; Kim, Min-Su

    2013-10-01

    A 2-year-old male mixed dog was referred to us for further evaluation and treatment of a 4-week-history of oliguria and abdominal distension after a surgical repair of urethral injury. To relieve the urethral stricture, we placed a self-expanding aortic stent graft extension with a partial coverage with an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE). After the placement of the stent, the dog presented with a normal urinary voiding, despite the presence of urinary incontinence. The current case indicates that the ePTFE-covered, self-expanding ASGE is an effective intervention for the treatment of severe urethral stricture in the dog. PMID:23676211

  19. Erbium:YAG laser incision of urethral strictures: early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, John A.; Riemer, Jennifer D.; Hayes, Gary B.; Negus, Dan; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2007-02-01

    Two cases involving Erbium:YAG laser incision of proximal bulbar urethral strictures are described. Erbium:YAG laser radiation with a wavelength of 2.94 μm, pulse energy of 10 mJ, and a pulse repetition rate of 15 Hz, was delivered through a 2-m-long, 250-μm-core sapphire optical fiber in contact with tissue. Total laser irradiation time was 5 min. The first patient suffering from a virgin urethral stricture was treated and is stricture-free. The second patient suffering from a recurrent urethral stricture required further treatment. This case report describes the first clinical application of the Er:YAG laser in urology.

  20. Management for Prostate Cancer Treatment Related Posterior Urethral and Bladder Neck Stenosis With Stents

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Bradley A.; McAninch, Jack W.; Eisenberg, Michael L.; Washington, Samuel L.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Prostate cancer treatment has the potential to lead to posterior urethral stricture. These strictures are sometimes recalcitrant to dilation and urethrotomy alone. We present our experience with the Urolume® stent for prostate cancer treatment related stricture. Materials and Methods A total of 38 men with posterior urethral stricture secondary to prostate cancer treatment were treated with Urolume stenting. Stents were placed in all men after aggressive urethrotomy over the entire stricture. A successfully managed stricture was defined as open and stable for greater than 6 months after any necessary secondary procedures. Results The initial success rate was 47%. After a total of 31 secondary procedures in 19 men, including additional stent placement in 8 (18%), the final success rate was 89% at a mean ± SD followup of 2.3 ± 2.5 years. Four cases (11%) in which treatment failed ultimately requiring urinary diversion (3) or salvage prostatectomy (1). Incontinence was noted in 30 men (82%), of whom 19 (63%) received an artificial urinary sphincter a mean of 7.2 ± 2.4 months after the stent. Subanalysis revealed that irradiated men had longer strictures (3.6 vs 2.0 cm, p = 0.003) and a higher post-stent incontinence rate (96% vs 50%, p <0.001) than men who underwent prostatectomy alone but the initial failure rate was similar (54% vs 50%, p = 0.4). Conclusions Urolume stenting is a reasonable option for severe post-prostate cancer treatment stricture when patients are unwilling or unable to undergo open reconstructive surgery. Incontinence should be expected. The need for additional procedures is common and in some men may be required periodically for the lifetime of the stent. PMID:21074796

  1. Dorsal inlay buccal mucosal graft (Asopa) urethroplasty for anterior urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Stephen D.; Raup, Valary T.

    2015-01-01

    Asopa described the inlay of a graft into Snodgrass’s longitudinal urethral plate incision using a ventral sagittal urethrotomy approach in 2001. He claimed that this technique was easier to perform and led to less tissue ischemia due to no need for mobilization of the urethra. This approach has subsequently been popularized among reconstructive urologists as the dorsal inlay urethroplasty or Asopa technique. Depending on the location of the stricture, either a subcoronal circumferential incision is made for penile strictures, or a midline perineal incision is made for bulbar strictures. Other approaches for penile urethral strictures include the non-circumferential penile incisional approach and a penoscrotal approach. We generally prefer the circumferential degloving approach for penile urethral strictures. The penis is de-gloved and the urethra is split ventrally to exposure the stricture. It is then deepened to include the full thickness of the dorsal urethra. The dorsal surface is made raw and grafts are fixed on the urethral surface. Quilting sutures are placed to further anchor the graft. A Foley catheter is placed and the urethra is retubularized in two layers with special attention to the staggering of suture lines. The skin incision is then closed in layers. We have found that it is best to perform an Asopa urethroplasty when the urethral plate is ≥1 cm in width. The key to when to use the dorsal inlay technique all depends on the width of the urethral plate once the urethrotomy is performed, stricture etiology, and stricture location (penile vs. bulb). PMID:26816804

  2. Evaluation of early endoscopic realignment of post-traumatic complete posterior urethral rupture

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsalam, Yaser M; Abdalla, Medhat A; Safwat, Ahmad S; ElGanainy, Ehab O

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: to report our experience with 41 patients treated by early endoscopic realignment of complete post-traumatic rupture urethra. Materials and Methods: The study includes patients presented to our institute, between May 2004 and April 2009, with post-traumatic complete posterior urethral disruption. Preoperative retrograde urethrography, voiding cystourethrography and abdominopelvic CT were performed to evaluate the urethral defect length, the bladder neck competence, the prostate position, and the extent of the pelvic hematoma. Within the first week after trauma, antegrade and retrograde urethroscopy were performed to identify both urethral ends and insert urethral catheter. Patients were followed up by pericatheter retrograde urethrogram monthly postoperatively till catheter removal on disappearance of extravasation. Retrograde urethrography, voiding cystourethrography and urethroscopy were performed 1 month after the removal of the catheter. Follow-up abdominal ultrasound and uroflowmetry monthly till 6 months, bimonthly till 1 year, and every 3 months thereafter were encouraged. Urinary continence and postoperative erectile dysfunction were assessed by direct patient interview. Results: Forty one patients in the age group 17-61 years (mean 37.9) were treated. Patients were followed up for Conclusions: Early endoscopic realignment for complete posterior urethral rupture is a feasible technique with no or minimal intraoperative complications. The technique is successful as the definitive line of therapy in reasonable number of patients and seems to render further future interventions for inevitable urethral stricture easier. PMID:24082438

  3. Unusual Giant Prostatic Urethral Calculus

    PubMed Central

    Bello, A.; Maitama, H. Y.; Mbibu, N. H.; Kalayi, G. D.; Ahmed, A.

    2010-01-01

    Giant vesico-prostatic urethral calculus is uncommon. Urethral stones rarely form primarily in the urethra, and they are usually associated with urethral strictures, posterior urethral valve or diverticula. We report a case of a 32-year-old man with giant vesico-prostatic (collar-stud) urethral stone presenting with sepsis and bladder outlet obstruction. The clinical presentation, management, and outcome of the giant prostatic urethral calculus are reviewed. PMID:22091328

  4. Challenges in the Diagnosis and Management of Acquired Nontraumatic Urethral Strictures in Boys in Yaoundé, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Mouafo Tambo, F. F.; Fossi kamga, G.; Kamadjou, C.; Mbouche, L.; Nwaha Makon, A. S.; Birraux, J.; Andze, O. G.; Angwafo, F. F.; Mure, P. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Urethral strictures in boys denote narrowing of the urethra which can be congenital or acquired. In case of acquired strictures, the etiology is iatrogenic or traumatic and rarely infectious or inflammatory. The aim of this study was to highlight the diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of acquired nontraumatic urethral strictures in boys in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Methodology. The authors report five cases of nontraumatic urethral strictures managed at the Pediatric Surgery Department of the YGOPH over a two-year period (November 2012–November 2014). In order to confirm the diagnosis of urethral stricture, all patients were assessed with both cystourethrography and urethrocystoscopy. Results. In all the cases the urethra was inflammatory with either a single or multiple strictures. The surgical management included internal urethrotomy (n = 1), urethral dilatation (n = 1), vesicostomy (n = 2), and urethral catheterization (n = 3). With a median follow-up of 8.2 months (4–16 months) all patients remained symptoms-free. Conclusion. The authors report the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis and management of nontraumatic urethral strictures in boys at a tertiary hospital in Yaoundé, Cameroon. The existence of an inflammatory etiology of urethral strictures in boys deserves to be considered. PMID:27239364

  5. Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (Xiaflex) for the Treatment of Urethral Stricture Disease in a Rat Model of Urethral Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sangkum, Premsant; Yafi, Faysal A.; Kim, Hogyoung; Bouljihad, Mostafa; Ranjan, Manish; Datta, Amrita; Mandava, Sree Harsha; Sikka, Suresh C.; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B.; Moparty, Krishnarao; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the treatment effect of collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) in a rat model of urethral fibrosis. Materials and Methods Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were divided into 5 groups. The rat urethra was injected with normal saline in the sham group and, in the other 4 groups, the rat urethra was injected with 10 μg of transforming growth factor beta 1 to create fibrosis of the urethra. Two weeks following transforming growth factor beta 1 injection, the rats were injected with varying doses of CCH or vehicles, depending on their group. The rats were then euthanized at 4 weeks after CCH or vehicle injection. Urethral tissue was harvested for histologic and molecular analyses. Type I and III collagen levels were evaluated by Western blot analysis. Results There was urethral fibrosis and to significant increase in collagen type I and III expressions in the urethral fibrosis group compared with the sham group (P <.05). Urethral injection of CCH appeared to be safe and significantly reduce urethral fibrosis as well as collagen type I and III expressions in the high-dose CCH treatment groups when compared with the treatment control group (P <.01). Conclusion This study demonstrated a beneficial effect of CCH injections in a rat model of urethral fibrosis. These findings suggest a potential role for CCH as a therapeutic option in urethral stricture patients and warrant further investigation. PMID:26126692

  6. Relationship between development of urethral stricture after transurethral resection of prostate and glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Kumsar, Şükrü; Sağlam, Hasan Salih; Köse, Osman; Budak, Salih; Adsan, Oztuğ

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to investigate the association of glycemic control prior to TUR-P and postoperative urethral stricture development. Materials and Methods: Of the 168 patients with a diagnosis of urethral stricture, who underwent internal urethrotomy in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed for this study. 98 patients who underwent monopolar TUR-P in our hospital previously and were developed urethral stricture were divided into two groups as diabetic and nondiabetic. Based on their HbA1c concentrations, diabetics were allocated to two groups with good (HbA1c ≤6.5%) or poor (HbA1c > 6,5%) glycemic control. Time to internal urethrotomy and the other operative parameters were compared among groups. Results: Time to internal urethrotomy after TUR-P was significantly shorter in diabetic patients with poor glycemic control than Group 1 and Group 2 (P = 0,02, P = 0,012) but no significant difference was found between Group 1 and Group 2 (P = 0,368). There was no significant difference in the mean diagnosed and resected prostate wight among groups There was no significant difference in the mean resection time and the mean time to urethral catheter removal among groups. Conclusions: Especially in poor glycemic control patients, urethral stricture development was seen in the early period after TUR-P. For this reason, in the elective TUR-P scheduled poor glycemic controlled patients the operation should be done after glycemic control. PMID:25371609

  7. Use and outcomes of amplatz renal dilator for treatment of urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Akkoc, Ali; Aydin, Cemil; Kartalmıs, Mahir; Topaktas, Ramazan; Altin, Selcuk; Yilmaz, Yakup

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Urethral stricture disease is still a major problem in men. Many procedures are available for the treatment of urethral strictures; urethral dilatation is one of the oldest. The blind dilatation of urethral strictures may be a difficult and potentially dangerous procedure. The purpose of this study was to describe safe urethral dilatation using amplatz renal dilator and to report outcomes. Materials and Methods From 2010 to 2014, a total of 26 men with primary urethral strictures were managed by urethral dilatation using amplatz renal dilators. The parameters analyzed included presentation of patients, retrograde urethrography (RGU) findings, pre-and postoperative maximum flow rate (Qmax) on uroflowmetry (UF) and post-void residual urine (PVR). Patients were followed-up at 1.6 and 12 months. The technique described in this paper enables such strictures to be safely dilated after endoscopic placement of a suitable guidewire and stylet over which amplatz renal dilators are introduced. Results The mean age of the patients was 57.6 (35–72) years. The median stricture length was 0.82 (0.6–1.5)cm. Pre-operative uroflowmetry showed Qmax of 7.00 (4–12) mL/sec and ultrasonography showed PVR of 75.00 (45–195)mL. Postoperatively, Qmax improved to 18.00 (15–22)mL/sec (p<0.001) at 1 month, 17.00 (13–21)mL/sec (p<0.001) at 6 months and 15.00 (12–17)mL/sec (p<0.001) at 12 months. The post-operative PVR values were 22.50 (10–60)mL (p<0.001), 30.00 (10–70)mL (p<0.001) and 30.00 (10–70) mL (p<0.001) at 1.6 12 months, respectively. The median procedure time was 15.00 (12–22) minutes. None of the patients had a recurrence during a 12-month period of follow-up. Conclusion Urethral dilatation with amplatz renal dilators avoids the risks associated with blind dilatation techniques. This tecnique is a safe, easy, well-tolerated and cost-effective alternative for treatment of urethral strictures. PMID:27256192

  8. Prevention of stricture recurrence following urethral internal urethrotomy: routine repeated dilations or active surveillance?

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Wazir, Romel; Wang, Jianzhong; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Strictures of the urethra are the most common cause of obstructed micturition in younger men and there is frequent recurrence after initial treatment. Currently, routine repeated dilations, including intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) are prescribed by urologists to prevent urethral stricture recurrence. There is, however, no high level evidence available supporting the effectiveness of practicing these painful techniques. Balancing efficacy, adverse effects and costs, we hypothesize that active surveillance is a better option for preventing stricture recurrence as compared with routine repeated dilations. However, well designed, adequately powered multi-center trials with comprehensive evaluation are urgently needed to confirm our hypothesis. . PMID:27576888

  9. Management of recurrent anterior urethral strictures following buccal mucosal graft-urethroplasty: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Javali, Tarun Dilip; Katti, Amit; Nagaraj, Harohalli K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the safety, feasibility and outcome of redo buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in patients presenting with recurrent anterior urethral stricture following previous failed BMG urethroplasty. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective chart review of 21 patients with recurrent anterior urethral stricture after buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty, who underwent redo urethroplasty at our institute between January 2008 to January 2014. All patients underwent preoperative evaluation in the form of uroflowmetry, RGU, sonourethrogram and urethroscopy. Among patients with isolated bulbar urethral stricture, who had previously undergone ventral onlay, redo dorsal onlay BMG urethroplasty was done and vice versa (9+8 patients). Three patients, who had previously undergone Kulkarni-Barbagli urethroplasty, underwent dorsal free graft urethroplasty by ventral sagittal urethrotomy approach. One patient who had previously undergone urethroplasty by ASOPA technique underwent 2-stage Bracka repair. Catheter removal was done on 21st postoperative day. Follow-up consisted of uroflow, PVR and AUA-SS. Failure was defined as requirement of any post operative procedure. Results: Idiopathic urethral strictures constituted the predominant etiology. Eleven patients presented with stricture recurrence involving the entire grafted area, while the remaining 10 patients had fibrotic ring like strictures at the proximal/distal graft-urethral anastomotic sites. The success rate of redo surgery was 85.7% at a mean follow-up of 41.8 months (range: 1 yr-6 yrs). Among the 18 patients who required no intervention during the follow-up period, the graft survival was longer compared to their initial time to failure. Conclusion: Redo buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty is safe and feasible with good intermediate term outcomes. PMID:26834398

  10. Single stage: dorsolateral onlay buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures using perineal route

    PubMed Central

    Prabha, Vikram; Devaraju, Shishir; Vernekar, Ritesh; Hiremath, Murigendra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To assess the outcome of single stage dorsolateral onlay buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures (>4cm long) using a perineal incision. Materials and Methods From August 2010 to August 2013, 20 patients underwent BMG urethroplasty. The cause of stricture was Lichen sclerosis in 12 cases (60%), Instrumentation in 5 cases (25%), and unknown in 3 cases (15%). Strictures were approached through a perineal skin incision and penis was invaginated into it to access the entire urethra. All the grafts were placed dorsolaterally, preserving the bulbospongiosus muscle, central tendon of perineum and one-sided attachement of corpus spongiosum. Procedure was considered to be failure if the patient required instrumentation postoperatively. Results Mean stricture length was 8.5cm (range 4 to 12cm). Mean follow-up was 22.7 months (range 12 to 36 months). Overall success rate was 85%. There were 3 failures (meatal stenosis in 1, proximal stricture in 1 and whole length recurrent stricture in 1). Other complications included wound infection, urethrocutaneous fistula, brownish discharge per urethra and scrotal oedema. Conclusion Dorsolateral buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures using a single perineal incision is simple, safe and easily reproducible by urologists with a good outcome. PMID:27286122

  11. Visual Internal Urethrotomy for Adult Male Urethral Stricture Has Poor Long-Term Results

    PubMed Central

    Al Taweel, Waleed; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the long-term stricture-free rate after visual internal urethrotomy following initial and follow-up urethrotomies. Methods. The records of all male patients who underwent direct visual internal urethrotomy for urethral stricture disease in our hospital between July 2004 and May 2012 were reviewed. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze stricture-free probability after the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth urethrotomies. Results. A total of 301 patients were included. The overall stricture-free rate at the 36-month follow-up was 8.3% with a median time to recurrence of 10 months (95% CI of 9.5 to 10.5, range: 2–36). The stricture-free rate after one urethrotomy was 12.1% with a median time to recurrence of eight months (95% CI of 7.1–8.9). After the second urethrotomy, the stricture-free rate was 7.9% with a median time to recurrence of 10 months (95% CI of 9.3 to 10.6). After the third to fifth procedures, the stricture-free rate was 0%. There was no significant difference in the stricture-free rate between single and multiple procedures. Conclusion. The long-term stricture-free rate of visual internal urethrotomy is modest even after a single procedure. PMID:26494995

  12. Anterior Urethral Stricture Disease Negatively Impacts the Quality of Life of Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Weese, Jonathan R.; Eswara, Jairam R.; Marshall, Stephen D.; Chang, Andrew J.; Vetter, Joel; Brandes, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify the quality of life (QoL) distress experienced by immediate family members of patients with urethral stricture via a questionnaire given prior to definitive urethroplasty. The emotional, social, and physical effects of urethral stricture disease on the QoL of family members have not been previously described. Materials and Methods. A questionnaire was administered prospectively to an immediate family member of 51 patients undergoing anterior urethroplasty by a single surgeon (SBB). The survey was comprised of twelve questions that addressed the emotional, social, and physical consequences experienced as a result of their loved one. Results. Of the 51 surveyed family members, most were female (92.2%), lived in the same household (86.3%), and slept in the same room as the patient (70.6%). Respondents experienced sleep disturbances (56.9%) and diminished social lives (43.1%). 82.4% felt stressed by the patient's surgical treatment, and 83.9% (26/31) felt that their intimacy was negatively impacted. Conclusions. Urethral stricture disease has a significant impact on the family members of those affected. These effects may last decades and include sleep disturbance, decreased social interactions, emotional stress, and impaired sexual intimacy. Treatment of urethral stricture disease should attempt to mitigate the impact of the disease on family members as well as the patient. PMID:27034658

  13. Does resectoscope size play a role in formation of urethral stricture following transurethral prostate resection?

    PubMed Central

    Günes, Mustafa; Keles, Muzaffer Oguz; Kaya, Cevdet; Koca, Orhan; Sertkaya, Zülfü; Akyüz, Mehmet; Altok, Muammer; Umul, Mehmet; Karaman, Muhammet Ihsan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and aims: To investigate the possible effect of resectoscope size on urethral stricture rate after monopolar TURP. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of 71 men undergoing TURP was conducted at two centers’ from November 2009 to May 2013. The patients were divided into one of two groups according to the resectoscope diameter used for TURP. Resectoscope diameter was 24 F in group 1 (n=35) or 26 F in group 2 (n=36). Urethral catheter type, catheter removal time and energy type were kept constant for all patients. Urethral stricture formation in different localizations after TURP was compared between groups. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, pre-operative prostate gland volume (PV), prostate-specific antigen (PSA), maximal urinary flow rates (Qmax), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and post-voiding residual urine volume (PVR). The resection time and weight of resected prostate tissue were similar for both groups (p>0.05). A statistically significant higher incidence of bulbar stricture was detected in group 2 compared to group1 (p=0.018). Conclusions: The use of small-diameter resectoscope shafts may cause a reduction in the incidence of uretral strictures in relation to urethral friction and mucosal damage. PMID:26401868

  14. Nd-YAG laser core-through urethrotomy in obliterative posttraumatic urethral strictures in children.

    PubMed

    Dogra, P N; Nabi, G

    2003-11-01

    This study analysed the feasibility and effectiveness of Nd-YAG laser core-through urethrotomy in the management of obliterative posttraumatic urethral strictures in children. Between May 1997 and April 2000, 61 patients underwent core-through urethrotomy in posttraumatic urethral strictures, ten of whom were children (ages 5-15 years). Three patients had had previous railroading procedures, two attempted core-through urethrotomy, and two underwent end-to-end urethroplasties. Patients were on suprapubic cystostomy for a mean period of 12 months with mean stricture length of 2 cm. Nd-YAG laser core-through urethrotomy was carried out using 600- micro m bare-contact fibre as a day care procedure. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Micturating cystourethrography was performed 6 weeks following urethral catheter removal. Urethroscopy and uroflowmetry were carried out after 3 months. Mean follow-up was 24 months.Nd-YAG laser core-through urethrotomy was seen to be successful in all patients without any complications. All patients are voiding without obstructive symptoms. Four required optical urethrotomy/endoscopic dilatation at least twice. Nd-YAG laser core-through urethrotomy is a safe and effective procedure for the management of obliterative posttraumatic urethral strictures in children PMID:14579073

  15. Treatment of Urethral Strictures from Irradiation and Other Nonsurgical Forms of Pelvic Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Khourdaji, Iyad; Parke, Jacob; Chennamsetty, Avinash; Burks, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT), external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), brachytherapy (BT), photon beam therapy (PBT), high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and cryotherapy are noninvasive treatment options for pelvic malignancies and prostate cancer. Though effective in treating cancer, urethral stricture disease is an underrecognized and poorly reported sequela of these treatment modalities. Studies estimate the incidence of stricture from BT to be 1.8%, EBRT 1.7%, combined EBRT and BT 5.2%, and cryotherapy 2.5%. Radiation effects on the genitourinary system can manifest early or months to years after treatment with the onus being on the clinician to investigate and rule-out stricture disease as an underlying etiology for lower urinary tract symptoms. Obliterative endarteritis resulting in ischemia and fibrosis of the irradiated tissue complicates treatment strategies, which include urethral dilation, direct-vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU), urethral stents, and urethroplasty. Failure rates for dilation and DVIU are exceedingly high with several studies indicating that urethroplasty is the most definitive and durable treatment modality for patients with radiation-induced stricture disease. However, a detailed discussion should be offered regarding development or worsening of incontinence after treatment with urethroplasty. Further studies are required to assess the nature and treatment of cryotherapy and HIFU-induced strictures. PMID:26494994

  16. Treatment of Urethral Strictures from Irradiation and Other Nonsurgical Forms of Pelvic Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Khourdaji, Iyad; Parke, Jacob; Chennamsetty, Avinash; Burks, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT), external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), brachytherapy (BT), photon beam therapy (PBT), high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and cryotherapy are noninvasive treatment options for pelvic malignancies and prostate cancer. Though effective in treating cancer, urethral stricture disease is an underrecognized and poorly reported sequela of these treatment modalities. Studies estimate the incidence of stricture from BT to be 1.8%, EBRT 1.7%, combined EBRT and BT 5.2%, and cryotherapy 2.5%. Radiation effects on the genitourinary system can manifest early or months to years after treatment with the onus being on the clinician to investigate and rule-out stricture disease as an underlying etiology for lower urinary tract symptoms. Obliterative endarteritis resulting in ischemia and fibrosis of the irradiated tissue complicates treatment strategies, which include urethral dilation, direct-vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU), urethral stents, and urethroplasty. Failure rates for dilation and DVIU are exceedingly high with several studies indicating that urethroplasty is the most definitive and durable treatment modality for patients with radiation-induced stricture disease. However, a detailed discussion should be offered regarding development or worsening of incontinence after treatment with urethroplasty. Further studies are required to assess the nature and treatment of cryotherapy and HIFU-induced strictures. PMID:26494994

  17. Penile inversion through a penoscrotal incision for the treatment of penile urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Tracey, James M; Zhumkhawala, Ali A; Chan, Kevin G.; Lau, Clayton S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This article describes a novel technique for the repair of penile urethral strictures and establishes the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of this innovative surgical approach. Materials and Methods Patients with urethral strictures underwent a one-sided anterior dorsal oral mucosal graft urethroplasty through a penoscrotal inversion technique. The clinical outcome was considered a failure when any instrumentation was needed postoperatively, including dilatation. Results Five patients underwent the novel procedure. The patients' mean age was 58 years. The cause of stricture was instrumentation in 2 cases (40%), lichen sclerosis in 1 case (20%), and failed hypospadias repair in 2 cases (40%). The mean stricture length was 3 cm. The overall mean (range) follow-up was 6 months (range, 3–9 months). Of the 5 patients, 4 (80%) had a successful outcome and 1 (20%) had a failed outcome. The failure was successfully treated by use of a meatotomy. Conclusions The penile inversion technique through a penoscrotal incision is a viable option for the management of penile urethral strictures with several advantages to other techniques: namely, no penile skin incision, a single-stage operation, and supine positioning. PMID:26981596

  18. Clinical evaluation of Apamarga-Ksharataila Uttarabasti in the management of urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, K. Rajeshwar

    2013-01-01

    Stricture urethra, though a rare condition, still is a rational and troublesome problem in the international society. Major complications caused by this disease are obstructed urine flow, urine stasis leading to urinary tract infection, calculi formation, etc. This condition can be correlated with Mutramarga Sankocha in Ayurveda. Modern medical science suggests urethral dilatation, which may cause bleeding, false passage and fistula formation in few cases. Surgical procedures have their own complications and limitations. Uttarabasti, a para-surgical procedure is the most effective available treatment in Ayurveda for the diseases of Mutravaha Strotas. In the present study, total 60 patients of urethral stricture were divided into two groups and treated with Uttarabasti (Group A) and urethral dilatation (Group B). The symptoms like obstructed urine flow, straining, dribbling and prolongation of micturation were assessed before and after treatment. The results of the study were significant on all the parameters. PMID:24250127

  19. Clinical evaluation of Apamarga-Ksharataila Uttarabasti in the management of urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Rajeshwar

    2013-04-01

    Stricture urethra, though a rare condition, still is a rational and troublesome problem in the international society. Major complications caused by this disease are obstructed urine flow, urine stasis leading to urinary tract infection, calculi formation, etc. This condition can be correlated with Mutramarga Sankocha in Ayurveda. Modern medical science suggests urethral dilatation, which may cause bleeding, false passage and fistula formation in few cases. Surgical procedures have their own complications and limitations. Uttarabasti, a para-surgical procedure is the most effective available treatment in Ayurveda for the diseases of Mutravaha Strotas. In the present study, total 60 patients of urethral stricture were divided into two groups and treated with Uttarabasti (Group A) and urethral dilatation (Group B). The symptoms like obstructed urine flow, straining, dribbling and prolongation of micturation were assessed before and after treatment. The results of the study were significant on all the parameters. PMID:24250127

  20. Dorsally Placed Buccal Mucosal Graft Urethroplasty in Treatment of Long Urethral Strictures Using One-Stage Transperineal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tavakkoli Tabassi, Kamyar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the results of one-stage buccal mucosal urethroplasty in treatment of long urethral strictures. Methods. This retrospective study was carried out on 117 patients with long urethral strictures who underwent one-stage transperineal urethroplasty with dorsally placed buccal mucosal grafts (BMG). Success was defined as no need for any intervention during the follow-up period. Results. Among 117 patients with mean age of 39.55 ± 15.98 years, the strictures were located in penile urethra in 46 patients (39.32%), bulbar urethra in 33 (28.20%) and were panurethral in 38 (32.48%). The etiology of the urethral stricture was sexually transmitted disease (STD) in 17 (14.53%), lichen sclerosus in 15 (12.82%), trauma in 15 (12.82%), catheterization in 13 (11.11%), transurethral resection (TUR) in 6 (5.13%), and unknown in 51 (43.59%). The mean length of strictures was 9.31 ± 2.46 centimeters. During the mean followup of 18.9 ± 6.7 months success rate was 93.94% in bulbar strictures, 97.83% in penile strictures, and 84.21% in panurethral strictures (P value: 0.061). Conclusions. The success rate of transperineal urethroplasty with dorsally placed buccal mucosal grafts is equal in different sites of strictures with different etiologies. So reconstruction of long urethral strictures may be safely and effectively performed at a simple single operative procedure using this method of urethroplasty.

  1. Efficacy of mitomycin C in reducing recurrence of anterior urethral stricture after internal optical urethrotomy

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Muhammad; Orakzai, Nasir; Khan, Ihsanullah; Ahmad, Mubashira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy of mitomycin C in reducing the recurrence of anterior urethral stricture after internal optical urethrotomy (IOU). Materials and Methods This was a randomized controlled trial conducted in the Department of Urology at the Institute of Kidney Diseases Peshawar from March 2011 to December 2013. A total of 151 patients who completed the study were divided into two groups by the lottery method. Group A (cases) comprised 78 patients in whom mitomycin C 0.1% was injected submucosally in the stricture after conventional IOU. Group B (controls) comprised 73 patients in whom IOU only was performed. Self-clean intermittent catheterization was not offered in either group. All patients were regularly followed up for 18 months. Recurrence was diagnosed by use of retrograde urethrogram in all patients and flexible urethroscopy in selected cases. Data were collected on a structured pro forma sheet and were analyzed by SPSS. Results The mean age of the patients in group A was 37.31±10.1 years and that in group B was 40.1±11.4 years. Recurrence of urethral stricture was recorded in 11 patients (14.1%) in group A and in 27 patients (36.9%) in group B (p=0.002). The mitomycin group also showed a delay in recurrence compared with the control group (p=0.002). Conclusions Recurrence of urethral stricture is high after optical urethrotomy. Mitomycin C was found to be highly effective in preventing the recurrence of urethral stricture after IOU. PMID:26366278

  2. Posterior Urethral Valve: An Unusual Cause of Primary Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Agbugui, Jude Orumuah; Omokhudu, Oisamoren

    2015-01-01

    Background Posterior urethral valve presenting in adulthood is uncommon. This can be an unusual cause of primary male infertility as a result of abnormalities in sexual function. Case Presentation This report describes a 40 year old man who presented to us on account of inability to impregnate his wife after 2 years of marriage. History revealed poor stream of urine since childhood and passage of scanty ejaculate during intercourse. A micturating cystourethrogram revealed dilated posterior urethra in keeping with posterior urethral valves. Endoscopic valve ablation was done with subsequent improvement in ejaculate volume and urine stream. His spouse achieved pregnancy thereafter. Conclusion In this report, it was found that adult posterior urethral valve though uncommon may be a cause of male infertility. Restoration of fertility potential can be achieved following valve ablation. PMID:25927029

  3. Early Experience with Hyaluronic Acid Instillation to Assist with Visual Internal Urethrotomy for Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Min; Kang, Dong Il; Shim, Bong Suk

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The clinical usefulness of hyaluronic acid (HA) instillation during visual internal urethrotomy (VIU) for decreasing the incidence of recurrent urethral stricture was assessed. Materials and Methods Twenty-eight patients were treated by VIU with HA instillation between May 2007 and June 2009. After insertion of a Foley catheter following urethrotomy, HA was instilled via an 18-gauge tube catheter between the urethral lumen and Foley catheter. Seventeen cases were analyzed retrospectively 12 months postoperatively. We evaluated the success rate of this procedure by comparing retrograde urethrography (RGU) results, maximum flow rates, and postvoid residual urine volumes preoperatively and 3 and 12 months postoperatively. Success was defined as either a maximum flow rate of at least 15 ml/s or no visible urethral stricture on RGU at 12 months postoperatively. Results Total success rates were 76.5% (13/17) and 52.9% (9/17) at 3 and 12 months postoperatively, respectively. By etiology, success rates at 3 and 12 months postoperatively, respectively, were 66.7% and 33.3% for inflammation, 66.7% and 50.0% for trauma, and 83.3% and 66.7% for unknown causes. Success rates were 63.6% for strictures less than 10 mm in length and 33.3% for strictures of 10 mm or more in length at 12 months postoperatively. Success rates were 61.5% for single strictures and 25% for multiple strictures at 12 months postoperatively. Conclusions The success rate of VIU with HA instillation was not better than that observed in the literature for conventional VIU. PMID:21221206

  4. Urethral strictures treatment with neodymium:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Silber, N

    1992-04-01

    A total of 14 patients with stricture of the urethra underwent treatment with Nd:YAG (neodymium:YAG) laser irradiation. A new 800-micron hemispherical optical quartz fiber was used in contact technique to produce linear incisions in the scarred tissue. Within 11.2 months, median of follow up, there was improvement in the obstructive voiding symptoms in all the patients. One patient who still had mild stricture in the first follow-up cystoscopy was managed successfully with second treatment. Endoscopic application of laser energy in the contact mode facilitates the immediate vaporization and disintegration of the fibrous area and secondary reepithelization of the urethra without scarring. PMID:10171965

  5. Fetoscopic transuterine release of posterior urethral valves: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Matthew S; Harrison, Michael R; Ball, Robert; Lee, Hanmin

    2008-01-01

    Fetal urinary tract obstruction with oligohydramnios produces pulmonary hypoplasia and renal dysplasia. Decompression of the obstructed urinary tract may restore amniotic fluid and allow lung growth, but transabdominal catheter shunt decompression is often inadequate and does not allow for cycling of the bladder, while open procedures cause significant maternal morbidity. Disruption of the anatomic obstruction, usually posterior urethral valves in a male fetus, would be ideal but has proven technically difficult. Here we describe a new technique of percutaneous fetal cystoscopy and disruption of posterior urethral valves, and the case report of our first application of this technique. We pre-sent a case of a 17-week male fetus with posterior urethral valves which underwent fetal cystoscopy for mechanical disruption of posterior urethral valves. This minimally invasive approach to disruption of posterior urethral valves in a fetus is a novel method for decompressing the urinary tract. The technique offers a minimal degree of maternal morbidity and, if instituted early enough, can restore amniotic fluid volume, avert fatal pulmonary hypoplasia and may preserve renal function. PMID:18033963

  6. Comparison of sonoelastography with sonourethrography and retrograde urethrography in the evaluation of male anterior urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Talreja, Shyam Manoharlal; Tomar, Vinay; Yadav, Sher Singh; Jaipal, Usha; Priyadarshi, Shivam; Agarwal, Neeraj; Vyas, Nachiket

    2016-01-01

    Objective Retrograde urethrography (RUG) is the most common and preferred imaging modality for imaging of the anterior urethral strictures despite its well-known limitations and disadvantages. Sonourethrography (SUG) was introduced in 1988 to overcome the limitations of RUG and to provide more accurate results. As proper selection of imaging modality is very important for planning the treatment, various advances in this area are required. One of the major factors for recurrence of stricture disease is spongiofibrosis. Sonoelastography (SE) is a newer technique, tried in various other pathologies. In this study, we have used this technique for the first time to assess its efficacy in the evaluation of anterior urethral stricture disease by comparison with RUG and SUG. Material and methods Between August 2014 and May 2015, 77 patients with clinical features of anterior urethral stricture disease were included in the study and evaluated by RUG followed by SUG and SE for stricture location, length, depth of spongiofibrosis and periurethral pathologies. The results were then correlated with operative and histopathological findings. Results Overall diagnostic accuracy of SE, SUG, and RGU for the estimation of stricture location, and length were estimated 92.68% vs. 91.54%, 79% vs. 78.87% and 80.48% vs. 43.66%, respectively, while for depth of spongiofibrosis SE, and SUG had accuracy rates of 87.3%, 48%, respectively. The mean length measured on SE was nearest to the mean intra-operative stricture length (21.34+11.8 mm). SE findings significantly correlated with the colour of bladder mucosa on cystoscopic examination (p=0.003) whereas the association was non-significant (p=0.127) for difficulty in incision. While a nonsignificant correlation existed between SUG findings related both to the colour of the bladder mucosa and difficulty in incision on cystoscopy, SE findings had a significant association (p<0.001) with histopathology findings for severe degree of fibrosis

  7. Use of Silodosin to Visualize the Posterior Urethra in Pelvic Floor Urethral Distraction Defect Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Nikhil; Singh, Rana Pratap; Ahmed, Ahsan; Kumar, Vijoy; Singh, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Retrograde urethrogram and voiding cystourethrogram are used to define length and location of urethral stricture prior to surgery. We used a single dose of silodosin prior to VCUG to relax the bladder neck and achieve visualization of posterior urethra. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of silodosin in visualization of posterior urethra during VCUG, and to compare the findings with a control group. Patients and Methods: Patients were divided into two groups A and B containing 20 and 15 patients, respectively. Patients in group A were given a single dose of silodosin prior to radiological studies. Results: In group A 19 out of 20 patients were able to achieve satisfactory bladder neck opening while in group B 10 out of 15 patients were able to achieve bladder neck opening. Conclusions: Silodosin use prior to VCUG confers a statistically significant increase in bladder neck opening and visualization of posterior urethra. PMID:26543831

  8. The current role of direct vision internal urethrotomy and self-catheterization for anterior urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVIU) followed by intermittent self-dilatation (ISD) is the most commonly performed intervention for urethral stricture disease. The objective of this paper is to outline the current scientific evidence supporting this approach for its use in the management of anterior urethral strictures. Materials and Methods: A Pubmed database search was performed with the words “internal urethrotomy” and “internal urethrotomy” self-catheterization. All papers dealing with this subject were scrutinized. Cross-references from the retrieved articles were also viewed. Only English language articles were included in the analyses. Studies were analyzed to identify predictors for success for DVIU. Results: Initial studies showed excellent outcomes with DVIU with success rates ranging from 50% to 85%. However, these studies reported only short-term results. Recent studies with longer followup have shown a poor success rate ranging from 6% to 28%. Stricture length and degree of fibrosis (luminal narrowing) were found to be predictors of response. Repeated urethrotomies were associated with poor results. Studies involving intermittent self-catheterization following DVIU have shown no role in short-term ISD with one study reporting beneficial effects if continued for more than a year. A significant number of studies have shown long-term complications with SC and high dropout rates. Conclusions: DVIU is associated with poor long-term cure rates. It remains as a treatment of first choice for bulbar urethral strictures <1 cm with minimal spongiofibrosis. There is no role for repeated urethrotomy as outcomes are uniformly poor. ISD, when used for more than a year on a weekly or biweekly basis may delay the onset of stricture recurrence. PMID:22022065

  9. Three-Dimensional Imaging of Urethral Stricture Disease and Urethral Pathology for Operative Planning.

    PubMed

    Theisen, Katherine M; Kadow, Brian T; Rusilko, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Diagnosing urethral pathology can prove difficult, as clinically, the presentation is often nonspecific and may be suggestive of multiple etiologies. Therefore, detailed and accurate urethral imaging in both males and females is critical. Since the early 1900s, conventional imaging studies including RUG and VCUG, with adjunct cystourethroscopy, have remained the gold standard diagnostic techniques to evaluate urethral pathology. However, limitations of conventional imaging have generated interest in finding alternative imaging modalities with comparable, if not superior, diagnostic accuracy, the goal being a more complete assessment of urethral pathology and anatomy that would allow for appropriate surgical planning. Imaging modalities with three-dimensional (3D) capabilities may provide more comprehensive information regarding urethral diseases through a more detailed illustration of periurethral soft tissue structures. Whether or not these imaging modalities will replace conventional studies is unclear, though there is an increasing body of literature that support their use. PMID:27278565

  10. Initial experience with lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty for anterior urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Anand; Dutta, A.; Jain, D.K.

    2012-01-01

    Background To present the feasibility of lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty in anterior urethral strictures and appraisal of donor site morbidity. Methods From November 2007 to December 2010, 14 patients underwent dorsal onlay lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty for anterior urethral strictures. Lingual mucosal graft was harvested from the lateral and undersurface of the tongue. Check micturating cystourethrograms were done 2 weeks after catheter removal and uroflowmetry after 3 months. Success was defined as normal uroflowmetry rates at 3 months in the absence of any postoperative instrumentation. Tongue was assessed for any residual pain, taste disturbances or restricted movement at 3 months. Results Four patients had submucosal fibrosis of the oral cavity and their buccal mucosa was unfit for grafting. Mean (range) stricture length was 5 (3–16) cm and the operation time 170 (140–210) min. Graft width averaged 1.6 cm. Average length of harvested graft was 6.5 cm. Mean duration of follow-up was 12.8 months. Two patients developed stricture at the proximal anastomotic site. There were no donor site complications. Conclusions Lingual mucosal graft harvesting is simple, gives graft lengths comparable to buccal mucosa and is associated with negligible donor site morbidity. PMID:24532928

  11. Anastomotic Urethroplasty in Female Urethral Stricture Guided by Cystoscopy – A Point of Technique

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sachin; Dalela, Deepansh; Dalela, Divakar; Goel, Apul; Sankhwar, Pushpalata; Sankhwar, Satya N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: During anastomotic urethroplasty for stricture urethra with false passage using standard technique, there remains a chance of anastomosis of normal distal urethra to proximal false lumen. Herein, we present a point of technique in which by using antegrade cystoscope, one cannot just identify and dissect normal anatomical proximal urethral lumen, but also perform some of the steps for anastomosis under direct vision. This will avoid making anastomosis to false lumen and thus leading to further complications. Materials and Methods: We report a case of 35-years-female who was presented to us with total mid-urethral stricture with false passage following multiple urethral dilatation attempts. We used antegrade cystoscopy during anastomotic urethroplasty to identify and dissect the proximal end of urethra thereby avoiding anastomosis to false tract. Results: We successfully performed anastomotic urethroplasty avoiding false passage. Post-operative Uroflow showed Q max of 18 ml/sec. Voiding cystourethrogram post-operatively showed anastomosis between normal anatomical lumens. Conclusion: This modification of using antegrade cystoscopy helps to identify proximal urethral end which in turn helps in avoiding anastomosis to false tract and ensures anastomosis between normal lumens. PMID:24741435

  12. Surgical Outcome of Excision and End-to-End Anastomosis for Bulbar Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jun-Gyo; Choi, Woo Suk; Paick, Jae-Seung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although direct-vision internal urethrotomy can be performed for the management of short, bulbar urethral strictures, excision and end-to-end anastomosis remains the best procedure to guarantee a high success rate. We performed a retrospective evaluation of patients who underwent bulbar end-to-end anastomosis to assess the factors affecting surgical outcome. Materials and Methods We reviewed 33 patients with an average age of 55 years who underwent bulbar end-to-end anastomosis. Stricture etiology was blunt perineal trauma (54.6%), iatrogenic (24.2%), idiopathic (12.1%), and infection (9.1%). A total of 21 patients (63.6%) underwent urethrotomy, dilation, or multiple treatments before referral to our center. Clinical outcome was considered a treatment failure when any postoperative instrumentation was needed. Results Mean operation time was 151 minutes (range, 100 to 215 minutes) and mean excised stricture length was 1.5 cm (range, 0.8 to 2.3 cm). At a mean follow-up of 42.6 months (range, 8 to 96 months), 29 patients (87.9%) were symptom-free and required no further procedure. Strictures recurred in 4 patients (12.1%) within 5 months after surgery. Of four recurrences, one patient was managed successfully by urethrotomy, whereas the remaining three did not respond to urethrotomy or dilation and required additional urethroplasty. The recurrence rate was significantly higher in the patients with nontraumatic causes (iatrogenic in three, infection in one patient) than in the patients with traumatic etiology. Conclusions Excision and end-to-end anastomosis for short, bulbar urethral stricture has an acceptable success rate of 87.9%. However, careful consideration is needed to decide on the surgical procedure if the stricture etiology is nontraumatic. PMID:23878686

  13. A case of hypospadias, anterior and posterior urethral valves.

    PubMed

    Carvell, James; Mulik, Roopa

    2013-01-01

    This report outlines the case of a 3-year-old boy whose initial presentation was that of asymptomatic hypertension (lowest recording 148/90), found at preoperative check prior to stage 2-correction surgery for distal hypospadias. Upon diagnosis of true hypertension, an ultrasound of the child's renal tract showed evidence of marked hydronephrosis and calyceal dilatation. On the background of deteriorating renal function (Urea 25.5 and Creatinine 188), a Micturating Cystourethrogram was performed, demonstrating posterior urethral dilatation. With difficulties controlling blood pressure, the child was transferred to Urology care, where resection of a posterior urethral valve (PUV) was undertaken. Despite this, renal function deteriorated further and re-cystoscopy identified an anterior urethral valve (AUV), which was also resected. Renal function, although improved, remains poor and blood pressure is controlled with two anti-hypertensives. To the publisher's knowledge, the association between hypospadias, PUVs and AUVs is as yet undocumented. PMID:24964414

  14. Tubularized Penile-Flap Urethroplasty Using a Fasciocutaneous Random Pedicled Flap for Recurrent Anterior Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Kwon

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the use of a tubularized random flap for the curative treatment of recurrent anterior urethral stricture. Under the condition of pendulous lithotomy and suprapubic cystostomy, the urethral stricture was removed via a midline ventral penile incision followed by elevation of the flap and insertion of an 18-Fr catheter. Subcutaneous buried interrupted sutures were used to reapproximate the waterproof tubularized neourethra and to coapt with the neourethra and each stump of the urethra, first proximally and then distally. The defect of the penile shaft was covered by advancement of the surrounding scrotal flap. The indwelling catheter was maintained for 21 days. A 9 month postoperative cystoscopy showed no flap necrosis, no mechanical stricture, and no hair growth on the lumen of the neourethra. The patient showed no voiding discomfort 6 months after the operation. The advantages of this procedure are the lack of need for microsurgery, shortening of admission, the use of only spinal anesthesia (no general anesthesia), and a relatively short operative time. The tubularized unilateral penile fasciocutaneous flap should be considered an option for initial flap urethroplasty as a curative technique. PMID:22783537

  15. Treatment of bulbar urethral strictures a review, with personal critical remarks.

    PubMed

    Oosterlinck, Willem

    2003-05-27

    This is a review article on treatment of bulbar urethral strictures with personal critical remarks on newer developments. As a treatment of first intention there exists 4 options : dilatation, urethrotomy, end to end anastomosis and free graft, open urethroplasty. Success rate of dilatation and visual urethrotomy after 4 years is only 20 en 40% respectively. Laser urethrotomy could not fulfill expectations. End to end anastomosis obtains a very high success rate but is only applicable for short strictures. Free graft urethroplasty obtains success rates of +/- 80%. There is considerable debate on the best material for grafting. Buccal mucosa graft is the new wave, but this is not based on scientific data. Whether this graft should be used dorsally or ventrally is also a point of discussion. In view of the good results published with both techniques it is probably of no importance. Intraluminal stents are not indicated for complicated cases and give only good results in those cases which can easily be treated with other techniques. Metal self-retaining urethral stent, resorbable stents and endoscopic urethroplasty is briefly discussed. Redo's and complicated urethral strictures need often other solutions. Here skin flap from the penile skin and scrotal flap can be used. Advantages and drawbracks of both are discussed. There is still a place for two-stage procedures in complicated redo"s. The two-stage mesh-graft urethroplasty offers advantage over the use of scrotal skin. Some other rare techniques like substitution with bowel and pudendal thigh flap, to cover deep defects, are also discussed. PMID:12806105

  16. [Present status of transurethral laser technique in the treatment of urethral strictures (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bülow, H; Bülow, U; Levine, S; Wurster, H; Frohmüller, H

    1981-09-01

    The main difference between the conventional methods of urethrotomy and the laser method is that the scar tissue of the urethral stricture is not cut but removed by evaporisation. At present only neodymium: YAG and argon ion lasers are available for clinical endoscopic use. For the purpose of removing tissue neodymium: YAG lasers need irrigation with a gas in contrast to argon ion lasers that can be utilized with the well known water irrigation. Certain considerations and experiences suggest the carbon dioxide lasers to be the best ones for evaporating stricture tissue since they cause very limited zones of necrosis with immediate sealing of the wound edges. Transurethral carbon dioxide laser application, however, is still at an experimental stage, since convenient light transmission systems are not available for clinical use at the present time. PMID:6795783

  17. Staged urethroplasty in the management of complex anterior urethral stricture disease

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Ryan L.

    2015-01-01

    Staged buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty has emerged as a reliable procedure for difficult anterior urethral strictures not amenable to one-stage graft or flap reconstruction. It has primarily been used for strictures and/or fistulae occurring after previous surgery for hypospadias or those related to lichen sclerosus (LS). Success rates in these patient populations have improved when compared to earlier techniques. However, prior studies have demonstrated a number of patients requiring more than two procedures to complete the reconstruction, as well as some who have been content with their voiding pattern after the first operation and therefore elected to forego second stage tubularization. In this setting, we have reviewed the surgical technique and summarized previously published work. There may be an opportunity to complete more of these repairs in two operations using additional oral mucosa at the time of tubularization. PMID:26816806

  18. Application of novel optical diffuser for urethral stricture treatment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trung Hau; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-02-01

    Optical fibers have frequently been used for photothermal laser therapy due to its efficiency to deliver laser energy directly to tissue. The aim of the current study was to develop a diffusing optical fiber to achieve radially uniform light irradiation for endoscopically treating urethral stricture. The optical diffuser was fabricated by micro-machining helical patterns on the fiber surface using CO2 laser light at 5 W. Visible light emission (632 nm) and spatial emissions (including polar, azimuthal, and longitudinal emissions) of the fiber tip were evaluated to validate the performance of the fabricated diffuser. Prior to tissue tests, numerical simulation on heat distribution was developed to estimate the degree of tissue coagulation depth during interstitial coagulation. Due to a high absorption coefficient by tissue water, 1470 nm laser was used for photothermal therapy treatment of urethral stricture to obtain a more precise depth profile. For in vitro tissue tests, porcine liver tissue was irradiated with three different power levels (3, 6, and 9 W) at various irradiation times. Porcine urethral tissue was also tested with the diffuser for 10 sec at 6 W to validate the feasibility of circumferential photothermal treatment. The treated tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and then imaged with an optical transmission microscope. The spatial emission characteristics of the diffusing optical fiber presented an almost uniform power distribution along the diffuser tip (less than 10% deviation) and around its circumference (less than 5% deviation). The peak temperature in simulation model at the tissue interface between the glass-cap and the tissue was 373 K that was higher than that at the distal end. The tissue tests showed that higher power levels resulted in lower coagulation thresholds (e.g., 1 sec at 9 W vs 8 sec at 3 W). Furthermore, the coagulation depth was approximately 20% thinner than the simulation results (p<0.001). The extent of

  19. Efficacy of Holmium Laser Urethrotomy in Combination with Intralesional Triamcinolone in the Treatment of Anterior Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Ankur; Ganesamoni, Raguram; Nanjappa, Bhuvanesh; Sharma, Varun; Mete, Uttam K

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcome of visual internal urethrotomy with a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser along with intralesional triamcinolone injection. Materials and Methods Patients with an anterior urethral stricture less than 3 cm in length were evaluated by clinical history, physical examination, uroflowmetry, and retrograde urethrogram preoperatively. All patients were treated with holmium laser urethrotomy and intralesional triamcinolone (80 mg) injection under general or regional anesthesia. An 18 F urethral catheter was placed for 5 days. All patients were followed up for 12 months postoperatively by history, uroflowmetry, and if required, retrograde urethrogram or urethroscopy every 3 months. Results The mean age of the patients was 42.9 years (range, 14 to 70 years). The overall recurrence rate was 24%. The success rate in patients with strictures less than 1 cm in length was 95.8%, whereas that in patients with strictures of 1 to 3 cm in length was 57.7% (p=0.002). The outcome did not depend on age, duration of symptoms, etiology, or location of stricture. Conclusions Holmium laser urethrotomy with intralesional triamcinolone is a safe and effective minimally invasive therapeutic modality for urethral strictures. This procedure has an encouraging success rate, especially in those with stricture segments of less than 1 cm in length. PMID:23060998

  20. Early removal of urinary catheter after excision and primary anastomosis in anterior urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ankur; Sankhwar, Satyanarayan; Gupta, Ashok; Singh, Kawaljit; Patodia, Madhusudan; Aeron, Ruchir

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of removing the urinary catheter 7 days after excision and primary anastomosis (EPA) performed with the indication of anterior urethral stricture disease. Material and methods Retrospective review of medical records of the patients who had undergone EPA between January 2005 and December 2010 was performed. These patients were divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (urethral catheter removed on or before 7. postoperative day) and Group 2 (urethral catheter removed on 8. postoperative day or later). We compared 2 groups as for the frequency of extravasation as detected on retrograde pericatheter urethrogram (PUG) and recurrence rate till the last follow-up. Results PUG was performed on an average day 7 and 14 in Groups 1 (n=102) and 2 (n=134), respectively followed by removal of the catheter. Extravasation on the first PUG was detected in 6.8% of the patients in Group 1, and in 4.5% of the cases in Group 2 had extravasation on the first PUG. Urethral catheter was left in situ in these patients and a repeat PUG after one week was performed which was normal in all cases. The incidence of extravasation and recurrence rate did not differ significantly whether catheter was removed on day 7 or 14 (6.8% vs. 4.5% and 4.9% vs. 5.2% respectively) (p>0.5). Conclusion We conclude that removal of the catheter on postoperative day 7 after EPA does not increase the rate of extravasation and recurrence during long-term follow-up. Urethral catheter restricts physical activity in the postoperative period which is bothersome to the patient. Hence early removal of a catheter should be offered to men after EPA. PMID:27274892

  1. Evaluation of holmium laser versus cold knife in optical internal urethrotomy for the management of short segment urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Kaza, Ram Chandra Murthy; Singh, Bipin Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Sachse cold knife is conventionally used for optical internal urethrotomy intended to manage urethral strictures and Ho: YAG laser is an alternative to it. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of urethral stricture treatment outcomes, efficacy, and complications using cold knife and Ho: YAG (Holmium laser) for optical internal urethrotomy Materials and Methods: In this prospective study included, 90 male patients age >18 years, with diagnosis of urethral stricture admitted for internal optical urethrotomy during April 2010 to March 2012. The patients were randomized into two groups containing 45 patients each using computer generated random number. In group A (Holmium group), internal urethrotomy was done with Holmium laser and in group B (Cold knife group) Sachse cold knife was used. Patients were followed up for 6 months after surgery in Out Patient Department on 15, 30 and 180 post-operative days. At each follow up visit physical examination, and uroflowmetry was performed along with noting complaints, if any. Results: The peak flow rates (PFR) were compared between the two groups on each follow up. At 180 days (6 month interval) the difference between mean of PFR for Holmium and Cold knife group was statistically highly significant (P < 0.001). Complications were seen in 12.22% of cases. Conclusion: Both modalities are effective in providing immediate relief to patients with single and short segment (<2 cm long) urethral strictures but more sustained response was attained with Cold knife urethrotomy. PMID:25371611

  2. Urethral stricture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enlarged or tender prostate Hardness on the under surface of the penis Redness or swelling of the penis Sometimes, the exam reveals no abnormalities. Tests include the following: Cystoscopy Post-void residual ( ...

  3. Adjunctive maneuvers to treat urethral stricture: a review of the world literature

    PubMed Central

    Raheem, Omer A.

    2014-01-01

    The development of urethral stricture (US) or bladder neck contracture is a relatively uncommon but well described condition observed primarily in men. Despite familiarity with US disease, management remains challenging for urologists. Risk factors for the development of USs or bladder neck contracture include primary treatment modality, tobacco smoking, coronary artery disease and poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. Numerous treatment options exist for this condition that vary in procedural complexity, including intermittent self catheterization (CIC), serial urethral dilation, endoscopic techniques and open reconstructive repairs. Repetitive procedures for this condition may carry increased failure rates and morbidities. For the treatment of refractory or recalcitrant bladder neck contracture, newer intralesional anti-proliferative, anti-scar agents have been used in combination with transurethral bladder neck incisions to augment outcome and long-term effect. The primary focus of this systematic review of the published literature is to streamline and summarize various and newer therapeutic modalities available to manage patients with US or bladder neck contracture. PMID:26813349

  4. Posterior Urethral Valves: Renal Failure and Prenatal Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Daniel P.; Tomaszewski, Jeffrey J.; Ost, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Posterior urethral valves occur in 1 : 5000 live births. Despite the high prevalence, the few children that survive do poorly, with over 50% progressing to ESRD in 10 years. The gold standard for post-natal diagnosis is voiding cystourethrography, while pre-natal diagnosis is dependent on routine screening ultrasonography. Despite the ability to identify features of bladder outlet obstruction early in fetal development, there is no consensus on how to incorporate early detection into current screening protocols. There has yet to be a marker that allows prediction of obstruction in the absence of or prior to radiographic evidence of obstruction. With our current screening strategy, the majority of interventions are performed well after irreversible damage has occurred. Improved mortality and long term morbidity from posterior urethral valves and congenital bladder outlet obstruction will likely remain unchanged until it is possible to intervene prior to the onset of irreversible renal damage. New biologic markers and improved instrumentation will allow for more effective diagnosis and intervention at earlier stages of fetal development. PMID:21860792

  5. Critical Analysis of the Use of Uroflowmetry for Urethral Stricture Disease Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Christopher A.; Voelzke, Bryan B.; Elliott, Sean P.; Myers, Jeremy B.; McClung, Christopher D.; Vanni, Alex J.; Breyer, Benjamin N.; Erickson, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To critically evaluate the use of uroflowmetry (UF) in a large urethral stricture disease cohort as a means to monitor for stricture recurrence. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study included men that underwent anterior urethroplasty and completed a study-specific follow-up protocol. Pre- and postoperative UF studies of men found to have cystoscopic recurrence were compared to UF studies from successful repairs. UF components of interest included maximum flow rate (Qm), average flow rate (Qa), and voided volume, in addition to the novel post-UF calculated value of Qm minus Qa (Qm-Qa). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) of individual UF parameters was compared. RESULTS Qm-Qa had the highest AUC (0.8295) followed by Qm (0.8241). UF performed significantly better in men ≤40 with an AUC of 0.9324 and 0.9224 for Qm-Qa and Qm respectively, as compared to 0.7484 and 0.7661 in men >40. Importantly, of men found to have anatomic recurrences, only 41% had a Qm of ≤15 mL/s at time of diagnostic cystoscopy, whereas over 83% were found to have a Qm-Qa of ≤10 mL/s. CONCLUSION Qm rate alone may not be sensitive enough to replace cystoscopy when screening for stricture recurrence in all patients, especially in younger men where baseline flow rates are higher. Qm-Qa is a novel calculated UF measure that appears to be more sensitive than Qm when using UF to screen for recurrence, as it may be a better numerical representation of the shape of the voiding curve. PMID:26873640

  6. Is there a way to predict failure after direct vision internal urethrotomy for single and short bulbar urethral strictures?

    PubMed Central

    Harraz, Ahmed M.; El-Assmy, Ahmed; Mahmoud, Osama; Elbakry, Amr A.; Tharwat, Mohamed; Omar, Helmy; Farg, Hashim; Laymon, Mahmoud; Mosbah, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify patient and stricture characteristics predicting failure after direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU) for single and short (<2 cm) bulbar urethral strictures. Patients and methods We retrospectively analysed the records of adult patients who underwent DVIU between January 2002 and 2013. The patients’ demographics and stricture characteristics were analysed. The primary outcome was procedure failure, defined as the need for regular self-dilatation (RSD), redo DVIU or substitution urethroplasty. Predictors of failure were analysed. Results In all, 430 adult patients with a mean (SD) age of 50 (15) years were included. The main causes of stricture were idiopathic followed by iatrogenic in 51.6% and 26.3% of patients, respectively. Most patients presented with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms (68.9%) and strictures were proximal bulbar, i.e. just close to the external urethral sphincter, in 35.3%. The median (range) follow-up duration was 29 (3–132) months. In all, 250 (58.1%) patients did not require any further instrumentation, while RSD was maintained in 116 (27%) patients, including 28 (6.5%) who required a redo DVIU or urethroplasty. In 64 (6.5%) patients, a redo DVIU or urethroplasty was performed. On multivariate analysis, older age at presentation [odds ratio (OR) 1.017; P = 0.03], obesity (OR 1.664; P = 0.015), and idiopathic strictures (OR 3.107; P = 0.035) were independent predictors of failure after DVIU. Conclusion The failure rate after DVIU accounted for 41.8% of our present cohort with older age at presentation, obesity, and idiopathic strictures independent predictors of failure after DVIU. This information is important in counselling patients before surgery. PMID:26609447

  7. Anterior urethral valve associated with posterior urethral valves: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tran, Christine N; Reichard, Chad A; McMahon, Daniel; Rhee, Audrey

    2014-08-01

    Anterior urethral valve (AUV) associated with posterior urethral valves (PUVs) is an extremely rare congenital urologic anomaly resulting in lower urinary tract obstruction. We present our experience with 2 children with concomitant AUV and PUV as well as a literature review. The clinical presentation of concomitant AUV and PUV is variable. Successful endoscopic management can result in improvement in renal function, reversal of obstructive changes, and improvement or resolution of voiding dysfunction. PMID:24958476

  8. W-V flap: a new technique for reconstruction of female distal urethral stricture using vestibular mucosa.

    PubMed

    Dalela, Diwakar; Gupta, Piyush; Dalela, Disha; Govil, Tuhina

    2016-01-01

    A premenopausal woman having a totally occlusive distal urethral stricture, with suprapubic catheter (SPC) in situ, was referred to us for a definitive procedure. On discussion of the treatment options, the patient refused for a buccal or vaginal flap procedure. Thus, a local W-V flap was fashioned from the periurethral vestibular mucosa with seemingly excellent results, both in terms of resolution of her symptoms and a forwardly directed stream of urine without incontinence. PMID:27170612

  9. SIU/ICUD Consultation on Urethral Strictures: Anterior urethra-lichen sclerosus.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Laurence; McCammon, Kurt; Metro, Michael; Virasoro, Ramon

    2014-03-01

    We reviewed the current literature on lichen sclerosus as it related to urethral stricture disease using MEDLINE and PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health) up to the current time. We identified 65 reports, 40 of which were considered relevant and form the basis of this review. Lichen sclerosus is now the accepted term, and balanitis xerotica obliterans is no longer acceptable. This common chronic inflammatory skin condition, mainly affecting the genitalia, remains an enigma, with uncertain etiology, varied presentation, and multiple treatments. In the early stages of the condition, a short course of steroids may be beneficial for some patients. If persistent, patients need long-term surveillance because of the potential development of squamous cell carcinoma. If diagnosed early, lichen sclerosus can be controlled, preventing progression. But once the disease has progressed, it is very difficult to treat. Surgical treatment by circumcision can be curative if the disease is treated early when still localized. Once progression to urethral involvement has occurred, treatment is much more difficult. Meatal stenosis alone is likely to require meatotomy or meatoplasty. Treatment of the involved urethra requires urethroplasty. Single-stage and multiple-stage procedures using oral mucosa have both been reported to give acceptable results, but the use of skin, genital or nongenital, is not recommended, because being skin, it remains prone to lichen sclerosus. With extensive disease, affecting the full length of the urethra, consideration should be given to perineal urethrostomy. A significant number of patients may prefer this simpler option. PMID:24268357

  10. Analysis of short-term results of monsieur's tunica albuginea urethroplasty as a definitive procedure for pan-anterior urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Adittya K.; Ratkal, C. S.; Shivlingaiah, M.; Girish, G. N.; Sanjay, R. P.; Venkatesh, G. K.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Long anterior urethral strictures are fairly common in developing world and the treatment is equally challenging. Aim: To assess the results and efficacy of Monsieur's Tunica Albuginea Urethroplasty (TAU) for anterior urethral stricture. Settings and Design: We analyzed the results in 10 consecutive patients with pan-anterior urethral stricture, who underwent Monsieur's urethroplasty. Materials and Methods: The procedure involves mobilization of strictured urethra and laying it open with a dorsal slit. Edges of the slit-open urethra are sutured to edges of the urethral groove to the tunica of corporal bodies with catheter in situ. Results were assessed postoperatively 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Patients were categorized as success and failure by comparative analysis of patient satisfaction along with urethroscopy, retrograde urethrogram, uroflowmetry. All patients were taken for post-operative urethroscopic analysis at 6 months to allow better understanding of both successful and failed cases. Results: Mean follow-up of 15.2 (11-19) months showed an 80% success rate. Mean uroflow rate showed Qmax 24.5 cc/sec with 8 cases showing no residual or recurrent stricture. Two cases failed and required intervention. Urethroscopic visualization of the reconstruction site showed wide, patent and distensible neourethra appearing epithelized over roof formed by tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa in successful cases. Conclusion: Monsieur's TAU is effective technique in treatment of anterior urethral stricture especially cases with unavailable buccal mucosa, with results fairly acceptable at the end of one year. PMID:24311899

  11. Diversity of patient profile, urethral stricture, and other disease manifestations in a cohort of adult men with lichen sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Peter Stanford; Yi, Yooni; Hadj-Moussa, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lichen sclerosus (LS) in men is poorly understood. Though uncommon, it is often severe and leads to repeated surgical interventions and deterioration in quality of life. We highlight variability in disease presentation, diagnosis, and patient factors in male LS patients evaluated at a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed charts of male patients presenting to our reconstructive urology clinic with clinical or pathologic diagnosis of LS between 2004 and 2014. Relevant clinical and demographic information was abstracted and descriptive statistics calculated. Subgroup comparisons were made based on body mass index (BMI), urethral stricture, and pathologic confirmation of disease. Results We identified 94 patients with clinical diagnosis of LS. Seventy percent (70%) of patients in this cohort had BMI >30 kg/m2, and average age was 51.5 years. Lower BMI patients were more likely to suffer from urethral stricture disease compared to overweight counterparts (p=0.037). Patients presenting with stricture disease were more likely to be younger (p=0.003). Thirty percent (30%) of this cohort had a pathologic diagnosis of LS. Conclusions Urethral stricture is the most common presentation for men with LS. Many patients endure skin scarring and have numerous comorbidities. Patient profile is diverse, raising the concern that not all patients with clinical diagnosis of LS are suffering from identical disease processes. The rate of pathologic confirmation at a tertiary care institution is alarmingly low. Our findings support a role for increased focus on pathologic confirmation and further delineation of the subtype of disease based on location and clinical manifestations. PMID:27195319

  12. Vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture: A novel modification of surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Gani, Johan; Chee, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To present a novel modification of surgical technique to treat female urethral stricture (FUS) by a vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal urethroplasty. Recurrent FUS represents an uncommon, though difficult clinical scenario to manage definitively. A variety of surgical techniques have been described to date, yet a lack of consensus on the optimal procedure persists. Materials and Methods We present a 51-year-old female with urethral stricture involving the entire urethra. Suspected etiology was iatrogenic from cystoscopy 17 years prior. Since then, the patient had undergone at least 25 formal urethral dilations and periods of self-dilation. In lithotomy position, the urethra was dilated to accommodate forceps, and ventral urethrotomy carried out sharply, exposing a bed of periurethral tissue. Buccal mucosa was harvested, and a ventral inlay technique facilitated by a nasal speculum, was used to place the graft from the proximal urethra/bladder neck to urethral meatus without a vaginal incision. Graft was sutured into place, and urethral Foley catheter inserted. Results The vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty was deemed successful as of last follow-up. Flexible cystoscopy demonstrated patency of the repair at 6 months. At 10 months of follow-up, the patient was voiding well, with no urinary incontinence. No further interventions have been required. Conclusions This case describes a novel modification of surgical technique for performing buccal mucosal urethroplasty for FUS. By avoiding incision of the vaginal mucosa, benefits may include reduced: morbidity, urinary incontinence, and wound complications including urethro-vaginal fistula. PMID:27437540

  13. Vesicourethral fistula after retrograde primary endoscopic realignment in posterior urethral injury.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rajat; John, Nirmal Thampi; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male patient presented with iatrogenic vesicourethral fistula after immediate retrograde endoscopic realignment of urethra after a posterior urethral injury associated with pelvic fracture. PMID:25440761

  14. Comparison of plasmakinetic transurethral resection of the prostate with monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate in terms of urethral stricture rates in patients with comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Sinanoglu, Orhun; Ekici, Sinan; Balci, MB Can; Hazar, A Ismet; Nuhoglu, Baris

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare urethral stricture rates in comorbid patients undergoing plasmakinetic transurethral resection of the prostate (PK-TURP) and monopolar transurethral resection of the prostate (M-TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Methods The data of 317 patients with comorbidities undergoing either PK-TURP or M-TURP from September 2008 to December 2012 were retrospectively evaluated. Preoperative and postoperative 12-month International Prostate Symptom Score, maximal flow rate, postoperative International Index of Erectile Function scores, and urethral stricture rates were evaluated. Results A total of 154 patients underwent M-TURP and 163 patients underwent PK-TURP. Urethral stricture rates were 6/154 in the M-TURP treatment arm and 17/163 in the PK-TURP treatment arm (P=0.000). In the presence of hypertension and/or coronary artery disease and/or diabetes mellitus, the risk of urethral stricture complication was significantly higher in the PK-TURP group than in the M-TURP group (P=0.000). Conclusions The risk of urethral stricture increases with PK-TURP in elderly patients with a large prostate and concomitant hypertension and/or coronary artery disease and/or diabetes mellitus. Therefore, PK-TURP should be performed cautiously in this group of benign prostatic hyperplasia patients. PMID:25325023

  15. A comparative study of lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty with buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in urethral stricture disease: An institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilip Kumar; Gupta, Depak Kumar; Ghosh, Bastab; Bera, Malay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: A prospective study to compare the outcomes of lingual versus buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in patients with long segment anterior urethral strictures disease. Materials and Methods: The study included 30 patients for buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty (group I) and 30 patients for lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty (group II) for treatment of long segment (>3 cm) incomplete anterior urethral stricture disease using single-stage dorsal onlay free oral mucosal graft urethroplasty by Barbagli's technique between February 2013 to September 2014. All patients underwent complete evaluation of the stricture including inspection of the oral cavity. Results: The results of urethroplasty in between two group were not significant (P > 0.05) in terms of Qmax (P = 0.63), mean postoperative AUA symptom score (P = 0.83), operative time (P = 0.302) intra operative blood loss (P = 0.708), duration of postoperative hospitalization (P = 0.83), but slurring of speech complications was seen in group II, but not in group I. Long-term complications of salivary disturbance, tightness of the mouth, persistent pain at graft site, perioral numbness, seen only in group I (BMGU). Conclusion: LMG urethroplasty is an excellent alternative to BMG urethroplasty with comparable results of urethroplasty and minimal donor site complications. PMID:27141184

  16. Microsurgical Urethroplasty for Complex Bulbar Urethral Strictures Using the Radial Forearm Free Flap Prelaminated with Buccal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ajay; Sham, Eric; Chee, Justin

    2016-06-01

    Background Complex bulbar urethral strictures are a heterogeneous group, including those secondary to radiotherapy, failed previous open urethroplasty, and total bulbar necrosis following pelvic trauma. Traditional urethroplasty techniques in this group are unpredictable. We describe a novel technique of a buccal mucosa-prelaminated radial forearm free flap urethroplasty, which seeks to improve the quality of life for this group of patients. Methods Known, reliable techniques from two surgical specialties were combined to create a novel surgical solution, consisting of a radial forearm free flap prelaminated with buccal mucosa. Prospective data were collected on patient and stricture characteristics, complications, and results, including voiding flow rates, urethrography, and cystourethroscopy. Success was defined as the ability to void per urethra. The procedure was performed in four patients, previously considered unreconstructable and who were suprapubic catheter dependent. Results Microsurgical transfer was successful in all four cases. All patients were voiding per urethra and remained catheter free at a minimum of 12-month follow-up. There was no significant donor morbidity and all patients were able to return to their usual occupation. Mean voiding flow rates were 17.3 mL/s. Flexible cystoscopy revealed well-vascularized, patent neomucosa. Conclusions We demonstrate proof of concept for a novel technique of microsurgical urethroplasty. We believe this technique may have widespread application in the treatment of radiation-induced and other complex urethral strictures where traditional urethroplasty has limited success. PMID:26848566

  17. Treatment of Urethral/Bladder Neck Stricture After High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Prostate Cancer With Holmium: Yttrium-Aluminium-Garnet Laser

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Jin; Kim, Tae Heon; Lee, Hyo Serk; Chung, Jin Woo; Lee, Ha Na

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Holmium: yttrium-aluminium-garnet (YAG) laser for the treatment of urethral/bladder neck strictures after high-intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer. Methods Between February 2007 and July 2010, Holmium: YAG laser urethrotomies were performed in eleven patients for bladder neck strictures or prostatic urethral strictures. The laser was used with a 550-µm fiber at 2 J and frequency 30 to 50 Hz. The medical records were retrospectively reviewed for medical history, perioperative and postoperative data, uroflowmetry, International Prostate Symptoms Score/quality of life, and stricture recurrence. Results At a median follow-up of 12.0 months (range, 4 to 35 months), the mean postoperative maximal flow rate and residual volume were improved significantly (P<0.05). The mean postoperative total, voiding and quality of life of international prostate symptom score were improved significantly (P<0.05). Of the 11 patients, 7 patients required one treatment, 4 patients two treatment, and 1 patients three treatment. 2 patients who had a documented urinary incontinence prior to the laser treatment subsequently required artificial urinary sphincter implantation and reported satisfaction without developing any recurrent strictures or artificial urinary sphincter erosion. All patients exhibited well-healed strictures and could void without difficulty. Conclusions Holmium: YAG laser therapy represents a safe, effective and minimally invasive treatment for urethral/bladder neck strictures occurring secondary to high-intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer. PMID:23610708

  18. Posterior urethral valve: Prognostic factors and renal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bhadoo, Divya; Bajpai, Minu; Panda, Shasanka Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to study the outcome of posterior urethral valve (PUV) cases treated by stepladder protocol and the prognostic factors affecting the outcome. Materials and Methods: Hospital records of all PUV patients treated by stepladder protocol between January 1992 and December 2013 were reviewed. The studied parameters were: Age at presentation, serum creatinine, types of surgical intervention, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) on initial voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG), renal cortical scars, plasma renin activity (PRA), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Results: Of 396 PUV patients treated during the study period, 152 satisfied study criteria. The age at presentation ranged from 2 days to 15 years (mean 31.3 months). The mean follow-up period was 5 years (range: 2-18 years). Primary endoscopic valve ablation was the most common initial procedure. Chronic renal failure was seen in 42.7% patients at the last follow-up. Serum creatinine at presentation, initial PRA levels, initial GFR, and PRA levels at last follow-up were significant predictors of final renal outcome. Age at presentation (<1 vs. >1 year), presence/absence of VUR on initial VCUG and renal cortical scars had no significant correlation with ultimate renal function. Conclusion: Our study confirms the high prognostic significance of initial serum creatinine, PRA levels and GFR in cases with PUV. PRA also holds promise in long-term follow-up of these patients as a marker of progressive renal damage. PMID:25197189

  19. Posterior urethral valves: the scenario in a developing center.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, S K; Banerjee, S; Basak, D; Basu, A K; Chakravarti, A K; Chatterjee, U S; Haque, J

    2001-01-01

    We have reviewed 233 patients with posterior urethral valves treated in a single center in Calcutta, India, over the last 20 years: 37 were neonates, 75 were between 1 and 12 months, 88 were between 1 and 5 years, and 33 were more than 5 years old when first seen. The clinical presentation and methods employed in diagnosis and assessment are described. Primary endoscopic valve ablation was performed in 140 patients (60%). One or other form of diversion was done in 100 (43%), 93 before and 7 either during or after valve ablation. The short- and long-term results have been studied. Eleven patients died during the initial hospitalization, 3 died subsequently, 15 are in end-stage renal disease, 17 are in poor health, and 18 have been totally lost to follow-up. The remaining 169 have been in good health for periods between 1 and 20 years. While our results of primary valve ablation in low-risk patients with responsible parents are as good as anywhere else in the world, we are concerned at our relatively high diversion rate and relatively poor long-term follow up; the methods being adopted to reduce these problems are discussed. PMID:11294260

  20. Rare copy number variants implicated in posterior urethral valves.

    PubMed

    Boghossian, Nansi S; Sicko, Robert J; Kay, Denise M; Rigler, Shannon L; Caggana, Michele; Tsai, Michael Y; Yeung, Edwina H; Pankratz, Nathan; Cole, Benjamin R; Druschel, Charlotte M; Romitti, Paul A; Browne, Marilyn L; Fan, Ruzong; Liu, Aiyi; Brody, Lawrence C; Mills, James L

    2016-03-01

    The cause of posterior urethral valves (PUV) is unknown, but genetic factors are suspected given their familial occurrence. We examined cases of isolated PUV to identify novel copy number variants (CNVs). We identified 56 cases of isolated PUV from all live-births in New York State (1998-2005). Samples were genotyped using Illumina HumanOmni2.5 microarrays. Autosomal and sex-linked CNVs were identified using PennCNV and cnvPartition software. CNVs were prioritized for follow-up if they were absent from in-house controls, contained ≥ 10 consecutive probes, were ≥ 20 Kb in size, had ≤ 20% overlap with variants detected in other birth defect phenotypes screened in our lab, and were rare in population reference controls. We identified 47 rare candidate PUV-associated CNVs in 32 cases; one case had a 3.9 Mb deletion encompassing BMP7. Mutations in BMP7 have been associated with severe anomalies in the mouse urethra. Other interesting CNVs, each detected in a single PUV case included: a deletion of PIK3R3 and TSPAN1, duplication/triplication in FGF12, duplication of FAT1--a gene essential for normal growth and development, a large deletion (>2 Mb) on chromosome 17q that involves TBX2 and TBX4, and large duplications (>1 Mb) on chromosomes 3q and 6q. Our finding of previously unreported novel CNVs in PUV suggests that genetic factors may play a larger role than previously understood. Our data show a potential role of CNVs in up to 57% of cases examined. Investigation of genes in these CNVs may provide further insights into genetic variants that contribute to PUV. PMID:26663319

  1. Giant urethral calculus

    PubMed Central

    Kotkar, Kunal; Thakkar, Ravi; Songra, MC

    2011-01-01

    Primary urethral calculus is rarely seen and is usually encountered in men with urethral stricture or diverticulum. We present a case of giant urethral calculus secondary to a urethral stricture in a man. The patient was treated with calculus extraction with end to end urethroplasty. PMID:24950400

  2. Urethral stricture vaporization with the KTP laser provides evidence for a favorable impact of laser surgery on wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidlin, Franz R.; Venzi, Giordano; Jichlinski, Patrice; Oswald, Michael; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Gabbiani, Giulio; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg; Graber, Peter

    1997-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the safety and efficacy of the KTP 532 laser to direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU) in the management of urethral strictures. A total of 32 patients were randomized prospectively in this study, 14 DVIU and 18 KTP 532 laser. Patients were evaluated postoperatively with flowmetry and in the case of recurrence with cystourethrography at 3, 12, 24 weeks. With the KTP 532 laser complete symptomatic and uredynamic success was achieved in 15 (83%) patients at 12 and 24 weeks. Success rate was lower in the DVIU group with 9 (64%) patients at 12 weeks and 8 (57%) patients at 24 weeks. Mean preoperative peak-flow was improved from 6 cc/s to 20 cc/s at 3, 12 and 24 weeks with the KTP laser. With DVIU mean preoperative peak-flow was improved from 5.5 cc/s to 20 cc/s at 3 weeks followed by a steady decrease to 13 cc/s at 12 weeks and to 12 cc/s 24 weeks. No complication was observed in either group of patients. Our results confirm that stricture vaporization with the KTP 532 laser is a safe and efficient procedure. The better results after laser surgery make it also a valuable alternative in the endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures. These findings suggest a favorable influence of laser surgery on wound healing with less wound contraction and scarring. The lack of contraction of laser wounds might be related to the absence and the lack of organization of myofibroblasts in laser induced lesions.

  3. Analysis of risk factors leading to postoperative urethral stricture and bladder neck contracture following transurethral resection of prostate

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Huang; Jiang, Yu Yong; Jun, Qi; Ding, Xu; Jian, Duan Liu; Jie, Ding; Ping, Zhu Yu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine risk factors of postoperative urethral stricture (US) and vesical neck contracture (BNC) after transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) from perioperative parameters. Materials and Methods: 373 patients underwent TURP in a Chinese center for lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic obstruction (LUTS/BPO), with their perioperative and follow-up clinical data being collected. Univariate analyses were used to determine variables which had correlation with the incidence of US and BNC before logistic regression being applied to find out independent risk factors. Results: The median follow-up was 29.3 months with the incidence of US and BNC being 7.8% and 5.4% respectively. Resection speed, reduction in hemoglobin (ΔHb) and hematocrit (ΔHCT) levels, incidence of urethral mucosa rupture, re-catheterization and continuous infection had significant correlation with US, while PSA level, storage score, total prostate volume (TPV), transitional zone volume (TZV), transitional zone index (TZI), resection time and resected gland weight had significant correlation with BNC. Lower resection speed (OR=0.48), urethral mucosa rupture (OR=2.44) and continuous infection (OR=1.49) as well as higher storage score (OR=2.51) and lower TPV (OR=0.15) were found to be the independent risk factors of US and BNC respectively. Conclusions: Lower resection speed, intraoperative urethral mucosa rupture and postoperative continuous infection were associated with a higher risk of US while severer storage phase symptom and smaller prostate size were associated with a higher risk of BNC after TURP. PMID:27256185

  4. Posterior Urethral Polyp: First Holmium-YAG Laser Ablation on a 3-Month-Old Infant

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Ercument; Yapanoglu, Turgut; Adanur, Senol; Ziypak, Tevfik; Altay, Mehmet Sefa; Aksoy, Yılmaz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Urethral polyps are rare benign pathologies seen in the male posterior urethra, more frequently originating from verumontanum. In this article, we aimed to discuss diagnosis and treatment of a urethral polyp causing hematuria and urinary infection in a 3-month-old male infant. This is the first case in the literature in which a urethral polyp is treated with Holmium yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser. Case Presentation: The patient was a 3-month-old male infant, and complains were hematuria and crying during micturition. Ultrasonography and voiding cystourethrogram were used for diagnosis. Urethral polyp was observed on urethrocystoscopy. Ablation was performed with a newborn cystoscope. Conclusion: Urethral polyp can cause hematuria and urinary obstruction and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pathologies such as posterior urethral valve and cecoureterocele that could cause infravesical obstruction. Holmium-YAG laser is a good choice of treatment with easy application possibilities using a newborn cystoscope, especially for newborns and infants who have thin urethra. PMID:27579428

  5. Efficacy of Optical Internal Urethrotomy and Intralesional Injection of Vatsala-Santosh PGI Tri-Inject (Triamcinolone, Mitomycin C, and Hyaluronidase) in the Treatment of Anterior Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Mandal, Arup Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To study the efficacy of optical internal urethrotomy with intralesional injection of Vatsala-Santosh PGI tri-inject (triamcinolone, mitomycin C, and hyaluronidase) in the treatment of anterior urethral stricture. Material and Methods. A total of 103 patients with symptomatic anterior urethral stricture were evaluated on the basis of clinical history, physical examination, uroflowmetry, and retrograde urethrogram preoperatively. All patients were treated with optical internal urethrotomy followed by injection of tri-inject at the urethrotomy site. Tri-inject was prepared by diluting the combination of triamcinolone 40 mg, mitomycin C 2 mg, and hyaluronidase 3000 in 5–10 mL of saline according to length of stricture. An indwelling 18 Fr silicone catheter was left in place for a period of 7–21 days. All patients were followed up for 6–18 months postoperatively on the basis of history, uroflowmetry, and, if required, retrograde urethrogram and micturating urethrogram every 3 months. Results. The overall recurrence rate after first OIU is 19.4% (20 out of 103 patients), that is, a success rate of 80.6%. Overall recurrence rate after second procedure was 5.8% (6 out of 103 patients), that is, a success rate of 94.2%. Conclusion. Optical internal urethrotomy with intralesional injection of Vatsala-Santosh PGI tri-inject (triamcinolone, mitomycin C, and hyaluronidase) is a safe and effective minimally invasive therapeutic modality for short segment anterior urethral strictures. PMID:25349604

  6. Growth in boys and posterior urethral valves. Primary valve resection vs upper tract diversion.

    PubMed

    Krueger, R P; Hardy, B E; Churchill, B M

    1980-06-01

    Seventy-four patients with posterior urethral valves were evaluated for long-term growth potential and renal function. In those boy diagnosed and treated within the first year of life, initial treatment by temporary supravesical diversion (prior to valve resection) was associated with better growth potential and renal function than was treatment by primary valve resection alone. PMID:7404868

  7. The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) Is an Inadequate Tool to Screen for Urethral Stricture Recurrence After Anterior Urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Christopher A.; Elliott, Sean P.; Voelzke, Bryan B.; Myers, Jeremy B.; Vanni, Alex J.; Breyer, Benjamin N.; Smith, Thomas G.; McClung, Christopher D.; Erickson, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To validate the use of the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) as a stand-alone tool to detect urethral stricture recurrence following urethroplasty. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study included 393 men who had undergone anterior urethroplasty and were enrolled in a multi-institutional outcomes study. Data analyzed included pre- and post-operative answers to the IPSS in addition to findings from a same- day cystoscopy. IPSS from men found to have cystoscopic recurrence were then compared to scores from those with successful repairs, and receiver operating characteristic curves were plotted to illustrate the predictive ability of these questions to screen for cystoscopic recurrence. RESULTS Mean postoperative scores were lower (fewer symptoms) in successful repairs; IPSS improved from preoperative values regardless of recurrence. Successful repairs had significantly better degree of improvement in question #5 (assessing weak stream) compared to recurrences. Receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated the highest area under the curve for the IPSS quality of life question (0.66) that alone outperformed the complete IPSS questionnaire (0.56). CONCLUSION The IPSS had inadequate sensitivity and specificity to be used as a stand-alone screening tool for stricture recurrence in this large cohort of men, highlighting the need to continue development of a disease-specific, validated patient-reported outcome measure. PMID:27109599

  8. Concomitant Anterior and Posterior Urethral Valves: A Comprehensive Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Keihani, Sorena; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    Posterior urethral valves (PUVs) are the most common cause of infravesical obstruction in children, whereas anterior urethral valves and/or diverticula (AUV/D) are less commonly encountered. Concomitant AUV/D and PUV is believed to be very rare and may be missed on the initial evaluation. In this review, we provide brief information on embryology of AUV/D and PUV to explain the concurrent presence of these anomalies. We also summarize the information on published cases of concomitant AUV/D and PUV in the English literature with a special focus on diagnosis and the importance of both voiding cystourethrography and careful urethrocystoscopy. PMID:25863834

  9. Urethritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sensitivity to the chemicals used in spermicides or contraceptive jellies, creams, or foams Risks for urethritis include: Being a female in the reproductive years Being male, ages 20 to 35 Having many sexual partners ...

  10. Penile Circular Fasciocutaneous (McAninch) Flap as an Option for Complex Anterior Urethral Stricture in Case of Non-Viable Buccal Mucosal Graft

    PubMed Central

    Vijayganapathy, Sundaramoorthy; Mallya, Ashwin; Sreenivas, Jayaram

    2016-01-01

    The penile circular fasciocutaneous flap (FCF) is employed in the successful single stage reconstruction of long segment complex anterior urethral strictures especially when buccal mucosa is unavailable due to various reasons. A 65-year-old gentleman, chronic smoker and tobacco chewer, hypertensive on treatment, presented with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms for 8 months. He had no prior urethral catheterization. On examination, he had circumcised penis, with stenosis of the external urethral meatus. Glans had no changes suggesting balanitis xerotica obliterans. Suprapubic cystostomy was done as he developed acute urinary retention during evaluation. Retrograde urethrogram (RGU) showed pan-anterior urethral stricture. He was planned for substitution urethroplasty. On oral cavity examination, he had moderate trismus with oral submucous fibrosis. As buccal mucosal graft was unavailable, he was planned for FCF. A ventral onlay tubularization FCF urethroplasty from meatus to bulbar urethra based on dartos dorsal pedicle was done. His postoperative recovery was uneventful. Pericatheter RGU did not show extravastion and he voided well with Qmax 14 ml/second. He is doing well at follow-up.

  11. Safety and efficacy of Intraurethral Mitomycin C Hydrogel for prevention of post-traumatic anterior urethral stricture recurrence after internal urethrotomy

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Mahmoudreza; Derakhshandeh, Katayoun; Karimian, Babak; Fasihi, Mahtab

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of intraurethral Mitomycin C (MMC) hydrogel for prevention of post-traumatic anterior urethral stricture recurrence after internal urethrotomy. Methods: A thermoresponsive hydrogel base consisting of 0.8 mg MMC with 1cc water and propylene glycol to PF-127 poloxamer was used in theater. 40 male patients with short, non-obliterated, urethral stricture were randomized into 2 groups: control and MMC. After internal urethrotomy, the MMC group patients received the MMC-Hydrogel while the others were just catheterized. Both groups had their catheters for at least 1 week. After surgery, they were followed up by means of medical history and physical examination, monitoring voiding patterns and retrograde urethrogram at 1 month, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. Results: 40 male patients between 14 to 89 years old (Mean = 54.15) underwent internal urethrotomy. The average age for the control and MMC group was 54.55±21.25 and 53.75±24.75 respectively. In a comparison of age between the two groups, they were matched (P=0.574). Stricture length was 10.7±5.9 and 9.55±4.15 mm for the control and MMC group respectively. There were no statistically meaningful differences between the two groups (P=0.485). Fifteen patients had a history of one previous internal urethrotomy which in a comparison between the two groups meant there was no meaningful difference (P = 0.327). During postoperative follow up, total urethral stricture recurrence happened in 12 patients: 10 patients (50%) in control group and 2 patients (10%) in MMC group. The difference was statistically significant (P = 0.001). There were no significant complications associated with the MMC injection in our patients. Conclusions: Based on our results, MMC Hydrogel may have an anti-fibrotic action preventing post-traumatic anterior urethral stricture recurrence with no side effects on pre-urethral tissue. Due to our study limitations, our follow up time and the

  12. Endoscopic urethrotomy versus urethrotomy plus Nd-YAG laser in the treatment of urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Vicente, J; Salvador, J; Caffaratti, J

    1990-01-01

    Between February 1987 and May 1988, 30 patients who presented with single, iatrogenic, annular strictures of the bulbar urethra were included in this prospective study. They were randomly divided into two groups; group 1: 15 patients who underwent direct-vision endoscopic urethrotomy (cold-knife incision at 12 o'clock) and group 2: 15 patients who underwent internal urethrotomy plus Nd-YAG laser. The results obtained were analyzed and compared at 1 and 2 years by clinical evaluation, uroflowmetry and retrograde-voiding urethrography. Group 1 obtained 80% good results at 1 year, falling to 60% at 2 years follow-up. Group 2 presented good results in 73.3% both at 1 and 2 years of follow-up. PMID:2261927

  13. [Significance of early diagnosis of posterior urethral valves in fetus for further development - own experience].

    PubMed

    Krzemień, Grażyna; Szmigielska, Agnieszka; Wawer, Zofia; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of posterior urethral valves is estimated to be from 3:1000 to 8:1000 and this is one of the most common causes of obstruction of urinary tract in boys. About 13-17% of children with posterior urethral valves develop end stage renal failure. We present a  6-month-old boy with late diagnosis of posterior urtehral valves. Antenatal ultrasound investigation of the urinary tract was normal. A small degree of oligohydramnios was found during delivery. At the age of six months the boy was admitted to hospital because of urinary tract infection, hypertension (130/90 mmHg) and acute kidney injury (urea - 46 mg/dL, creatinine - 1.1 mg/dL, GFR - 35.5 mL/min/1.73 m2 ). Bilateral hydronephrosis and megaureters, low-capacity bladder with hypertrophied wall were seen on ultrasound examination. Voiding cystourethrograhy revealed vesicoureteral refluxes (III/V), hypertrophy of the bladder wall with numerous diverticula and dilated posterior urethra. During urethroscopy urethral valves were resected. Increased intravesical pressure (leak point up to 305 cm H2 O) was found on urodynamic test. Renal scintigraphy (99mTc-EC) revealed decreased intake of isotope in the left kidney (5%), and the right kidney intake was 95% ERPF. The patient was qualified for left-sided nephrectomy, which was postponed because of high leak point and high risk of worsening of vesicoureteral reflux to right kidney after nephrectomy. Anticholinergic and α-blocker treatment was started. At the age of 11 months left-side nephrectomy was performed because of recurrent urinary tract infections. After 3.5-year follow-up blood pressure, physical development, kidney function tests, and urinalysis are normal. Additionally to this investigation the significance of early diagnosis including prenatal (PUV) for further development as well as further therapeutic procedure is discussed. PMID:24519771

  14. The contemporary management of urethral strictures in men resulting from lichen sclerosus.

    PubMed

    Belsante, Michael J; Selph, J Patrick; Peterson, Andrew C

    2015-02-01

    Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic, inflammatory disease primarily involving the genital skin and urethra in males. Historically, the treatment of this common condition was a challenge due to its uncertain etiology, variable response to therapy, and predilection to recur. The etiology of LS is still debated and has been linked to autoimmune disease, infection, trauma, and genetics. Today, topical steroids are a mainstay of therapy for patients, even in the presence of advanced disease, and can induce regression of the disease. In advanced cases, surgery may be required and range from circumcision, meatoplasty, or, in the case of advanced stricture disease, urethroplasty or perineal urethrostomy. When urethroplasty is required, the use of genital skin as a graft or flap is to be avoided due to the predilection for recurrence. Surgical management should be approached only after failure of more conservative measures due to the high risk of recurrence of LS in the repaired site despite the use of buccal grafting. LS may be associated with the development of squamous cell carcinoma and for this reason, patients should undergo biopsy when LS is suspected and long-term surveillance is recommended. PMID:26816805

  15. The contemporary management of urethral strictures in men resulting from lichen sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    Belsante, Michael J.; Selph, J. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic, inflammatory disease primarily involving the genital skin and urethra in males. Historically, the treatment of this common condition was a challenge due to its uncertain etiology, variable response to therapy, and predilection to recur. The etiology of LS is still debated and has been linked to autoimmune disease, infection, trauma, and genetics. Today, topical steroids are a mainstay of therapy for patients, even in the presence of advanced disease, and can induce regression of the disease. In advanced cases, surgery may be required and range from circumcision, meatoplasty, or, in the case of advanced stricture disease, urethroplasty or perineal urethrostomy. When urethroplasty is required, the use of genital skin as a graft or flap is to be avoided due to the predilection for recurrence. Surgical management should be approached only after failure of more conservative measures due to the high risk of recurrence of LS in the repaired site despite the use of buccal grafting. LS may be associated with the development of squamous cell carcinoma and for this reason, patients should undergo biopsy when LS is suspected and long-term surveillance is recommended. PMID:26816805

  16. Renal Parenchymal Area and Risk of ESRD in Boys with Posterior Urethral Valves

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Jose E.; Furth, Susan L.; Zderic, Stephen A.; Canning, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Approximately 20% of boys with posterior urethral valves develop ESRD; however, few factors associated with the risk of ESRD have been identified. The objective of this study was to determine if renal parenchymal area, defined as the area of the kidney minus the area of the pelvicaliceal system on first postnatal ultrasound, is associated with the risk of ESRD in infants with posterior urethral valves. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A retrospective cohort of boys who were diagnosed with posterior urethral valves at less than 6 months of age between 1988 and 2011 and followed for at least 1 year at a free-standing children’s hospital was assembled. Cox proportional hazard regression and Kaplan–Meier analysis were used to estimate the association between renal parenchymal area and time to ESRD. Cox models were adjusted for age at presentation, minimum creatinine 1 month after bladder decompression, and vesicoureteral reflux. Results Sixty patients were followed for 393 person-years. Eight patients developed ESRD. Median renal parenchymal area was 15.9 cm2 (interquartile range=13.0–21.6 cm2). Each 1-cm2 increase in renal parenchymal area was associated with a lower risk of ESRD (hazard ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.42 to 0.98). The rate of time to ESRD was 10 times higher in boys with renal parenchymal area<12.4 cm2 than boys with renal parenchymal area≥12.4 cm2 (P<0.001). Renal parenchymal area could best discriminate children at risk for ESRD when the minimum creatinine in the first 1 month after bladder decompression was between 0.8 and 1.1 mg/dl. Conclusion In boys with posterior urethral valves presenting during the first 6 months of life, lower renal parenchymal area is associated with an increased risk of ESRD during childhood. The predictive ability of renal parenchymal area, which is available at time of diagnosis, should be validated in a larger, prospectively-enrolled cohort. PMID:24311709

  17. Spontaneous Rupture of Kidney Due to Posterior Urethral Valve–Diagnostic Difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Kiliś-Pstrusińska, Katarzyna; Pukajło-Marczyk, Agnieszka; Patkowski, Dariusz; Zalewska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Zwolińska, Danuta

    2013-01-01

    Background Spontaneous kidney rupture could develop in the course of posterior urethral valve (PUV), the most common cause of outflow urinary tract obstruction in male infants. However, urinary extravasation is a rare complication among this group of children. Case Presentation Our case report presents diagnostic difficulties connected with spontaneous kidney rupture due to PUV in a 6 week-old infant. Due to not equivocal images, thundery course of disease and rapid deterioration in the infant's condition, the patient required an urgent laparatomy. Conclusion This case showed that the investigation of renal abnormalities during early neonatal period, is very important specifically in PUV that can lead to kidney rupture. PMID:23795264

  18. A randomized clinical trial comparing intracorpus spongiosum block versus intraurethral lignocaine in visual internal urethrotomy for short segment anterior urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Deepak Kumar; Ghosh, Bastab; Bera, Malay Kumar; Pal, Dilip Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective was to compare the effectiveness in pain relief of intracorpus spongiosum block (ICSB) versus intraurethral topical anesthesia (TA) using 2% lignocaine jelly for performing visual internal urethrotomy (VIU) for short segment anterior urethral strictures. Materials and Methods: It was a randomized, parallel group controlled trial. Participants are adult patients with a single anterior urethral stricture up to 2 cm in length. Patients were allocated to two intervention groups with thirty patients in each group. For anesthesia of the urethra, Group 1 patients received ICSB whereas Group 2 patients received intraurethral TA using 2% lignocaine jelly before VIU. Patient discomfort was assessed with visual analog scale (VAS) during the procedure and 1 h postprocedure. The increase in pulse rate and the change in systolic blood pressure (BP) during the procedure were recorded. The procedure was considered successful if there was absence of symptoms or signs of recurrent stricture and ability to pass freely 18Fr catheter during urethral calibration at last follow-up. Results: From March 2014 to June 2015, sixty patients were randomized into two groups of thirty patients each. The mean (±standard deviation) intraoperative VAS score was 2.8 ± 1.1 in Group 1, which was significantly less (P < 0.05) than the 5.6 ± 1.7 score in Group 2. The mean 1 h postoperative VAS score was also significantly lower in Group 1 patients (1.0 ± 1.0) than in Group 2 patients (3.2 ± 1.5). The change in pulse rate was significantly greater in Group 2 (21.3 ± 10.1 beats/min) than in Group 1 (10.6 ± 4.6 beats/min, P < 0.05). The change in systolic BP was also significantly higher in Group 2 (16.3 ± 8.6 mmHg) than in Group 1 (9.1 ± 4.4 mmHg, P < 0.05). The stricture-free rate at 6-month after VIU in Group 1 and Group 2 patients were 88.5% and 89.6%, respectively. Conclusions: ICSB has better pain control with similar complication and recurrence rate than

  19. A comparative study of ascending urethrogram and sono-urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra

    PubMed Central

    B.R., Ravikumar; Tejus, Chiranjeevi; K.M., Madappa; Prashant, Dharakh; G.S., Dhayanand

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of sono-urethrogram and ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. Materials and Methods In this prospective study 40 patients with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms and suspected to be having stricture urethra were subjected to ascending urethrogram and sonourethrogram. The radiologist was blinded to the findings of ascending urethrogram. All the sonourethrograms were done by the same radiologist. The findings of sonourethrogram & ascending urethrogram were compared with the findings of cystoscopy and intra-operative findings. The specificity, sensitivity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value of each modality in the diagnosis of various urethral anomalies were estimated. Results The sonourethrogram identified stricture disease in all the patients who had abnormal ascending urethrogram. In addition, other abnormalities like spongiofibrosis, diverticula and stones which were not picked up in ascending urethrogram were diagnosed by sonourethrogram. The cystoscopic and intra-operative findings with respect to stricture length, diameter and spongiofibrosis correlated well with sono-urethrogram findings. 5 patients who had stricture in the ascending urethrogram were found to be having the normal urethra in sonourethrogram and confirmed by cystoscopy. Conclusion sonourethrogram is an effective alternative to ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. It is more sensitive in the diagnosis of anterior urethral strictures than posterior urethral strictures. It is superior to ascending urethrogram in the identification of spongiofibrosis, diameter and length of the stricture. The complications were lower in sonourethrogram group compared to ascending urethrogram. PMID:26005985

  20. The predictive value of ultrasonography in evaluation of infants with posterior urethral valves.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, W C; Rosenberg, H K; Cartwright, P C; Duckett, J W; Snyder, H M

    1992-07-01

    Between 1981 and 1989, 28 infants less than 6 months old with posterior urethral valves underwent ultrasound evaluation as part of the initial evaluation at our hospital. The single ultrasound feature that correlated with subsequent renal function was the status of corticomedullary differentiation. The presence of corticomedullary junctions in at least 1 kidney in 17 infants was always associated with a serum creatinine level of 0.8 mg./dl. or less in long-term followup. Of 11 patients with absent corticomedullary differentiation 7 had eventual creatinine levels of greater than 0.8 mg./dl. with 5 of them suffering clinically significant renal insufficiency. An association between vesicoureteral reflux and absent corticomedullary junctions was also found. PMID:1613850

  1. Efficacy of holmium laser urethrotomy and intralesional injection of Santosh PGI tetra-inject (Triamcinolone, Mitomycin C, Hyaluronidase and N-acetyl cysteine) on the outcome of urethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Lalit; Sharma, Aditya Prakash; Garg, Nitin; Singh, Shrawan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To study the efficacy of holmium laser urethrotomy with intralesional injection of Santosh PGI tetra-inject (Triamcinolone, Mitomycin C, Hyaluronidase and N-acetyl cysteine) in the treatment of urethral strictures. Material and methods A total of 50 patients with symptomatic urethral stricture were evaluated by clinical history, physical examination, uroflowmetry and retrograde urethrogram preoperatively. All patients were treated with holmium laser urethrotomy, followed by injection of tetra-inject at the urethrotomy site. Tetra-inject was prepared by diluting acombination of 40 mg Triamcinolone, 2 mg Mitomycin, 3000 UHyaluronidase and 600 mg N-acetyl cysteine in 5–10 ml of saline, according to the stricture length. An indwelling 18 Fr silicone catheter was left in place for 7–10 days.All patients were followed-up for 6-18 months postoperatively by history, uroflowmetry, and if required, retrograde urethrogram and micturating urethrogram every 3 months. Results 41 (82%) patients had asuccessful outcome,whereas 9 (18%) had recurrences during a follow-up ranging from 6–18 months. In <1 cm length strictures, the success rate was 100%, while in 1–3 cm and >3 cm lengthsthe success rates were 81.2% and 66.7% respectively. This modality, thus, has an encouraging success rate, especially in those with short segment urethral strictures (<3 cm). Conclusions Holmium laser urethrotomy with intralesional injection ofSantosh PGI tetra-inject (Triamcinolone, Mitomycin C, Hyaluronidase, N-acetyl cysteine) is a safe and effective minimally-invasive therapeutic modality for short segment urethral strictures. PMID:26855803

  2. Pelvic-fracture urethral injury in children

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Judith C.; Voelzke, Bryan B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review paediatric posterior urethral injuries and the current potential management options; because urethral injury due to pelvic fracture in children is rare and has a low incidence, the management of this type of trauma and its complications remains controversial. Methods We reviewed previous reports identified by searching the PubMed Medline electronic database for clinically relevant articles published in the past 25 years. The search was limited to the keywords ‘pediatric’, ‘pelvic fracture’, ‘urethral injury’, ‘stricture’, ‘trauma’ and ‘reconstruction’. Results Most paediatric urethral injuries are a result of pelvic fractures after high-impact blunt trauma. After the diagnosis, immediate bladder drainage via a suprapubic cystotomy, or urethral realignment, are the initial management options, except for a possible immediate primary repair in girls. The common complications of pelvic fracture-associated urethral injury include urethral stricture formation, incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Excellent results can be achieved with delayed urethroplasty for pelvic fracture-associated urethral injuries. Conclusion Traumatic injury to the paediatric urethra is rare and calls for an immediate diagnosis and management. These devastating injuries have a high complication rate and therefore a close follow-up is warranted to assure adequate delayed repair by a reconstructive urologist. PMID:26019977

  3. Low-power holmium:YAG laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture disease: comparison of outcomes with the cold-knife technique.

    PubMed

    Atak, Mustafa; Tokgöz, Hüsnü; Akduman, Bülent; Erol, Bülent; Dönmez, Ibrahim; Hancı, Volkan; Türksoy, Ozlem; Mungan, Necmettin Aydın

    2011-11-01

    In this prospective randomized clinical trial, we aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endourethrotomy with holmium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (HO:YAG) laser and compare the outcomes with the conventional cold-knife urethrotomy. Fifty-one male patients with single, iatrogenic, annular strictures of the urethra were randomly divided into two groups; 21 patients who underwent direct-vision endoscopic urethrotomy with Ho:YAG laser (15 W; 1,200-1,400 mJ; 8-12 Hz) at 12 o'clock position (laser group) and 30 patients who underwent direct-vision endoscopic urethrotomy with cold-knife incision at 12 o'clock position (cold-knife group). The results obtained were analyzed and compared at 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months postoperatively by clinical evaluation, uroflowmetry, and retrograde urethrographies. Variables were compared among groups using Fisher's exact and Mann Whitney U tests. There were no differences between two groups in terms of patient age, preoperative Qmax value, stricture location, and length. Operative time was shorter in laser group (16.4 ± 8.04 minutes) when compared with cold-knife group (23.8 ± 5.47 minutes) (p<0.001). Recurrence-free rate at 3 months was similar between two groups (p=0.122). However, recurrence-free rates at 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months were significantly higher in laser group when compared with cold-knife group (p values were 0.045, 0.027, and 0.04, respectively). No intra- or postoperative complications were encountered. Use of Ho:YAG laser in the management of urethral stricture disease is a safe and effective method. In addition, it provides shorter operative time and lower recurrence rate when compared with the conventional technique. PMID:22005159

  4. Outcome of buccal mucosa and lingual mucosa graft urethroplasty in the management of urethral strictures: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sharad; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the outcome of buccal and lingual mucosa graft (LMG) augmentation urethroplasty along with donor sites morbidities in anterior urethra stricture. Subjects and Methods: From September 2010 to January 2014, 125 patients underwent single stage augmentation urethroplasty. They were randomly divided into two groups to receive either buccal mucosa graft (BMG) or LMG. The patients were prospectively followed for complications and outcome. Results: Baseline characteristics such as mean age, etiology, stricture length, and location were comparable in both groups. Overall success rate for Group 1 and Group 2 were 69.2% and 80%, respectively. Mean follow-up periods were 28.2 and 25 months in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively. Conclusions: LMG provides the better outcome with fewer immediate and delayed complications as compared to BMG. The length of stricture and width of graft were main factors affecting the outcome. PMID:26834399

  5. Vesicostomy and Colostomy in a Premature Neonate With Posterior Urethral Valves, Bilateral Dysplastic Kidneys, and High Imperforate Anus: The Challenge of Stoma Placement.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Melissa; Alnaqi, Amar A A; Braga, Luis H

    2016-07-01

    Although anorectal malformations are often associated with urinary tract abnormalities, the association with posterior urethral valves is exceptionally rare. We report a unique case of a premature (35 gestational weeks) male neonate born with posterior urethral valves, bilateral dysplastic kidneys, and imperforate anus, successfully treated by Blocksom vesicostomy and left upper quadrant loop colostomy. The challenges involving placement of both stomas in a small abdominal wall of a 2200 g premature neonate are discussed. PMID:27015939

  6. Semen analysis in post-pubertal patients with posterior urethral valves: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Puri, A; Gaur, K K; Kumar, A; Bhatnagar, V

    2002-03-01

    The issues of sexual function and fertility are becoming relevant in patients with posterior urethral valves (PUV), as more of them reach adulthood. To evaluate the semen of post-pubertal patients with PUV as a determinant of future fertility, all such patients (age >16 years) attending the follow-up urology clinic of our department from 1985 to December 1999 were contacted. Of the nine patients contacted, eight agreed to form the study group. All eight patients were asked to provide a post-masturbation semen sample and urine. Semen was analysed for pH, viscosity, liquefaction time, sperm morphology, sperm count, motility, and agglutination. The patients ages ranged from 16 to 21 years (mean 17.5 years). One patient with chronic renal failure awaiting a renal transplant refused to give a semen sample; two tried but failed to ejaculate on three consecutive visits. Their urine was negative for sperm. Of the five patients who gave semen, the liquefaction time was high in two. pH ranged from 7.2 to 8, sperm counts were 24-80 million. None of the patients had oligospermia. Abnormal sperm agglutination was present in four cases; a higher percentage of immotile sperm was also present in four. Semen abnormalities in the form of increased liquefaction time, abnormal sperm agglutination, and a high percentage of immotile sperm were thus seen in the present study. The bearing of these findings on subsequent sexual function and fertility remains a matter of speculation. PMID:11956780

  7. Impact of Posterior Urethral Plate Repair on Continence Following Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Isaac Yi; Hwang, Eun A; Mmeje, Chinedu; Ercolani, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study is to evaluate the continence rate following reconstruction of the posterior urethral plate in robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RLRP). Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis of 50 men with clinically localized prostate cancer who underwent RLRP was carried out. Twenty-five patients underwent RLRP using the reconstruction of the posterior aspect of the rhabdosphincter (Rocco repair). Results of 25 consecutive patients who underwent RLRP prior to the implementation of the Rocco repair were used as the control. Continence was assessed at 7, 30, 90, and 180 days following foley catheter removal using the EPIC questionnaire as well as a follow-up interview with the surgeon. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in any of the patient demographics. At 7 days, the Rocco experimental group had a continence rate of 19% vs. 38.1% in the non-Rocco control group (p = 0.306). At 30 days, the continence rate in the Rocco group was 76.2% vs. 71.4% in the non-Rocco group (p = 1). At 90 days, the values were 88% vs. 80% (p = 0.718), respectively. At 180 days, the pad-free rate was 96% in both groups. Conclusion Rocco repair offers no significant advantage in the time to recovery of continence following RLRP when continence is defined as the use of zero pads per day. On the other hand, Rocco repair was associated with increased incidence of urinary retention requiring prolonged foley catheter placement. PMID:20376897

  8. One-Stage Urethroplasty for Strictures in Maiduguri, North Eastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ahmed Gadam; Ali, Nuhu; Aliyu, Sulieman; Bakari, Abubakar Alhaji

    2012-01-01

    Background. Urethral stricture is a frequent cause of lower urinary tract obstruction worldwide. The aim of this study is to present our experience with one-stage urethroplasty. Methods. All males that underwent one-stage urethroplasty between January 2001 and December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Details of their biodata, clinical presentation, diagnostic investigations, operative treatment, postoperative complications, and other outcome of surgery were extracted and analyzed. Results. Ninety-one patients aged 8–76 years, (mean; 45.6 ± 19.7) with urethral stricture were studied. Postinfective strictures accounted for 58.2% and postprostatectomy strictures for 3.3%. Twenty-six (27.9%) of the strictures were in the posterior urethra of which 18 (59.2%) were posttraumatic. Fifty-seven strictures (61.3%) were in the anterior urethra of which 51 (54.8%) were postinfective. Thirty-nine (42.9%) patients had end to end anastomosis, 29 (31.9%) flap augmentation and 17 (18.7%) tabularized flap substitution, and 6 (6.6%) dorsal onlay grafts (5 with buccal mucosa and 1 with penile skin). There were 18 (19.8%) cases of wound infection, 12 (13.2%) of restricture and 6 (6.6%) cases of urethrocutaneous fistula. Satisfactory urinary stream was found in 77 (84.6%) patients. There was no mortality. Conclusion. Infection is the commonest cause of urethral stricture followed by trauma, and one-stage urethroplasty give excellent results. PMID:22567426

  9. Comparison of early neonatal valve ablation with vesicostomy in patient with posterior urethral valve

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Vahid; Zarenezhad, Mohammad; Kamali, Mansour; Gholamzadeh, Saeed; Sabet, Babak; Alipour, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare the results of final renal function by two methods of treatment in patients diagnosed as posterior urethral valve (PUV) (valve ablation vs. vesicostomy). Materials and Methods: Fifty-four boys diagnosed with PUV participated in this study. They were divided into top two groups. Thirty-one of the total were treated with primary valve fulguration (Group 1) and 23 were treated with vesicostomy (Group 2). One-year-creatinine level and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured. Also, they were taken ultrasonography detecting hydronephrosis. Data analysed in IBM SPSS21 with t-test and Chi-square test. Presented with 95% of confidence intervals. Results: Fifty-four boys diagnosed with PUV participated in this study. The mean age of patients in Group 1 was 3.8 ± 1.48 days and Group 2 was 4.7 ± 1.85 days. One-year Cr level was 1.57 ± 1.45 in Group 1 and 1.57 ± 1.45 in Group 2 which was not statistically significant (P < 0.8). Also 1-year GFR level was 31.1 ± 4.4 in Group 1 and 33 ± 4.7% in Group 2 (P < 0.10/23) in Group 2 (43.47%) had severe hydronephrosis and 14/31 (45.16%) in Group 1 had severe hydronephrosis. Graded ultrasound results were not significantly different (P = 0.24). Conclusion: The results showed no significant difference. Vesicostomy might be a more favourable method due to less complication and follow-up in early neonatal life. Hence, the condition of the patients and decision of the surgeon are effective parameters in choosing an optimal method in patients diagnosed with PUV. PMID:26712294

  10. Presentation, management, and outcome of posterior urethral valves in a Nigerian tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Orumuah, Agbugui Jude; Oduagbon, Obarisiagbon Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posterior urethral valves (PUV) remain the most common cause of bladder outlet obstruction and renal insufficiency in male children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presentation, management, challenges, and outcome of the disease in a Nigerian tertiary health institution. Patients and Methods: Retrospectively, medical records of male children with a diagnosis of PUVs over a 10 year period (2003-2012) were retrieved. All data in relation to the study objectives were recorded and analyzed. Results: A total of 44 patients was managed for PUV within the period. The mean age of presentation was 3.95 years with 56.8% of the patients presenting after the age of 1 year. Voiding dysfunction noted in 40 (91.0%) patients was the most common mode of presentation. The most common finding on physical examination was a palpable bladder while urinary tract infection noted in 23 (52.3%) patients was the most common complication noted. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed dilated posterior urethra in 16 (36.4%) cases, while micturating cystourethrogram revealed a dilated proximal urethra in all 35 cases in which it was done, diverticulum in 6 and vesicoureteric reflux in 9. The creatinine value at presentation ranged between 0.4 mg/dl and 4.0 mg/dl with a mean of 1.02 ± 0.93 mg/dl. Urethroscopy in 37 patients confirmed type I and type III PUV in 35 and 2 patients, respectively. Valve ablation with a diathermy bugbee electrode provided relief of obstructions in the 37 patients who underwent the procedure without any significant immediate complication. The period of follow-up ranged between 2 weeks and 3 years with a mean of 10.2 months. There was sustained improvement in urine stream, reduction in the mean creatinine concentration and incidence of UTI during follow-up. However, patients with significantly impaired renal function had a poorer outcome. Conclusion: Many patients with PUV presented late within the reviewed period. Valve ablation provided relief of

  11. Urethral ultrasonography: A novel diagnostic tool for dysuria following bipolar transurethral plasma kinetic prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Chun; Bian, Cui-Dong; Zhou, Ting-Ting; Liu, Min; Huang, Jian-Hua; Peng, Bo

    2016-04-29

    Urethral ultrasonography is non-invasive and able to indicate the urethral lumen clearly, as well as the surrounding tissues of the posterior urethra, without contrast agent or X-ray irradiation. In this paper, we evaluate the reliability of urethral ultrasonography in the diagnosis of dysuria following bipolar transurethral plasma kinetic prostatectomy (TUPKP). A total of 120 benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) patients with dysuria undergoing TUPKP were enrolled in this study, with a mean age of 72.8 years. All the patients received urethral ultrasonography, urethroscopy and bladder neck urethra stenosis oulectomy. Among the 120 cases, there were 22 cases of bladder neck closure, 20 bladder orifice stricture, 60 urethral stricture, 10 prostate remnants, 2 calculi in prostatic urethra, 4 dysfunction of bladder detrusor muscle and 2 flap of internal urethral orifice. χ2-test was used for the comparison of ultrasonography and urethral cystoscopy in the diagnosis of dysuria following TRPKP, and no significant difference was found between two diagnostic tools (χ 2 = 0.94, P > 0.05). Urethral ultrasonography is a reliable and minimally invasive diagnostic tool for dysuria following TUPKP and is conducive to early treatment of dysuria following prostatectomy. PMID:27163308

  12. Study of prognostic significance of antenatal ultrasonography and renin angiotensin system activation in predicting disease severity in posterior urethral valves

    PubMed Central

    Bhadoo, Divya; Bajpai, M.; Abid, Ali; Sukanya, Gayan; Agarwala, Sandeep; Srinivas, M.; Deka, Deepika; Agarwal, Nutan; Agarwal, Ramesh; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Study on prognostic significance of antenatal ultrasonography and renin angiotensin system activation in predicting disease severity in posterior urethral valves. Materials and Methods: Antenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis patients were included. Postnatally, they were divided into two groups, posterior urethral valve (PUV) and non-PUV. The studied parameters were: Gestational age at detection, surgical intervention, ultrasound findings, cord blood and follow up plasma renin activity (PRA) values, vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR), renal scars, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Results: A total of 25 patients were included, 10 PUV and 15 non-PUV. All infants with PUV underwent primary valve incision. GFR was less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 body surface area in 4 patients at last follow-up. Keyhole sign, oligoamnios, absent bladder cycling, and cortical cysts were not consistent findings on antenatal ultrasound in PUV. Cord blood PRA was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in PUV compared to non-PUV patients. Gestational age at detection of hydronephrosis, cortical cysts, bladder wall thickness, and amniotic fluid index were not significantly correlated with GFR while PRA could differentiate between poor and better prognosis cases with PUV. Conclusions: Ultrasound was neither uniformly useful in diagnosing PUV antenatally, nor differentiating it from cases with non-PUV hydronephrosis. In congenital hydronephrosis, cord blood PRA was significantly higher in cases with PUV compared to non-PUV cases and fell significantly after valve ablation. Cord blood PRA could distinguish between poor and better prognosis cases with PUV. PMID:25829668

  13. Distal urethroplasty for fossa navicularis and meatal strictures

    PubMed Central

    Dielubanza, Elodi J.; Han, Justin S.

    2014-01-01

    Distal urethral strictures involving the fossa navicularis and meatus represent a unique subset of urethral strictures that are particularly challenging to reconstructive urologists. Management of distal urethral strictures must take into account not only maintenance of urethral patency but also glans cosmesis. A variety of therapeutic approaches exist for the management of distal urethral strictures, including dilation, meatotomy, extended meatotomy, flap urethroplasty, and substitution grafting. Common etiologies for distal urethral strictures include lichen sclerosus, instrumentation, and prior hypospadias repair. Proper patient selection is paramount to the ultimate success and durability of the treatment, which should be individualized and include an assessment of the stricture etiology, location, and burden, and patient-centered goals of care. PMID:26816765

  14. Management of panurethral strictures

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Apul; Goel, Anuj; Jain, Abhishek; Singh, Bhupendra Pal

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Treatment of panurethral stricture is considered a surgical challenge. We searched the literature to present a comprehensive review. Materials and Methods: A review of literature was performed using MEDLINE/PubMed database using terms “urethral stricture” and “urethroplasty”. Only articles published between 1990 and 2009 and written in English language were included in the review. Results: The main causes of panurethral strictures are previous catheterization, urethral surgery, and lichen sclerosus. The treatment of each individual case has to be tailored according to the etiology, history of previous urethral surgeries, availability of local tissues for flap harvesting, availability of appropriate donor tissue, and the expertise of the treating surgeon. In patients with complicated strictures, previously failed urethroplasties and in patients with poor quality of urethral plate two-stage surgery is a better option. In all other situations, either a flap or graft urethroplasty or if adequate tissue is not available then combination of flap and graft gives reasonable success rates. Conclusions: Panurethral strictures are relatively less common. For successful results, the surgeon should be experienced and should be familiar with all the treatment modalities. PMID:22022063

  15. The Endoscopic Morphological Features of Congenital Posterior Urethral Obstructions in Boys with Refractory Daytime Urinary Incontinence and Nocturnal Enuresis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shigeru; Hyuga, Taiju; Kawai, Shina; Kubo, Taro; Nakai, Hideo

    2016-08-01

    Purpose This study aims to evaluate the endoscopic morphological features of congenital posterior urethral obstructions in boys with refractory daytime urinary incontinence and/or nocturnal enuresis. Patients and Methods A total of 54 consecutive patients underwent endoscopy and were diagnosed with a posterior urethral valve (PUV) (types 1-4). PUV type 1 was classified as severe, moderate, or mild. A transurethral incision (TUI) was mainly performed for anterior wall lesions of the PUV. Voiding cystourethrography and pressure flow studies (PFS) were performed before and 3 to 4 months after TUI. Clinical symptoms were evaluated 6 months after TUI, and outcomes were assessed according to PFS waveform pattern groups (synergic pattern [SP] and dyssynergic pattern [DP]). Results All patients had PUV type 1 and/or 3 (i.e., n = 34 type 1, 7 type 3, and 13 types 1 and 3). There were severe (n = 1), moderate (n = 21), and mild (n = 25) cases of PUV type 1. According to PFS, SP and DP were present in 43 and 11 patients, respectively. TUI was effective in the SP group and symptoms improved in 77.4 and 69.3% of patients with daytime incontinence and nocturnal enuresis, respectively. Almost no effect was observed in the DP group. A significant decrease in the detrusor pressure was observed at maximum flow rate using PFS in the SP group. Conclusions PUV type 1 encompassed lesions with a spectrum of obstructions ranging from severe to mild, with mild types whose main obstructive lesion existed at the anterior wall of urethra occurring most frequently in boys with refractory daytime urinary incontinence and/or nocturnal enuresis. PMID:26378483

  16. New frontiers in urethral reconstruction: injectables and alternative grafts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary management of anterior urethral strictures requires both endoscopic as well as complex substitution urethroplasty, depending on the nature of the urethral stricture. Recent clinical and experimental studies have explored the possibility of augmenting traditional endoscopic urethral stricture management with anti-fibrotic injectable medications. Additionally, although buccal mucosa remains the gold standard graft for substitution urethroplasty, alternative grafts are necessary for reconstructing particularly complex urethral strictures in which there is insufficient buccal mucosa or in cases where it may be contraindicated. This review summarizes the data of the most promising injectable adjuncts to endoscopic stricture management and explores the alternative grafts available for reconstructing the most challenging urethral strictures. Further research is needed to define which injectable medications and alternative grafts may be best suited for urethral reconstruction in the future. PMID:26813260

  17. Posterior Urethral Valves in Children: Pattern of Presentation and Outcome of Initial Treatment in Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Talabi, Ademola Olusegun; Sowande, Oludayo Adedapo; Etonyeaku, Amarachukwu Chiduziem; Salako, Abdulkadir A; Adejuyigbe, Olusanya

    2015-01-01

    Background: The management of posterior urethral valves (PUV) and its sequelae is still a challenge to most pediatric surgeons in our environment due to late presentation and inadequate facilities for long-term evaluation and treatment. Despite initial successful treatment about 40% would develop chronic renal failure. The aim is to describe the presentation, management and outcome of the initial treatment in boys with PUV. Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective analysis of PUV in boys 8 years and below over a 17 years period. Demographic characteristics, clinical features, investigations, and treatment outcome were reviewed. Results: Thirty-seven cases were analyzed. The median age was 5 months (range from birth to 8 years). Three (8.1%) patients had prenatal ultrasound diagnosis. The most common presentation was voiding dysfunction 37 (100%). Part of the preoperative investigation included micturating cystourethrogram (n = 31: 83.8%) and abdomino-pelvic ultrasonography (n = 37:(100%). The mean serum creatinine value of those who presented within the first 30 days of life and those who presented afterwards were 325 (±251) µmol/L and 141 (±100) µmol/L respectively, P = 0.003. Surgical interventions included trans-vesical excision of valves (n = 9: 28.1%), valvotomy (n = 10: 31.3%), balloon avulsion (n = 8: 25.0%), vesicostomy (n = 4: 12.5%) and endoscopic valve avulsion (n = 1: 3.1%). Seventeen (56.7%) patients had serum creatinine >70.4 µmol/L after 1-month of valve excision. Five (13.5%) patients had postrelief complications and 5 (13.5%) died on admission. Ninety percentage (27/30) of patients had poor prognostic indices. Conclusions: The initial treatment outcome was good but most had poor prognostic factors. PMID:26425072

  18. The spectrum of pelvic fracture urethral injuries and posterior urethroplasty in an Italian high-volume centre, from 1980 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Barbagli, Guido; Sansalone, Salvatore; Romano, Giuseppe; Lazzeri, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the emergency and delayed treatment of patients with pelvic fracture urethral injuries (PFUI) presenting to an Italian high-volume centre. Patients and methods In a retrospective, observational study we evaluated the spectrum of PFUI and posterior urethroplasty in an Italian high-volume centre, from 1980 to 2013. Patients requiring emergency treatment for PFUI and delayed treatment for pelvic fracture urethral defects (PFUD) were included. Patients with incomplete clinical records were excluded from the study. Descriptive statistical methods were applied. Results In all, 159 male patients (median age 35 years) were included in the study. A traffic accident was the most frequent (42.8%) cause of PFUI, and accidents at work were reported as the cause of trauma in 34% of patients. Agricultural accidents decreased from 24.4% to 6.2% over the course of the survey. A suprapubic cystostomy was the most frequent (49%) emergency treatment in patients with PFUI. The use of surgical realignment decreased from 31.7% to 6.2%, and endoscopic realignment increased from 9.7% to 35.3%. A bulbo-prostatic anastomosis was the most frequent (62.9%) delayed treatment in patients with PFUD. The use of the Badenoch pull-through decreased from 19.5% to 2.6%, and endoscopic holmium laser urethrotomy increased from 4.9% to 32.7%. Conclusions The spectrum of PFUI and subsequent treatment of PFUD has changed greatly over the last 10 years at our centre. These changes involved patient age, aetiology, emergency and delayed treatments, and were found to be related to changes in the economy and lifestyle of the Italian patients. PMID:26019976

  19. Urethral Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Injuries Ureteral Injuries Urethral Injuries Injuries to the Penis and Scrotum Most urethral injuries occur in men. ... leakage of urine into the tissues of the penis, scrotum, abdominal wall, or perineum (the area between ...

  20. Modified sonourethrography assists urethral catheterization.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Tomonori; Suzuki, Toshiro; Domen, Takahisa; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Masakuni; Hirakata, Shiro; Nagai, Takashi; Nakazawa, Masaki; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2016-07-01

    Sonourethrography (SUG) is an infrequently used modality to observe the male urethra. We modified SUG to examine the reasons for difficulty in urethral catheterization and to determine a safe approach to resolve these problems. Following retrograde urethral jelly injection, modified SUG (mSUG) was performed in male patients with difficulty in urethral catheterization. mSUG was performed using transcutaneous ultrasonography in patients for whom the catheter became lodged in the penile urethra. In other patients, mSUG was performed using transrectal ultrasonography. We divided the causes of difficult indwelling urethral catheterization into physiological and pathological conditions. With regard to physiological conditions, the urethral catheter became stuck in the bulbous portion, membranous urethra, and prostatic urethra. mSUG distinguished the problematic part of the urethra in real time, and it assisted in overcoming the problem. With regard to pathological conditions, urethral stricture after trauma or surgery was clearly demonstrated in the penile and prostatic portions of the urethra. As with physiological conditions, mSUG images assisted in navigating the catheter through the problematic pathological areas or demonstrated the need to abandon the catheterization. mSUG can visualize the male urethra clearly during urethral catheterization and provide real-time assistance with the procedure. PMID:26847624

  1. One-step treatment of proximal hypospadias by the autologous graft of cultured urethral epithelium.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, G; De Luca, M; Faranda, F; Franzi, A T; Cancedda, R

    1993-10-01

    Surgical management of severe proximal hypospadias or long strictures of the posterior urethra is a difficult clinical task. Often, the therapeutic approach involves the autologous graft of free flaps of bladder or oral mucosa. We recently reported the use of autologous graft of cultured squamous urethral epithelium during urethroplasty in patients with severe proximal hypospadias. The main limitation to the widespread use of cultured epithelium was the long hospitalization due to the requirement of 2 surgical steps. We now report a substantial modification of the surgical procedure which allows for rapid 1-step urethroplasty. Cultured squamous urethral epithelium is tubularized in vitro with the aid of a tubular polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex) support and 1-step urethroplasty is performed within 30 minutes. Results obtained in 8 patients are presented. PMID:8371392

  2. Endoscopic removal of a proximal urethral stent using a holmium laser: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Francisco; Thomas, Anil A.; Miocinovic, Ranko; Angermeier, Kenneth W.

    2012-01-01

    Urethral stents were initially developed for the management of urethral strictures and obstructive voiding disorders in select patients. Urethral stent complications are common and may require stent explantation, which is often quite challenging. We present our experience with endoscopic removal of an encrusted UroLume proximal urethral stent in a 72-year-old male using a holmium laser. The literature on various management options and outcomes for urethral stent removal is reviewed. Endoscopic removal of proximal urethral stents is feasible and safe and should be considered as the primary treatment option in patients requiring stent extraction. PMID:23248530

  3. Successful treatment of recurrent vesicourethral stricture after radical prostatectomy with holmium laser: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tetsuo; Yoshinaga, Atsushi; Ohno, Rena; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Toru; Yamada, Takumi; Kihara, Kazunori

    2005-04-01

    We report three cases with severe anastomotic strictures, which recurred several times after radical prostatectomy despite repeated treatments of urethral dilation, internal urethrotomy and/or transurethral resection. All three cases were finally treated with holmium laser successfully without any intraoperative or postoperative complications after repeated failures of each treatment. There were two specific characteristics in these three cases: the early onset of the stricture and the pinhole opening located on the top (12-o'clock) of the stricture wall. PMID:15948734

  4. Muscular, myocutaneous, and fasciocutaneous flaps in complex urethral reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zinman, Leonard

    2002-05-01

    The ability to achieve a long-term, stable, stricture-free, hairless urethral lumen in patients with complex anterior stricture and compromised genital skin is one of the ongoing challenges of reconstructive urologic surgery. The conservative approach by endoscopic urethrotomy or dilatation with a self-catheterization schedule rarely affects a definitive cure except in the short filmy superficial strictures of the bulbous portion of the urethra. Genital fasciocutaneous island flaps are currently the golden standard for definitive, reliable resolution of anterior urethral strictures in patients who have not undergone a prior surgical procedure that may alter the penile or scrotal circulation, or those with skin loss from trauma, decubiti, radiation, or balanitis xerotica obliterans. PMID:12371235

  5. [First experience of Ho:YAG laser urethrotomy in the treatment of strictures in patients with prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Lebedinets, A A; Shkol'nik, M I; Timofeev, D A

    2014-01-01

    Strictures of vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA), urethral strictures, and bladder neck obliteration are frequent complications occurring after treatment for prostate cancer and dramatically reducing the quality of life of the patients. To date, there is no single standard treatment of urethral strictures. One of the promising methods is laser optical urethrotomy using a solid-state Ho:YAG- laser. Since 2012, we treated 12 patients with strictures of VUA, urethral strictures, and bladder neck obliteration. According urethrography, the maximum length of stricture was 4.5 cm. Treatment efficacy was assessed at 6 months after surgery objectively according urethrography, uroflowmetry, and ultrasound of the bladder with the definition of residual urine; and subjectively--by IPSS questionnaire and QoL questionnaire. After removal of the urethral catheter, all patients had recovered independent urination, decreased IPSS scores by 59.5%, IPSS-QoL score by 45.87%, decreased residual urine volume by 89.92%, and increased maximum urinary flow rate by 78.19%. Intraoperative complications and early postoperative complications were not observed. Ho:YAG laser is a minimally invasive and safe tool for urethrotomy of strictures of VUA, urethral strictures, and bladder neck obliteration arising after treatment for prostate cancer. Definitive conclusions about the effectiveness of this method should be based on long-term results of comparative trials. PMID:25211930

  6. [Vaporization of urethral stenosis using the KTP 532 laser].

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, F; Oswald, M; Iselin, C; Rohner, S; Jichlinski, P; Delacrétaz, G; Leisinger, H J; Graber, P

    1997-01-01

    The authors treated 16 patients presenting with a total of 20 anterior urethral strictures using the KTP 16 Laser. The aetiology was iatrogenic in 50% of cases, infectious in 20% of cases, traumatic in 20% of cases and unknown in 10% of cases. The stricture was situated in the bulbous urethra (80%), membranous urethra (10%) or penil urethra (10%). Laser vaporization of the urethral stricture was performed over the entire circumference of the urethra when necessary, followed by bladder drainage by urethral catheter for 24 hours. All patients were prospectively reviewed at 3 weeks, 3 months and 6 months (clinical symptoms, uroflowmetry, cystourethrography). A complete symptom and urodynamic success was obtained in 13 patients (81%) at 3 and 6 months. The stricture recurred in 4 patients, but only three of them (19%) required treatment (reoperation of repeat dilatations). The mean maximum flow rate increased from 6 mL/s to 20 mL/s at 3 months and was maintained at 19 mL/s at 6 months. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were observed. In conclusion, our results confirm that KTP 532 laser urethral strictures is a reliable and effective method in the medium term. These good results also suggest an advantage in terms of the recurrence rate in comparison with internal urethrotomy. However, our series needs to be evaluated with a longer follow-up and prospective, randomized trials comparing the two methods need to be conducted. PMID:9157820

  7. Urethral stone presenting as a stop valve--a rare complication of balanitis xerotica obliterans.

    PubMed

    Dogra, P N; Singh, I; Khaitan, A

    2001-01-01

    Balanitis xerotic obliterans (BXO) is the genital subcategory of lichen sclerosis et atrophicus. The association of BXO with urethral stone causing interruption of the urinary stream and voiding by manual displacement of the urethral stone has not been described before. We describe one such case of a young boy with BXO and urethral stone who voided by manually displacing the stone for over a year. The case is reported to emphasize the ingenuity of the patient in continuing to void for over a year despite the association of the impacted urethral stone with urethral stricture and BXO. PMID:12092665

  8. Treatment of urethral diseases with neodymium:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Bloiso, G; Warner, R; Cohen, M

    1988-08-01

    Over a thirty-month period, a wide variety of common urethral problems were treated on an ambulatory basis, with the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. When used discriminately, laser treatment appears to be an effective modality for the management of selected urethral strictures. Thus far, excellent results have been obtained in 30 of 31 cases of short strictures where laser urethrotomy was performed as the first stricture procedure (average follow-up 10 months). Furthermore, in a series of 36 cases of secondary bladder neck contractures, all of the evaluated patients responded well (average follow-up 7 months). Good results were obtained in only 11 of 48 complicated strictures (average follow-up 14 months). However, while most of these extensive strictures were not eradicated, laser therapy generally produced a documented clinical improvement, comparable to urethrotomy or dilatation, in 15 of these cases. A series of 24 condylomata involving the urethra were treated satisfactorily, with no recurrences (average follow-up 13 months). Laser treatment also has been used successfully for the management of several urethral caruncles, urethral polyps, two meatal hemangiomas, one urethral carcinoma, and a distal duplicated urethra. Recently, the Nd:YAG laser has been applied to the prostatic urethra with vaporization of obstructing median bar hyperplasia. Favorable results have been achieved in 5 of 6 cases treated with a newly developed technique that utilizes direct laser contact. Retrograde ejaculation has not been encountered in these patients (average follow-up 6 months). All of these procedures have been accomplished in the office, largely without urethral catheterization. Lidocaine jelly occasionally supplemented with intravenous sedation provided satisfactory anesthesia. PMID:3400132

  9. Management of Long-Segment and Panurethral Stricture Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Francisco E.; Kulkarni, Sanjay B.; Joshi, Pankaj; Warner, Jonathan; Martins, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Long-segment urethral stricture or panurethral stricture disease, involving the different anatomic segments of anterior urethra, is a relatively less common lesion of the anterior urethra compared to bulbar stricture. However, it is a particularly difficult surgical challenge for the reconstructive urologist. The etiology varies according to age and geographic location, lichen sclerosus being the most prevalent in some regions of the globe. Other common and significant causes are previous endoscopic urethral manipulations (urethral catheterization, cystourethroscopy, and transurethral resection), previous urethral surgery, trauma, inflammation, and idiopathic. The iatrogenic causes are the most predominant in the Western or industrialized countries, and lichen sclerosus is the most common in India. Several surgical procedures and their modifications, including those performed in one or more stages and with the use of adjunct tissue transfer maneuvers, have been developed and used worldwide, with varying long-term success. A one-stage, minimally invasive technique approached through a single perineal incision has gained widespread popularity for its effectiveness and reproducibility. Nonetheless, for a successful result, the reconstructive urologist should be experienced and familiar with the different treatment modalities currently available and select the best procedure for the individual patient. PMID:26779259

  10. Internal Urethrotomy Under Local Urethral Anaesthesia Is Feasible With Sedation and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, Hakki; Zorba, Orhan Ünal; Tomak, Yakup; Bostan, Habip; Kalkan, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Background Urethral stricture is a common condition, and direct vision internal urethrotomy is prefered as the first treatment option by many urologists, for strictures shorter than 2 cm. This procedure is generally performed under general or spinal anaesthesia. Objectives To investigate the feasibility of adding local urethral anaesthesia to intravenous sedation and analgesia (sedoanalgesia) methods in patients undergoing internal urethrotomy. Patients and Methods A total of 21 and 15 patients with anterior urethral strictures underwent internal urethrotomy under local urethral anaesthesia, with or without sedoanalgesia, respectively. Patient discomfort and pain levels were evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS). Statistical analyses were calculated with a Mann-Whitney U test to compare difference in VAS scores between the subjects in both groups. Results Two of the 15 (13%) patients operated under local urethral anaesthesia without sedoanalgesia were converted to general anaesthesia due to patient intolerability. Mean pain VAS scores for patients operated under 2% lidocain urethral gel anaesthesia with or without sedoanalgesia were 2.86 cm and 4.5 cm, respectively (P = 0.001). In addition, a VAS score over 3 cm was found in 3 of the 21 (14%) patients with, and 13 of the 15 (86%) patients without sedoanalgesia (P = 0.001). Conclusions The addition of intravenous sedoanalgesia improved the VAS scores of pain and discomfort, compared to patients operated under only local urethral anaesthesia. This may offer patients safer anaesthesia and shorter operative times with equilavent results in selected patients. PMID:23573506

  11. Rectal strictures following abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T. M.; Bentley, P. G.

    2000-01-01

    Rectal stricture formation is a rare complication of aortic aneurysm repair. Two case are described here. A combination of hypotension, a compromised internal iliac circulation and poor collateral supply following inferior mesenteric artery ligation can result in acute ischaemic proctitis--an infrequently described clinical entity. Ulceration and necrosis are the sequelae of prolonged ischaemia and fibrous stricture formation may result. One patient responded to dilatation and posterior mid-rectal myotomy; the other failed to respond to conservative measures and eventually had an end colostomy fashioned following intractable symptoms. PMID:11103163

  12. Fossa Navicularis Strictures Due to 22F Catheters Used in Robotic Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ahlering, Thomas E.; Gelman, Joel; Skarecky, Douglas W.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Fossa navicularis strictures following radical prostatectomy are reported infrequently. We recently experienced a series of fossa strictures following robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Fossa strictures are usually procedure-induced, arising from urethral trauma or infection; catheter size has not been reported as a factor. We describe herein our experience to determine and prevent fossa navicularis stricture development. Methods: From June 2002 until February 2005, 248 patients underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy with the da Vinci surgical system at our institution. Fossa strictures were diagnosed based on acute onset of obstructive voiding symptoms, IPSS and flow pattern changes, and bougie calibration. During our series, we switched from an 18F to a 22F catheter to avoid inadvertent stapling of the urethra when dividing the dorsal venous complex. All patients had an 18F catheter placed after the anastomosis for 1 week. Parameters were evaluated using Fisher's exact test and the Student t test for means. Results: The 18F catheter group (n=117) developed 1 fossa stricture, whereas the 22F catheter group (n=131) developed 9 fossa strictures (P=0.02). The fossa stricture rate in the 18F group was 0.9% versus 6.9% in the 22F group. The 2 groups had no differences in age, body mass index, cardiovascular disease, International Prostate Symptom Score, urinary bother score, SHIM score, preoperative PSA, operative time, estimated blood loss, cautery use, prostate size, or catheterization time. Conclusions: Using a larger urethral catheter size during intraoperative dissection appears to increase the risk 8-fold for fossa stricture as compared with the 18F catheter. The pneumoperitoneum and prolonged extreme Trendelenberg position could potentially contribute to local urethral ischemia. PMID:17931514

  13. Missed diagnosis of complete urethral transection after sling: the case for translabial ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Rogo-Gupta, Lisa; Le, Ngoc-Bich; Raz, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    Patients with complications of urethral sling placement for stress urinary incontinence are often treated for recurrent symptoms for years after initial reassuring evaluation. Translabial ultrasound is a noninvasive modality with minimal risks that can clearly diagnose urethral mesh complications. We present a 47-year-old premenopausal woman referred for treatment of urethral stricture and diverticulum 8 years after mesh sling placement. The diagnosis was made at an outside institution by voiding cystourethrogram and cystoscopy. However, translabial ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis of complete urethral transection, and the patient underwent a complex urethral reconstruction. Ultrasound should be used to evaluate patients with a history of urethral sling and persistent lower urinary tract symptoms. Referral to a center with advanced pelvic reconstruction services may be required. PMID:22453271

  14. Tissue engineering in urethral reconstruction—an update

    PubMed Central

    Mangera, Altaf; Chapple, Christopher R

    2013-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering is rapidly progressing. Much work has gone into developing a tissue engineered urethral graft. Current grafts, when long, can create initial donor site morbidity. In this article, we evaluate the progress made in finding a tissue engineered substitute for the human urethra. Researchers have investigated cell-free and cell-seeded grafts. We discuss different approaches to developing these grafts and review their reported successes in human studies. With further work, tissue engineered grafts may facilitate the management of lengthy urethral strictures requiring oral mucosa substitution urethroplasty. PMID:23042444

  15. Recurrent urethral hairball and stone in a hypospadiac: management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Hemal, A K

    2001-08-01

    A 32-year-old perineal hypospadiac man presented with recurrent urethral hair growth, stone, and stricture with a history of multiple urethroplasties. He was treated by urethrolithotomy, internal urethrotomy, laser epilation of the hair-bearing urethral graft, closure of the fistula, and chemical depilation of the neourethral hair. A dilute solution of thioglycolate was prophylactically instilled into the neourethra at intervals of 3 months to ensure complete tricholysis and to prevent recurrent hair growth in the future. PMID:11552792

  16. Electrospun Poly(l-lactide)/Poly(ethylene glycol) Scaffolds Seeded with Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Urethral Epithelium Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiaokui; Guo, Qianping; Han, Fengxuan; Chen, Chunyang; Ling, Christopher; Chen, Weiguo; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering-based urethral replacement holds potential for repairing large segmental urethral defects, which remains a great challenge at present. This study aims to explore the potential of combining biodegradable poly(l-lactide) (PLLA)/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) scaffolds and human amniotic mesenchymal cells (hAMSCs) for repairing urethral defects. PLLA/PEG fibrous scaffolds with various PEG fractions were fabricated via electrospinning. The scaffolds were then seeded with hAMSCs prior to implantation in New Zealand male rabbits that had 2.0 cm-long defects in the urethras. The rabbits were randomly divided into three groups. In group A, hAMSCs were grown on PLLA/PEG scaffolds for two days and then implanted to the urethral defects. In group B, only the PLLA/PEG scaffolds were used to rebuild the rabbit urethral defect. In group C, the urethral defect was reconstructed using a regular urethral reparation technique. The repair efficacy was compared among the three groups by examining the urethral morphology, tissue reconstruction, luminal patency, and complication incidence (including calculus formation, urinary fistula, and urethral stricture) using histological evaluation and urethral radiography methods. Findings from this study indicate that hAMSCs-loaded PLLA/PEG scaffolds resulted in the best urethral defect repair in rabbits, which predicts the promising application of a tissue engineering approach for urethral repair. PMID:27517902

  17. Recurrent urethrovesical anastomotic strictures following artificial urinary sphincter implantation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The management of an anastomotic stricture after a radical prostatectomy can become a complex and difficult situation when an artificial urinary sphincter precedes the formation of the stricture. The urethral narrowing does not allow the passage of the routinely used urological instruments and no previous reports have suggested alternate approaches. Case presentation We present the case of a 68-year-old Greek man diagnosed as having a recurrent anastomotic stricture approximately two years after a radical prostatectomy and three years after the implantation of an artificial urinary sphincter, and propose novel alternate methods of treatment. Our patient was first subjected to stricture incision with the use of a rigid ureteroscope with a holmium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser fiber, which was followed by a second successful attempt with the use of a pediatric resectoscope. After a one-year follow-up, our patient is doing well, with no evidence of recurrence. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the management of recurrent urethral strictures following an artificial urinary sphincter implantation. Minimal invasive techniques with the use of small caliber instruments may offer efficient treatment options, diminishing the danger of urethral corrosion. PMID:22472293

  18. Esophageal stricture - benign

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines) can keep a peptic stricture from returning. Surgery is rarely needed. If you have eosinophilic esophagitis, you may need to take medicines or make changes to your diet to reduce the inflammation. In some cases, dilation is done.

  19. Esophageal stricture - benign

    MedlinePlus

    ... you from getting enough fluids and nutrients. Solid food, especially meat, can get stuck above the stricture. If this happens, endoscopy would be needed to remove the lodged food. There is also a higher risk of having ...

  20. Reconstruction of Rabbit Urethral Epithelium with Skin Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rogovaya, O. S.; Fayzulin, A. K.; Vasiliev, A. V.; Kononov, A. V.; Terskikh, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the living skin equivalent (LSE) as an alternative source of plastic material for closing full-thickness epithelial-stromal urethral injuries. The possibility of transdifferentiation of epidermal keratinocytes, a component of 3D tissue constructs, was investigated in vivo in a model of the recovery of urethral injuries in laboratory rabbits. Autologous grafting of LSE in de-epithelialized urethra showed that skin keratinocytes placed in a specific in vivo microenvironment can be incorporated into the damaged area and function as urothelium. The use of EGFP transfected keratinocytes allowed us to identify transplanted cells. The reconstructed urethral tubes did not develop strictures or fistulas at the site of the grafted LSE. Immunohistochemical studies of neo-urothelium revealed EGFP-positive cells expressing the urothelial markers K7 and UP3. PMID:25927003

  1. Reconstruction of rabbit urethral epithelium with skin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rogovaya, O S; Fayzulin, A K; Vasiliev, A V; Kononov, A V; Terskikh, V V

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the living skin equivalent (LSE) as an alternative source of plastic material for closing full-thickness epithelial-stromal urethral injuries. The possibility of transdifferentiation of epidermal keratinocytes, a component of 3D tissue constructs, was investigated in vivo in a model of the recovery of urethral injuries in laboratory rabbits. Autologous grafting of LSE in de-epithelialized urethra showed that skin keratinocytes placed in a specific in vivo microenvironment can be incorporated into the damaged area and function as urothelium. The use of EGFP transfected keratinocytes allowed us to identify transplanted cells. The reconstructed urethral tubes did not develop strictures or fistulas at the site of the grafted LSE. Immunohistochemical studies of neo-urothelium revealed EGFP-positive cells expressing the urothelial markers K7 and UP3. PMID:25927003

  2. Inability to pass a urethral catheter: the bedside role of the flexible cystoscope.

    PubMed

    Beaghler, M; Grasso, M; Loisides, P

    1994-08-01

    An all too common cause of urologic consultation is the inability to place a urethral catheter. Often other health care providers have unsuccessfully attempted catheter placement. Urethral false passages, perforations, and edema are common sequelae. Diseases such as urethral strictures, bladder neck contractures, and prostate cancer are often the underlying etiologies for failed catheterization. Traditionally, the use of filiforms and followers or the placement of a suprapubic tube is required to drain the lower urinary tract. Bedside flexible endoscopy was performed in this series not only to define the area and etiology of urethral obstruction, but also to facilitate catheter placement. Fifty-four patients were studied prospectively. Initial endoscopic assessment was based on bedside flexible cystoscopy. Most procedures were performed under topical lidocaine anesthetic. Under direct vision a 0.038 inch standard guide wire was directed through the area or areas of obstruction. Strictures, fibrosis, and false passages were dilated using a series of graduated Nottingham dilators over the guide wire. A Council-tipped urethral catheter was then placed over the guide wire to assure bladder drainage. In 52 of the 54 patients urethral obstructions were dilated and drainage catheters were placed into the bladder. No complications were encountered. This technique is simple, it avoids suprapubic puncture, and it minimizes unneeded trips to the operating room. PMID:8048205

  3. Laser lithotripsy of a urethral calculus via ischial urethrotomy in a steer.

    PubMed

    Streeter, R N; Washburn, K E; Higbee, R G; Bartels, K E

    2001-09-01

    A steer examined because of obstructive urolithiasis and urethral rupture underwent laser lithotripsy, using a chromium-thulium-holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser inserted through an ischial urethrotomy. Procedures were performed with caudal epidural anesthesia. Six months after surgery, the urethra was patent with no clinical evidence of urethral stricture or fistula. Ischial urethrotomy provided rapid access to the bladder for catheterization and to the obstructive urolith for lithotripsy. Laser lithotripsy was a rapid and effective means of urolith removal in this steer. PMID:11549094

  4. Tissue Engineering for Human Urethral Reconstruction: Systematic Review of Recent Literature

    PubMed Central

    de Kemp, Vincent; de Graaf, Petra; Fledderus, Joost O.; Ruud Bosch, J. L. H.; de Kort, Laetitia M. O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Techniques to treat urethral stricture and hypospadias are restricted, as substitution of the unhealthy urethra with tissue from other origins (skin, bladder or buccal mucosa) has some limitations. Therefore, alternative sources of tissue for use in urethral reconstructions are considered, such as ex vivo engineered constructs. Purpose To review recent literature on tissue engineering for human urethral reconstruction. Methods A search was made in the PubMed and Embase databases restricted to the last 25 years and the English language. Results A total of 45 articles were selected describing the use of tissue engineering in urethral reconstruction. The results are discussed in four groups: autologous cell cultures, matrices/scaffolds, cell-seeded scaffolds, and clinical results of urethral reconstructions using these materials. Different progenitor cells were used, isolated from either urine or adipose tissue, but slightly better results were obtained with in vitro expansion of urothelial cells from bladder washings, tissue biopsies from the bladder (urothelium) or the oral cavity (buccal mucosa). Compared with a synthetic scaffold, a biological scaffold has the advantage of bioactive extracellular matrix proteins on its surface. When applied clinically, a non-seeded matrix only seems suited for use as an onlay graft. When a tubularized substitution is the aim, a cell-seeded construct seems more beneficial. Conclusions Considerable experience is available with tissue engineering of urethral tissue in vitro, produced with cells of different origin. Clinical and in vivo experiments show promising results. PMID:25689740

  5. Laparoendoscopic Management of Midureteral Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Komninos, Christos; Koo, Kyo Chul

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of ureteral strictures has increased worldwide owing to the widespread use of laparoscopic and endourologic procedures. Midureteral strictures can be managed by either an endoscopic approach or surgical reconstruction, including open or minimally invasive (laparoscopic/robotic) techniques. Minimally invasive surgical ureteral reconstruction is gaining in popularity in the management of midureteral strictures. However, only a few studies have been published so far regarding the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic and robotic ureteral reconstruction procedures. Nevertheless, most of the studies have reported at least equivalent outcomes with the open approach. In general, strictures more than 2 cm, injury strictures, and strictures associated either with radiation or with reduced renal function of less than 25% may be managed more appropriately by minimally invasive surgical reconstruction, although the evidence to establish these recommendations is not yet adequate. Defects of 2 to 3 cm in length may be treated with laparoscopic or robot-assisted uretero-ureterostomy, whereas defects of 12 to 15 cm may be managed either via ureteral reimplantation with a Boari flap or via transuretero-ureterostomy in case of low bladder capacity. Cases with more extended defects can be reconstructed with the incorporation of the ileum in ureteral repair. PMID:24466390

  6. Stricture length and etiology as preoperative independent predictors of recurrence after urethroplasty: A multivariate analysis of 604 urethroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Kinnaird, Adam S.; Levine, Max A.; Ambati, Druvtej; Zorn, Jeff D.; Rourke, Keith F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We determine the preoperative identifiable risk factors during staging that predict stricture recurrence after urethroplasty. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all urethroplasties performed at a Canadian tertiary referral centre from 2003 to 2012. Failure was defined as a recurrent stricture <16 Fr on cystoscopic assessment. Multivariate analysis was calculated by Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: In total, 604 of 651 (93%) urethroplasties performed had adequate data with a mean follow-up of 52 months. Overall urethral patency was 90.7% with failures occurring between 2 weeks and 77 months postoperatively. The average time to recurrence was 11.7 months, with most patients with recurrence within 6 months (42/56; 75%). Multivariate regression identified Lichen sclerosus, iatrogenic, and infectious etiologies to be independently associated with stricture recurrence with hazard ratios (HR) (95% confidence interval) of 5.9 (2.1–16.5; p ≤ 0.001), 3.4 (1.2–10; p = 0.02), and 7.3 (2.3–23.7; p ≤ 0.001), respectively. Strictures ≥5cm recurred significantly more often (13.8% vs. 5.9%) with a HR 2.3 (1.2–4.5; p ≤ 0.01). Comorbidities, smoking, previous urethroplasty, stricture location and an age ≥50 were not associated with recurrence. Conclusion: Urethroplasty in general is an excellent treatment for urethral stricture with patency rates approaching 91%. While recurrences occur over 6 years after surgery, most (75%) recur within the first 6 months. Long segment strictures (≥5 cm), as well as Lichen sclerosus, infectious and iatrogenic etiologies, are associated with increased risk of recurrence. Limitations include the retrospective, single-centre nature of the study and the 7% loss to follow-up due to the centre being a regional referral one. PMID:24940453

  7. Single stage circumferential lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty in near obliterative bulbar urethra stricture: A novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Umesh; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay; Garg, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Aims: This is a prospective study of the use and efficacy of a novel technique of circumferential tubularised lingual mucosal graft (LMG) in obliterative and near obliterative bulbar urethral stricture of >2 cm where excisional and augmented anastomotic urethroplasty are not feasible. Materials and Methods: The stenotic urethral segment was opened dorsally in midline and fibrosed urethra was excised taking care to preserve the healthy spongiosum tissue. LMG (av. Length 3 cm) was placed from one end of corporal body towards spongy tissue in a circumferential manner. Another LMG was placed in similar manner to deal with longer stricture. The urethra was tubularised over 14 Fr silicone catheter. Results: A total of 12 men, of mean age 47 years underwent this procedure. The mean follow up period was 11 months starting from July 2014 till manuscript submission. Follow up included voiding cystourethrogram at 3 weeks, cystoscopy at 3 months (one patient didn’t turned up) and subsequent follow up. Mean stricture length was 4.66 cm (range, 3–8.5 cm) and mean operative time was 195 min. (range, 160 to 200 min.). The technique was successful (normal voiding with no need for any post-operative procedure) in 11(91.6%) patients. One patient developed early recurrence at 4 month of surgery and had anastomotic stricture which was successfully managed by direct visual internal urethrotomy. Conclusion: Single stage circumferential tubularised graft urethroplasty is an excellent technique for strictures that include segments of obliterative and near obliterative diseased urethra. It provide a wider neourethra than patch graft urethroplasty. PMID:27141182

  8. Steroid Treatment for Recurrent Epididymitis Secondary to Idiopathic Urethritis and Urethrovasal Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Ninan, G. K.; Bhishma, Preethi; Patel, Ramnik

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of recurrent left-sided epididymitis secondary to severe idiopathic posterior urethritis extending to left seminal vesicle and vas deference with associated urethrovasal reflux (UVR). Cystourethroscopy and micturating cystourethrogram were essential for the diagnosis. Following cystourethroscopy, intravesical, and urethral instillation of topical steroid triamcinolone, patient had a full recovery. Idiopathic urethritis in association with veru montentitis, utriculitis leading to left-sided UVR, inflammation of the seminal vesicle, and vas deference causing secondary epididymitis is rare. We report the first such rare case presenting as recurrent acute scrotum and response to innovative treatment we used. PMID:25755955

  9. Aspects of urethrality in women.

    PubMed

    Bass, A

    1994-07-01

    It has long been noticed that women experience direct sexual stimulation from urethral practices that men do not. However, this empirical finding remains to be integrated with the general theory of female psychosexual development. An attempt is made to begin such an integration, with a focus on urethral perversions or perverse trends. PMID:7972586

  10. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjeet Kumar; Ansari, Ms

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum (CAUD) may be found all along the anterior urethra and may present itself at any age, from infant to adult. Most children with this condition present with difficulty in initiating micturition, dribbling of urine, poor urinary stream, or urinary tract infection. A careful history will reveal that these children never had a good urinary stream since birth, and the telltale sign is a cystic swelling of the penile urethra. In this paper, we present two cases of CAUD that were managed by excision of the diverticulum with primary repair. PMID:26328174

  11. Idiopathic urethritis in children: Classification and treatment with steroids

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Sivasankar; Pringle, Kirsty; Ninan, George K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic urethritis [IU] in children is of unknown etiology and treatment options are limited. We propose a classification for IU based on cystourethroscopy findings and symptoms (Grade 1 – 4) and report our experience with use of topical and oral steroids in IU. Materials and Methods: Retrospective data collection of all male children (0-16 years) diagnosed with IU over a period of 8 years between 2005 and 2012 at our institution. Data was collected on patient demographics, laboratory and radiological investigations, cystourethroscopy findings, management and outcomes. Results: A total of 19 male children were diagnosed with IU. The median age of the patients was 13(7-16) years. Presenting symptoms included dysuria in 12; hematuria in 9; loin pain in 6; and scrotal pain in 2 patients. Both patients with scrotal pain had previous left scrotal exploration that revealed epididymitis. Serum C-reactive protein and Full blood count was tested in 15 patients and was within normal limits in all of them. Cystourethroscopy revealed urethritis of grade-I in 2; grade-II in 11; and grade-III in 3 patients. There were 3 patients with systemic symptoms from extra-urethral extension of inflammation (grade-IV). Mean follow up was 18.9(1-74) months. All patients had steroid instillation at the time of cystourethroscopy. Three patients with IU grade IV required oral steroids (prednisolone) in view of exacerbation of symptoms and signs despite steroid instillation. Complete resolution of symptoms and signs occurred in 18(94.7%) patients. Significant improvement in symptoms and signs was noted in 1(5.3%) patient who is still undergoing treatment. Conclusions: IU in male children can be successfully managed with steroid instillation, especially in grade I and II. Grade III, will need steroid instillation but treatment of scarring and stricture will necessitate longer duration of treatment. In children with IU and extra-urethral symptoms (grade IV), oral steroids may be

  12. The management of the acute setting of pelvic fracture urethral injury (realignment vs. suprapubic cystostomy alone)

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Jonathan N.; Santucci, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Background In patients with pelvic fracture urethral injury there are two options for management: First, to realign as an early primary realignment over a catheter; and second, to place a suprapubic tube with delayed urethroplasty of the inevitable stricture. Methods We reviewed previous reports from 1990 to the present, comparing early endoscopic realignment, early open realignment and suprapubic tube placement, to determine the rates of incontinence, erectile dysfunction and stricture formation. Results Twenty-nine articles were identified. The rates of erectile dysfunction, incontinence, and stricture formation, respectively, were: for early endoscopic realignment, 20.5%, 5.8% and 43.8%; for open realignment over a catheter, 16.7%, 4.7% and 48.9%; and for a suprapubic tube and delayed urethroplasty 13.7%, 5.0%, and 89.0%. A one-way anova showed no difference in the mean rate of erectile dysfunction (P = 0.53) or incontinence (P = 0.73), and only stricture formation was significantly different (P < 0.1). Conclusion The rates of incontinence and erectile dysfunction are similar between the groups. Only the rate of stricture formation was higher in the suprapubic tube and delayed urethroplasty group. PMID:26019971

  13. [One-stage surgical correction of complex urethral stenoses with a pedicled skin graft].

    PubMed

    Falandry, L

    1991-01-01

    The author reports his experience and the results of a series of 104 patients suffering from urethral strictures, operated by the same operator from September 1984 to March 1990 and treated by the same surgical method: one stage urethroplasty using a pedicled skin graft. The principles which guided his technique are: complete exposure of the pathological tissue, appropriate size and cut of the graft from a healthy skin zone, careful dissection of the pedicle, elliptical anastomosis at each end and sparing of the corpora cavernosa. Eighty percent of the urethral strictures encountered in the series were complex and situated in various locations: 19 were penile, 55 were bulbar perineal, 30 were bulbar membranous. The urethral strictures were fistulated for 31 cases, multi-operated in 32 case, half of the cases had upstream repercussions from the stenosed zone, and 17 cases had an accompanying pathology. Ninety-one percent of the patients benefited from a patch graft designed to widen the stenosed zone, while a tubular graft was performed for 13 patients to reconstitute a neo-urethra. For a large number of the cases studied, postoperative follow-up was done for two years and for some cases exceeded two years. The operative results were quickly obtained. Good results observed after 3 months generally did not deteriorate thereafter, whereas bad results observed immediately after operation are not definitive since they can be reoperated by the same technique. For 82.7% of the patients, definitive cure was obtained, while 96% of the total number of patients showed considerable improvement. The intermediate results, average (13.6%) and the bad results (3.6%) both show the same inducing factors: past history of localized dilatory manipulations, infected areas but mostly defective application of management techniques. The superiority of this type of surgical technique and its reliability are stressed in the discussion. Also analysed are the following: the difficulty

  14. Endoscopic management of post-traumatic prostatic and supraprostatic strictures using Neodymium-YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Ghulam; Dogra, Prem Nath

    2002-12-01

    We assessed the feasibility, efficacy and long-term results of endoscopic management using Neodymium-YAG (Nd-YAG) laser as a day care procedure in patients with post-traumatic supraprostatic and prostatic strictures. Three patients with post-traumatic prostatic and supraprostatic obliterative strictures underwent Nd-YAG laser core through urethrotomy as a day care procedure. Patient age ranged between 12 and 14 years. Mean duration of injury was 16 months. The length of stricture was assessed by bi-directional endoscopy prior to the procedure in all cases. Core through procedure was carried out using Nd-YAG laser under the guidance of a cystoscope placed antegradely. Patients were discharged on the same day with urethral catheter. Foley catheters were removed at 6 weeks. Nd-YAG laser core through procedure was carried out successfully in all cases with negligible blood loss in a mean time of 48 min. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Patients were discharged on the same day. Follow-up cystogram was conducted at 6 weeks and urethroscopy at months. At a mean follow-up of 23 months, patients were asymptomatic and voiding well. Nd-YAG laser core through urethrotomy is a safe and effective procedure. It is a less invasive alternative to more complex urethroplasty procedures for patients with post-traumatic prostatic and supraprostatic strictures. It can be carried out as a day care procedure in carefully selected patients and has no complications. PMID:12492959

  15. Endoscopic management of hilar biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    Hilar biliary strictures are caused by various benign and malignant conditions. It is difficult to differentiate benign and malignant strictures. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary strictures are frequently encountered. Endoscopic management of these strictures is challenging. An endoscopic method has been advocated that involves placement of increasing number of stents at regular intervals to resolve the stricture. Malignant hilar strictures are mostly unresectable at the time of diagnosis and only palliation is possible.Endoscopic palliation is preferred over surgery or radiological intervention. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is quite important in the management of these strictures. Metal stents are superior to plastic stents. The opinion is divided over the issue of unilateral or bilateral stenting.Minimal contrast or no contrast technique has been advocated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of these patients. The role of intraluminal brachytherapy, intraductal ablation devices, photodynamic therapy, and endoscopic ultrasound still remains to be defined. PMID:26191345

  16. Endoscopic management of hilar biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Virendra

    2015-07-10

    Hilar biliary strictures are caused by various benign and malignant conditions. It is difficult to differentiate benign and malignant strictures. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary strictures are frequently encountered. Endoscopic management of these strictures is challenging. An endoscopic method has been advocated that involves placement of increasing number of stents at regular intervals to resolve the stricture. Malignant hilar strictures are mostly unresectable at the time of diagnosis and only palliation is possible.Endoscopic palliation is preferred over surgery or radiological intervention. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is quite important in the management of these strictures. Metal stents are superior to plastic stents. The opinion is divided over the issue of unilateral or bilateral stenting.Minimal contrast or no contrast technique has been advocated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of these patients. The role of intraluminal brachytherapy, intraductal ablation devices, photodynamic therapy, and endoscopic ultrasound still remains to be defined. PMID:26191345

  17. Ruptured urinary bladder attributable to urethral compression by a haematoma after vertebral fracture in a bull

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In male cattle, rupture of the urinary bladder is usually associated with urethral obstruction by uroliths. Less common causes include urethral compression or stricture. This case report describes the findings in a young Limousion breeding bull with rupture of the urinary bladder because of urethral compression by a haematoma after coccygeal fracture. Case presentation The bull had been introduced into a 40-head Red-Holstein herd one week before being injured. One week after introduction to the herd, the bull had an acute onset of anorexia and he was referred to the clinic. There was marked abdominal distension, reduced skin turgor and enophthalmus. The serum concentration of urea and creatinine was increased. Ultrasonographic examination revealed severe ascites and abdominocentesis yielded clear yellow fluid with high urea and creatinine concentrations, which supported a diagnosis of uroperitoneum. The bull was euthanatized because of a poor prognosis. Postmortem examination revealed a comminuted fracture of the first two coccygeal vertebrae associated with a massive haematoma that obstructed entire pelvic cavity. The haematoma compressed the urethra thereby preventing outflow of urine, which resulted in a 5-cm tear ventrally at the neck of the bladder. It was assumed that the newly-introduced bull had sustained the vertebral fractures when he was mounted by a cow. Conclusions The present case study serves to expand the differential diagnosis of urinary bladder rupture. Therefore, in addition to obstructive urolithiasis, compression and stricture of the urethra might be considered in male cattle with uroperitoneum. PMID:24666697

  18. Gram stain of urethral discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Urethral discharge Gram stain ... microscope slide. A series of stains called a Gram stain is applied to the specimen. The stained ... culture ) should be performed in addition to the gram stain. More sophisticated diagnostic tests (such as PCR ...

  19. Detailed urethral dosimetry in the evaluation of prostate brachytherapy-related urinary morbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Zachariah A.; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@wheelinghospital.com; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Kurko, Brian; Anderson, Richard L.; Murray, Brian C.; Galbreath, Robert W.

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy and urethral doses calculated at the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm. Methods and Materials: From February 1998 through July 2002, 186 consecutive patients without a prior history of a transurethral resection underwent monotherapeutic brachytherapy (no supplemental external beam radiation therapy or androgen deprivation therapy) with urethral-sparing techniques (average urethral dose 100%-140% minimum peripheral dose) for clinical T1c-T2b (2002 AJCC) prostate cancer. The median follow-up was 45.5 months. Urinary morbidity was defined by time to International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) resolution, maximum increase in IPSS, catheter dependency, and the need for postimplant surgical intervention. An alpha blocker was initiated approximately 2 weeks before implantation and continued at least until the IPSS returned to baseline. Evaluated parameters included overall urethral dose (average and maximum), doses to the base, midprostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm, patient age, clinical T stage, preimplant IPSS, ultrasound volume, isotope, and D90 and V100/150/200. Results: Of the 186 patients, 176 (94.6%) had the urinary catheter permanently removed on the day of implantation with only 1 patient requiring a urinary catheter >5 days. No patient had a urethral stricture and only 2 patients (1.1%) required a postbrachytherapy transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). For the entire cohort, IPSS on average peaked 2 weeks after implantation with a mean and median time to IPSS resolution of 14 and 3 weeks, respectively. For the entire cohort, only isotope predicted for IPSS resolution, while neither overall average prostatic urethra nor segmental urethral dose predicted for IPSS resolution. The maximum postimplant IPSS increase was best predicted by preimplant IPSS and the maximum apical urethral dose. Conclusions: With the routine use of prophylactic alpha

  20. Urethral Stone Disease Leading to Retention After Hair-bearing Neophalloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Viviano, Robert; Morganstern, Bradley A.; O'Toole, Adam

    2014-01-01

    A 35-year-old male patient with a past history of traumatic penile amputation and subsequent penile reconstruction with a radial artery free flap phalloplasty presented to the urology clinic for urinary retention and complaint of a firm penile mass. The patient had been lost to follow-up for 2 years before this presentation. Patient had a suprapubic tube in place from initial surgery, with imaging showing 2 large uroliths encrusted around the end. Urethral stricture was suspected in the patient. On cystoscopy, an additional obstructing urolith was found in penile urethra, appearing to have formed in situ. PMID:26955545

  1. High peptic stricture of the oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J S

    1976-02-01

    Fifty-seven patients with high peptic stricture and the lower oesophagus lined by columnar epithelium are considered from the clinical point of view. Information from 115 cases of low stricture is introduced for comparison. The average age of adult patients was 62 years with a sex incidence of 36 females to 21 males. There is little difference between the symptoms of high and low strictures. Radiologically, the majority of high strictures are short and smooth but other types are illustrated. Carcinoma and congenital mid-oesophageal web are considered in the differential diagnosis. There was an associated duodenal ulcer in 10% of cases. In six patients, a high stricture developed soon after an abdominal operation or period of recumbency. Two patients are illustrated showing the process of stricture formation. Four patients are described who had gastric-lined oesophagus but no ulceration of stricture. One patient had a Barrett ulcer in addition to a high stricture. A patient is described in whom the mucosa of the lower oesophagus appeared to be replaced by jejunal mucosa following oesophagojejunostomy. One patient is illustrated in whom a stricture was seen to ascend the oesophagus over a period of six years. Thirty-three patients were treated by dilatation and 24 by operation. Hernial repair is an effective form of treatment. Of 19 patients treated in this way, significant dysphagia persisted in two and slight dysphagia in one. The clinical findings are discussed in relation to the origin of columnar epithelium in the oesophagus. PMID:1257929

  2. Anterior Urethral Valves: Not Such a Benign Condition…

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Diaz, Omar; Salomon, Anahi; Rosenberg, Eran; Moldes, Juan Manuel; de Badiola, Francisco; Labbie, Andrew Scott; Gosalbez, Rafael; Castellan, Miguel Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Anterior urethral valves (AUVs) is an unusual cause of congenital obstruction of the male urethra, being 15–30 times less common than posterior urethral valves (PUVs). It has been suggested that patients with congenital anterior urethral obstruction have a better prognosis than those with PUV, with less hydronephrosis, and a lower incidence of chronic renal insufficiency (5 vs. 30%). The long-term prognosis of AUVs is not clear in the literature. In this report we describe our experience and long-term follow up of patients with anterior urethral valve. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively identified 13 patients who presented with the diagnosis of AUVs in our institutions between January 1994 and June 2012. Two patients were excluded: one patient had no follow up after intervention; the other had a follow up <1 year. From the 11 patients included, we evaluated the gestational age, prenatal and postnatal ultrasound findings, voiding cystourethrogram findings, age upon valve ablation, micturition pattern, creatinine, and clinical follow up. Results: Between 1994 and 2012 we evaluated 150 patients with the diagnosis of urethral valves. Of this group, 11 patients (7.3%) had AUVs and an adequate follow up. Mean follow up is 6.3 years (2.5–12 years). Five (45.4%) patients had prenatal diagnosis of AUV. The most common prenatal ultrasonographic finding was bilateral hydronephrosis and distended bladder. One patient showed a large perineal cystic mass, which was confirmed to be a dilated anterior urethra. The mean gestational age was 37.6 weeks (27–40 WGA). Postnatally, 90% had trabeculated bladder, 80% hydronephrosis, and 40% renal dysplasia. The most common clinical presentation was urinary tract infection in five patients (45.4%), followed by weak urinary stream found in four patients (36.3%). The age at initial surgical intervention ranged between 7 days and 13 years. Seven (63.6%) patients had primary transurethral valve resection or

  3. Anterior Urethral Valve: A Rare But an Important Cause of Infravesical Urinary Tract Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Jitendra P.; Mohan, Chander; Vora, Maulik P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Urethral valves are infravesical congenital anomalies, with the posterior urethral valve (PUV) being the most prevalent one. Anterior urethral valve (AUV) is a rare but a well-known congenital anomaly. AUV and diverticula can cause severe obstruction, whose repercussions on the proximal urinary system can be important. Few cases have been described; both separately and in association with urethral diverticulum. The presentation of such a rare but important case led us to a report with highlighting its classic imaging features. Case Report We present a case report of AUV with lower urinary tract symptoms in a 6-year-old boy with complaints of a poor stream of urine and strain to void. Unique findings were seen on Retrograde Urethrography (RGU) and Voiding Cysto-Urethrography (VCUG), i.e. linear incomplete filling defect in the penile urethra and associated mild dilatation of the anterior urethra ending in a smooth bulge. On cysto-urethroscopy the anterior urethral valve was confirmed and fulguration was done. Conclusions Congenital anterior urethral valve is an uncommon but important cause of infravesical lower urinary tract obstruction that is more common in male urethra. It can occur as an isolated AUV or in association with diverticulum and VATER anomalies. Early diagnosis and management of this rare condition is very important to prevent further damage, infection and vesicoureteral reflux. AUV may be associated with other congenital anomalies of the urinary system; therefore a full evaluation of the urinary system is essential. PMID:27231492

  4. Management of Biliary Strictures After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nicolas A.

    2015-01-01

    Strictures of the bile duct are a well-recognized complication of liver transplant and account for more than 50% of all biliary complications after deceased donor liver transplant and living donor liver transplant. Biliary strictures that develop after transplant are classified as anastomotic strictures or nonanastomotic strictures, depending on their location in the bile duct. The incidence, etiology, natural history, and response to therapy of the 2 types vary greatly, so their distinction is clinically important. The imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis of biliary strictures is magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography because of its high rate of diagnostic accuracy and limited risk of complications. Biliary strictures that develop after liver transplant may be managed with endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), or surgical revision, including retransplant. The initial treatment of choice for these strictures is ERC with progressive balloon dilation and the placement of increasing numbers of plastic stents. PTC and surgery are generally reserved for failures of endoscopic therapy or for anatomic variants that are not suitable for ERC. In this article, we discuss the classification of biliary strictures, their diagnosis, and the therapeutic strategies that can be used to manage these common complications of liver transplant. PMID:27482175

  5. Single stage ventral onlay buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty for navicular fossa strictures

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Puskar Shyam; Nayak, Prasant; Mallick, Sujata; Gurumurthy, Srinivasan; David, Deepak; Mossadeq, A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The correction of fossa navicularis strictures poses a distinct reconstructive challenge as it requires attention to cosmesis, in addition to urethral patency. Different graft and flap based repairs have been described with variable success rates. However, the ideal management remains unclear. The feasibility and efficacy of a single stage ventral onlay buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty (VOBMGU) for navicular fossa strictures (NFS) was evaluated in the present study. Subjects and Methods: All patients with NFS attending urology out-patient department from March, 2009 onward accepting VOBMGU were evaluated prospectively. Patients with minimum 1 year of follow-up were included for analysis. The technique involves opening the diseased stenosed meatus ventrally up to the corona. The diseased mucosa is excised leaving a midline strip of native urethral mucosa on the dorsal side. The buccal mucosal graft (BMG) is fixed on either side of this strip over a 24 Fr. silicone catheter. The glans wings are apposed in midline taking anchoring bites on the mucosal graft ventrally. Post-operatively patients were reviewed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months and annually thereafter. Cosmetic acceptance and splaying of the urinary stream was assessed with individual questionnaires. Results: A total of six patients underwent VOBMGU. Average flow rate at 3 months post-operatively was 12 ml/s. The end result was cosmetically highly acceptable. There was no fistula in any of the cases. With a median follow-up of 37 months, only one patient had a recurrence of stricture in a proximal site. Conclusions: VOBMGU is a viable technique for reconstruction of NFS with promising short term results. However, long-term follow-up is necessary. PMID:24497676

  6. Cell-Seeded Tubularized Scaffolds for Reconstruction of Long Urethral Defects: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Orabi, Hazem; AbouShwareb, Tamer; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yoo, James J.; Atala, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Background The treatment options for patients requiring repair of a long segment of the urethra are limited by the availability of autologous tissues. We previously reported that acellular collagen-based tubularized constructs seeded with cells are able to repair small urethral defects in a rabbit model. Objective We explored the feasibility of engineering clinically relevant long urethras for surgical reconstruction in a canine preclinical model. Design, setting, and participants Autologous bladder epithelial and smooth muscle cells from 15 male dogs were grown and seeded onto preconfigured collagen-based tubular matrices (6 cm in length). The perineal urethral segment was removed in 21 male dogs. Urethroplasties were performed with tubularized collagen scaffolds seeded with cells in 15 animals. Tubularized constructs without cells were implanted in six animals. Serial urethrography and three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) scans were performed pre- and postoperatively at 1, 3, 6, and 12 mo. The animals were euthanized at their predetermined time points (three animals at 1 mo, and four at 3, 6, and 12 mo) for analyses. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Statistical analysis of CT imaging and histology was not needed. Results and limitations CT urethrograms showed wide-caliber urethras without strictures in animals implanted with cell-seeded matrices. The urethral segments replaced with acellular scaffolds collapsed. Gross examination of the urethral implants seeded with cells showed normal-appearing tissue without evidence of fibrosis. Histologically, an epithelial cell layer surrounded by muscle fiber bundles was observed on the cell-seeded constructs, and cellular organization increased over time. The epithelial and smooth muscle phenotypes were confirmed using antibodies to pancytokeratins AE1/AE3 and smooth muscle–specific desmin. Formation of an epithelial cell layer occurred in the unseeded constructs, but few muscle fibers formed

  7. Management of Benign Biliary Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Martin, Derrick F.

    2002-12-15

    Benign biliary strictures are most commonly a consequence of injury at laparoscopic cholecystectomy or fibrosis after biliary-enteric anastomosis. These strictures are notoriously difficult to treat and traditionally are managed by resection and fashioning of acholedocho- or hepato-jejunostomy. Promising results are being achieved with newer minimally invasive techniques using endoscopic or percutaneous dilatation and/or stenting and these are likely to play an increasing role in the management. Even low-grade biliary obstruction carries the risks of stone formation, ascending cholangitis and hepatic cirrhosis and it is important to identify and treat this group of patients. There is currently no consensus on which patient should have what type of procedure, and the full range of techniques may not be available in all hospitals. Careful assessment of the risks and likely benefits have to be made on an individual basis. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the options available. The techniques of endoscopic and percutaneous dilatation and stenting are described with evaluation of the likely success and complication rates and compared to the gold standard of biliary-enteric anastomosis.

  8. A comparison of surgical outcomes of perineal urethrostomy plus penile resection and perineal urethrostomy in twelve calves with perineal or prescrotal urethral dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Marzok, M.A.; El-khodery, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis, ultrasonographic findings, surgical management, outcome, and survival rate of perineal or prescrotal urethral dilatation in 12 male calves are described. All calves were crossbred and intact males. The most noticeable clinical presentations were perineal (n= 10) or prescrotal (n= 2) swellings and micturition problems. The main ultrasonographic findings were oval shaped dilatation of the urethra in all animals with dimensions of 40-75 X 30-62 mm. The calves with perineal urethral dilatation were treated by perineal urethrostomy (n= 4) and partial penile transection including the dilated urethra and urethral fistulation (n= 6). Prescrotal urethral dilatations were treated by penile transection proximal to the dilatation site (n= 2). Cystitis and stricture of the urethra were recorded postoperatively for two of the calves that underwent perineal urethrostomy. Nine animals were slaughtered at normal body weight approximately 6-8 months after the surgical treatment. Three animals were slaughtered after approximately three to four months, two of them having gained insufficient body weight. Our study shows that ultrasonography is a useful tool for the diagnosis of urethral dilatation in bovine calves. Our study also shows that the partial penile transection may be a suitable and satisfactory choice of surgical treatment for correcting the urethral dilatation in bovine calves. PMID:26623322

  9. Endoscopic management of inflammatory bowel disease strictures

    PubMed Central

    Vrabie, Raluca; Irwin, Gerald L; Friedel, David

    2012-01-01

    Stricture formation is a common complication of Crohn’s disease, occurring in approximately one third of all patients with this condition. While the traditional management of such strictures has been largely surgical, there have been case series going back three decades highlighting the potential role of endoscopic balloon dilation in this clinical setting. This review article summarizes the stricture pathogenesis, focusing on known clinical and genetic risk factors. It then highlights the endoscopic balloon dilation research to date, with particular emphasis on three large recent case series. It concludes by describing the literature consensus regarding specific methodology and presenting avenues for future investigations. PMID:23189221

  10. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Jamidar, Priya A

    2015-01-01

    Benign biliary strictures are a common indication for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Endoscopic management has evolved over the last 2 decades as the current standard of care. The most common etiologies of strictures encountered are following surgery and those related to chronic pancreatitis. High-quality cross-sectional imaging provides a road map for endoscopic management. Currently, sequential placement of multiple plastic biliary stents represents the preferred approach. There is an increasing role for the treatment of these strictures using covered metal stents, but due to conflicting reports of efficacies as well as cost and complications, this approach should only be entertained following careful consideration. Optimal management of strictures is best achieved using a team approach with the surgeon and interventional radiologist playing an important role. PMID:25613176

  11. Erectile function after anastomotic urethroplasty for pelvic fracture urethral injuries.

    PubMed

    El-Assmy, A; Harraz, A M; Benhassan, M; Nabeeh, A; Ibrahiem, El Hi

    2016-07-01

    There is an established association between ED and pelvic fracture urethral injuries (PFUIs). However, ED can occur after the injury and/or the urethral repair. To our knowledge, only one study of erectile function (EF) after urethroplasty for PFUIs used a validated questionnaire. This study was carried out to determine the impact of anastomotic posterior urethroplasty for PFUIs on EF. We retrospectively reviewed the computerized surgical records to identify patients who underwent anastomotic urethroplasty for PFUIs from 1998 to 2014. Those patients were contacted by phone or mail and were re-evaluated in the outpatient clinic by International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire; in unmarried men, the single-question self-report of ED was used for evaluation of EF, clinical examination and penile color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) for men with ED. Overall, 58 patients were included in the study among whom 36 (62%) men were sexually active and the remaining 22 (38%) were single. The incidence of ED among our group is 72%. All patients developed ED after initial pelvic trauma and none of our patients had impaired EF after urethroplasty. The incidence of ED increased proportionally with severity of pelvic trauma. All patients with type-C pelvic fracture, associated symphysis pubis diastasis, sacroiliac joints diastasis and bilateral pubic ramus fractures had ED. Men with PFUIs had worse EF than men in other series with pelvic fractures without urethral injury. The majority (88%) of men with ED showed veno-occlusive dysfunction on penile CDU. So we concluded that men with PFUIs had a high incidence of ED up to 72%. Anastomotic posterior urethroplasty had no negative impact on EF and the development of ED after PFUIs was related to the severity of the original pelvic trauma. Veno-occlusive dysfunction is the commonest etiology of ED on penile CDU. PMID:27146349

  12. The mechanism of continence after posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, Herman S.; Angermeier, Kenneth W.

    2015-01-01

    The standard of care after a pelvic fracture urethral injury is a repair via a one-stage anastomotic posterior urethroplasty using a step-wise perineal approach. The initial injury, immediate postoperative management, and surgical repair can all affect urinary continence in these patients. Proximal continence mechanisms, particularly the bladder neck, are particularly important in maintaining urinary continence in these patients. Patients with bladder neck dysfunction should be counselled about the greater risk of urinary incontinence. PMID:26019981

  13. Eosinophilic cholecystitis with common bile duct stricture: a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Daniel; Naseem, Zainab; Mustaev, Muslim

    2016-01-01

    Although the most common cause of cholecystitis is gallstones, other conditions may present as acute cholecystitis. We describe a case of eosinophilic cholecystitis with common bile duct stricture. A 36-year-old woman initially had generalised abdominal pain and peripheral eosinophilia. Diagnostic laparoscopy showed eosinophilic ascites and necrotic nodules on the posterior abdominal wall. She was treated with anthelminthics on presumption of toxacara infection based on borderline positivity of serological tests. She later presented with acute cholecystitis and had a cholecystectomy and choledocotomy. Day 9 T-tube cholangiogram showed irregular narrowing of the distal common bile duct. The patient's symptoms were improved with steroids and the T-tube was subsequently removed. PMID:27222280

  14. Urethral and penile war injuries: The experience from civil violence in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azzawi, Issam S.; Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence, mechanism of injury, wounding pattern and surgical management of urethral and penile injuries sustained in civil violence during the Iraq war. Patients and methods In all, 2800 casualties with penetrating trauma to the abdomen and pelvis were received at the Al-Yarmouk Hospital, Baghdad, from January 2004 to June 2008. Of these casualties 504 (18%) had genitourinary trauma, including 45 (8.9%) with urethral and/or penile injuries. Results Of 45 patients, 29 (64%) were civilians and 16 (36%) were Iraqi military personnel. The injury was caused by an improvised explosive device (IED) in 25 (56%) patients and by individual firearms in 20 (44%). Of the patients, 24 had penile injuries, 15 had an injury to the bulbar urethra and six had an injury to the posterior urethra. Anterior urethral injuries were managed by primary repair, while posterior urethral injuries were managed by primary realignment in five patients and by a suprapubic cystostomy alone in one. An associated injury to major blood vessels was the cause of death in eight of nine patients who died soon after surgery (P < 0.001). Conclusion Urethral and penile injuries were caused by IEDs and individual firearms with a similar frequency. Most of the casualties were civilians and a minority were military personnel. Injuries to the anterior urethra can be managed by primary repair, while injuries to the posterior urethra can be managed by primary realignment. An associated trauma to major blood vessels was the leading cause of death in these casualties. PMID:26019940

  15. 21 CFR 876.5520 - Urethral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urethral dilator. 876.5520 Section 876.5520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5520 Urethral dilator....

  16. Prefabricated partial distal urethral in 2-staged repair of proximal hypospadias with severe chordee

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhi-Qiang; Sun, Jian-Tao; Huangfu, Xue-Hun; Chen, Guo-Xiao; Hao, Jian-Wei; Liu, Zhong-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a new technique for staged hypospadias repair in which the urethral plate is divided and tubularized transverse island flap prefabricated partial distal urethral at the time of the first stage. Materials and methods: Sixteen patients with proximal hypospadias associated with severe chordee were operated on using a new staged technique. At the time of the first stage, the urethral plate was divided and chordee was corrected. Then tubularized transverse island flap was used to prefabricate partial distal urethra. The defective urethra was repaired using the Thiersch-Duplay principle at the second stage. Results: All participants have completed both stages of the operation. The mean follow-up duration was 18.4 months (range from 6 to 72 months). In the first-stage surgery, the modified tabularized transverse preputial island flap was performed on 6 patients, whereas the modified preputial double-faced island flap was performed on the other 10 patients. All of the prefabricated partial distal neourethras had no evidence of stenosis or scarring. The result of the second-stage procedure was a complete penis with integrated urethral. All patients were satisfied with cosmetic and functional results. Neither stricture nor diverticula was observed. A good urinary stream during the urination was attained in 12 (75.0%) patients. Four cases (25.0%) developed urethrocutaneous fistula after the second stage repair. Conclusions: In our preliminary series, this procedure improved functional and cosmetic results. It may be applicable to most cases of proximal hypospadias. Even when complications occur, they are less severe compared to those of the traditional staged approach. PMID:25932188

  17. Delayed urethral erosion after tension-free vaginal tape.

    PubMed

    Powers, Kenneth; Lazarou, George; Greston, Wilma Markus

    2006-06-01

    Urethral erosions have been reported with various sling materials placed by means of various techniques. The patient often presents in the immediate postoperative period, although late presentations have been described. The diagnosis is made on cystoscopy, and mesh excision with urethral reconstruction is advocated. We present the cases of two patients with urethral erosion after mid-urethral polypropylene sling who presented 3 months after surgery with urethral pain, mid-urethral blockage and symptoms of bladder dysfunction. Urethroscopy revealed the mesh bridging the lumen of the urethra. Trans-vaginal mesh excision and layered urethral reconstruction was curative in both patients. PMID:16741603

  18. Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation for malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    WANG, FEI; LI, QUANPENG; ZHANG, XIUHUA; JIANG, GUOBING; GE, XIANXIU; YU, HONG; NIE, JUNJIE; JI, GUOZHONG; MIAO, LIN

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a novel palliation therapy for malignant biliary stricture; however, its feasibility and safety has not yet been clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of endoscopic RFA for the treatment of malignant biliary strictures. A total of 12 patients treated by endoscopic RFA between December 2011 and October 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Adverse events within 30 days post-intervention, stricture diameters prior to and following RFA, stent patency and survival time were investigated. A total of 12 patients underwent 20 RFA procedures as a treatment for malignant biliary strictures. Two patients required repeated elective RFA (4 and 6 times, respectively). All 20 RFA procedures were successfully performed without technical problems. During a 30 day period following each RFA procedure, two patients experienced fever (38.2 and 38.9°C, respectively) and another patient exhibited post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. The 30- and 90-day mortality rates were 0 and 8.3%, respectively. Mean stricture diameter prior to RFA was 5.3 mm (standard deviation (SD), 0.9 mm; range, 5–8 mm), and the mean diameter following RFA was 12.6 mm (SD, 3.1 mm; range, 8–15 mm). There was a significant increase of 7.3 mm in the bile duct diameter following RFA in comparison with prior to RFA (t=8.6; P≤0.001). Of the 11 patients with stents inserted following RFA, the median stent patency was 125.0 days [95% confidence interval (CI), 94.7–155.3 days]. Extrapolated median survival following the first RFA was 232 days (95% CI, 94.3–369.7 days). In conclusion, RFA appears to be an efficient and safe treatment strategy for the palliation of unresectable malignant biliary strictures. PMID:27284336

  19. Urethritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... semen Burning pain while urinating ( dysuria ) Discharge from penis Fever (rare) Frequent or urgent urination Itching, tenderness, or swelling in penis Enlarged lymph nodes in the groin area Pain ...

  20. Urethritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Information, Search Drug Names, Generic and Brand Natural Products, Search Drug Interactions Pill Identifier News & Commentary ALL NEWS > Resources First Aid Videos Figures Images Audio Pronunciations The ...

  1. Benign Biliary Strictures: Diagnostic Evaluation and Approaches to Percutaneous Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fidelman, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Interventional radiologists are often consulted to help identify and treat biliary strictures that can result from a variety of benign etiologies. Mainstays of noninvasive imaging for benign biliary strictures include ultrasound, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and computed tomography cholangiography. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography is the invasive diagnostic procedure of choice, allowing both localization of a stricture and treatment. Percutaneous biliary interventions are reserved for patients who are not candidates for endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (eg, history of distal gastrectomy and biliary-enteric anastomosis to a jejunal roux limb). This review discusses the roles of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary drainage in the diagnosis of benign biliary strictures. The methodology for crossing benign biliary strictures, approaches to balloon dilation, management of recalcitrant strictures (ie, large-bore biliary catheters and retrievable covered stents), and the expected outcomes and complications of percutaneous treatment of benign biliary strictures are also addressed. PMID:26615161

  2. [Urethral leiomyoma during pregnancy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Silveira, Arlon Breno Figueiredo Nunes da; Riccetto, Cássio Luis Zanettini; Herrmann, Viviane; Palma, Paulo César Rodrigues; Tiecher, Juliane de Fátima Agostini

    2012-12-01

    The authors report a case of urethral leiomyoma diagnosed during pregnancy, which was conservatively treated up to the 38th week, when the pregnancy was interrupted. Thirty days after delivery, exeresis of the lesion was performed from the upper border of the urethral meatus and sutured with interrupted delayed-absorbable suture. The patient evolved favorably and presented no lesion recurrence during three months of follow up. PMID:23348657

  3. Urethral Diverticulum Masquerading as Anterior Vaginal Wall Cyst: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Sharma, Abha; Suneja, Amita; Guleria, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Urethral diverticulum (UD) is a condition in which a variably sized outpouching forms, next to the urethra. Because it connects to the urethra, this outpouching repeatedly gets filled with urine during micturition, thus causing symptoms. In females, it presents as a bulge in anterior vagina, mimicking a vaginal wall cyst. Various aetiologies proposed attributing to urethral diverticulum formation is repeated infection of the periurethral gland, childbirth trauma, iatrogenic and urethral instrumentation. Patients of UD present with non specific irritative lower urinary tract symptoms such as increased frequency, urgency and dysuria; symptoms may not correlate with the size of the diverticulum. Recurrent cystitis or urinary tract infection is seen in one-third of patients. Pain, hematuria, post-void dribbling, dyspareunia, urinary retention or incontinence is other symptoms. In some cases, there may be associated urethral calculi or carcinoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of UD, although non invasive sonography may be the first line investigation. Treatment is by transvaginal diverticulectomy or marsupialization. A 60-year-old P9L6 postmenopausal lady, presented with a tender, hard suburethral anterior vaginal wall mass. Cystourethroscopy revealed a small opening in posterior urethra, with stone visible through it. With the final diagnosis of suburethral diverticulum with retained multiple calculi, excision of the diverticulum and repair of urethra was done vaginally. Correct evaluation and treatment of this condition can lead to avoidance of urinary tract injury. PMID:26557574

  4. Bladder neck incompetence at posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2015-01-01

    The finding of an incompetent bladder neck (BN) at the time of posterior urethroplasty will necessarily exacerbate the already difficult situation. In such cases the aim of the treatment is not only to restore urethral continuity by end-to-end urethral anastomosis, but also to restore the function of the BN to maintain urinary continence. Fortunately, the incidence of incompetence of the BN at posterior urethroplasty is uncommon, usually ≈4.5%. It seems that pelvic fracture-related BN injuries, in contrast to urethral injuries which result from a shearing force, are due to direct injury by the sharp edge of the fractured and displaced pubic bone. The risk of injuries to the BN is greater in children, in patients with a fracture involving both superior and inferior pubic rami on the same side, and in those managed initially by primary realignment. An incompetent BN is suspected by finding an open rectangular BN on cystography, and a fixedly open BN on suprapubic cystoscopy. An incompetent BN can be treated either subsequent to or concomitant with the urethral repair, according to whether a perineal or a perineo-abdominal urethroplasty is used, respectively. Several options have been reported to treat pelvic fracture-related BN incompetence, including reconstructing the BN, forming a new sphincter by tubularisation of a rectangular flap of the anterior bladder wall, and mechanical occlusion by an artificial sphincter or collagen injection. Reconstruction of the BN by the Young-Dees-Leadbetter∗∗ procedure probably provides the most successful results. PMID:26019982

  5. A Giant Dumbbell Shaped Vesico-Prostatic Urethral Calculus: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Prabhuswamy, Vinod Kumar; Tiwari, Rahul; Krishnamoorthy, Ramakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Calculi in the urethra are an uncommon entity. Giant calculi in prostatic urethra are extremely rare. The decision about treatment strategy of calculi depends upon the size, shape, and position of the calculus and the status of the urethra. If the stone is large and immovable, it may be extracted via the perineal or the suprapubic approach. In most of the previous reported cases, giant calculi were extracted via the transvesical approach and external urethrotomy. A 38-year-old male patient presented with complaints of lower urinary tract symptoms. Further investigations showed a giant urethral calculus secondary to stricture of bulbo-membranous part of the urethra. Surgical removal of calculus was done via transvesical approach. Two calculi were found and extracted. One was a huge dumbbell calculus and the other was a smaller round calculus. This case was reported because of the rare size and the dumbbell nature of the stone. Giant urethral calculi are better managed by open surgery. PMID:23762742

  6. Urethral caruncle: clinicopathologic features of 41 cases.

    PubMed

    Conces, Miriam R; Williamson, Sean R; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Scarpelli, Marina; Cheng, Liang

    2012-09-01

    Urethral caruncle is a benign polypoid mass of the urethral meatus in primarily postmenopausal women. Although a conclusive association with malignancy, urologic disorder, or systemic disease has not been established, often the lesion carries a challenging clinical differential diagnosis that includes malignancy. Conversely, unexpected malignancy is identified in some cases resembling caruncle clinically. We examined clinical and histopathologic characteristics in 41 patients. Medical records were assessed for presentation, clinical diagnosis, associated urothelial carcinoma, radiation treatment, tobacco use, immunologic/urologic disorder, and treatment strategy/outcome. Average patient age was 68 years (range, 28-87 years). Presenting symptoms were pain (37%), hematuria (27%), and dysuria (20%), in contrast to asymptomatic (32%). Clinical diagnosis favored malignancy in 10% of cases. Concurrent or subsequent urothelial carcinoma was present for 5 patients (12%), although none developed urethral carcinoma. Histologic features included mixed hyperplastic urothelial and squamous lining, overlying a variably fibrotic, edematous, inflamed, and vascular stroma. Invaginations of urothelium extending into the stroma were common (68%), showing rounded nests with cystic or glandular luminal spaces, similar to urethritis cystica/glandularis, without intestinal metaplasia. Two lesions included an organizing thrombus, 1 with intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia. Twenty patients were treated with topical medications without resolution. Three lesions recurred (7%) after excision. A subset of patients had history of smoking or previous pelvic irradiation. Urethral caruncle is an uncommon lesion that may clinically mimic benign and malignant conditions. Awareness of the spectrum of clinical and histologic differential diagnoses is important in dealing with this unusual disease. PMID:22397870

  7. Y-Type Urethral Duplication: A True Variant of the Anomaly or a Misnomer?

    PubMed

    AbouZeid, Amr A; Mohammad, Shaimaa A; Radwan, Nehal A; Safoury, Hesham S; El-Naggar, Osama; Hay, Sameh A

    2016-06-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to define anatomical and radiological features of the so-called Y-type urethral duplication. Methods The study included four male patients and one female patient with congenital connection between the urogenital tract and the external anal orifice. Investigations included renal sonography, urethrograms, and magnetic resonance imaging pelvis in the last patient. The urethrograms of male patients were carefully reviewed, in addition to available urethrograms of similar cases that could be obtained through searching the literature. Results Unlike cases of urethral duplication, the male patients had always a complete prepuce and a functioning anterior urethra in 25%. The accessory uroanal channel had almost always a constant origin from the posterior urethra. Some tension seems to be exerted by the urethroanal tract pulling on and causing a kink in the posterior urethra. Management was simple in patients without anterior urethral hypoplasia (one male and the female patient). Both were treated by simple excision of the communicating ano-urogenital tract through a perineal approach with an excellent outcome. Histopathological examination of excised tracts revealed stratified squamous cell in the former and transitional cell lining in the latter. In patients with hypoplastic anterior urethra, staged urethral reconstruction was performed in two, and progressive dilatation of hypoplastic anterior urethra was tried in the last patient. Conclusion Several observations would support diagnosing the congenital connection between the urinary tract and the external anal orifice in the male as a congenital fistula rather than an accessory urethra. Confirming and accepting this information may have its impact on changing the current surgical approach. PMID:26024207

  8. 21 CFR 876.4590 - Interlocking urethral sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Interlocking urethral sound. 876.4590 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4590 Interlocking urethral sound. (a) Identification. An interlocking urethral sound is a device that consists of two metal...

  9. 21 CFR 876.4590 - Interlocking urethral sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Interlocking urethral sound. 876.4590 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4590 Interlocking urethral sound. (a) Identification. An interlocking urethral sound is a device that consists of two metal...

  10. 21 CFR 876.4590 - Interlocking urethral sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Interlocking urethral sound. 876.4590 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4590 Interlocking urethral sound. (a) Identification. An interlocking urethral sound is a device that consists of two metal...

  11. 21 CFR 876.4590 - Interlocking urethral sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Interlocking urethral sound. 876.4590 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4590 Interlocking urethral sound. (a) Identification. An interlocking urethral sound is a device that consists of two metal...

  12. 21 CFR 876.4590 - Interlocking urethral sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interlocking urethral sound. 876.4590 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4590 Interlocking urethral sound. (a) Identification. An interlocking urethral sound is a device that consists of two metal...

  13. Management issues in post living donor liver transplant biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Manav; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-04-01

    Biliary complications are common after living donor liver transplant (LDLT) although with advancements in surgical understanding and techniques, the incidence is decreasing. Biliary strictures are more common than leaks. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the first line modality of treatment of post LDLT biliary strictures with a technical success rate of 75%-80%. Most of ERCP failures are successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) and rendezvous technique. A minority of patients may require surgical correction. ERCP for these strictures is technically more challenging than routine as well post deceased donor strictures. Biliary strictures may increase the morbidity of a liver transplant recipient, but the mortality is similar to those with or without strictures. Post transplant strictures are short segment and soft, requiring only a few session of ERCP before complete dilatation. Long-term outcome of patients with biliary stricture is similar to those without stricture. With the introduction of new generation cholangioscopes, ERCP success rate may increase, obviating the need for PTBD and surgery in these patients. PMID:27057304

  14. Management of benign biliary strictures: current status and perspective.

    PubMed

    Kaffes, Arthur J

    2015-09-01

    Benign biliary strictures are common and occur either from hepato-biliary surgery or from diseases including chronic pancreatitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, among others. The treatment of many such strictures is endoscopic with evolving new approaches especially with fully covered metal stents. The only classification system available is for postoperative strictures with the intention to guide surgical correction. There is no useful classification system to guide both assessment and management of benign biliary strictures. This proposed classification is relevant to patient care in assisting diagnosis and endoscopic management. PMID:26147976

  15. Management issues in post living donor liver transplant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Wadhawan, Manav; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Biliary complications are common after living donor liver transplant (LDLT) although with advancements in surgical understanding and techniques, the incidence is decreasing. Biliary strictures are more common than leaks. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the first line modality of treatment of post LDLT biliary strictures with a technical success rate of 75%-80%. Most of ERCP failures are successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) and rendezvous technique. A minority of patients may require surgical correction. ERCP for these strictures is technically more challenging than routine as well post deceased donor strictures. Biliary strictures may increase the morbidity of a liver transplant recipient, but the mortality is similar to those with or without strictures. Post transplant strictures are short segment and soft, requiring only a few session of ERCP before complete dilatation. Long-term outcome of patients with biliary stricture is similar to those without stricture. With the introduction of new generation cholangioscopes, ERCP success rate may increase, obviating the need for PTBD and surgery in these patients. PMID:27057304

  16. Epithelial-differentiated adipose-derived stem cells seeded bladder acellular matrix grafts for urethral reconstruction: an animal model.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbin; Xu, Yuemin; Xie, Hong; Li, Chao; Song, Lujie; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Qin; Xie, Minkai; Wang, Ying; Lv, Xiangguo

    2014-02-01

    The limited amount of available epithelial tissue is considered a main cause of the high rate of urethral reconstruction failures. The aim of this study was to investigate whether epithelial-differentiated rabbit adipose-derived stem cells (Epith-rASCs) could play a role of epithelium in vivo functionally and be a potential substitute of urothelium. Substitution urethroplasty was performed to repair an anterior urethral defect in male New Zealand rabbits using Epith-rASCs seeded bladder acellular matrix grafts (BAMGs) after 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling, based on the in vitro epithelial induction system we previously described. Urethroplasty with cell-free BAMGs and with undifferentiated rASCs (Und-rASCs) seeded BAMGs were performed as controls. After surgery, a notable amelioration of graft contracture and recovery of urethral continuity were observed in the Epith-rASCs/BAMG group by retrograde urethrograms and macroscopic inspection. Immunofluorescence revealed that the BrdU-labeled Epith-rASCs/Und-rASCs colocalized with cytokeratin 13 or myosin. Consistent with the results of western blotting, at early postimplantation stage, the continuous epithelial layer with local multilayered structure was observed in the Epith-rASCs/BAMG group, whereas no significant growth and local monolayer growth profile of epithelial cells were observed in the BAMG and Und-rASCs/BAMG group, respectively. The results showed that Epith-rASCs could serve as a potential substitute of urothelium for urethral tissue engineering and be available to prevent lumen contracture and subsequent complications including recurrent stricture. PMID:24329501

  17. Refractory strictures despite steroid injection after esophageal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Noboru; Ishihara, Ryu; Uedo, Noriya; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Kanesaka, Takashi; Matsuura, Noriko; Yamasaki, Yasushi; Hamada, Kenta; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although steroid injection prevents stricture after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), some patients require repeated sessions of endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD). We investigated the risk for refractory stricture despite the administration of steroid injections to prevent stricture in patients undergoing esophageal ESD. Refractory stricture was defined as the requirement for more than three sessions of EBD to resolve the stricture. In addition, the safety of steroid injections was assessed based on the rate of complications. Patients and methods: We analyzed data from 127 consecutive patients who underwent esophageal ESD and had mucosal defects with a circumferential extent greater than three-quarters of the esophagus. To prevent stricture, steroid injection was performed. EBD was performed whenever a patient had symptoms of dysphagia. Results: The percentage of patients with a tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % was significantly higher in those with refractory stricture than in those without stricture (P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, history of radiation therapy, tumor location, and tumor diameter showed that a tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % was an independent risk factor for refractory stricture (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 5.49 [95 %CI 1.91 – 15.84], P = 0.002). Major adverse events occurred in 3 patients (2.4 %): perforation during EBD in 2 patients and delayed perforation after EBD in 1 patient. The patient with delayed perforation underwent esophagectomy because of mediastinitis. Conclusions: A tumor circumferential extent greater than 75 % is an independent risk factor for refractory stricture despite steroid injections. The development of more extensive interventions is warranted to prevent refractory stricture. PMID:27004256

  18. 21 CFR 876.5520 - Urethral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urethral dilator. 876.5520 Section 876.5520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... flexibilities. The device may include a mechanism to expand the portion of the device in the urethra...

  19. Utilization of urethral plate in hypospadias surgery

    PubMed Central

    Snodgrass, Warren T.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Recognition the urethral plate comprises tissues that normally should have created the urethra was an important milestone in hypospadias surgery, giving rise to new operative repairs - most notably the tubularized incised plate technique. This article reviews the current state of the art for hypospadias repair using tubularized, incised plate (TIP). Materials and Methods Personal experience and literature reports were reviewed to summarize use of TIP urethroplasty for distal, proximal, and re-operative hypospadias repairs. Results The TIP can be used to correct all distal and most proximal hypospadias. The major contraindication is ventral curvature that leads to urethral plate transection for straightening, which is only necessary in some proximal cases. Reoperations can also be performed using TIP provided the urethral plate has been maintained and is not grossly scarred. Complication rates are comparable to previously used techniques, while cosmetic appearance after TIP is considered superior to other available procedures. Conclusions Recognition of the urethral plate and its incorporation into the neourethra has revolutionized hypospadias repair. The most commonly used operative procedure today is TIP. PMID:19468397

  20. Pathologic Outcomes following Urethral Diverticulectomy in Women

    PubMed Central

    Laudano, Melissa A.; Jamzadeh, Asha E.; Lee, Richard K.; Robinson, Brian D.; Tyagi, Renuka; Kaplan, Steven A.; Te, Alexis E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Although most urethral diverticula in women are benign, there is a subset of patients who develop malignant changes. Limited studies report the pathologic findings associated with this relatively rare entity. We describe the clinicopathologic findings of women who underwent urethral diverticulectomy. Methods. A consecutive series of 29 women who underwent surgical resection of a urethral diverticulum were identified between 1992 and 2013. Clinical and radiographic data was collected by retrospective review of patient medical records. All pathological slides were rereviewed by a single urologic pathologist. Results. Of the 14 women with clinical data, 9 (64%) presented with urgency, 7 (50%) with urinary frequency, 3 (21%) with urinary incontinence, and 3 (21%) with dysuria. Mean diverticular size was 2.3 (±1.4) cm. Although one patient (3%) had invasive adenocarcinoma on final pathology, the remaining 28 cases (97%) demonstrated benign features. The most common findings were inflammation (55%) and nephrogenic adenoma (21%). Conclusions. Although most urethral diverticula in women are benign, there is a subset of patients who develop malignancy in association with the diverticulum. In this series, 97% of cases had a benign histology. These findings are important when counseling patients regarding treatment options. PMID:24860605

  1. Spontaneous Intravesical Knotting of Urethral Catheter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Infant feeding tubes (IFT) have been universally used as urethral catheters in neonates and children for several decades. Though generally a safe procedure, it may cause significant morbidity if the catheter spontaneously knots inside the bladder. We report this complication in three children including a neonate. PMID:22953288

  2. Urethral erosion of transobturator male sling.

    PubMed

    Harris, Stephanie E; Guralnick, Michael L; O'Connor, R Corey

    2009-02-01

    The transobturator male sling has been introduced as an alternative to other surgical methods for the treatment of mild to moderate postprostatectomy stress urinary incontinence. We report the first published case of mesh erosion into the urethra observed 5 months after placement. The patient was treated with suprapubic tube urinary diversion, suburethral sling explantation, and buccal mucosal grafting of the urethral defect. PMID:18400275

  3. Endoscopic palliation of malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Sanjay M; Gaidhane, Monica; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Malignant biliary strictures often present late after the window for curative resection has elapsed. In such patients, the goal of therapy is typically focused on palliation. While historically, palliative measures were performed surgically, the advent of endoscopic intervention offers minimally invasive options to provide relief of symptoms, improve quality of life, and in some cases, increase survival of these patients. Some of these therapies, such as endoscopic biliary decompression, have become mainstays of treatment for decades, whereas newer modalities, including radiofrequency ablation, and photodynamic therapy offer additional options for patients with incurable biliary malignancies. PMID:26989459

  4. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Visrodia, Kavel H; Tabibian, James H; Baron, Todd H

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic management of biliary obstruction has evolved tremendously since the introduction of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. For the last several decades, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become established as the mainstay for definitively diagnosing and relieving biliary obstruction. In addition, and more recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has gained increasing favor as an auxiliary diagnostic and therapeutic modality in facilitating decompression of the biliary tree. Here, we provide a review of the current and continually evolving role of gastrointestinal endoscopy, including both ERCP and EUS, in the management of biliary obstruction with a focus on benign biliary strictures. PMID:26322153

  5. Cutting laser systems for ureteral strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durek, C.; Knipper, Ansgar; Brinkmann, Ralf; Miller, Ado; Gromoll, Bernd; Jocham, Dieter

    1994-02-01

    Acquired ureteral strictures are still treated either with a stent, balloon dilatation, by open surgery or by endoscopic therapy with a `cold knife' or high current density as intubated ureterotomy. The success rates described in the literature range between 50% and 90%. Using the experimental CTH:YAG laser (wavelength 2120 nm) and CT:YAG laser (wavelength 1950 nm), the reduction of invasiveness and of morbidity was evaluated. First, the CTH:YAG laser was investigated on 540 fresh porcine ureters varying the parameters. With a computerized morphometry system, defect depth, defect width, coagulation depth and coagulation width were measured. Then 21 female pigs underwent 7.5 F - 12 F ureteroscopy with CTH:YAG laser, CT:YAG laser, high current density and `cold knife' ureterotomy. An IVP and sacrification with explanation of the whole urinary tract was done on day 6 and around day 60. In practice, laser application via the endoscope was easy to handle and exact cutting was always seen. The CT:YAG laser seems to have the best success results with low ureteral stricture recurrence rates. However, its clinical use remains to be proven.

  6. Management of non-gonococcal urethritis.

    PubMed

    Moi, Harald; Blee, Karla; Horner, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU), or inflammation of the urethra, is the most common treatable sexually transmitted syndrome in men, with approximately 20-50 % of cases being due to infection with Chlamydia trachomatis and 10-30 % Mycoplasma genitalium. Other causes are Ureaplasma urealyticum, Trichomonas vaginalis, anaerobes, Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and adenovirus. Up to half of the cases are non-specific. Urethritis is characterized by discharge, dysuria and/or urethral discomfort but may be asymptomatic. The diagnosis of urethritis is confirmed by demonstrating an excess of polymorpho-nuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) in a stained smear. An excess of mononuclear leucocytes in the smear indicates a viral etiology. In patients presenting with symptoms of urethritis, the diagnosis should be confirmed by microscopy of a stained smear, ruling out gonorrhea. Nucleid acid amplifications tests (NAAT) for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, C. trachomatis and for M. genitalium. If viral or protozoan aetiology is suspected, NAAT for HSV, adenovirus and T. vaginalis, if available. If marked symptoms and urethritis is confirmed, syndromic treatment should be given at the first appointment without waiting for the laboratory results. Treatment options are doxycycline 100 mg x 2 for one week or azithromycin 1 gram single dose or 1,5 gram distributed in five days. However, azithromycin as first line treatment without test of cure for M. genitalium and subsequent Moxifloxacin treatment of macrolide resistant strains will select and increase the macrolide resistant strains in the population. If positive for M. genitalium, test of cure samples should be collected no earlier than three weeks after start of treatment. If positive in test of cure, moxifloxacin 400 mg 7-14 days is indicated. Current partner(s) should be tested and treated with the same regimen. They should abstain from intercourse until both have completed treatment. Persistent or recurrent NGU must be confirmed with microscopy

  7. Sigmoid stricture at colonoscopy--an indication for surgery.

    PubMed

    King, D W; Lubowski, D Z; Armstrong, A S

    1990-08-01

    Strictures of the sigmoid colon continue to pose a diagnostic dilemma. They commonly appear to be due to diverticular disease but carcinoma must always be excluded. In some cases diverticula may be present but in others there is no obvious cause for the stricture. In a series of 1039 consecutive colonoscopies performed between 1984 and 1986, 19 cases of sigmoid stricture that could not be negotiated with the colonoscope were encountered. In each case the cause of the stricture could not be demonstrated. Fifteen patients (79%) underwent laparotomy primarily on clinical grounds or with barium enema findings suggestive of carcinoma. A final diagnosis of diverticular disease was made in nine cases and adenocarcinoma is six cases. Barium enema was a poor predictor of malignancy in a stricture. Four patients were treated conservatively and two of these patients continued to have significant symptoms due to diverticular disease. This experience suggests that sigmoid strictures that prevent the passage of a colonoscope should be resected when the cause of the stricture is not apparent. PMID:2212846

  8. Spontaneous Postmenopausal Urethral Prolapse Treated Surgically and Successfully

    PubMed Central

    Klein, I.; Dekel, Y.; Stein, A.

    2014-01-01

    Urethral prolapse (UP) is a circular complete eversion of the distal urethral mucosa through the external meatus. It is a rare condition seen mostly in African-American premenarcheal girls. Both a medical and a surgical approach to this condition have been described. We present a case of a spontaneous urethral prolapse in a 60-year-old postmenopausal Caucasian woman, who failed medical management and underwent successful surgical management. The patient is asymptomatic 18 months following the procedure. PMID:25140273

  9. How to measure inner urethral wall softness.

    PubMed

    Plevnik, S; Vrtacnik, P

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and preliminarily test the measuring principle suitable for quantification of the capability of deformation of the inner urethral wall, i.e. quantification of inner urethral wall softness. The special measuring catheter was made of plexiglass with two conically shaped stainless steel electrodes mounted 5 cm from its distal tip. The principle of indirect compression measurement on the basis of impedance changes between the electrodes due to the introduction of the tissue between them was tested. The changes in impedance were measured in the distal male urethra during external manual compression, and in the anal sphincter during voluntary contractions and during coughing. The results obtained confirm the applicability as well as the significance of a further perfection of the new method. Calibration technique of the transducer was developed and tested in NaCl solution. PMID:7199730

  10. [Non-chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis].

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Takashi; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Maeda, Shin-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Besides Chlamydia trachomatis, various microorganisms could cause non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU). Recently, Mycoplasma genitalium and Ureaplasma urealyticum (biovar 2) have been suggested to be other pathogens of NGU independent of C. trachomatis. Clinical findings of non-chlamydial NGU, including M. genitalium--or U. urealyticum-postive NGU, are not different from those of chlamydial NGU. M. genitalium and U. urealyticum (biovar 2) are susceptible to tetracyclines, macrolides, and fluoroquinolones. However, the post-treatment presence of M. genitalium in the urethra is significantly associated with persistent or recurrent urethritis. Eradication of this mycoplasma from the urethra is essential for managing M. genitalium-positive NGU. In treatment of non-chlamydial NGU, therefore, the antimicrobial agents that are active against M. genitalium should be chosen. PMID:19177768

  11. Distributed pressure sensors for a urethral catheter.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Rajamani, Rajesh; Timm, Gerald; Sezen, A S

    2015-08-01

    A flexible strip that incorporates multiple pressure sensors and is capable of being fixed to a urethral catheter is developed. The urethral catheter thus instrumented will be useful for measurement of pressure in a human urethra during urodynamic testing in a clinic. This would help diagnose the causes of urinary incontinence in patients. Capacitive pressure sensors are fabricated on a flexible polyimide-copper substrate using surface micromachining processes and alignment/assembly of the top and bottom portions of the sensor strip. The developed sensor strip is experimentally evaluated in an in vitro test rig using a pressure chamber. The sensor strip is shown to have adequate sensitivity and repeatability. While the calibration factors for the sensors on the strip vary from one sensor to another, even the least sensitive sensor has a resolution better than 0.1 psi. PMID:26738054

  12. Advanced endoscopic imaging of indeterminate biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Tabibian, James H; Visrodia, Kavel H; Levy, Michael J; Gostout, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic evaluation of indeterminate biliary strictures (IDBSs) has evolved considerably since the development of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography pancreatography (ERCP) was introduced nearly a decade later and has since become the mainstay of therapy for relieving obstruction of the biliary tract. However, longstanding methods of ERCP-guided tissue acquisition (i.e., biliary brushings for cytology and intraductal forceps biopsy for histology) have demonstrated disappointing performance characteristics in distinguishing malignant from benign etiologies of IDBSs. The limitations of these methods have thus helped drive the search for novel techniques to enhance the evaluation of IDBSs and thereby improve diagnosis and clinical care. These modalities include, but are not limited to, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, cholangioscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography. In this review, we discuss established and emerging options in the evaluation of IDBSs. PMID:26675379

  13. [Clinical practice guideline. Traumatic urethral stenosis in males].

    PubMed

    Serrano-Brambila, Eduardo Alonso; Moreno-Alcázar, Othón Martino; Neri-Páez, Edgar; Sánchez-Martínez, Luis Carlos; Hernández-Ordóñez, Octavio Francisco; Morales-Morales, Arturo; Basavilvazo-Rodríguez, M Antonia; Torres-Arreola, Laura del Pilar; Valenzuela-Flores, Adriana Abigail; Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of urethral stenosis in Mexico had not been documented. At the Centro Médico Nacional La Raza, during the year 2010, 629 patients with urethral stenosis were attended as outpatient consultation: 85 % with previous urethral stenosis and 15 % with urethral treatment complication. Urethral stenosis is a chronic illness, with multiple etiological origins and the handling is controversial. It has a great negative impact for the patients and the recurrence reaches 85 %. The treatment consisted of an invasive approach (urethral dilations, endoscopy procedure) and open surgery (urethroplasty). The World Health Organization and World Alliance take the world challenge about the urinary tract infections associated with the attention of patients, focused on urethral stenosis. The objective of the following clinical guide is to offer to the health professional a clinical tool for making decisions in the handling of the hardship or masculine urethral stenosis, based on the best available evidence, carrying out in systematized form with bibliographical research using validated terms of the MeSH: urethral structures, in the databases Trip database, PubMed, Guideline Clearinghouse, Cochrane Library and Ovid. PMID:24021082

  14. [Treatment of the urethral sphincter insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Boissier, R; Karsenty, G

    2013-11-01

    The intrinsic sphincter insufficiency is a cause of stress urinary incontinence. Its definition is clinical and based on urodynamics. It is mostly met with women, in context of the post-obstetrical period or older women in a multifactorial context. For men, it occurs mainly as complication of the surgery of the cancer of prostate or bladder. An initial, clinical and paraclinical assessment allows to confirm the diagnosis of intrinsic sphincter insufficiency, to estimate its severity, and to identify associated mechanisms of incontinence (urethral hypermobility, bladder overactivity) to choose the most adapted treatment. The perineal reeducation is the treatment of first intention in both sexes. At the menopausal woman, the local hormonotherapy is a useful additive. In case of failure or of incomplete efficiency, the treatment of the intrinsic sphincter insufficiency is surgical. Bulking agents, urethral slings, peri-urethral balloons and artificial sphincter are 4 therapeutic options to discuss according to history, the severity of the incontinence, the expectations of the patient. PMID:24176408

  15. Multiple urethral anomalies: Parameatal urethral cyst, penile curvature, incomplete hypospadiac anterior duplication of the urethra and distal hipospadias

    PubMed Central

    Tuglu, Devrim; Yuvanç, Ercan; Yılmaz, Erdal; Gur, Serhan; Batislam, Ertan

    2015-01-01

    The male genitourinary system is quite complex. There are numerous known anomalies of the male urethra either as isolated cases or in combination with other disorders. An improved understanding of the embryology and anatomy of the normal male urethral development might help explain the causes of the various urethral abnormalities. We contribute to the etiology of congenital anomalies with this multiple urethral anomalies case. PMID:26029298

  16. Characterizing intestinal strictures with acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hao; Xu, Guan; Liu, Shengchun; Johnson, Laura A.; Moons, David S.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Rice, Michael D.; Ni, Jun; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease, which may cause obstructing intestinal strictures due to inflammation, fibrosis (deposition of collagen), or a combination of both. Identifying the different stages of the disease progression is still challenging. In this work, we indicated the feasibility of non-invasively characterizing intestinal strictures using photoacoustic imaging (PAI), utilizing the uniquely optical absorption of hemoglobin and collagen. Surgically removed human intestinal stricture specimens were investigated with a prototype PAI system. 2D PA images with acoustic resolution at wavelength 532, 1210 and 1310 nm were formulated, and furthermore, the PA histochemical components images which show the microscopic distributions of histochemical components were solved. Imaging experiments on surgically removed human intestinal specimens has demonstrated the solved PA images were significantly different associated with the presence of fibrosis, which could be applied to characterize the intestinal strictures for given specimens.

  17. Antegrade repositioning of Memokath stent in malignant ureteroileal anastomotic stricture.

    PubMed

    Ng, Keng Lim; Nawawi, Ouzrieah; Lim, Bee Kuan; Htun, Thi Ha; Dublin, Norman; Razack, Azad Hassan

    2013-11-01

    Ureteric strictures are common and can be due to benign or malignant causes. Various surgical treatments can be used from minimally invasive endoscopic retrograde JJ stent insertion, balloon dilatation, ureterolithotomy, to open surgical exploration and repair. Memokath 051 stent is a metallic stent designed for long-term ureteral stenting in the management of ureteral strictures. The insertion of this device is usually a straightforward procedure performed endoscopically in a retrograde fashion via cystoscopy. However, this procedure can be difficult in complicated scenarios when the bladder has been removed with neoureteral reimplantations or high-grade strictures. Here, we report a case of Memokath stent insertion complicated by placement difficulties in a lady with ileal conduit due to previous ovarian cancer complicated by vesicovaginal fistula, who presented with malignant stricture of the ureteroileal anastomosis. We describe a simple yet effective antegrade technique to precisely reposition the malpositioned Memokath stent, along with illustrations. PMID:24210538

  18. Does Dysphagia Indicate Recurrence of Benign Esophageal Strictures?

    PubMed Central

    Borgström, Anders; Fork, Frans-Thomas; Lövdahl, Eje

    1995-01-01

    Esophageal dilatation in dysphagic patients with benign strictures is usually considered successful if the patients' dysphagia is alleviated. However, the relation between dysphagia and the diameter of a stricture is not well understood. Moreover, the dysphagia may also be caused by an underlying esophageal motor disorder. In order to compare symptoms and objective measurements of esophageal stricture, 28 patients were studied with interview and a radiologic esophagram. The latter included swallowing of a solid bolus. All patients underwent successful balloon dilatation at least one month prior to this study. Recurrence of a stricture with a diameter of less than 13 mm was diagnosed by the barium swallow in 21 patients. Recurrence of dysphagia was seen in 15 patients. Thirteen patients denied any swallowing symptoms. Chest pain was present in 9 patients. Of 15 patients with dysphagia 2 (13%) had no narrowing but severe esophageal dysmotility. Of 13 patients without dysphagia 9 (69%) had a stricture with a diameter of 13 mm or less. Of 21 patients with a stricture of 13 mm or less 14 (67%) were symptomatic while 7 (33%) were asymptomatic. Four of 11 patients with retrosternal pain had a stricture of less than 10 mm. Three patients with retrosternal pain and obstruction had severe esophageal dysmotility. Whether or not the patients have dysphagia may be more related to diet and eating habits than to the true diameter of their esophageal narrowing. We conclude that the clinical history is non-reliable for evaluating the results of esophageal stricture dilatation. In order to get an objective measurement of therapeutic outcome, barium swallow including a solid bolus is recommended. PMID:18493375

  19. Eosinophilic Cholangitis—A Challenging Diagnosis of Benign Biliary Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Fragulidis, Georgios Panagiotis; Vezakis, Antonios I.; Kontis, Elissaios A.; Pantiora, Eirini V.; Stefanidis, Gerasimos G.; Politi, Aikaterini N.; Koutoulidis, Vasilios K.; Mela, Maria K.; Polydorou, Andreas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract When confronting a biliary stricture, both benign and malignant etiologies must be carefully considered as a variety of benign biliary strictures can masquerade as hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Therefore, patients could undergo a major surgery despite the possibility of a benign biliary disease. Approximately 15% to 24% of patients undergoing surgical resection for suspected biliary malignancy will have benign pathology. Eosinophilic cholangitis (EC) is a rare benign disorder of the biliary tract, which can cause obstructive jaundice and can pose a difficult diagnostic task. We present a rare case of a young woman who was referred to our hospital with obstructive painless jaundice due to a biliary stricture at the confluence of the hepatic bile ducts, with a provisional diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. Though, during her work up she was found to have EC, an extremely rare benign cause of biliary stricture, which is characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltration of the biliary tree causing stricturing, fibrosis, and obstruction and which is reversible with short-term high-dose steroids. Despite its rarity, EC should be taken into consideration when imaging modalities demonstrate a biliary stricture, especially if preoperative diagnosis of malignancy cannot be made, in the setting of peripheral eosinophilia and the absence of cardinal symptoms of malignancy. PMID:26735539

  20. Endoscopic incisional therapy for benign esophageal strictures: Technique and results

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Jayanta; Dhaka, Narendra; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Benign esophageal strictures refractory to the conventional balloon or bougie dilatation may be subjected to various adjunctive modes of therapy, one of them being endoscopic incisional therapy (EIT). A proper delineation of the stricture anatomy is a prerequisite. A host of electrocautery and mechanical devices may be used, the most common being the use of needle knife, either standard or insulated tip. The technique entails radial incision and cutting off of the stenotic rim. Adjunctive therapies, to prevent re-stenosis, such as balloon dilatation, oral or intralesional steroids or argon plasma coagulation can be used. The common strictures where EIT has been successfully used are Schatzki’s rings (SR) and anastomotic strictures (AS). Short segment strictures (< 1 cm) have been found to have the best outcome. When compared with routine balloon dilatation, EIT has equivalent results in treatment naïve cases but better long term outcome in refractory cases. Anecdotal reports of its use in other types of strictures have been noted. Post procedure complications of EIT are mild and comparable to dilatation therapy. As of the current evidence, incisional therapy can be used for management of refractory AS and SR with relatively short stenosis (< 1 cm) with good safety profile and acceptable long term patency. PMID:26722613

  1. Endoscopic incisional therapy for benign esophageal strictures: Technique and results.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Jayanta; Dhaka, Narendra; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2015-12-25

    Benign esophageal strictures refractory to the conventional balloon or bougie dilatation may be subjected to various adjunctive modes of therapy, one of them being endoscopic incisional therapy (EIT). A proper delineation of the stricture anatomy is a prerequisite. A host of electrocautery and mechanical devices may be used, the most common being the use of needle knife, either standard or insulated tip. The technique entails radial incision and cutting off of the stenotic rim. Adjunctive therapies, to prevent re-stenosis, such as balloon dilatation, oral or intralesional steroids or argon plasma coagulation can be used. The common strictures where EIT has been successfully used are Schatzki's rings (SR) and anastomotic strictures (AS). Short segment strictures (< 1 cm) have been found to have the best outcome. When compared with routine balloon dilatation, EIT has equivalent results in treatment naïve cases but better long term outcome in refractory cases. Anecdotal reports of its use in other types of strictures have been noted. Post procedure complications of EIT are mild and comparable to dilatation therapy. As of the current evidence, incisional therapy can be used for management of refractory AS and SR with relatively short stenosis (< 1 cm) with good safety profile and acceptable long term patency. PMID:26722613

  2. Evaluation of Quantitative PET/MR Enterography Biomarkers for Discrimination of Inflammatory Strictures from Fibrotic Strictures in Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Onofrio A; Gee, Michael S; Nicolai, Emanuele; Selvaggi, Francesco; Pellino, Gianluca; Cuocolo, Alberto; Luongo, Angelo; Catalano, Marco; Rosen, Bruce R; Gervais, Debra; Vangel, Mark G; Soricelli, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) enterography for the differentiation of fibrotic strictures from inflammatory strictures in patients with Crohn disease. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. Patients gave their written informed consent for study enrollment. PET/MR enterography images were evaluated in 19 patients with Crohn disease who had strictures that underwent surgical resection with pathologic confirmation. Two radiologists and a nuclear medicine physician in consensus evaluated the following bowel wall PET/MR enterography biomarkers: signal intensity (SI) on T2-weighted images, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), PET maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SI on T2-weighted images × SUVmax, and ADC × SUVmax values at levels that corresponded to pathologic specimens. MR, PET, and hybrid PET/MR biomarkers were compared, and the performance for differentiation of inflammatory strictures from fibrotic strictures was assessed. Mixed-model regression analysis was used to compare the mean imaging parameters between groups; the P values were corrected for the five comparisons by using the Bonferroni method. Results Three of the PET/MR enterography biomarkers, SUVmax, SI on T2-weighted images × SUVmax, and ADC × SUVmax, showed significant differences in the fibrosis group compared with the fibrosis with active inflammation group and the active inflammation only group. The best discriminator between fibrosis and active inflammation was the combined PET/MR enterography biomarker ADC × SUVmax cutoff of less than 3000, which was associated with accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity values of 0.71, 0.67, and 0.73, respectively. Conclusion PET/MR enterography offers a potential noninvasive technique for the differentiation of purely fibrotic strictures from mixed or inflammatory strictures. A hybrid biomarker that incorporates

  3. Gonococcal Conjunctivitis Despite Successful Treatment of Male Urethritis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peters, Remco P H; Verweij, Stephan P; McIntyre, James A; Schaftenaar, Erik

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of progressive, cephalosporin-susceptible, Neisseria gonorrhoeae conjunctivitis despite successful treatment of male urethritis syndrome. We hypothesize that conjunctival infection progressed due to insufficient penetration of cefixime and azithromycin and point out that extragenital infection and male urethritis may not be cured simultaneously in settings where the syndromic approach is used. PMID:26760182

  4. Urethral injury in laparoscopic-assisted abdominoperineal resection

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Laurel; Flores, Francisco Avila; Dhalla, Sonny S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a 71-year-old man who underwent laparoscopic-assisted abdominoperineal resection for recurrence of rectal cancer, which was complicated by a urethral injury. Traumatic urinary catheter insertion was ruled out as an alternative etiology. This case highlights the importance of recognizing urethral injury as a possible complication of laparoscopic-assisted abdominoperineal resection surgery. PMID:26834902

  5. Postpriapism erectile dysfunction and shunt-related urethral stricture: long-term morbidity after proximal shunt for ischaemic priapism

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Jibril Oyekunle

    2014-01-01

    Recent guidelines have advocated for step-wise treatment of increasing invasiveness in the management of ischaemic priapism though with low-level evidences. In the past, proximal shunts were favoured as first-line treatment. We present an African man who had proximal shunt (cavernoso-spongiosal) three decades ago for ischaemic priapism and subsequently had long-term morbidity over the three decades with adverse effect on his quality of life. Recent guidelines appear to be sound despite their limitations and more invasive cavernoso-spongiosal shunts may be associated with significant long-term morbidities and poor quality of life. PMID:25709730

  6. Female Urethral Diverticulum Containing a Giant Calculus

    PubMed Central

    Dong, ZhiLong; Wang, Hanzhang; Zuo, LinJun; Hou, MingLi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Urethral diverticula with calculi have a low incidence as reported in the literature. Diverticulum of female urethra is rare, often discovered due to associated complications. We report a case of diverticulum of the female urethra containing giant calculi in a 62-year-old multiparous woman. She consulted with our office due to dysuria and a hard, painful periurethral mass in the anterior vagina wall. The diverticulum was approached surgically by a vaginal route, and local extraction of the calculi and subsequent diverticulectomy successfully treated the condition. Diagnosis of a complicated diverticulum can be easily achieved if one possesses a high degree of clinical symptoms. PMID:25997056

  7. Urethral catheters: can we reduce use?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Indwelling urinary catheters are the main cause of healthcare-associated urinary tract infections. It can be expected that reduction of the use of urinary catheters will lead to decreased numbers of urinary tract infection. Methods The efficacy of an intervention programme to improve adherence to recommendations to reduce the use of urethral catheters was studied in a before-after comparison in ten Dutch hospitals. The programme detected barriers and facilitators and each individual facility was supported with developing their own intervention strategy. Outcome was evaluated by the prevalence of catheters, alternatives such as diapers, numbers of urinary tract infections, the percentage of correct indications and the duration of catheterization. The costs of the implementation as well as the catheterization were evaluated. Results Of a population of 16,495 hospitalized patients 3335 patients of whom 2943 were evaluable for the study, had a urethral catheter. The prevalence of urethral catheters decreased insignificantly in neurology (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.77 - 1.13) and internal medicine wards (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.83 - 1.13), decreased significantly in surgical wards (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.75 - 0.96), but increased significantly in intensive care (IC) and coronary care (CC) units (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.01 - 2.17). The use of alternatives was limited and remained so after the intervention. Duration of catheterization decreased insignificantly in IC/CC units (ratio after/before 0.95; 95% CI 0.78 - 1.16) and neurology (ratio 0.97; 95% CI 0.80 - 1.18) and significantly in internal medicine (ratio 0.81; 95% CI 0.69 - 0.96) and surgery wards (ratio 0.80; 95% CI 0.71 - 0.90). The percentage of correct indications on the day of inclusion increased from 50 to 67% (p < 0.0001). The prevalence of urinary tract infections in catheterized patients did not change. The mean cost saved per 100 patients was € 537. Conclusion Targeted implementation of recommendations from an

  8. Haemophilus parainfluenzae urethritis among homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Meng-Shiuan; Wu, Mei-Yu; Lin, Tsui-Hsien; Liao, Chun-Hsing

    2015-08-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a common inhabitant of the human upper respiratory tract of the normal oral microflora. We report three men who had been having unprotected sex with men (MSM) and subsequently acquired H. parainfluenzae urethritis, which was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Two men were treated with ceftriaxone and doxycycline, and the third man was treated with clarithromycin. All three patients responded to treatment. This case series highlights the potential role of H. parainfluenzae as a sexually transmitted genitourinary pathogen. PMID:23357607

  9. Female covered urethral duplication with urogenital sinus.

    PubMed

    Philippe-Chomette, Pascale; Zeidan, Smart; Belarbi, Nadia; Van Der Meer, Gretha; Oury, Jean-Francois; El-Ghoneimi, Alaa

    2012-02-01

    We report a covered urethral duplication in a girl presenting prenatally with an enlarged fluid-filled vulvar cyst, genital duplication, and urogenital sinus revealed by fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and serial ultrasounds. Physical examination revealed an enlarged vulvar mass covering the clitoris, a single orifice, and normally sited anus. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia was ruled out at birth. MRI in addition showed an accessory duct between the sinus and the urine-filled vulvar pouch with a bifid clitoris. A total urogenital sinus mobilization with resection of the accessory urethra and vulvoplasty was performed with uneventful follow-up. PMID:21601245

  10. Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepanshu; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-05-01

    Advances in diagnostic modalities and improvement in surveillance programs for Barrett esophagus has resulted in an increase in the incidence of superficial esophageal cancers (SECs). SEC, due to their limited metastatic potential, are amenable to non-invasive treatment modalities. Endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are some of the new modalities that gastroenterologists have used over the last decade to diagnose and treat SEC. However, esophageal stricture (ES) is a very common complication and a major cause of morbidity post-ESD. In the past few years, there has been a tremendous effort to reduce the incidence of ES among patients undergoing ESD. Steroids have shown the most consistent results over time with minimal complications although the preferred mode of delivery is debatable, with both systemic and local therapy having pros and cons for specific subgroups of patients. Newer modalities such as esophageal stents, autologous cell sheet transplantation, polyglycolic acid, and tranilast have shown promising results but the depth of experience with these methods is still limited. We have summarized case reports, prospective single center studies, and randomized controlled trials describing the various methods intended to reduce the incidence of ES after ESD. Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations, and reported complications are discussed. PMID:26949124

  11. Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Advances in diagnostic modalities and improvement in surveillance programs for Barrett esophagus has resulted in an increase in the incidence of superficial esophageal cancers (SECs). SEC, due to their limited metastatic potential, are amenable to non-invasive treatment modalities. Endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are some of the new modalities that gastroenterologists have used over the last decade to diagnose and treat SEC. However, esophageal stricture (ES) is a very common complication and a major cause of morbidity post-ESD. In the past few years, there has been a tremendous effort to reduce the incidence of ES among patients undergoing ESD. Steroids have shown the most consistent results over time with minimal complications although the preferred mode of delivery is debatable, with both systemic and local therapy having pros and cons for specific subgroups of patients. Newer modalities such as esophageal stents, autologous cell sheet transplantation, polyglycolic acid, and tranilast have shown promising results but the depth of experience with these methods is still limited. We have summarized case reports, prospective single center studies, and randomized controlled trials describing the various methods intended to reduce the incidence of ES after ESD. Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations, and reported complications are discussed. PMID:26949124

  12. Conservative surgical treatment of reflux esophagitis and esophageal stricture.

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, J L; Wright, R S; Edwards, W H; Sawyers, J L

    1975-01-01

    During a recent 3-year period, 17 consecutive patients were seen with advanced fibrotic esophageal strictures secondary to alkaline-acid-pepsin reflux. From detailed preoperative evaluations alone it was impossible to determine whether therapy should consist of excisional surgery, esophagogastroplasty or intra-operative dilatation with correction of reflux. Only at operation could the length, extent, degree and severity of the stricture be fully determined. Each of the 17 patients was treated by controlled dilatation, coupled with an antireflux procedure. This simplified approach proved successful on strictures thought preoperatively to be undilatable. It appears that this conservative approach is applicable to many advanced strictures and excisional and plastic procedures should be reserved for those cases that prove unyielding to intraoperative dilatation. The true appraisal of a reflux stricture and the choice of surgical procedure is best determined at the operating table. Images Fig. 5A. Fig. 5B. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. Fig. 17. Fig. 18. Fig. 19. Fig. 20. Fig. 21. PMID:1130874

  13. Clinical efficacy of azithromycin for male nongonococcal urethritis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Matsukawa, Masanori; Kurimura, Yuichiro; Takeyama, Koh; Kunishima, Yasuharu; Iwasawa, Akihiko; Koroku, Mikio; Tanda, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Nobukazu; Takagi, Yoshio; Hirose, Takaoki; Nishimura, Masahiro; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to confirm the clinical efficacy of a single-dose azithromycin (AZM) regimen (1000 mg) for patients with nongonococcal urethritis in real-life practice. The study finally evaluated 55 patients, 42 who were symptomatic and 13 who were asymptomatic, after excluding 40 who visited clinics only once. Sixteen of the symptomatic patients were diagnosed as having nongonococcal chlamydial urethritis, 7 as having nongonococcal nonchlamydial urethritis, and 19 as having urethritis without any microbial detection. Chlamydia trachomatis was detected in 11 asymptomatic patients, Mycoplasma genitalium in 1, and Ureaplasma urealyticum in 1. Of the patients who were microbiologically evaluated before and after single-dose AZM, microbiological cure was achieved in 87% (20/23) of those with symptomatic nongonococcal urethritis and in 100% (13/13) of those with asymptomatic nongonococcal urethritis. The clinical cure rate was 86% for the 42 symptomatic patients with detectable and undetectable pathogens. There were adverse events in 5 (9%) patients but they were commonly mild and self-limited. In conclusion, the single-dose AZM regimen was well tolerated and eradicated the estimated and potential pathogens of nongonococcal urethritis. PMID:19089553

  14. Transperineal ultrasonography in stress urinary incontinence: The significance of urethral rotation angles

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saadi, Wasan Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess, using transperineal ultrasonography (TPUS), the numerical value of the rotation of the bladder neck [represented by the difference in the anterior (α angle) and posterior urethral angles (β angle)] at rest and straining, in continent women and women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), to ascertain if there are significant differences in the angles of rotation (Rα and Rβ) between the groups. Patients, subjects and methods In all, 30 women with SUI (SUI group) and 30 continent women (control group) were included. TPUS was performed at rest and straining (Valsalva manoeuver), and the threshold value for the urethral angles (α and β angles) for each group were estimated. The degree of rotation for each angle was calculated and was considered as the angle of rotation. Results Both the α and β angles were significantly different between the groups at rest and straining, and there was a significant difference in the mean increment in the value of each angle. Higher values of increment (higher rotation angles) were reported in the SUI group for both the α and β angles compared with those of the control group [mean (SD) Rα SUI group 19.43 (12.76) vs controls 10.53 (2.98) °; Rβ SUI group 28.30 (12.96) vs controls 16.33 (10.8) °; P < 0.001]. Conclusion Urethral rotation angles may assist in the assessment and diagnosis of patients with SUI, which may in turn reduce the need for more sophisticated urodynamic studies. PMID:26966596

  15. Urethral reconstruction with a 3D porous bacterial cellulose scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Wen; Lv, Xiang-Guo; Li, Zhe; Song, Lu-Jie; Feng, Chao; Xie, Min-Kai; Li, Chao; Li, Hong-Bin; Wang, Ji-Hong; Zhu, Wei-Dong; Chen, Shi-Yan; Wang, Hua-Ping; Xu, Yue-Min

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of urethral reconstruction with a three-dimensional (3D) porous bacterial cellulose (BC) scaffold seeded with lingual keratinocytes in a rabbit model. A novel 3D porous BC scaffold was prepared by gelatin sponge interfering in the BC fermentation process. Rabbit lingual keratinocytes were isolated, expanded, and seeded onto 3D porous BC. BC alone (group 1, N  =  10), 3D porous BC alone (group 2, N  =  10), and 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes (group 3, N  =  10) were used to repair rabbit ventral urethral defects (2.0   ×   0.8 cm). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that BC consisted of a compact laminate while 3D porous BC was composed of a porous sheet buttressed by a dense outer layer. The average pore diameter and porosity of the 3D porous BC were 4.23   ±   1.14 μm and 67.00   ±   6.80%, respectively. At 3 months postoperatively, macroscopic examinations and retrograde urethrograms of urethras revealed that all urethras maintained wide calibers in group 3. Strictures were found in all rabbits in groups 1 and 2. Histologically, at 1 month postoperatively, intact epithelium occurred in group 3, and discontinued epithelium was found in groups 1 and 2. However, groups 2 and 3 exhibited similar epithelial regeneration, which was superior to that of group 1 at 3 months (p  <  0.05). Comparisons of smooth muscle content and endothelia density among the three groups revealed a significant increase at each time point (p  <  0.05). Our results demonstrated that 3D porous BC seeded with lingual keratinocytes enhanced urethral tissue regeneration. 3D porous BC could potentially be used as an optimized scaffold for urethral reconstruction. PMID:26358641

  16. The incidence of erectile dysfunction after pelvic fracture urethral injury: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Blaschko, Sarah D.; Sanford, Melissa T.; Schlomer, Bruce J.; Alwaal, Amjad; Yang, Glen; Villalta, Jacqueline D.; Wessells, Hunter; McAninch, Jack W.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pelvic fracture urethral injury (PFUI) is associated with a high risk of erectile dysfunction (ED). The effect of the type of posterior urethral disruption repair on erectile function has not been clearly established. We systematically reviewed and conducted a meta-analysis of the proportion of patients with ED at (i) baseline after pelvic fracture with PFUI, (ii) after immediate primary realignment, and (iii) after delayed urethroplasty. Methods Using search terms for primary realignment or urethroplasty and urethral disruption, we systematically reviewed PubMed and EMBASE. A meta-analysis of the proportion of patients with ED was conducted assuming a random-effects model. Results Of 734 articles found, 24 met the inclusion criteria. The estimate of the proportion (95% confidence interval) of patients with ED after (i) PFUI was 34 (25–45)%, after (ii) immediate primary realignment was 16 (8–26)%, and after (iii) delayed urethroplasty was an additional 3 (2–5)% more than the 34% after pelvic fracture in this cohort. Conclusions After pelvic fracture, 34% of patients had ED. After primary endoscopic alignment, patients had a lower reported rate of ED (16%). Delayed urethroplasty conferred an additional 3% risk above the 34% associated with PFUI alone, with 37% of patients having de novo ED. The difference in de novo ED after primary endoscopic alignment vs. delayed urethroplasty is probably due to reporting differences in ED and/or patients with less severe injury undergoing primary realignment. PMID:26019983

  17. Surgical Management of Ureteral Strictures Arising From Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orchard, J.; Tward, Jonathan D.; Lenherr, Sara; Hotaling, James M.; Brant, William O.; Myers, Jeremy B.

    2016-01-01

    Ureteral strictures arising from radiotherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer are rare. We describe four cases of these ureteral strictures emphasizing pre-operative factors that may have contributed to development of the strictures, their ultimate surgical management, and the patients' short-term outcomes. PMID:27175344

  18. Crossing Ureteric Strictures: Microcatheters to the Rescue When Conventional Methods Fail

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, A. N.; Lee, M. J.

    2007-11-15

    Tight distal ureteric strictures can be most challenging to traverse both from above, by interventional radiologists, and below, by urologists. Despite the advent of numerous guidewires, manufactured from different materials, often ureteric strictures are too tight to allow conventional guidewires to pass through. We describe an alternative approach to cross tight ureteric strictures, using a microguidewire and microcatheter combination.

  19. Urethral cavernous hemangioma in a female patient: a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Bolat, Mustafa Suat; Yüzüncü, Kubilay; Akdeniz, Ekrem; Demirdoven, Ayse Nurten

    2015-01-01

    Genitourinary hemangiomas are rare entities of the urinary system. We reported a female patient who suffered dyspareunia and intermitant hematuria that was proved as urethral cavernous hemangioma. Despite its benign nature, hemangiomas may recur due to incomplet excision. PMID:26985270

  20. Management of advanced primary urethral carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Dayyani, Farshid; Hoffman, Karen; Eifel, Patricia; Guo, Charles; Vikram, Raghu; Pagliaro, Lance C; Pettaway, Curtis

    2014-07-01

    Primary urethral carcinoma (PUC) is a rare malignancy accounting for <1% of genitourinary cancers, with a predilection for men and African-Americans. The sites and histology of urethral carcinoma vary by gender and anatomical location. Squamous cell carcinoma is most common among both genders but adenocarcinomas are noted in 15-35% of cases among women. Obstructive or irritative symptoms and haematuria are common modes of presentation. Clinical evaluation includes cystourethroscopy with biopsy and examination under anaesthesia. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a highly effective method to image the primary tumour while defıning the potential involvement of surrounding structures. Most tumours are localised, with regional metastases to nodal sites seen in up to 30% of cases in both genders, while distant metastases at presentation are rare (0-6%), but occur in up to 40% of cases with recurrent disease. Among men, the two most important prognostic factors are disease location and stage. Low-stage tumours (T1-2) and tumours involving the fossa navicularis or the penile urethra have a better prognosis than higher stage tumours (>T2 or N+) and lesions involving the bulbomembranous urethra. In women, in addition to stage and location, the size of the tumour has also prognostic implications. While surgery and radiation therapy (RT) are of benefit in early stage disease, advanced stage PUC requires multimodal treatment strategies to optimise local control and survival. These include induction chemotherapy followed by surgery or RT and concurrent chemoradiation with or without surgery. The latter strategy has been used successfully to treat other human papillomavirus-related cancers of the vagina, cervix and anus and may be of value in achieving organ preservation. Given the rarity of PUC, prospective multi-institutional studies are needed to better define the optimal treatment approach for this disease entity. PMID:24447439

  1. Male urethral sarcoma: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Magno Almeida; dos Santos, Guilherme Campelo Lopes; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos; Dall’Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Sant’Anna, Alexandre Crippa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urethral tumors are rare and aggressive. They usually affect men (2:1) and occur more commonly in white (85% of cases). Soft tissue sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors that arise from embryonic mesoderm. It represents 1% of all cases of urinary tract malignancies and rarely primary affect the ureter. We report a case of male urethral sarcoma. To date, only two similar cases have been published in literature. PMID:26398363

  2. Male urethral sarcoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Magno Almeida; Santos, Guilherme Campelo Lopes Dos; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos; Dall'Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Sant'Anna, Alexandre Crippa

    2016-03-01

    Urethral tumors are rare and aggressive. They usually affect men (2:1) and occur more commonly in white (85% of cases). Soft tissue sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors that arise from embryonic mesoderm. It represents 1% of all cases of urinary tract malignancies and rarely primary affect the ureter. We report a case of male urethral sarcoma. To date, only two similar cases have been published in literature. PMID:26398363

  3. Successful Use of Esophageal Stent Placement to Treat a Postoperative Esophageal Stricture in a Toddler.

    PubMed

    Gebrail, Rami; Absah, Imad

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is the most common type of gastrointestinal atresia. The most common variant (type C) consists of a blind esophageal pouch with a fistula between the trachea and the distal esophagus. Surgical repair can be complicated by the development of benign stricture. Most strictures are amenable to dilation, but refractory strictures may require surgical intervention. A 24-month-old boy born with tracheoesophageal fistula and EA underwent surgical repair on day 1 of life. He developed esophageal stricture that responded to esophageal stent placement. Endoscopic biliary accessories can be safely used to dilate refractory esophageal strictures in children, and should be considered prior to seeking other complex alternatives. PMID:26157909

  4. Urethral Sparing Histotripsy of the Prostate in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Schade, George R.; Hall, Timothy L.; Roberts, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and healing response to urethral sparing prostate histotripsy a canine model of benign prostatic hypertrophy. Methods Histotripsy was performed on 10 canines using a 750 kHz piezoelectric ultrasound transducer targeting the prostatic parenchyma while avoiding the urethra. Periprocedure prostatic urethral integrity was evaluated with serial cystourethroscopy. Evolution of histotripsy treatment effect and subjects’ response to urethral sparing was evaluated with serial ultrasound and laboratory evaluation, respectively. Subjects were euthanized acutely or chronically and findings were confirmed histologically. Results Bilateral treatment was possible in 8/10 subjects while unilateral treatment was performed in 2/10. Failure to spare the urethra was observed in 2/18 treatments; one acutely and one chronically despite normal cystourethroscopy for the first week. Modest prostatic volume reduction was seen in subjects survived to 8 weeks post-histotripsy. Laboratory studies revealed transient perioperative increases in mean white-blood cell count, C-reactive protein, and lactate dehydrogenase. On histology, 80% of successful urethral sparing treatment cavities were completely epithelialized, containing simple fluid with minimal cellular debris at 8 weeks despite no communication with the urethra. Conclusions Urethral sparing histotripsy of the prostate is feasible and well tolerated in a canine model, resulting in modest volume reduction and prompt resorption of homogenized tissue debris. Human studies to evaluate the clinical utility and symptomatic response of urethral sparing are needed. PMID:22840869

  5. Bilateral congenital ureteral strictures in a young cat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Namsoon; Choi, Mihyun; Keh, Seoyeon; Oh, Yein; Seo, Jimin; Choi, Heeyeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Yoon, Junghee

    2014-01-01

    An 8-month-old cat was presented with bilateral hydronephrosis. Bilateral ureteral obstructions were identified by diagnostic imaging and confirmed by necropsy. Histopathologic findings revealed polypoid transitional epithelial hyperplasia with chronic lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. This report documents congenital ureteral strictures as a cause of ureteral obstruction in a young cat. PMID:25183890

  6. Obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhara, K.L.; Iyer, S.K.

    1984-10-01

    A case of obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture is reported. The patient received postoperative radiation for left adrenal carcinoma, seven years prior to this admission. The sequelae of hepatobiliary radiation and their management are discussed briefly.

  7. Crohn’s disease complicated by strictures: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Florian; Zimmermann, Ellen M; Remzi, Feza H; Sandborn, William J

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of strictures as a complication of Crohn’s disease is a significant clinical problem. No specific antifibrotic therapies are available. This systematic review comprehensively addresses the pathogenesis, epidemiology, prediction, diagnosis and therapy of this disease complication. We also provide specific recommendations for clinical practice and summarise areas that require future investigation. PMID:23626373

  8. Anastomotic Repair versus Free Graft Urethroplasty for Bulbar Strictures: A Focus on the Impact on Sexual Function

    PubMed Central

    Beysens, Matthias; Palminteri, Enzo; Oosterlinck, Willem; Spinoit, Anne-Françoise; Hoebeke, Piet; François, Philippe; Decaestecker, Karel; Lumen, Nicolaas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate alterations in sexual function and genital sensitivity after anastomotic repair (AR) and free graft urethroplasty (FGU) for bulbar urethral strictures. Methods. Patients treated with AR (n = 31) or FGU (n = 16) were prospectively evaluated before, 6 weeks and 6 months after urethroplasty. Evaluation included International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), 5-Item International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5), Ejaculation/Orgasm Score (EOS), and 3 questions on genital sensitivity. Results. At 6 weeks, there was a significant decline of IIEF-5 for AR (−4.8; p = 0.005), whereas there was no significant change for FGU (+0.9; p = 0.115). After 6 months, differences with baseline were not significant overall and among subgroups. At 6 weeks, there was a significant decline in EOS for AR (−1.4; p = 0.022). In the FGU group there was no significant change (+0.6; p = 0.12). Overall and among subgroups, EOS normalized at 6 months. After 6 weeks and 6 months, respectively, 62.2 and 52% of patients reported alterations in penile sensitivity with no significant differences among subgroups. Conclusions. AR is associated with a transient decline in erectile and ejaculatory function. This was not observed with FGU. Bulbar AR and FGU are likely to alter genital sensitivity. PMID:26494997

  9. Role of metallic stents in benign esophageal stricture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Chan Sup

    2012-10-01

    Simple esophageal strictures, which are focal, straight, and large in diameter, usually require 1 - 3 dilation sessions to relieve symptoms. However, complex strictures, which are long, tortuous, or associated with a severely compromised luminal diameter, are usually more difficult to treat with conventional bougie or balloon dilation techniques, and often have high recurrence rates. Although the permanent placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) has been used to manage refractory benign esophageal strictures, this procedure is associated with additional problems, such as stricture from tissue hyperplasia, stent migration, and fistula formation. Thus, several new types of stents have been developed, including temporary SEMS, self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS), and biodegradable stents. The use of these new products has produced varied results. Temporary SEMS that have been used to relieve benign esophageal conditions have caused granulation tissue at both ends of the stent because of contact between the mucosa and the exposed metal components of the stent, thus hindering stent removal. We examined the tissue response to two new types of SEMS, a flange-type and a straighttype, each coated with a silicone membrane on the outside of the metal mesh. These two SEMS were evaluated individually and compared with a conventional control stent in animal experiments. Although the newly designed stents resulted in reduced tissue hyperplasia, and were thus more easily separated from the esophageal tissue, some degree of tissue hyperplasia did occur. We suggest that newly designed DES (drug-eluting stents) may provide an alternative tool to manage refractory benign esophageal stricture.

  10. A protocol for managing urethral obstruction in male cats without urethral catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Edward S.; Owens, Tammy J.; Chew, Dennis J.; Tony Buffington, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine efficacy of a protocol for managing urethral obstruction (UO) in male cats without urethral catheterization. Design Clinical trial. Animals 15 male cats with UO in which conventional treatment had been declined. Procedures Laboratory testing and abdominal radiography were performed, and cats with severe metabolic derangements or urinary calculi were excluded. Treatment included administration of acepromazine (0.25 mg, IM, or 2.5 mg, PO, q 8 h), buprenorphine (0.075 mg, PO, q 8 h), and medetomidine (0.1 mg, IM, q 24 h) and decompressive cystocentesis and SC administration of fluids as needed. Cats were placed in a quiet, dark environment to minimize stress. Treatment success was defined as spontaneous urination within 72 hours and subsequent discharge from the hospital. Results Treatment was successful in 11 of the 15 cats. In the remaining 4 cats, treatment was considered to have failed because of development of uroabdomen (n = 3) or hemoabdomen (1). Cats in which treatment failed had significantly higher serum creatinine concentrations than did cats in which treatment was successful. Necropsy was performed on 3 cats in which treatment had failed. All 3 had severe inflammatory disease of the urinary bladder, but none had evidence of bladder rupture. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results suggested that in male cats, a combination of pharmacological treatment, decompressive cystocentesis, and a low-stress environment may allow for resolution of UO without the need for urethral catheterization. This low-cost protocol could serve as an alternative to euthanasia when financial constraints prevent more extensive treatment. PMID:21118011

  11. Single-centre study comparing standard apical dissection with a modified technique to facilitate vesico-urethral anastomosis during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Pu, Xiao-Yong; Si-Tu, Jie; Huang, Wen-Tao

    2011-01-01

    A modified apical dissection of the prostate to improve the efficiency of vesico-urethral anastomosis (VUA) in laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) was reported. A total of 42 patients were randomly selected and enrolled in this study. A standard LRP was performed in 21 patients (group 1), whereas a novel, modified apical dissection of the prostate in LRP was performed in another 21 patients (group 2). Surgical data, total operative time, VUA time, extravasation rate, catheterisation time, occurrence of anastomotic strictures, and the early and late continence rates were analysed statistically. No differences in clinical or pathological characteristics were determined between the two groups. The total operative time, VUA time, blood loss and catheterisation time were lower in group 2, which received the novel, modified technique compared with group 1, which received the standard technique to dissect the apex of the prostate (P<0.01 for each variable). Regarding the extravasation rate and the occurrence of anastomotic strictures, no significant differences were found between the two groups (P>0.05 for each). After catheter removal, a statistically significant difference in the continence rates was present at 3 and 30 days post operation in the two groups (P<0.01, respectively). At 90 days post operation, the difference, although still present, was no longer statistically significant (P>0.05). The novel, modified apical dissection of the prostate facilitates the VUA and significantly improves the efficacy of the procedure and early restoration of continence. PMID:21297656

  12. Urethral duplication in males: our experience in ten cases.

    PubMed

    Arena, Salvatore; Arena, Carmela; Scuderi, Maria Grazia; Sanges, Giuseppe; Arena, Francesco; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo

    2007-08-01

    Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly, affecting mainly boys. Clinical presentation varies because of the different anatomical patterns of this abnormality. We report our experience in ten males affected by urethral duplication. We retrospectively reviewed the records of ten males affected by urethral duplication. Mild cases of distal type I duplications as well as "Y-type" duplication associated to anorectal malformation were excluded. Evaluation included voiding cystourethrography, retrograde urethrography, intravenous urography and urethrocystoscopy. Mean age at diagnosis was 46.7 +/- 32.3 months A blind ending duplicated urethra (type I) was present in three patients, two urethras originating from a common bladder neck (type II A2) in three, an "Y-type" duplication in three and a complete bladder with incomplete urethral duplication in one. Surgical management included excision of the duplicated urethra in four patients while a displacement of the ventral urethra (in "Y-type" duplication) in perineal-scrotal or scrotal position was performed in two patients as first stage of urethral reconstruction. Good cosmetical and functional results were achieved in all six treated boys while surgical management was not required in four. Urethral duplication is often associated with genito-urinary and gastro-intestinal abnormalities. Embryology is unclear and a lot of hypotheses have been proposed. We believe that the same embryological explanation cannot be applied to all subtypes of urethral duplication. Management must be evaluated for each case. The overall prognosis is good, in spite of the presence of other severe associate congenital anomalies. PMID:17576574

  13. Lymphocyte reactivity in patients with gonococcal urethritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, L; Sandström, E

    1978-01-01

    Lymphocyte reactivity to virulent gonococcal antigen T2 and the non-pathogenic Neisseria pharyngis (NPN) has been studied by using the 14C-thymidine uptake in cell cultures from 42 patients with gonococcal urethritis and from 18 controls. The DNA synthesis in cell cultures with T2 antigen was higher in 21 female patients than in the 18 controls. No differences in DNA synthesis were observed in antigen-stimulated cell cultures from patients with single or multiple infections, from patients with urogenital complication, or from controls. Gonococcal antibodies in the serum were detected by the gonococcal complement-fixation test (GCFT). A study of the possible correlation between the outcome of the serological test and the cellular response to gonococcal antigen showed that 14C-thymidine uptake in lymphocyte cultures from male patients with negative GCFT, stimulated with T2 antigen, was much lower than the thymidine uptake in stimulated cell cultures from all the other male and female patients (P less than 0.001). The DNA synthesis was higher in cell cultures from seronegative women than from seronegative men (P less than 0.01). A significant difference (P less than 0.01) was also noted in the lymphocyte reactivity to gonococcal antigen between controls and all patients, except in those men who gave negative results to the serological tests. There were no differences between these two groups with respect to the thymidine uptake in NPN-stimulated cell cultures. PMID:678955

  14. Female Urethral Diverticulum: Current Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Crescenze, Iryna M; Goldman, Howard B

    2015-10-01

    While urethral diverticulum (UD) affects less than 20 per 1,000,000 women overall, it is thought to represent 1.4% of women with incontinence presenting to urology practices. It is hypothesized to evolve from periurethral glands that become obstructed, infected, and dilated over time, and patients typically present with dyspareunia, bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), and/or recurrent UTIs. In many patients, a periurethral mass can be appreciated on exam. In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the imaging test of choice for diagnosis of UD, but ultrasound (US) is a readily available alternative and provides good specificity at a lower cost. Surgical excision of the diverticulum with tension-free, water-tight, three-layer closure continues to be the mainstay of treatment of UD with most studies reporting cure rates of >90%. Concomitant treatment of preexisting stress incontinence with autologous fascial pubovaginal sling can be used at the time of diverticulectomy to avoid a secondary procedure. However, since secondary anti-incontinence procedures are needed in only a small number of patients, up-front stress incontinence treatment may result in significant overtreatment, and staged anti-incontinence procedures continue to be a reasonable option for patients with persistent bothersome stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after diverticulectomy. PMID:26267225

  15. Bougie urethral dilators: revival or survival?

    PubMed Central

    Al–Adawi, Mohammad Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To present our center's experience in managing bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) conditions using bougie dilators. We described the dilation technique methodically for teaching purpose. Patients and method Retrospectively, a total of 196 medical records over the last four years denoting BOO conditions in men, women, and children were retrieved for analysis. Data reviewed for common complications was namely: perforation, recurrence, urinary tract obstruction (UTI) and inability to overcome the obstruction. Results Among the 196 analyzed cases, 24 (12.2%) cases were cured, whereas 172 (87.8%) cases reported complications. Within the complicated cases analyzed, 134 (68.4%) cases had recurrent obstructions, 13 (6.6%) cases had perforations, 6 (3.0%) cases developed UTI, while in 19 (9.7%) cases, we failed to pass the obstruction. Conclusions In our center where urethral dilation technique has revived four years ago, it turned back to be the standard choice in managing BOO cases. We propose the technique to Urology training program directors, all over the world, to teach it as a compulsory skill for junior urologists to master. PMID:24757552

  16. Necrotizing Urethritis due to Aerococcus urinae

    PubMed Central

    Babaeer, Abdulrahman A.; Nader, Claudia; Iacoviello, Vito; Tomera, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A 49-year-old male presented to the emergency with hematuria and pain in the shaft of the penis for one day. The patient was found to be in a state of shock. The shaft of the penis and the scrotum were swollen and tender. No skin necrosis was observed and no crepitus was palpable. Serum white count (WBC) was 29.5 × 103/μL. A CT scan showed gas in the corpus spongiosum. Antibiotics were started with IV metronidazole, vancomycin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. Metronidazole was then replaced by clindamycin. Exploration was performed but no necrotic tissue was identified. Cystourethroscopy revealed dusky looking urethra. A suprapubic tube and a urethral catheter were placed in the bladder. WBC trended down to 13.9 × 103/μL on the fourth postoperative day. Urine culture grew Aerococcus urinae and blood cultures grew Alpha Hemolytic Streptococcus. On the sixth day, the patient was feeling worse and WBC increased. MRI revealed absent blood flow to the corpus spongiosum. Urethroscopy revealed necrosis of the urethra. Urethrectomy was performed via perineal approach. The patient immediately improved. The patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day to continue ampicillin/sulbactam IV every 6 hours for a total of 4 weeks from the day of urethrectomy. PMID:26171271

  17. Necrotizing Urethritis due to Aerococcus urinae.

    PubMed

    Babaeer, Abdulrahman A; Nader, Claudia; Iacoviello, Vito; Tomera, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A 49-year-old male presented to the emergency with hematuria and pain in the shaft of the penis for one day. The patient was found to be in a state of shock. The shaft of the penis and the scrotum were swollen and tender. No skin necrosis was observed and no crepitus was palpable. Serum white count (WBC) was 29.5 × 10(3)/μL. A CT scan showed gas in the corpus spongiosum. Antibiotics were started with IV metronidazole, vancomycin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. Metronidazole was then replaced by clindamycin. Exploration was performed but no necrotic tissue was identified. Cystourethroscopy revealed dusky looking urethra. A suprapubic tube and a urethral catheter were placed in the bladder. WBC trended down to 13.9 × 10(3)/μL on the fourth postoperative day. Urine culture grew Aerococcus urinae and blood cultures grew Alpha Hemolytic Streptococcus. On the sixth day, the patient was feeling worse and WBC increased. MRI revealed absent blood flow to the corpus spongiosum. Urethroscopy revealed necrosis of the urethra. Urethrectomy was performed via perineal approach. The patient immediately improved. The patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day to continue ampicillin/sulbactam IV every 6 hours for a total of 4 weeks from the day of urethrectomy. PMID:26171271

  18. Endoscopic fetal urethrotomy for anterior urethral valves: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Sago, Haruhiko; Hayashi, Satoshi; Chiba, Toshio; Ueoka, Katsuhiko; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Nakagawa, Atsuko; Kitagawa, Michihiro

    2008-01-01

    Anterior urethral valves are a rare congenital anomaly associated with distal urethral obstruction, which can result in a poor prognosis. We report on the endoscopic creation of a fetal urethrotomy for obstructive uropathy resulting from anterior urethral valves. A 33-year-old woman was evaluated at 17 weeks gestation due to fetal megacystis. The diagnosis of anterior urethral valves was confirmed by the characteristic sonographic feature of a dilated membranous penile urethra. Oligohydramnios with normal-appearing kidneys and favorable urinary electrolytes led to fetal intervention. Ablation on the ventral site of the fetal penis for a cutaneous urethrotomy was performed using a YAG laser under a 1-mm fetoscope at 19 weeks gestation. Urine was drained from the incision and the dilated penis and the distended bladder shrunk with an increase in amniotic fluid. However, the fetus died unexpectedly on postoperative day 3, and chorioamnionitis was suspected as the etiology. While the outcome was unfavorable, our preliminary experience shows that fetal urethrotomy for obstructive uropathy can be achieved in utero using an endoscopic laser approach. Further experience will be required to evaluate the therapeutic value of this new procedure in the management of fetal anterior urethral valves. PMID:18648205

  19. Role of stents and laser therapy in biliary strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    The most frequent primary cancers causing malignant obstructive jaundice were pancreatic cancer (57%), hilar biliary cancer (19% including metastatic disease), nonhilar biliary cancer (14%) and papillary cancer (10%). Endoscopic stenting has widely replaced palliative surgery for malignant biliary obstruction because of its lower risk and cost. Self-expandable metal stents are the preferred mode of palliation for hilar malignancies. Plastic stents have a major role in benign biliary strictures. Major complications and disadvantages associated with metallic stents include high cost, cholangitis. malposition, migration, unextractability, and breakage of the stents, pancreatitis and stent dysfunction. Dysfunction due to tumor ingrowth can be relieved by thermal methods (argon plasma coagulator therapy). We present a concise review of the efficacy of metallic stents for palliation of malignant strictures.

  20. Palliation of malignant tracheal strictures using silicone T tubes.

    PubMed Central

    Insall, R L; Morritt, G N

    1991-01-01

    The use of silicone T tubes for intubation of malignant tracheobronchial strictures may provide some degree of palliation of this distressing condition. It was used in seven patients with malignant lesions and two with benign strictures (resulting from tracheal trauma and lung transplantation). Four patients (two with cancer) are still alive and well with the tube in position. All patients noted improvement in dyspnoea and stridor. The main problems were tube migration (one patient), tracheo-oesophageal fistula (one patient), and blockage of the tube by tumour (two patients) or encrusted secretions (three patients). Airway patency was restored when the tube was blocked by cleaning or by laser resection of the tumour. With careful supervision and education of the patient intubation can give useful palliation to patients with distressing upper airways obstruction. Images PMID:1709308

  1. Congenital oesophageal stricture in a Japanese shiba inu.

    PubMed

    Fox, E; Lee, K; Lamb, C R; Rest, J; Baines, S J; Brockman, D

    2007-12-01

    An 11-week-old, female, Japanese shiba inu, weighing 1.3 kg, was presented with a history of intermittent regurgitation since birth. An oesophagram showed a partial obstruction of the caudal cervical oesophagus associated with a narrow, transverse tissue band. Following surgical resection, the regurgitation resolved and the dog attained a normal bodyweight. Histological examination revealed focally hyperplastic epithelium with dense fibrous underlying connective tissue forming the band. The diagnosis was a congenital oesophageal stricture. PMID:17725590

  2. Urethral hemangioma: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Regragui, Souhail; Slaoui, Amine; Karmouni, Tarik; El Khader, Khalid; Koutani, Abdelatif; Attya, Ahmed Ibn

    2016-01-01

    Hemangiomas are benign vascular tumors. They are the prerogative of the liver and skin. And genitourinary localizations are rare and have only been rarely reported in the prostat, bladder, ureter or the perineum. In the light of published cases, urethral hemangiomas are mostly found in males. Few cases of hemangioma in the female urethra were reported. We report a cavernous hemangioma of the urethra in a 61 years old patient who presented bleeding from the urethra and micturition disorders. Physical examination revealed a tumor 3 cm x 2 polyploid arising from the terminal urethra (urethral hemangioma). We performed surgical resection of the tumor, along with bladder drainage. The postoperative course was simple. We update through a review of the literature aspects of the diagnostic and therapeutic care of the urethral hemangioma. PMID:27231506

  3. [Non-gonococcal infectious urethritis : pathogen spectrum and management].

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, S

    2015-01-01

    For many years an increase in cases of urethritis has been observed in western Europe. In order to be able to combat this continuous rise, the perception of sexually transmitted diseases must be promoted, the clarification and screening must be intensified and therapy must be rapidly and correctly carried out. In addition to the commonest pathogens causing urethritis, namely chlamydia and gonococci, many other pathogenic microbes must be taken into consideration in the diagnostics. With respect to therapy, apart from the increasing resistance formation of Mycoplasma genitalium, the decreasing effectiveness of standard forms of treatment of other microbes must be emphasized. For chronic and recurrent urethritis in particular a broad clarification of the pathogen should be carried out to enable targeted treatment and also partner treatment. Priority must again be given to primary prevention. PMID:25410827

  4. Con: bulbomembranous anastomotic urethroplasty for pelvic fracture urethral injuries

    PubMed Central

    Tausch, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Current literature remains controversial regarding whether to treat patients sustaining pelvic fracture urethral injuries (PFUIs) with primary endoscopic realignment (PER) versus suprapubic tube (SPT) placement alone with elective bulbomembranous anastomotic urethroplasty (BMAU). Success rates for PER following PFUI are wide-ranging, depending on various authors’ definitions of what defines a successful outcome. At our institution, for SPT/BMAU patients, the mean time to definitive resolution of stenosis was dramatically shorter compared to PER cases. The vast majority of PER patients required multiple endoscopic urethral interventions and/or experienced various other adverse events which were rarely noted among the SPT/BMAU group. While PER does occasionally result in urethral patency without the need for further intervention, the risk of delay in definitive treatment and potential for adverse events has led to a preference for SPT and elective BMAU at our institution. PMID:26816814

  5. Con: bulbomembranous anastomotic urethroplasty for pelvic fracture urethral injuries.

    PubMed

    Tausch, Timothy J; Morey, Allen F

    2015-02-01

    Current literature remains controversial regarding whether to treat patients sustaining pelvic fracture urethral injuries (PFUIs) with primary endoscopic realignment (PER) versus suprapubic tube (SPT) placement alone with elective bulbomembranous anastomotic urethroplasty (BMAU). Success rates for PER following PFUI are wide-ranging, depending on various authors' definitions of what defines a successful outcome. At our institution, for SPT/BMAU patients, the mean time to definitive resolution of stenosis was dramatically shorter compared to PER cases. The vast majority of PER patients required multiple endoscopic urethral interventions and/or experienced various other adverse events which were rarely noted among the SPT/BMAU group. While PER does occasionally result in urethral patency without the need for further intervention, the risk of delay in definitive treatment and potential for adverse events has led to a preference for SPT and elective BMAU at our institution. PMID:26816814

  6. [CLINICO-MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF FEMALE URETHRAL MEATUS POLYPS].

    PubMed

    Nejmark, A I; Jakovlev, A V; Nepomnjashhih, L M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish the clinical and morphological characteristics of female urethral polyps including cases with concomitant sexually transmitted infections. A total of 150 women were enrolled in the study. The evaluation of microcirculatory changes, morphological parameters and immunogram indices of urethral polyps were carried out. The most common infectious agent in patients with urethral polyps was Ureaplasma urealyticum. In those cases predominance of inflammatory symptoms and elevated levels of serum proinflammatory cytokines were identified. It is found that the pronounced inflammatory reaction leads to an increase in the relative area of the subepithelial microvascular bed and the cellular elements population of lamina mucosa propria, as well as to the relative predominance of congestive forms of microcirculation disturbances according to the laser Doppler flowmetry. PMID:26390557

  7. Circumcision as a risk factor for urethritis in racial groups.

    PubMed

    Smith, G L; Greenup, R; Takafuji, E T

    1987-04-01

    A retrospective population-based case-control study of sexually transmitted urethritis was conducted at a large military base over a 21-month period. During the study, 9,514 patients were seen for sexually transmitted disease. The analysis was restricted to active duty males and showed that Blacks had 14.8 times the incidence rate of gonococcal urethritis (GCU) and 4.7 times the rate of nongonococcal urethritis (NGU) compared to Whites. There were slightly fewer cases of NGU than GCU. A case-control study of active duty soldiers showed that both Black and White circumcised subjects were 1.65 times as likely to have NGU as uncircumcised subjects (95% CI: 1.37-2.00). However, circumcision was not associated with an increased incidence of GCU. PMID:3826463

  8. Circumcision as a risk factor for urethritis in racial groups.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G L; Greenup, R; Takafuji, E T

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective population-based case-control study of sexually transmitted urethritis was conducted at a large military base over a 21-month period. During the study, 9,514 patients were seen for sexually transmitted disease. The analysis was restricted to active duty males and showed that Blacks had 14.8 times the incidence rate of gonococcal urethritis (GCU) and 4.7 times the rate of nongonococcal urethritis (NGU) compared to Whites. There were slightly fewer cases of NGU than GCU. A case-control study of active duty soldiers showed that both Black and White circumcised subjects were 1.65 times as likely to have NGU as uncircumcised subjects (95% CI: 1.37-2.00). However, circumcision was not associated with an increased incidence of GCU. PMID:3826463

  9. Virus culture studies in non-gonococcal urethritis

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R. S.; Gillespie, E. H.; Wilson, M. A.

    1964-01-01

    Specimens of urethal discharge and scrapings of the urethra from 45 men with non-gonococcal urethritis have been studied for virus content. Human amnion and monkey kidney cell cultures were inoculated. Various temperatures of incubation were used. Specimens were also inoculated into the yolk sac of seven-day fertile eggs. No cytopathic changes were detected in any specimen examined after direct incubation or after passage. No elementary bodies were seen in stained sections of yolk sacs. Haemagglutination and haemadsorption tests were negative. Paired sera from 21 cases were available for antibody titre study. Estimations of urethral temperature and pH were made. The cause of non-gonococcal urethritis remains to be discovered. PMID:14149932

  10. Congenital Midureteric Stricture: Challenges in Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Raashid; Bhat, Nisar A.; Rashid, Kumar Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Background. Congenital midureteric stricture (MUS) is a rare malformation. We report our experience with five cases seen over a period of 4 years from 2010 to 2014. Materials and Methods. The study was based on the retrospective analysis of five patients diagnosed as having MUS. Diagnosis was suspected after fetal ultrasonography (USG) in one patient and magnetic resonance urography (MRU) in four patients. Retrograde pyelography (RGP) was performed on three patients. The final diagnosis was confirmed during surgical exploration in all the patients. Results. MRU was found to be a good investigation method. It showed the site of obstruction in the ureter in all instances. Intravenous urography detected proximal ureteric dilatation present in two of the patients. RGP delineates the level of stricture and the course of ureter, as shown in our cases. All patients had significant obstruction on the affected side. Four patients underwent ureteroureterostomy, all of whom had satisfactory results. In one patient, ureteric reimplantation was carried out due to distal small ureteric caliber. Conclusion. This rare entity is often misdiagnosed initially as pelviureteric junction obstruction. MRU is an excellent option for the anatomical location and functional assessment of the involved system. At the time of surgical correction of a ureteral obstruction, RGP is a useful adjunct for delineating the stricture level and morphology. PMID:25922784

  11. Medication Effects on Periurethral Sensation and Urethral Sphincter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Greer, W. Jerod; Gleason, Jonathan L.; Kenton, Kimberly; Szychowski, Jeff M.; Goode, Patricia S; Richter, Holly E

    2014-01-01

    Aim To characterize urethral neuromuscular function before and 2 weeks after medication therapy. Methods Premenopausal women without lower urinary tract symptoms were randomly allocated to one of six medications for 2 weeks (pseudoephedrine ER 120mg, imipramine 25mg, cyclobenzaprine 10mg, tamsulosin 0.4mg, solifenacin 5mg or placebo). At baseline and after medication, participants underwent testing: quantitative concentric needle EMG (CNE) of the urethral sphincter using automated Multi-Motor Unit Action Potential (MUP) software; current perception threshold (CPT) testing to measure periurethral sensation; and standard urodynamic pressure flow studies (PFS). Nonparametric tests were used to compare pre-post differences. Results 56 women had baseline testing; 48 (85.7%) completed follow-up CNE, and 49 (87.5%) completed follow-up CPT and PFS testing. Demographics showed no significant differences among medication groups with respect to age (mean 34.3 ± 10.1), BMI (mean 31.8 ± 7.5), parity (median 1, range 0–7), or race (14% Caucasian, 80% African American). PFS parameters were not significantly different within medication groups. No significant pre-post changes in CNE values were noted; however, trends in amplitudes were in a direction consistent with the expected physiologic effect of the medications. With CPT testing, a trend toward increased urethral sensation at the 5 Hz stimulation level, was observed following treatment with pseudoephedrine (0.15 to 0.09 mA at 5Hz; P=0.03). Conclusion In women without LUTS, pseudoephedrine improved urethral sensation, but not urethral neuromuscular function on CNE or pressure flow studies. Imipramine, cyclobenzaprine, tamsulosin, solifenacin, and placebo did not change urethral sensation or neuromuscular function. PMID:25185603

  12. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma in an Adolescent Male Presenting as Ureteral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Christopher D.; McAlvany, Kelly L.; Zingula, Shannon N.; Kramer, Stephen A.; Granberg, Candace F.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoma may affect the ureter in cases of retroperitoneal involvement. We present a case of an adolescent male found to have non-Hodgkin lymphoma initially presenting as ureteral stricture evident on imaging. He was treated and responded to multiagent chemotherapy with resolution of both the lymphoma and the ureteral stricture. Although rare, non-Hodgkin lymphoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of pediatric patients with noncalculous, idiopathic ureteral strictures. PMID:25093138

  13. Pro: endoscopic realignment for pelvic fracture urethral injuries

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pelvic fracture urethral distraction injuries may benefit from early endoscopic realignment. Realignment is associated with a low risk of immediate complications and has a high success rate for achieving catheter placement. Review of over thirty studies assessing for subsequent urethral stenosis, including at least a dozen that directly compare realignment to suprapubic diversion along, conclude that there is a benefit averaging at least 35% in favor of realignment. Furthermore, realignment may result in easier subsequent urethroplasty and possibly shorter stenoses. PMID:26816813

  14. Pro: endoscopic realignment for pelvic fracture urethral injuries.

    PubMed

    Stein, Daniel M; Santucci, Richard A

    2015-02-01

    Patients with pelvic fracture urethral distraction injuries may benefit from early endoscopic realignment. Realignment is associated with a low risk of immediate complications and has a high success rate for achieving catheter placement. Review of over thirty studies assessing for subsequent urethral stenosis, including at least a dozen that directly compare realignment to suprapubic diversion along, conclude that there is a benefit averaging at least 35% in favor of realignment. Furthermore, realignment may result in easier subsequent urethroplasty and possibly shorter stenoses. PMID:26816813

  15. Development of an artificial urethral valve using SMA actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chonan, S.; Jiang, Z. W.; Tani, J.; Orikasa, S.; Tanahashi, Y.; Takagi, T.; Tanaka, M.; Tanikawa, J.

    1997-08-01

    The development of an artificial urethral valve for the treatment of urinary incontinence which occurs frequently in the aged is described. The prototype urethral valve is assembled in hand-drum form with four thin shape memory alloy (SMA) (nickel - titanium alloy) plates of 0.3 mm thickness. The shape memory effect in two directions is used to replace the urinary canal sphincter muscles and to control the canal opening and closing functions. The characteristic of the SMA is to assume the shape of a circular arc at normal temperatures and a flat shape at higher temperatures. Experiments have been conducted using a canine bladder and urinary canal.

  16. Benign Post-Radiation Rectal Stricture Treated with Endoscopic Balloon Dilation and Intralesional Triamcinolone Injection

    PubMed Central

    Karanikas, Michael; Touzopoulos, Panagiotis; Mitrakas, Alexandros; Zezos, Petros; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Efremidou, Eleni; Liratzopoulos, Nikolaos; Polychronidis, Alexandros; Kouklakis, George

    2012-01-01

    Post-radiation stricture is a rare complication after pelvis irradiation, but must be in the mind of the clinician evaluating a lower gastrointestinal obstruction. Endoscopy has gained an important role in chronic radiation proctitis with several therapeutic options for management of intestinal strictures. The treatment of rectal strictures has been limited to surgery with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, a less invasive therapeutic approach for benign rectal strictures, endoscopic balloon dilation with or without intralesional steroid injection, has become a common treatment modality. We present a case of benign post-radiation rectal stricture treated successfully with balloon dilation and adjuvant intralesional triamcinolone injection. A 70-year-old woman presented to the emergency room complaining for 2 weeks of diarrhea and meteorism, 11 years after radiation of the pelvis due to adenocarcinoma of the uterus. Colonoscopy revealed a stricture at the rectum and multiple endoscopic biopsies were obtained from the stricture. The stricture was treated with endoscopic balloon dilation and intralesional triamcinolone injection. The procedure appears to have a high success rate and a very low complication rate. Histologic examination of the biopsies revealed non-specific inflammatory changes of the rectal mucosa and no specific changes of the mucosa due to radiation. All biopsies were negative for malignancy. The patient is stricture-free 12 months post-treatment. PMID:23271987

  17. Double stapling method of anastomosis after esophagectomy with endoscopic stapler to prevent postoperative stricture.

    PubMed

    Murayama, I; Sato, H; Suzuki, T; Ootsuka, Y; Song, K; Yamagata, M; Fukase, T; Iwai, S

    1998-10-01

    To prevent stricture of an anastomotic site after operation of esophageal cancer, a new surgical technique, the "double-stapling method," was designed and applied clinically to 29 patients. According to the surgical technique, an automatic suture device for endoscopy was inserted from the side of the lesser curvature of the stomach to the esophageal side after performing end-side anastomosis between the esophagus and the stomach tube using a conventional circular anastomotic device to perform anastomosis between the anterior wall of the esophagus and the posterior wall of the stomach tube. As a result, a conventional anastomotic site, which was a plane (two dimensional), was transformed into a three-dimensional configuration. In the postoperative measurement of the anastomotic site using a measurement forceps, the inner diameter of the site was 8.6+/-3.1 mm in the circular group, while it was 17.2+/-4.5 mm in the DS group, showing a significant difference (p < 0.0001). Minor leakage was observed in three patients as a postoperative complication, but no postoperative hemorrhage occurred. PMID:9820722

  18. Application of Wnt Pathway Inhibitor Delivering Scaffold for Inhibiting Fibrosis in Urethra Strictures: In Vitro and in Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kaile; Guo, Xuran; Zhao, Weixin; Niu, Guoguang; Mo, Xiumei; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the mechanical property and biocompatibility of the Wnt pathway inhibitor (ICG-001) delivering collagen/poly(l-lactide-co-caprolactone) (P(LLA-CL)) scaffold for urethroplasty, and also the feasibility of inhibiting the extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in vitro and in vivo. Methods: ICG-001 (1 mg (2 mM)) was loaded into a (P(LLA-CL)) scaffold with the co-axial electrospinning technique. The characteristics of the mechanical property and drug release fashion of scaffolds were tested with a mechanical testing machine (Instron) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Rabbit bladder epithelial cells and the dermal fibroblasts were isolated by enzymatic digestion method. (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) assay) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to evaluate the viability and proliferation of the cells on the scaffolds. Fibrolasts treated with TGF-β1 and ICG-001 released medium from scaffolds were used to evaluate the anti-fibrosis effect through immunofluorescence, real time PCR and western blot. Urethrography and histology were used to evaluate the efficacy of urethral implantation. Results: The scaffold delivering ICG-001 was fabricated, the fiber diameter and mechanical strength of scaffolds with inhibitor were comparable with the non-drug scaffold. The SEM and MTT assay showed no toxic effect of ICG-001 to the proliferation of epithelial cells on the collagen/P(LLA-CL) scaffold with ICG-001. After treatment with culture medium released from the drug-delivering scaffold, the expression of Collagen type 1, 3 and fibronectin of fibroblasts could be inhibited significantly at the mRNA and protein levels. In the results of urethrography, urethral strictures and fistulas were found in the rabbits treated with non-ICG-001 delivering scaffolds, but all the rabbits treated with ICG-001-delivering scaffolds showed wide caliber in urethras. Histology results showed less collagen but more

  19. [Posterior capsule opacification].

    PubMed

    Milazzo, S; Grenot, M; Benzerroug, M

    2014-12-01

    Posterior capsule opacification (PCO) is the most common complication after cataract surgery, with an incidence of 30%. It tends to be considered a normal event in the natural history of cataract surgery. Better understanding of its pathophysiology and advancement of intraocular lens material and design along with the improvement of phacoemulsification technique have contributed to decrease the incidence of PCO. Although treatment by Nd: YAG laser posterior capsulotomy is quick and non-invasive, the opening of the posterior capsule may be associated with numerous complications. Prevention remains the best measure for controlling this pathology. PMID:25455552

  20. Congenital urethral stenosis in a male miniature piglet

    PubMed Central

    Pouleur-Larrat, Bénédicte; Maccolini, Edouard; Carmel, Eric Norman; Hélie, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    A 2-month-old male miniature pig showed progressive abdominal pain, pollakiuria, and stranguria that progressed to complete urinary obstruction. Postmortem examination revealed idiopathic urethral stenosis at the level of the recess, of probable congenital origin. Urinary tract malformations should be included in the differential diagnosis of miniature piglets with urinary disorders. PMID:24891635

  1. A Method for Recording Urethral Pressure Profiles in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shengfei; Li, Xiaohui; Xu, Lei; Chen, Biao; Tan, Huibing; Du, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    Aims Urethral pressure profile (UPP) and leak-point pressure (LPP) measurements as well as external urethral sphincter (EUS) electromyography (EMG) and videourodynamic analyses are the primary methods for evaluating urethral function in humans. However, UPP recording in female rats, a widely used animal model, is challenging due to their small body sizes. This study reports a novel method for recording UPP in female rats. Materials and Methods Seventeen anesthetized female rats were studied. LPP data for 14 rats were included. The other 3 rats were excluded because of death or abnormal urogenital organs. UPP curves were recorded using a modified water-perfusion catheter system, with the lateral hole facing the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-o’clock positions in a randomized sequence. LPP, functional urethral length (FUL) and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP) were analyzed. Results The mean LPP was 64.39 ± 20.29 cm H2O. The mean FUL and MUCP values at the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-o’clock positions were 12.90 ± 1.20, 16.70 ± 1.95, 13.90 ± 2.42, and 11.60 ± 0.97 mm, respectively, and 38.70 ± 11.85, 33.90 ± 11.82, 37.40 ± 11.95, and 71.90 ± 23.01 cm H2O, respectively. The FUL at the 6-o’clock position and MUCP at the 12-o’clock position were significantly greater than those at the other 3 positions. The FUL and MUCP of repeated UPP recordings were not significantly different than those of the first recordings. Conclusions UPP recording using a modified method based on a water-perfusion catheter system is feasible and replicable in female rats. It produces UPP curves that sensitively and appreciably reflect detailed pressure changes at different points within the urethra and thus provides opportunity to evaluate urethral structures, especially the urethral sphincter, in detail. These results may enhance the utility of female rat models in research of urinary sphincter mechanisms. PMID:26502072

  2. Posterior fossa tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the posterior fossa, it can block the flow of spinal fluid and cause increased pressure on the brain and ... the cancer early. A total blockage in the flow of spinal fluid can be life threatening. If tumors are found ...

  3. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  4. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases. PMID:16224109

  5. The Accordion Sign in the Transplant Ureter: Ramifications During Balloon Dilation of Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Kriegshauser, J. Scott Naidu, Sailen G.; Chang, Yu-Hui H.; Huettl, Eric A.

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to demonstrate the accordion sign within the transplant ureter and evaluate its ramifications during balloon dilation of strictures.MethodsA retrospective electronic chart and imaging review included demographic characteristics, procedure reports, and complications of 28 renal transplant patients having ureteral strictures treated with percutaneous balloon dilation reported in our transplant nephrology database during an 8-year period. The accordion sign was deemed present or absent on the basis of an imaging review and was defined as present when a tortuous ureter became kinked and irregular when foreshortened after placement of a wire or a catheter. Procedure-related urine leaks were categorized as occurring at the stricture if within 2 cm; otherwise, they were considered away from the stricture.ResultsThe accordion sign was associated with a significantly greater occurrence of leaks away from the stricture (P = 0.001) but not at the stricture (P = 0.34).ConclusionsThe accordion sign is an important consideration when performing balloon dilation procedures on transplant ureteral strictures, given the increased risk of leak away from the stricture. Its presence should prompt additional care during wire and catheter manipulations.

  6. MITOMYCIN C IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PEDIATRIC CAUSTIC ESOPHAGEAL STRICTURES. A CASE REPORT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the incidence of caustic ingestion is declining, the management of caustic esophageal strictures remains a challenge. Mitomycin C (MMC) inhibits fibroblast proliferation and is effective in reducing scar in animal experiments. We report the case of a child with a distal esophageal stricture...

  7. Retrograde dilation of a complex radiation-induced esophageal stricture through percutaneous gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Eminler, A T; Uslan, M I; Köksal, A Ş; Guven, M; Parlak, E

    2015-06-01

    Upper esophageal strictures occur in approximately 3-4% of patients who receive radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. The standart initial treatment is dilation by using bougie or through-the-scope balloon dilators. Endoscopic treatment requires the passage of a guidewire through the stricture which cannot be accomplished in some of the patients with complex strictures. Retrograde dilation of esophageal strictures through a mature percutaneous gastrostomy tract have been reported in a limited number of cases and small case series up to date and can be considered as a rescue treatment before considering surgery in such patients. Herein we report retrograde dilatation of a radiation-induced complex esophageal stricture through the percutaneous gastrostomy tract in a patient with operated larynx cancer. PMID:26151697

  8. Self-Expanding Metal Stenting in the Management of a Benign Colonic Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jessamy, Kegan; Ozden, Nuri; Simon, Howard M.; Kobrossi, Semaan; Ubagharaji, Ezinnaya

    2016-01-01

    Colonic postanastomotic strictures occur in 1.5–8% of patients following colorectal surgery. Traditionally, colonic strictures were treated by multiple modalities including endoscopic dilatation. Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) have been indicated in the management of benign colonic strictures; however, there are limited available data with regard to their efficacy. We present the case of a 68-year-old male who had perforated sigmoid diverticulitis followed by Hartmann's procedure with eventual reanastomosis 6 months later. He subsequently developed benign colonic stricture, which was treated with a metal stent. SEMS are associated with a low mortality rate and are appropriate in treating acute colonic obstruction as a result of benign stricture in the setting of postanastomosis. PMID:27403114

  9. Evaluation of efficacy of endoscopic incision method in postoperative benign anastomotic strictures of gastrointestinal system

    PubMed Central

    Ölmez, Şehmus; Pürnak, Tuğrul; Özaslan, Ersan; Altıparmak, Emin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative benign anastomotic strictures (POBAS) which develop after surgical resections of the gastrointestinal system (GIS) present with symptoms depending on location of the stricture. Diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic and radiological methods. Although bougie or balloon dilatation is preferred in management, the endoscopic incision method (EIM) is also used with considerable success. In this trial, we aimed to evaluate EIM, which is one of the endoscopic dilatation techniques used in postoperative anastomotic stricture of GIS. Material and methods A total of 20 POBAS patients, 12 men and 8 women, subjected to EIM intervention for strictures, were enrolled in the trial. The number of patients with upper GIS strictures was 6 (30%), while the number of cases with lower GIS strictures was 14 (70%). Results Dilatation of the stricture was achieved in 15 (75%) patients with one treatment session, while more than one session of EIM was needed in 5 (25%) cases. Mean duration of follow-up of patients was 10.65 ±5.86 (0–25) months. Procedure-related complications developed in 8 patients. Among them, 7 were minor complications and improved without any treatment. In only 1 (5%) patient, perforation was observed as a major complication. Following EIM, recurrence of POBAS was observed in 5 (25%) patients. The following parameters were found to have an impact on successful outcome in EIM: presence or absence of a tortuous lumen in POBAS (p = 0.035) and length of stricture (p = 0.02), complications during the procedure (if any), and presence of single or multiple strictures. Conclusions Endoscopic incision method may be regarded as a favorable approach among first choice treatment alternatives in uncomplicated anastomotic strictures of GIS, or it may be used as an adjunctive dilatation method. PMID:26528338

  10. Serum Proteome Profiles in Stricturing Crohn’s Disease: A pilot study.

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Peter; Zhang, Qibin; Shapiro, Jason; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Bramer, Lisa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Weitz, Karl K.; Mallette, Meaghan; Moniz, Heather; Bright, Renee; Merrick, Marjorie; Shah, Samir A.; Sands, Bruce E.; Leleiko, Neal

    2015-08-01

    Background: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with different described behaviors, including stricture. At present, there are no laboratory studies that can differentiate stricturing CD from other phenotypes of IBD. We performed a pilot study to examine differences in the proteome among patients with stricturing Crohn’s disease, non-stricturing Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods: Serum samples were selected from the Ocean State Crohn’s and Colitis Area Registry (OSCCAR), an established cohort of patients with IBD. Crohn’s disease patients with surgically-resected stricture were matched with similar patients with Crohn’s disease without known stricture, and with UC. Serum samples from each patient were digested and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to characterize the proteome. Statistical analyses were performed to identify peptides and proteins that can differentiate CD with stricture. Results: Samples from 9 patients in each group (27 total patients) were analyzed. Baseline demographic characteristics were similar among the three groups. We quantified 7668 peptides and 897 proteins for analysis. ROC analysis identified a subset of peptides with an area under the curve greater than 0.9, indicating greater separation potential. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was able to distinguish among the three groups with up to 70% accuracy by peptides, and up to 80% accuracy by proteins. We identified the significantly different proteins and peptides, and determined their function based on previously published literature. Conclusions: The serum of patients with stricturing CD, non-stricturing CD, and UC are distinguishable via proteomic analysis. Some of the proteins that differentiate the stricturing phenotype have been implicated in complement activation, fibrinolytic pathways, and lymphocyte adhesion.

  11. Bilateral posterior sternoclavicular dislocation.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Matthias; Vogel, Tobias; Weise, Kuno; Muratore, Tim; Trobisch, Per

    2010-07-01

    Posterior sternoclavicular dislocations are a rare injury, representing <5% of all sternoclavicular dislocations and 1 in 1600 shoulder girdle injuries. Proper imaging with computed tomography and prompt diagnosis are essential steps in preventing potentially lethal complications observed in approximately 3% of all posterior sternoclavicular dislocations. Surgical treatment is necessary if closed reduction fails. With the medial clavicular epiphysis being the last to close (between ages 22 and 25), children and adolescents typically present with epiphyseal fractures rather than joint dislocations. If closed reduction fails, open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) should be considered in fractures, whereas complex reconstructions with tendon graft procedures have been recommended for joint dislocations. This article presents a case of a traumatic bilateral posterior sternoclavicular dislocation due to an epiphyseal fracture in a 15-year-old boy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a bilateral posterior sternoclavicular dislocation. Attempted closed reduction failed with redislocation after 2 days. The patient subsequently required ORIF. This article describes our technique with anterior retraction of the medial clavicle, closure of the posterior periosteum, and ORIF using nonabsorbable sutures. Postoperative shoulder mobilization was started on day 1. At final follow-up, the patient was completely asymptomatic. PMID:20608625

  12. Nonclosure of rectourethral fistula during posterior sagittal anorectoplasty: Our experience

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Sudhakar; Raut, Amit; Mandke, Jui; Patil, Santosh; Vora, Ravindra; Kittur, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of nonclosure of rectourethral (RU) fistula and to do a comparative analysis of the complications with and without nonclosure of RU fistula during posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) in anorectal malformation cases (ARM). Materials and Methods: A total of 68 cases of ARM were included in the study group, of which 34 cases were those in whom RU fistula was not closed (group A) during PSARP. Another 34 successive cases were included in study group B in whom the RU fistula was closed as is conventionally done by using interrupted sutures. Results: Comparatively, group A had none or minimum urological complications as compared to Group B. Conclusion: RU fistula closure is not mandatory during PSARP and nonclosure avoids urological complications. It especially avoids urethral complications, which are 100% preventable. PMID:23599574

  13. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF POSTOPERATIVE STRICTURE OF ANAL CHANNELL].

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, I M; Sadoviy, I Ya; Novytskiy, O V

    2015-09-01

    The results of treatment of 50 patients, suffering postoperative stricture of anal channell (SACH), who were treated in Proctology Department of Ivano-Frankivskiy Rural Clinical Hospital in 2006-2014 yrs, were analyzed. After conduction of hemorrhoidectomy in accordance to Milligan-Morgan method for chronic hemorrhoids grades III-IV a SACH have occurred in 46 (92%) patients, excision of a chronic anal fissura was performed in 3 (6%) and excision of perianal pointed condylomas--in 1 patient. In 2006-2007 yrs 11 (22%) patients were operated in accordance to approaches, which were conventional at that time (comparison group). In 2008 - 2014 yrs 39 (78%) patients were admitted to hospital (main group), in whom new approaches for diagnosis, conservative and surgical treatment were applied, 30 (76.9%) of them were operated. The proposed method on isolated roentgen contrast investigation of anal channell have permitted to determine objectively a form, diameter and grade of the anal channel stricture, and it may be applied as a screening procedure, as additional objective criterion while choosing a surgical tactic. Application of the improved operative technique for SACH have permitted to lower its occurrence rate from 45.4 to 6.7%. PMID:26817078

  14. Tibialis Posterior Tendon Entrapment Within Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fragment.

    PubMed

    Fantry, Amanda; Lareau, Craig; Vopat, Bryan; Blankenhorn, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Management of posterior malleolus fractures continues to be controversial, with respect to both need for fixation and fixation methods. Fixation methods include an open posterior approach to the ankle as well as percutaneous reduction and fixation with or without arthroscopy for visualization of the articular surface. Plain radiographs are unreliable in identifying fracture pattern and intraoperative reduction, making arthroscopy a valuable adjunct to posterior malleolus fracture management. In this article, we report a case of tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus fracture, as identified by arthroscopy and managed with open reduction. Tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus has not been previously reported. Ankle arthroscopy for posterior malleolus fractures provides an opportunity to identify soft-tissue or tendinous entrapment, articular surface reduction, and articular cartilage injuries unlikely to be identified with fluoroscopy alone and should be considered in reduction and fixation of posterior malleolus fractures. PMID:26991573

  15. [Current approaches to the treatment of non-gonococcal urethritis in men].

    PubMed

    Kondrat'eva, Iu S; Neĭmark, A I

    2011-01-01

    The study was made of 50 men suffering from non-gonococcal urethritis caused by mixed pathogenic and opportunistic urogenital infection. Clinical characteristics of urethritis in relation to infection pathogen are shown. The results of clinical and laboratory examinations were considered in choice of antibacterial therapy. Safocid, a combined antibacterial medicine, demonstrated its clinical and microbiological efficacy in the treatment of patients with non-gonococcal urethritis of mixed etiology. PMID:22066239

  16. A Case of Strangulated Urethral Prolapse in a Premenopausal Adult Female

    PubMed Central

    Jessop, Morris L.; Al-Omar, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Urethral prolapse in a premenopausal adult female is exceedingly rare. This paper describes a case of strangulated urethral prolapse presenting as a urethral mass in an unusual demographic and reviews the literature on etiology and management. Only a few cases have occurred in women of reproductive age. The etiology is likely multifactorial. Treatment with surgical excision provides good results in the majority of cases. PMID:27413572

  17. Anterior urethral valve in an adolescent with nocturnal enuresis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia Chang; Yang, Stephen Shei Dei; Tsai, Yao Chou

    2007-11-01

    The anterior urethral valve (AUV) is a rare congenital urethral anomaly that can lead to variable urinary tract symptoms. We report on a 13-year-old boy with AUV who was referred from a primary care physician for nocturnal enuresis. AUV was disclosed by videourodynamic study and confirmed by simultaneous retrograde cystourethroscopy and antegrade urethroscopy. The AUV was ablated by neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet contact laser at the 5-o'clock and 7-o'clock directions. A postoperative videourodynamic study depicted a patent urethra, a good maximal flow rate, and improved bladder capacity. His nocturnal enuresis had completely subsided at a follow-up period of longer than 24 months. PMID:18068473

  18. Complete Urethral Duplication in Children: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Roshanzamir, Fatollah; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Ghoroubi, Javad; Mahdavi, Alireza; Mohajerzadeh, Leily; Sarafi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urethral duplication (UD) is a rare congenital anomaly with multiple anatomical variants. Case Presentation In this article we present a four year-old child with complete UD. The patient was admitted for hypospadias repair, in evaluation we found type IIA1 UD according to Effmann classification. Patient underwent hypospadias repair saving complete UD. Conclusions After one year follow-up he has normal and continent urination. PMID:27307964

  19. Cholinergic urethral brush cells are widespread throughout placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Deckmann, Klaus; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Rafiq, Amir; Herden, Christine; Wichmann, Judy; Knauf, Sascha; Nassenstein, Christina; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We previously identified a population of cholinergic epithelial cells in murine, human and rat urethrae that exhibits a structural marker of brush cells (villin) and expresses components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade (α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel melanostatin 5 (TRPM5)). These cells serve as sentinels, monitoring the chemical composition of the luminal content for potentially hazardous compounds such as bacteria, and initiate protective reflexes counteracting further ingression. In order to elucidate cross-species conservation of the urethral chemosensory pathway we investigated the occurrence and molecular make-up of urethral brush cells in placental mammals. We screened 11 additional species, at least one in each of the five mammalian taxonomic units primates, carnivora, perissodactyla, artiodactyla and rodentia, for immunohistochemical labeling of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), villin, and taste cascade components (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, TRPM5). Corresponding to findings in previously investigated species, urethral epithelial cells with brush cell shape were immunolabeled in all 11 mammals. In 8 species, immunoreactivities against all marker proteins and ChAT were observed, and double-labeling immunofluorescence confirmed the cholinergic nature of villin-positive and chemosensory (TRPM5-positive) cells. In cat and horse, these cells were not labeled by the ChAT antiserum used in this study, and unspecific reactions of the secondary antiserum precluded conclusions about ChAT-expression in the bovine epithelium. These data indicate that urethral brush cells are widespread throughout the mammalian kingdom and evolved not later than about 64.5millionyears ago. PMID:26044348

  20. Surgical correction of urethral dilatation in an intersex goat.

    PubMed

    Karras, S; Modransky, P; Welker, B

    1992-11-15

    Multiple congenital urethral abnormalities were successfully corrected in a polled goat kid. Anatomic genito-urinary abnormalities identified were paired testes with associated epididymis, ductus deferens, and active endometrial tissue. Blood karyotyping revealed the female state--XX sex chromosomes. This case exemplifies the complex interactions in addition to Y dominant Mendelian genetics that determine reproductive tract development in goats. The resultant intersex state is clinically recognized with greater frequency in polled progeny. PMID:1289340

  1. Ultrastructural analysis of primary human urethral epithelial cell cultures infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Harvey, H A; Ketterer, M R; Preston, A; Lubaroff, D; Williams, R; Apicella, M A

    1997-06-01

    In men with gonococcal urethritis, the urethral epithelial cell is a site of infection. To study the pathogenesis of gonorrhea in this cell type, we have developed a method to culture primary human urethral epithelial cells obtained at the time of urologic surgery. Fluorescent analysis demonstrated that 100% of the cells stained for keratin. Microscopic analyses indicated that these epithelial cells arrayed in a pattern similar to that seen in urethral epithelium. Using immunoelectron and confocal microscopy, we compared the infection process seen in primary cells with events occurring during natural infection of the same cell type in men with gonococcal urethritis. Immunoelectron microscopy studies of cells infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae 1291 Opa+ P+ showed adherence of organisms to the epithelial cell membrane, pedestal formation with evidence of intimate association between the gonococcal and the epithelial cell membranes, and intracellular gonococci present in vacuoles. Confocal studies of primary urethral epithelial cells showed actin polymerization upon infection. Polyclonal antibodies to the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) demonstrated the presence of this receptor on infected cells in the primary urethral cell culture. In situ hybridization using a fluorescent-labeled probe specific to the ASGP-R mRNA demonstrated this message in uninfected and infected cells. These features were identical to those seen in urethral epithelial cells in exudates from males with gonorrhea. Infection of primary urethral cells in culture mimics events seen in natural infection and will allow detailed molecular analysis of gonococcal pathogenesis in a human epithelial cell which is commonly infected. PMID:9169783

  2. Lumen-apposing covered self-expanding metal stent for management of benign gastrointestinal strictures

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Shounak; Buttar, Navtej S.; Gostout, Christopher; Levy, Michael J.; Martin, John; Petersen, Bret; Topazian, Mark; Wong Kee Song, Louis M.; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) are safe and effective for endoscopic management of malignant gastrointestinal strictures, but there is limited experience with their use in refractory benign strictures. We assessed the use of a new lumen-apposing covered SEMS for the management of benign gastrointestinal strictures. Methods: A single-center case-series of five patients who underwent lumen-apposing covered SEMS placement for benign gastrointestinal strictures. Results: Three patients had a benign gastroduodenal stricture, one had a distal colonic anastomotic stricture, and one with complete gastrojejunal anastomotic stenosis underwent endoscopic creation of a new gastrojejunostomy. None of the patients developed any immediate or delayed stent-related adverse events. In two patients, the stents were left in place indefinitely. Stents were removed from the other three patients with successful resolution of their symptoms during follow-up. Conclusion: Lumen-apposing, fully covered SEMS appear to be safe and effective for management of selected benign gastrointestinal strictures. PMID:26793793

  3. Ureteral stricture formation after ureteroscope treatment of impacted calculi: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Singam, Praveen; Ho, Christopher Chee Kong; Sridharan, Radhika; Hod, Rozita; Bahadzor, Badrulhisham; Goh, Eng Hong; Tan, Guan Hee; Zainuddin, Zulkifli

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Urinary calculi is a familiar disease. A well-known complication of endourological treatment for impacted ureteral stones is the formation of ureteral strictures, which has been reported to occur in 14.2% to 24% of cases. Materials and Methods This was a prospective study. Ureterotripsy treatment was used on patients with impacted ureteral stones. Then, after 3 months and 6 months, the condition of these patients was assessed by means of a kidney-ureter-bladder (KUB) ultrasound. If the KUB ultrasound indicated moderate to serious hydronephrosis, the patient was further assessed by means of a computed tomography intravenous urogram or retrograde pyelogram to confirm the occurrence of ureteral strictures. Results Of the 77 patients who participated in the study, 5 developed ureteral strictures. Thus, the stricture rate was 7.8%. An analysis of the intraoperative risk factors including perforation of the ureter, damage to the mucous membrane, and residual stone impacted within the ureter mucosa revealed that none of these factors contributed significantly to the formation of the ureteric strictures. The stone-related risk factors that were taken into consideration were stone size, stone impaction site, and duration of impaction. These stone factors also did not contribute significantly to the formation of the ureteral strictures. Conclusions This prospective study failed to identify any predictable factors for ureteral stricture formation. It is proposed that all patients undergo a simple postoperative KUB ultrasound screening 3 months after undergoing endoscopic treatment for impacted ureteral stones. PMID:25598938

  4. Urethral recurrence after cystectomy: current preventative measures, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yvonne; Fisher, Patrick; Tilki, Derya; Evans, Christopher P

    2016-04-01

    To summarise the current literature on the diagnosis and management of urethral recurrence (UR) after radical cystectomy (RC), as UR after RC is rare but associated with high mortality. With the recently increased use of orthotopic bladder substitution and the questionable benefit of prophylactic urethrectomy, identification of patients at high risk of UR, management of the remnant urethra, and treatment of UR become critical questions. A review of the PubMed database from 1980 to 2014 was performed to identify studies evaluating recurrent urothelial cancer of the urethra after RC. The search terms used included 'urethral recurrence', 'cystectomy' or 'cystoprostatectomy'. Selected studies provided information on the type of urinary diversion performed, the incidence of UR, and the time to UR. Incidence of UR after RC ranges from 1% to 8% with most recurrences occurring within the first 2 years after surgery. Increased risk of UR is associated with involvement of the prostate, tumour multifocality, bladder neck involvement, and cutaneous diversion. The median overall survival after UR ranges from 6 to 54 months and the 5-year disease-specific survival after UR is reported to be between zero and 83%. UR remains a relatively rare event. Current literature suggests that urethral wash cytology may be useful in patients with intermediate- to high-risk of recurrence to enable early detection of non-invasive disease, which may be amenable to conservative therapy before urethrectomy. PMID:26556525

  5. Somatomotor and sensory urethral control of micturition in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Yolanda; Pastelín, César; Balog, Brian M.; Zaszczurynski, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    In rats, axons of external urethral sphincter (EUS) motoneurons travel through the anastomotic branch of the pudendal nerve (ABPD) and anastomotic branch of the lumbosacral trunk (ABLT) and converge in the motor branch of the sacral plexus (MBSP). The aim of the present study was to determine in female rats the contribution of these somatomotor pathways and urethral sensory innervation from the dorsal nerve of the clitoris on urinary continence and voiding. EUS electromyographic (EMG) activity during cystometry, leak point pressure (LPP), and voiding efficiency (VE) were assessed in anesthetized virgin Sprague-Dawley female rats before and after transection of the above nerve branches. Transection of the MBSP eliminated EUS EMG, decreased LPP by 50%, and significantly reduced bladder contraction duration, peak pressure, intercontraction interval, and VE. Transection of the ABPD or ABLT decreased EUS EMG discharge and LPP by 25% but did not affect VE. Transection of the dorsal nerve of the clitoris did not affect LPP but reduced contraction duration, peak pressure, intercontraction interval, and VE. We conclude that somatomotor control of micturition is provided by the MBSP with axons travelling through the ABPD and ABLT. Partial somatomotor urethral denervation induces mild urinary incontinence, whereas partial afferent denervation induces voiding dysfunction. ABPD and ABLT pathways could represent a safeguard ensuring innervation to the EUS in case of upper nerve damage. Detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and functional innervation of the urethra will enable more accurate animal models of neural development, disease, and dysfunction in the future. PMID:25339694

  6. Reversibility of Stricturing Crohn's Disease-Fact or Fiction?

    PubMed

    Bettenworth, Dominik; Rieder, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal fibrosis is a common feature of Crohn's disease and may appear as a stricture, stenosis, or intestinal obstruction. Fibrostenosing Crohn's disease leads to a significantly impaired quality of life in affected patients and constitutes a challenging treatment situation. In the absence of specific medical antifibrotic treatment options, endoscopic or surgical therapy approaches with their potential harmful side effects are frequently used. However, our understanding of mechanisms of fibrogenesis in general and specifically intestinal fibrosis has emerged. Progression of fibrosis in the liver, lung, or skin can be halted or even reversed, and possible treatment targets have been identified. In face of this observation and given the fact that fibrotic alterations in various organs of the human body share distinct core characteristics, this article aims to address whether reversibility of intestinal fibrosis may be conceivable and to highlight promising research avenues and therapies. PMID:26588089

  7. High grade anorectal stricture complicating Crohn's disease: endoscopic treatment using insulated-tip knife

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Hyung Ku; Shin, Ik Sang; Kim, Sang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic treatments have emerged as an alternative to surgery, in the treatment of benign colorectal stricture. Unlike endoscopic balloon dilatation, there is limited data on endoscopic electrocautery incision therapy for benign colorectal stricture, especially with regards to safety and long-term patency. We present a case of a 29-year-old female with Crohn's disease who had difficulty in defecation and passing thin stools. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan, gastrograffin enema, and sigmoidoscopy showed a high-grade anorectal stricture. An endoscopic insulated-tip knife incision was successfully performed to resolve the problem. From our experience, we suggest that endoscopic insulated-tip knife treatment may be a feasible and effective modality for patients with short-segment, very rigid, fibrotic anorectal stricture. PMID:27433152

  8. High grade anorectal stricture complicating Crohn's disease: endoscopic treatment using insulated-tip knife.

    PubMed

    Chon, Hyung Ku; Shin, Ik Sang; Kim, Sang Wook; Lee, Soo Teik

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic treatments have emerged as an alternative to surgery, in the treatment of benign colorectal stricture. Unlike endoscopic balloon dilatation, there is limited data on endoscopic electrocautery incision therapy for benign colorectal stricture, especially with regards to safety and long-term patency. We present a case of a 29-year-old female with Crohn's disease who had difficulty in defecation and passing thin stools. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan, gastrograffin enema, and sigmoidoscopy showed a high-grade anorectal stricture. An endoscopic insulated-tip knife incision was successfully performed to resolve the problem. From our experience, we suggest that endoscopic insulated-tip knife treatment may be a feasible and effective modality for patients with short-segment, very rigid, fibrotic anorectal stricture. PMID:27433152

  9. Retrograde flexible ureteroscopy-assisted retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureteroureterostomy for refractory ureteral stricture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tsuru, Nobuo; Mugiya, Soichi; Sato, Shigenori

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic ureteroureterostomy (UU) is a preferred and valid minimally invasive procedure for treatment of benign ureteral strictures. In some cases with chronic inflammation or after repeated endoscopic ureteral surgery, it is difficult to identify the location of a ureteral stricture. Presentation of case We report a case of 48-year-old man with an impacted stone after laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. Although transurethral lithotripsy (TUL) was performed, the ureteral stricture did not improve by subsequent endoscopic ureteral Holmium laser incision and balloon dilation. Discussion To simultaneously identify the exact location of the constriction, we performed retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureteroureterostomy with intraoperative observations via super-slim flexible fiberoptic ureteroscopy retrograde. Conclusions Accurate identification of the ureteral stricture via observation by laparoscopy and observation by ureteroscopy was feasible. In contrast to the use of a rigid ureteroscopy, flexible fiberoptic ureteroscopy did not require placing the patient in an unnatural position. PMID:26826930

  10. [THE ROLE OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF STRICTURE DISEASE OF THE MALE URETHRA].

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, V I; Kogan, M I; Banchik, E L; Mitusov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a comprehensive study of 121 patients with stricture disease of the male urethra. Diagnosis and staging of the disease were made on the basis of medical imaging, namely retrograde urethrography, voiding cystourethrography and magnetic resonance imaging with complex pulse sequences developed by the authors. The results were compared with surgical findings and morphological study of surgical specimens. Detailed semiotics of magnetic resonance imaging of stricture disease, differences in the visualization of traumatic and inflammatory strictures of various locations, as well as features of primary and recurrent lesions are described. Detailed analysis of the data shows significant advantages of MRI in identifying stricture disease of the male urethra over traditional methods of endoscopic visualization. It makes possible to increase the diagnostic accuracy for detection of the disease and better surgical planning strategy. PMID:26237801

  11. Transabdominal Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Urethral Diverticulectomy of a Complex Anterior Horseshoe Diverticulum of the Proximal Urethra

    PubMed Central

    Sivarajan, Ganesh; Glickman, Leonard; Faber, Kenneth; Kim, Michelle; Fromer, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Complex, proximal, anteriorly located urethral diverticula present the reconstructive urologist with a uniquely challenging task for repair through a conventional transvaginal approach. Herein, we present the first report of urethral diverticulectomy to excise a large, anterior, horseshoe-shaped urethral diverticulum that resulted in bladder outlet obstruction, using a transabdominal robot-assisted laparoscopic approach.

  12. Etiology of urethral discharge in West Africa: the role of Mycoplasma genitalium and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Pépin, J.; Sobéla, F.; Deslandes, S.; Alary, M.; Wegner, K.; Khonde, N.; Kintin, F.; Kamuragiye, A.; Sylla, M.; Zerbo, P. J.; Baganizi, E.; Koné, A.; Kane, F.; Mâsse, B.; Viens, P.; Frost, E.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the etiological role of pathogens other than Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis in urethral discharge in West African men. METHODS: Urethral swabs were obtained from 659 male patients presenting with urethral discharge in 72 primary health care facilities in seven West African countries, and in 339 controls presenting for complaints unrelated to the genitourinary tract. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to detect the presence of N. gonorrhoeae, C. trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Mycoplasma genitalium, and Ureaplasma urealyticum. FINDINGS: N. gonorrhoeae, T. vaginalis, C. trachomatis, and M. genitalium--but not U. urealyticum--were found more frequently in men with urethral discharge than in asymptomatic controls, being present in 61.9%, 13.8%, 13.4% and 10.0%, respectively, of cases of urethral discharge. Multiple infections were common. Among patients with gonococcal infection, T. vaginalis was as frequent a coinfection as C. trachomatis. M. genitalium, T. vaginalis, and C. trachomatis caused a similar clinical syndrome to that associated with gonococcal infection, but with a less severe urethral discharge. CONCLUSIONS: M. genitalium and T. vaginalis are important etiological agents of urethral discharge in West Africa. The frequent occurrence of multiple infections with any combination of four pathogens strongly supports the syndromic approach. The optimal use of metronidazole in flowcharts for the syndromic management of urethral discharge needs to be explored in therapeutic trials. PMID:11242818

  13. Para-meatal urethral cyst with bladder calculi: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patil, Siddangouda B; Patil, Nikhil Ashok; Kundargi, Vinay S; Biradar, Ashok N

    2015-01-01

    Para-meatal urethral cyst or median raphe cyst of the glans penis is a benign cystic lesion uncommonly encountered in prepubertal age group. Approximately, about 50 cases have been reported till date in the world literature. Herein we report a case of para-meatal urethral cyst concurrent with urinary bladder calculi. PMID:26539378

  14. Case of a congenital urethral duplication being unmasked following circumcision for balanitis xerotica obliterans.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Matthew; Woodward, Mark; Lambert, Anthony

    2010-07-01

    We present the case of an 11-year-old boy diagnosed with an Effmann Type II A1 urethral duplication after routine circumcision for balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO). We discuss the pathophysiology, investigation and management both of BXO and urethral duplication. PMID:20529516

  15. Para-meatal urethral cyst with bladder calculi: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Siddangouda B.; Patil, Nikhil Ashok; Kundargi, Vinay S.; Biradar, Ashok N.

    2015-01-01

    Para-meatal urethral cyst or median raphe cyst of the glans penis is a benign cystic lesion uncommonly encountered in prepubertal age group. Approximately, about 50 cases have been reported till date in the world literature. Herein we report a case of para-meatal urethral cyst concurrent with urinary bladder calculi. PMID:26539378

  16. Sexually transmittable organisms in the urethra of males with and without urethritis.

    PubMed

    Elsner, P; Hartmann, A A; Wecker, I

    1987-06-01

    In 589 males, 169 with and 420 without urethritis, urethral swabs were taken and assessed semiquantitatively for the sexually transmittable infectious agents Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma hominis, Trichomonas vaginalis and Candida species. The organisms were isolated in patients with and without urethritis as follows: N. gonorrhoeae with urethritis 19.5%, without 0.0%; C. trachomatis with urethritis 16.0%, without 2.9%; U. urealyticum (high cfu-counts) with urethritis 27.2%, without 11.7%; M. hominis (high cfu) with 4.7%, without 2.9%. Combined infections were more frequent in males with urethritis (20.8%) than in those without (5.4%). None of the investigated pathogenic microorganisms could be demonstrated in 37.9% of males with and in 71.2% of males without urethritis. Using loglinear analysis, a significant coincidence of infections with N. gonorrhoeae and U. urealyticum and of infections with U. urealyticum and M. hominis was found. It is concluded that an asymptomatic infection of the male urethra with sexually transmittable organisms is to be expected in partner's control examinations and in patients presenting for other STD like venereal warts or genital herpes. Therefore in these men, even if they are asymptomatic, a comprehensive microbiological examination is strongly recommended. PMID:3118595

  17. Caustic Injury and Stricture of the Esophagus After Long-Term Phenytoin Use

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Steven B.; Champeaux, Anne L.; Feldman, John C.; Richter, Joel E.

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with a history of epilepsy controlled with phenytoin presented for evaluation of dysphagia. History revealed the patient was taking his phenytoin daily without water. Barium esophagram showed severe stricturing of the mid-esophagus. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse gross mucosal abnormality with a thick stricture and occasional exudate. Biopsies were consistent with a drug-induced injury with lymphocytic infiltration and epithelial cell necrosis. PMID:26157921

  18. Current diagnosis and treatment of benign biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae Hyuck; Lee, Inseok; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Han, Sok Won

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques, benign biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) remain a significant biliary complication and play an important role in graft and patient survival. Benign biliary strictures after transplantation are classified into anastomotic or non-anastomotic strictures. These two types differ in presentation, outcome, and response to therapy. The leading causes of biliary strictures include impaired blood supply, technical errors during surgery, and biliary anomalies. Because patients usually have non-specific symptoms, a high index of suspicion should be maintained. Magnetic resonance cholangiography has gained widespread acceptance as a reliable noninvasive tool for detecting biliary complications. Endoscopy has played an increasingly prominent role in the diagnosis and treatment of biliary strictures after LDLT. Endoscopic management in LDLT recipients may be more challenging than in deceased donor liver transplantation patients because of the complex nature of the duct-to-duct reconstruction. Repeated aggressive endoscopic treatment with dilation and the placement of multiple plastic stents is considered the first-line treatment for biliary strictures. Percutaneous and surgical treatments are now reserved for patients for whom endoscopic management fails and for those with multiple, inaccessible intrahepatic strictures or Roux-en-Y anastomoses. Recent advances in enteroscopy enable treatment, even in these latter cases. Direct cholangioscopy, another advanced form of endoscopy, allows direct visualization of the inner wall of the biliary tree and is expected to facilitate stenting or stone extraction. Rendezvous techniques can be a good option when the endoscopic approach to the biliary stricture is unfeasible. These developments have resulted in almost all patients being managed by the endoscopic approach. PMID:26819525

  19. Therapeutic Armamentarium for Stricturing Crohn's Disease: Medical Versus Endoscopic Versus Surgical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Fleshner, Phillip; Shen, Bo

    2015-09-01

    One-third of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) present as stricturing phenotype characterized by progressive luminal narrowing and obstructive symptoms. The diagnosis and management of these patients have been intriguing and challenging. Immunomodulators and biologics have been successfully used in treating inflammatory and fistulizing CD. There are issues of efficacy and safety of biological agents in treating strictures in CD. Rapid mucosal healing from potent biological agents may predispose patients to the development of new strictures or worsening of existing strictures. On the other hand, strictures constitute one-fifth of the reasons for surgery in patients with CD. Disease recurrence is common at or proximal to the anastomotic site with the majority of these patients developing new endoscopic lesions within 1 year of surgery. The progressive nature of the disease with repetitive cycle of inflammation and stricture formation results in repeated surgery, with a risk of small bowel syndrome. There is considerable quest for bowel conserving endoscopic and surgical strategies. Endoscopic balloon dilation and stricturoplasty have emerged as valid alternatives to resection. Endoscopic balloon dilation has been shown to be feasible, safe, and effective for the short primary or anastomotic strictures. However, repeated dilations are often needed, and long-term outcomes of endoscopic balloon dilation remain to be investigated. The introduction of stricturoplasty has added another dimension to bowel saving strategy. Although postoperative recurrence rate after stricturoplasty is comparable with surgical resection, there are concerns for increased risk of malignancy in preserved bowel. Laparoscopic surgery has widely been performed with similar outcomes to open approach with fewer complications, quicker recovery, better cosmesis, and lower cost. All of these issues should be considered by physicians involved in the management of patients with stricturing CD. PMID

  20. Assessment of stricturing Crohn's disease: Current clinical practice and future avenues

    PubMed Central

    Bettenworth, Dominik; Nowacki, Tobias M; Cordes, Friederike; Buerke, Boris; Lenze, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic remittent idiopathic disease. Although the early phase of the disease is commonly characterized by inflammation-driven symptoms, such as diarrhea, the frequency of fibrostenotic complications in patients with CD increases over the long-term course of the disease. This review presents the current diagnostic options for assessing CD-associated strictures. In addition to the endoscopic evaluation of CD strictures, this review summarizes the currently available imaging modalities, including ultrasound and cross-sectional imaging techniques. In addition to stricture detection, differentiating between the primarily inflammatory strictures and the predominantly fibrotic ones is essential for selecting the appropriate treatment strategy (anti-inflammatory medical treatment vs endoscopical or surgical approaches). Therefore, recent imaging advances, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasound and ultrasound elastography, contribute to the development of non-invasive non-radiating imaging of CD-associated strictures. Finally, novel magnetic resonance imaging techniques, such as diffusion-weighted, motility and magnetization transfer imaging, as well as 18F-FDG PET/CT, molecular imaging approaches and biomarkers, are critically reviewed with regard to their potential role in assessing stricturing CD. PMID:26811643

  1. Role of Interventional Radiology in the Treatment of Biliary Strictures Following Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Righi, Dorico; Cesarani, Federico; Muraro, Emanuele; Gazzera, Carlo; Salizzoni, Mauro; Gandini, Giovanni

    2002-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous treatment of biliary strictures complicating orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Methods: Between October 1990 and May 2000, 619 patients underwent 678 liver transplants. Seventy of the 619 (11%) patients were found to be affected by biliary strictures by July 2000. Bilioplasty was performed in 51 of these 70 (73%) patients. A cohort of 33 of 51 (65%) patients were clinically followed for more than 12 months after the last percutaneous treatment and included in the survey results. Results: After one to three treatments 24 of 33 (73%)patients were stricture-free on ultrasound and MR cholangiography follow-up. A delayed stricture recurrence required a fourth percutaneous bilioplasty in two of 33 (6%) patients. A surgical bilioenteric anastomosis was performed in six of 33 (18%) patients.Retransplantation was performed due to ischemic damage in one of 33(3%) patients. Conclusion: Interventional radiology is an effective therapeutic alternative for the treatment of most biliary strictures complicating OLT. It has a high success rate and should be considered before surgical interventions. Elective surgery may be necessary in a few failed cases or those with more severe and extensive biliary strictures.

  2. Novel method to prevent gastric antral strictures after endoscopic submucosal dissection: using triamcinolone.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Noriko; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujihara, Shintaro; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Oryu, Makoto; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-09-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of large gastric lesions often leads to severe gastric strictures, especially in cases of large ESD in the antrum of the stomach. It has recently been reported that balloon dilation, mucosal incision, and local steroid injections can successfully treat gastric strictures. However, there are some complications with existing methods and decreasing the quality of life. We have developed a novel method to prevent severe gastric strictures that does not involve balloon dilation, mucosal incision, or steroid injections after circumferential ESD. Our original method involves the submucosal injection of a mixed solution composed of triamcinolone acetonide and a general solution of glycerol, hyaluronic acid, and a small amount of indigo carmine and epinephrine during the ESD procedure; this mixture is called a mixed solution of triamcinolone (MST). According to standard ESD procedures, several milliliters of MST are injected into the submucosal layer for the purpose of elevating the submucosa during ESD resulting in prevention of severe strictures. Our method using MST take several advantages such as MST method suppress inflammation in ulcer from initial phase, prevention of stricture without obstructive symptoms, and does not require several ballooning. Therefore, MST method is safe and gentle, shorten the hospitalization duration. Here, we described two cases in which we prevented severe strictures of the gastric antrum after completing a circumferential ESD using MST without any complications. PMID:25206299

  3. Temporary Placement of Stent Grafts in Postsurgical Benign Biliary Strictures: a Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Willatt, Jonathon M; Arabi, Mohammad; Cwikiel, Wojciech B

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of temporary stent graft placement in the treatment of benign anastomotic biliary strictures. Materials and Methods Nine patients, five women and four men, 22-64 years old (mean, 47.5 years), with chronic benign biliary anastomotic strictures, refractory to repeated balloon dilations, were treated by prolonged, temporary placement of stent-grafts. Four patients had strictures following a liver transplantation; three of them in bilio-enteric anastomoses and one in a choledocho-choledochostomy. Four of the other five patients had strictures at bilio-enteric anastomoses, which developed after complications following laparoscopic cholecystectomies and in one after a Whipple procedure for duodenal carcinoma. In eight patients, balloon-expandable stent-grafts were placed and one patient was treated by insertion of a self-expanding stent-graft. Results In the transplant group, treatment of patients with bilio-enteric anastomoses was unsuccessful (mean stent duration, 30 days). The patient treated for stenosis in the choledocho-choledochostomy responded well to consecutive self-expanding stent-graft placement (total placement duration, 112 days). All patients with bilio-enteric anastomoses in the non-transplant group were treated successfully with stent-grafts (mean placement duration, 37 days). Conclusion Treatment of benign biliary strictures with temporary placement of stent-grafts has a positive effect, but is less successful in patients with strictures developed following a liver transplant. PMID:22043153

  4. Effects of tamsulosin on resting urethral pressure and arterial blood pressure in anaesthetized female dogs.

    PubMed

    Ohtake, Akiyoshi; Sato, Shuichi; Sasamata, Masao; Miyata, Keiji

    2006-03-01

    The purposes of the present study were to investigate the effects of the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists tamsulosin, prazosin and urapidil on resting urethral pressure in anaesthetized female dogs, and to compare the results with their effects on arterial blood pressure. Tamsulosin decreased resting maximal urethral pressure in the urethral pressure profile in a dose-dependent fashion, whereas it had almost no effect on mean arterial blood pressure. Prazosin and urapidil also dose-dependently decreased resting maximal urethral pressure, but these effects were accompanied by decreases in mean arterial blood pressure. Thus, of these three compounds, tamsulosin dose-dependently decreased resting maximal urethral pressure with negligible effect on mean arterial blood pressure in female dogs. These results suggest that tamsulosin will be useful in the treatment of voiding dysfunction associated with bladder outlet obstruction in women, with little hypotensive effect. PMID:16536901

  5. Three Distinct Urethral Fistulae 35 Years After Pelvic Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arindam; Kurtz, Michael P.; Eswara, Jairam R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: While the development of fistulae is a well-known complication of radiotherapy, such fistulae can often be challenging to manage. Case Presentation: We describe the case of a 37 year old male who developed in succession a urethrocutaneous fistula to the thigh, a rectourethral fistula and a peritoneo-urethral fistula 35 years after radiotherapy for pediatric pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma. These complications were managed successfully after multiple surgical procedures. Discussion: We subsequently discuss the different approaches currently employed for the management of radiation induced urinary fistulas and describe the rationale behind our approach towards their surgical management. PMID:24783170

  6. Retained Urethral Catheter Secondary to Placement in Proximal Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Sharda, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual complication secondary to indwelling urethral catheter placement. Routine catheter placement by the obstetrics team in a postpartum female leads to retention of the catheter and inability of its removal by both the obstetrics and urology teams. Although a retained urinary catheter is relatively common, inability to remove a catheter secondary to placement inadvertently into a ureter is extremely rare. In this paper we will discuss the options in removing a retained catheter and present our case of a retained catheter secondary to placement within the right proximal ureter. PMID:27144050

  7. Urethral duplication with unusual cause of bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Venkatramani, Vivek; George, Arun Jacob Philip; Chandrasingh, J.; Panda, Arabind; Devasia, Antony

    2016-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with poor flow and recurrent urinary tract infections following hypospadias repair at the age of 3 years. The evaluation revealed urethral duplication with a hypoplastic dorsal urethra and patent ventral urethra. He also had duplication of the bladder neck, and on voiding cystourethrogram the ventral bladder neck appeared hypoplastic and compressed by the dorsal bladder neck during voiding. The possibility of functional obstruction of the ventral urethra by the occluded dorsal urethra was suspected, and he underwent a successful urethro-urethrostomy. PMID:27127361

  8. Recovery of normal esophageal function in a kitten with diffuse megaesophagus and an occult lower esophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jaycie; Ames, Marisa; DiCicco, Michael; Savage, Mason; Atkins, Clarke; Wood, Michael; Gookin, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    An 8-week-old male domestic shorthair was presented to the Internal Medicine Service at North Carolina State University for regurgitation. Radiographic diagnosis of generalized esophageal dilation and failure of esophageal peristalsis were compatible with diagnosis of congenital megaesophagus. Endoscopic examination of the esophagus revealed a fibrous stricture just orad to the lower esophageal sphincter. Conservative management to increase the body condition and size of the kitten consisted of feeding through a gastrostomy tube, during which time the esophagus regained normal peristaltic function, the stricture orifice widened in size and successful balloon dilatation of the stricture was performed. Esophageal endoscopy should be considered to rule out a stricture near the lower esophageal sphincter in kittens with radiographic findings suggestive of congenital megaesophagus. Management of such kittens by means of gastrostomy tube feeding may be associated with a return of normal esophageal motility and widening of the esophageal stricture, and facilitate subsequent success of interventional dilation of the esophageal stricture. PMID:25030954

  9. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  10. Simple perineal and elaborated perineal posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Webster, George D.; Peterson, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    A pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect (PFUDD) can present in varying lengths and degrees of complexity. In recent decades the repair of PFUDD has developed into a reliance on a perineal anastomotic approach for all but the most complex cases, which might still require an abdominal transpubic approach, or rarely a staged skin-inlay procedure. There is now controversy about the extent to which the perineal repair needs to be elaborated in individual patients. As originally described, the elaborated perineal approach comprises four steps that are used sequentially, as required, depending on the magnitude of the urethral defect. These steps are urethral mobilisation, corporal body separation, inferior wedge pubectomy and supra-crural urethral re-routing to the anastomosis. We present a review of the progressive repair, its reported use and outcomes and our recommendations for its continued use. PMID:26019973

  11. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the urethral diverticulum mimicking prostate cancer: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ekin, Rahmi Gokhan; Yildirim, Zubeyde; Bayol, Umit; Diniz, Gulden; Karaca, Cezmi; Zorlu, Ferruh

    2015-01-01

    Primary urethral carcinomas are uncommon, with urothelial carcinoma as the most common subtype. Urethral diverticulum is also rarely seen in men. A 44-year-old male presented with voiding symptoms. Abdominoperineal resection, prostatectomy, bladder neck excision, and proximal urethral excision were performed. A pathological examination revealed a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) located inside an urethral diverticulum. We report this unusual case because primary SCC of the male urethral diverticulum is extremely rare. To our knowledge, our patient is only the second reported case. PMID:26029309

  12. Biodegradable esophageal stents in benign and malignant strictures – a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Sigounas, Dimitrios E.; Siddhi, Sandeep; Plevris, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Biodegradable (BD) esophageal stents were recently developed mainly for refractory benign strictures, but experience and available literature are limited. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective observational study. All patients who had BD stents inserted due to refractory benign esophageal strictures or malignant strictures, or were awaiting radical radiotherapy/chemotherapy or neo-adjuvant therapy and esophagectomy between March 2011 and July 2015 were included. Results: Stent placement was successful in all patients. Ten patients with benign strictures (3 male, median age 80.5 years, IQR: 68.75 – 89.5) were followed-up for a median of 171.5 weeks (IQR: 24 – 177.25). The interval between dilatations prior to the first BD stent placement (median: 34.25 days, IQR: 23.06 – 48.29) was significantly shorter than the interval between the first BD stent placement and the first intervention required (median: 149.5 days, IQR: 94.25 – 209.5) and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.012). Ten patients with esophageal cancer (8 male, median age: 69 years, IQR: 59.25 – 80.75) were included and they were followed up for a median of 36 weeks (IQR: 26 – 58). Only 1 completed radical radiotherapy successfully, but developed refractory post-radiotherapy stricture. No one proceeded to esophagectomy and 50 % required a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) at a median of 134 days (IQR: 100 – 263) following stent placement. Conclusions: BD stents were successfully deployed in both benign and malignant strictures. They offered a prolonged dilatation-free interval in benign strictures, yet in the majority of patients, strictures recurred. In malignant strictures, stent patency was similar to that of benign strictures, which suggests a potential value in ensuring adequate oral intake during oncologic therapy. In our cohort, however, use of stents did not contribute to improved outcome. PMID

  13. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  14. Optimising the outcome after anastomotic posterior urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Koraitim, Mamdouh M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop a plan that would optimise the outcome after an anastomotic repair of a pelvic fracture urethral injury (PFUI). Methods Data on the delayed repair of PFUI from reports in English were critically reviewed. The search criteria included reports by high-volume surgeons and those from tertiary centres of reconstructive urethral surgery. Results The delayed repair of a PFUI should not be attempted within 4–6 months of the initial trauma. A tension-free, scar-free and mucosa-to-mucosa urethral anastomosis is critically important for a successful outcome. Urethral defects shorter than a third of the bulbar urethral length can usually be repaired by a simple perineal operation, while longer defects usually need an elaborated perineal or perineo-abdominal transpubic procedure. The finest suture that provides adequate strength should always be used for a urethral anastomosis, generally 3/0 polyglactin 910 for adult patients and 4/0 for children. In transpubic urethroplasty, an omental wrapping of the intra-abdominal segment of the bulbar urethra and the site of anastomosis is mandatory. Conclusions Anastomotic repair of a PFUI entails various surgical components, and the importance of each of these should not be underestimated. Careful attention to these surgical components is mandatory for a successful outcome after repair. PMID:26019975

  15. Percutaneous Management of Biliary Strictures After Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Maruzzelli, Luigi; Caruso, Settimo; Riva, Silvia; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-09-15

    We analyze our experience with the management of biliary strictures (BSs) in 27 pediatric patients who underwent liver transplantation with the diagnosis of BS. Mean recipient age was 38 months (range, 2.5-182 months). In all patients percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, biliary catheter placement, and bilioplasty were performed. In 20 patients the stenoses were judged resolved by percutaneous balloon dilatation and the catheters removed. Mean number of balloon dilatations performed was 4.1 (range, 3-6). No major complications occurred. All 20 patients are symptom-free with respect to BS at a mean follow-up of 13 months (range, 2-46 months). In 15 of 20 patients (75%) one course of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty was performed, with no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-46 months). In 4 of 20 patients (20%) two courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; the mean time to recurrence was 9.8 months (range, 2.4-24 months). There was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 2-16 months). In 1 of 20 patients (5%) three courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; there was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 10 months. In conclusion, BS is a major problem following pediatric liver transplantation. Radiological percutaneous treatment is safe and effective, avoiding, in most cases, surgical revision of the anastomosis.

  16. Palliative Treatment of Malignant Colorectal Strictures with Metallic Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Diaz, Laura; Pinto Pabon, Isabel; Fernandez Lobato, Rosa; Montes Lopez, Carmen

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the effectiveness and safety of self-expanding metallic stents as a primary palliative treatment for inoperable malignant colorectal strictures. Methods: Under radiological guidance 20 self-expanding metallic Wallstents were implanted in 16 consecutive patients with colorectal stenoses caused by malignant neoplasms, when surgical treatment of the condition had been ruled out. The patients were followed up clinically for 1-44 months, until death or termination of this study. Results: The stents were successfully implanted in all cases and resolved the clinical obstruction in all the patients except one, who underwent subsequent colostomy. During follow-up of the remaining 15 patients, clinical complications arising from the procedure were pain (two patients), minor rectal bleeding (one patient), and severe rectal bleeding (one patient) (26%). There were three cases of stent migration and three cases of stent occlusion, and reintervention by us was necessary in 20% of cases (3/15). The mean life span following the procedure was 130 days, and none of the patients exhibited clinical symptoms of obstruction at the time of death (12 patients) or termination of the study (3 patients). Conclusion: Deployment of metallic stents under radiologic guidance is an effective alternative as a primary palliative measure in malignant colorectal obstruction, though the possible clinical complications and need for repeat intervention during follow-up should be taken into account.

  17. Steroid Administration is Effective to Prevent Strictures After Endoscopic Esophageal Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjin; Ma, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal stricture is a severe adverse event after circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Steroid administration is a new method to prevent stricture formation. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy and safety of steroid administration to prevent esophageal stricture after circumferential ESD. PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Database, and Clinicaltrials.gov were searched. Studies on steroid administration + endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) versus EBD alone for esophageal stricture were included and pooled analyzed in random-effects models. Besides, subgroup analysis and network analysis were performed to define the influence of ESD type and steroid administration method. Twelve studies involving 513 patients were included. Meta-analysis showed that steroid administration significantly achieved a lower stricture rate (risk ratio [RR], 0.40; 95% CI, 0.20–0.81) and less required EBD sessions (mean difference [MD], −4.33; 95% CI, −6.10 to −2.57) than control. Subgroup analysis indicated that steroid was effective after both semi- and complete circumferential ESD. Network meta-analysis showed that compared with oral steroid, local injected steroid had a similar effect to prevent stricture (RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.48–2.85), whereas a better effect to reduce required EBD sessions (MD, 7.77; 95%CI, 0.26–15.3). Additional steroid administration is effective to reduce the stricture rate and required EBD sessions. And local injected steroid was superior to oral steroid in EBD reduction, whereas due to the varied method and dose of steroid administration, the finding needs to be clarified in the future. PMID:26426665

  18. Surgical Management of Benign Biliary Stricture in Chronic Pancreatitis: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sukanta; Ghatak, Supriyo; Das, Khaunish; Dasgupta, Jayanta; Ray, Sujay; Khamrui, Sujan; Sonar, Pankaj Kumar; Das, Somak

    2015-12-01

    Biliary stricture in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is not uncommon. Previously, all cases were managed by surgery. Nowadays, three important modes of treatment in these patients are observation, endoscopic therapy, and surgery. In the modern era, surgery is recommended only in a subset of patients who develop biliary symptoms or those who have asymptomatic biliary stricture and require surgery for intractable abdominal pain. We want to report on our experience regarding surgical management of CP-induced benign biliary stricture. Over a period of 5 years, we have managed 340 cases of CP at our institution. Bile duct stricture was found in 62 patients. But, surgical intervention was required in 44 patients, and the remaining 18 patients were managed conservatively. Demographic data, operative procedures, postoperative complications, and follow-up parameters of these patients were collected from our prospective database. A total 44 patients were operated for biliary obstruction in the background of CP. Three patients were excluded, so the final analysis was based on 41 patients. The indication for surgery was symptomatic biliary stricture in 27 patients and asymptomatic biliary stricture with intractable abdominal pain in 14 patients. The most commonly performed operation was Frey's procedure. There was no inhospital mortality. Thirty-five patients were well at a mean follow-up of 24.4 months (range 3 to 54 months). Surgery is still the best option for CP-induced benign biliary stricture, and Frey's procedure is a versatile operation unless you suspect malignancy as the cause of biliary obstruction. PMID:26730073

  19. Management of Intestinal Strictures Post Conservative Treatment of Necrotizing Enterocolitis: The Long Term Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Houben, Christoph Heinrich; Chan, Kin Wai Edwin; Mou, Jennifer Wai Cheung; Tam, Yuk Him; Lee, Kim Hung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluating the long-term outcome of the surgical management for intestinal strictures developing after necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Patients and methods: This is a retrospective study of all patients with an intestinal stricture after completion of conservative management for NEC. They were treated during the eight years period from 1st January 2008 to 31st December 2015. Results: During the study period 67 infants had an operation for NEC, of which 55 had emergency surgery. The remaining twelve infants (6 males) had a stricture and were included in the study group. Their median gestational age was 35 (range 27-40) weeks and the median weight was 2180 (range 770 - 3290) g. The onset of NEC was seen at a median of 2 (range 1- 47) days. The median peak C-reactive protein (CRP) level was 73.1 (range 25.2 – 232) mg/dl. Isolated strictures were seen in 9 (75%) patients. Two-third of all strictures (n=15) were located in the colon. Surgery was done at a median of 5 (range 3 - 13) weeks after diagnosing NEC. Primary anastomosis was the procedure of choice; only one needed a temporary colostomy. This cohort had no mortality during a median follow up of 6.25 (range 0.5 - 7.6) years, whilst the overall death rate for NEC was 15 (22 %). Two fifth of the group developed a neurological / sensory impairment. Conclusion: One fifth of the surgical workload for NEC is related to post-NEC strictures. Most strictures are located in the colonic region. In the long-term no mortality and no surgical co-morbidities were observed.

  20. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  1. An animal model of photodynamic-therapy-induced esophageal stricture: preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Yaron; Epperly, Michael W.; Finkelstein, Sydney; Klein, Edwin; Greenberger, Joel; Luketich, James

    2003-06-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) using Photofrin has been recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of esophageal cancer and Barrett's esophagus. A major limitation of PDT for Barrett's esophagus is the development of esophageal stricture in up to 53% of patients. Mechanisms of PDT stricture formation have not been elucidated. The major difficulty is the lack of an animal model for PDT-induced stricture. We have used a pig model in which the esophagus is very similar to that of the human esophagus. Two (Scrofa) domestic pigs were injected with Photofrin at dosage of 2 mg/kg 48 hours prior to photoactivation with 630 nm light. Following anesthesia, a laser probe (2.5 cm in length) was passed through the oral cavity to approximately the mid-point of the esophagus via an endoscope. Light energy (400 Joules (J)/cm) was delivered as a single dose in one pig or repeated at 72 hours in the second pig. In this pig model, upper endoscopy, Barium swallow and pathological studies confirmed stricture formation following esophageal PDT exposure of 400 J as one or two fractions. We believe that this is the first animal model created to study esophageal strictures resulting from PDT.

  2. Computer-aided detection of small bowel strictures in CT enterography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainani, Nisha I.; Näppi, Janne J.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-01

    The workflow of CT enterography in an emergency setting could be improved significantly by computer-aided detection (CAD) of small bowel strictures to enable even non-expert radiologists to detect sites of obstruction rapidly. We developed a CAD scheme to detect strictures automatically from abdominal multi-detector CT enterography image data by use of multi-scale template matching and a blob detector method. A pilot study was performed on 15 patients with 22 surgically confirmed strictures to study the effect of the CAD scheme on observer performance. The 77% sensitivity of an inexperienced radiologist assisted by CAD was comparable with the 81% sensitivity of an unaided expert radiologist (p=0.07). The use of CAD reduced the reading time to identify strictures significantly (p<0.0001). Most of the false-positive CAD detections were caused by collapsed bowel loops, approximated bowel wall, muscles, or vessels, and they were easy to dismiss. The results indicate that CAD could provide radiologists with a rapid and accurate interpretation of strictures to improve workflow in an emergency setting.

  3. Treatment of Ureterointestinal Anastomotic Strictures by Diathermal or Cryoplastic Dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Orsi, Franco; Penco, Silvia Matei, Victor; Bonomo, Guido; Vigna, Paolo Della; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Cobelli, Ottavio De

    2007-09-15

    Background. Ureterointestinal anastomotic strictures (UAS) complicate 10-15% of surgeries for urinary diversion and are the main cause of deterioration in renal function. Treatments are surgical revision, management with autostatic stent, balloon dilatation, endoscopic incision, and percutaneous transrenal diathermy (Acucise). A new option is cryoplastic dilatation (Polar-Cath). Purpose. To assess the feasibility, complications, and preliminary results of UAS treatment using the Acucise and Polar-Cath systems. Methods. Nineteen UAS, diagnosed by ultrasonography or computed tomography and sequential renal scintigraphy, occurred in 15 cancer patients after radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. Fifteen were managed with balloon diathermy and 4 by balloon cryoplasty in a three-stage procedure-percutaneous nephrostomy, diathermal or cryoplastic dilatation, and transnephrostomic control with nephrostomy removal-each separated by 15 days. All patients gave written informed consent. Results. Dilatations were successful in all cases. The procedure is simple and rapid (about 45 min) under fluoroscopic control and sedation. Procedural complications occurred in 1 (5%) patient with UAS after Wallace II uretero-ileocutaneostomy: a common iliac artery lesion was induced by diathermal dilatation, evident subsequently, and required surgical repair. Patency with balloon diathermy was good, with two restenoses developing over 12 months (range 1-22) of follow-up. With balloon cryoplastic dilatation, one restenosis developed in the short term; follow-up is too brief to assess the long-term efficacy. Conclusion. Our short-term results with diathermal and cryoplastic dilatation to resolve UAS are good. If supported by longer follow-up, the techniques may be considered as first-choice approaches to UAS. Surgery should be reserved for cases in which this minimally invasive technique fails.

  4. A man with urethral polyembolokoilamania successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Ingves, Matthew V; Lau, Timothy; Fedoroff, J Paul; Levine, Sharon

    2014-08-01

    Polyembolokoilamania is the act of inserting foreign objects into bodily orifices and can be classified as a paraphilia if done for sexual pleasure. Although problematic sexual behaviors are common in dementia, the majority of case reports of urethral polyembolokoilamania in the elderly have occurred in the absence of dementia or cognitive impairment. Little empirical evidence exists for managing problematic sexual behaviors in the elderly and in dementia. Most evidence in the form of case reports demonstrates that behavioral, environmental, and pharmacological interventions can be effective. In this case report, we describe the management of sexually disinhibited behavior in the form of polyembolokoilamania in a 67-year-old man suffering from treatment-resistant depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, and early signs of frontotemporal dementia. The successful treatment included a course of electroconvulsive therapy. PMID:24569921

  5. Eliminating pulse-induced artifacts in Urethral Pressure data.

    PubMed

    Klunder, Mario; Feuer, Ronny; Amend, Bastian; Kelp, Alexandra; Stenzl, Arnulf; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Sawodny, Oliver; Ederer, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Urethral Pressure Profilometry (UPP) is a tool in the diagnosis of urinary incontinence. The pressure profile along the urethra is measured by a special catheter in order to assess the contraction strength of the sphincter muscle. The use of microtip catheters with several pressure sensors and an integrated acceleration sensor enables signal reconstruction of the pressure distribution on the urethra's inside. Experimental data from minipigs exhibit artifact patterns in the pressure data. It is shown that these artifacts are caused by vascular pulsation in the sphincter structure. We therefore investigate different methods exploiting the time-correlation of the artifacts to eliminate pulse-induced artifacts in the pressure data without compromising the actual signal. Evaluation of these methods applied to experimental data conclude this work showing that both an Input-Model and Principal Component Analysis Decorrelation are effective at removing the artifacts. PMID:26736868

  6. Endoscopic balloon dilatation of postsurgical intestinal strictures in Crohn's disease: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ljubicić, Neven; Bisćanin, Alen; Nikić, Ines; Budimir, Ivan; Nikolić, Marko; Pavić, Tajana

    2013-09-01

    Strictures are one of the most common complications of Crohn's disease. If symptomatic and resistant to medical anti-inflammatory therapy, and especially in cases of acute obstruction, surgical correction may be unavoidable. Although surgical treatment is dramatically effective in curing Crohn's disease strictures, a high rate of postsurgical restenosis has been recognized, ultimately requiring additional surgery. To avoid the risks and costs entailed by repeated surgical resection, endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) has been proposed as a conservative treatment option for intestinal strictures in Crohn's disease, in which the stricture is pneumatically dilated with through-the-scope balloons of different diameters. The main clinical indication for EBD is the appearance of obstructive symptoms associated with the stricture, especially if they are postoperative and shorter than 4 centimeters. Usually more than one dilatation session is required for every stricture. EBD is applied infrequently, possibly due to the perceived risk of perforation and early stricture recurrence, but studies have demonstrated that EBD has a high success rate, a low chance of complications, excellent symptomatic response, as well as good short-term and long-term outcomes, proving that it is a relatively simple and successful technique that provides long-term effective palliation of the symptoms with minimal risk in patients with simple strictures, and offers a reasonable alternative to surgery. PMID:24558771

  7. Side to Side Esophagogastrojejunoplasty in Post-corrosive Stricture of Distal Esophagus and Proximal Stomach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen; Pancholi, Mukesh; Patel, Gulab; Sharma, Anju

    2015-12-01

    A four years old female child presented after 2 months of ingestion of battery fluid (sulfuric acid) accidently with stricture of the distal esophagus, esophagogastric junction, and fundus as well as proximal portion of the body of the stomach. Corrosive stricture involving the distal esophagus with the proximal stomach is not a frequently encountered condition. Side to side esophagogastrojejunostomy without removal of the strictured esophagus or stomach (side to side esophagogastrojejunoplasty) can be done in such patient hence preserving the stomach which is important physiologically as a reservoir and for the secretion of gastric juices. In review of literature in search engines like MD Consult, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Embase and standard textbooks of surgery, we could not find such procedure had been performed till date, so that it is the innovative approach with support of literature and surgical principles. PMID:27011603

  8. Remote discovery of an asymptomatic bowel perforation by a mid-urethral sling.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Jason E; Maslow, Ken D

    2012-02-01

    Bowel perforation is a rare complication of mid-urethral sling procedures and is usually reported shortly after the surgery. We report a remotely discovered asymptomatic bowel injury found at the time of subsequent surgery. The patient with a history of several prior pelvic surgeries underwent an uneventful retropubic mid-urethral sling placement. Five years later, during an abdominal sacrocolpopexy procedure, mesh from the mid-urethral sling was found perforating the wall of the cecum and fixating it to the right pelvic sidewall. Cecal wedge resection was performed to excise the sling mesh. Asymptomatic bowel perforation by mid-urethral sling mesh has not been previously reported. Pelvic and abdominal surgeons should be aware of the possibility of finding this injury in patients with prior sling surgeries. PMID:22052439

  9. Juvenile allergic urethritis with urethro-ejaculatory reflux presenting as acute intermittent bilateral testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ramnik V; Brimioulle, Marina; Govani, Dhaval; Youssef, Talaat

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of juvenile allergic urethritis secondary to double concentrate orange squash of a famous brand in a 3-year-old boy who developed bilateral urethro-ejaculatory reflux (UER) and severe urethral, perineal and scrotal pain referred to both lower limbs intermittently predominantly during and after micturition-simulating features of bilateral intermittent testicular torsion. Accurate history, urinalysis, ultrasound, colour Doppler and food challenge were helpful in diagnosis. Topical steroids, antihistaminic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory medications together with withdrawal of the allergen produced complete recovery. Allergic urethritis in association with bilateral UER causing secondary seminal vesiculitis and epididymitis is rare. It presented as acute scrotum and responded to innovative treatment. Allergic disease can have a dramatic effect on a child's quality of life. This is the first documented case of allergic urethritis and associated UER presenting as juvenile acute scrotum. Steroids, antihistamines and anti-inflammatory agents together with avoidance of the allergen helped achieve recovery. PMID:26150614

  10. [Urethral duplication in pediatric age. A case report].

    PubMed

    Abbate, B; Centonze, N; Danti, D A

    2002-01-01

    Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly, resulting from a wide range of malformations of the urogenital sinus. Generally, the duplication develops on the sagittal plane; the accessory urethra may run dorsally or ventrally to the orthotopic one. The duplication is defined as epispadic in the first case, and hypospadic in the second. In the medical literature approximately 150 cases have been reported. Relatively more frequent among males, it is often associated with other malformations of the urogenital tract or other organs. The authors present a case of a 4 year old child with a complete epispadic duplication, that is, two external meatus, one of which the dorsal aspect of the glans, and the other orthotopic. Clinically, duplication and weakening of the stream, urinary incontinence and UTI were present. US examination documented the normality of the upper urinary tract and of the bladder. Retrograde urethrocystography showed a completely permeable urethral duplication, with two external meatus. The excision of the accessory urethra was carried out together with the reconstruction of the hypospadic meatus with an "overlap anastomosis". The post-operatory period was uneventful, and one year after surgery the patient is asymptomatic, with normal uroflowmetric readings and echographically documented complete bladder emptying. In the opinion of the authors, the treatment is indicated in symptomatic forms and the surgical options varies, depending on the type and grade of malformation, its clinical manifestations and the presence of associated anomalies. Antibiotic treatment is not effective and other treatments, such as diathermocoagulation or the injection of caustic substances into the accessory duct have been abandoned. PMID:12494542

  11. Urethral Dysfunction in Female Mice with Estrogen Receptor β Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chen, Chao-Jung; Yeh, Shuyuan; Lin, Yu-Ning; Wu, Yang-Chang; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Wu, Bor-Tsang; Ma, Wen-Lung; Chen, Wen-Chi; Chang, Chawnshang; Chen, Huey-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen has various regulatory functions in the growth, development, and differentiation of the female urogenital system. This study investigated the roles of ERβ in stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Wild-type (ERβ+/+) and knockout (ERβ−/−) female mice were generated (aged 6–8 weeks, n = 6) and urethral function and protein expression were measured. Leak point pressures (LPP) and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP) were assessed in mice under urethane anesthesia. After the measurements, the urethras were removed for proteomic analysis using label-free quantitative proteomics by nano-liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. The interaction between these proteins was further analysed using MetaCore. Lastly, Western blot was used to confirm the candidate proteins. Compared with the ERβ+/+ group, the LPP and MUCP values of the ERβ−/− group were significantly decreased. Additionally, we identified 85 differentially expressed proteins in the urethra of ERβ−/− female mice; 57 proteins were up-regulated and 28 were down-regulated. The majority of the ERβ knockout-modified proteins were involved in cell-matrix adhesion, metabolism, immune response, signal transduction, nuclear receptor translational regelation, and muscle contraction and development. Western blot confirmed the up-regulation of myosin and collagen in urethra. By contrast, elastin was down-regulated in the ERβ−/− mice. This study is the first study to estimate protein expression changes in urethras from ERβ−/− female mice. These changes could be related to the molecular mechanism of ERβ in SUI. PMID:25275480

  12. Long ureteric stricture replacement by buccal mucosa graft: an Armenian experience case series report

    PubMed Central

    Akopyan, Kristina; Levonyan, Arthur; Tsaturyan, Ashot

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to demonstrate the results of a case series concerning the replacement of long ureteric strictures using buccal mucosa grafts. Material and methods Five patients (3 men, 2 women), with a mean age of 35 years old, underwent reconstructive ureteral surgery using buccal mucosa graft with omental wrapping during the period of 2010–2013. In all cases, the location of strictures was in the proximal ureters with the length of strictures varying from 2.5 to 5.0 cm. Results We did not observe any major complications postoperatively. Two patients complained of constipation, which was resolved on the second day without any special treatment. Only one patient experienced fever (39°C) on the seventh day after the surgery due to inadequate drainage of the nephrostomic tube. Mean follow-up time was 39.6 months (range 26–52 months), mean hospital stay length was 10.6 days. Intravenous and antegrade urography were performed after removing JJ stents. Results were favorable without any signs of stricture. Repetitive ultrasound and radiologic imaging was performed at month 3, 6, 12 in the first year and every half-year thereafter. Intravenous urography showed no signs of strictures. Hydronephrosis was resolved in all patients by the sixth month following the surgery. Conclusions Postoperatively, we observed favorable results in all patients in terms of absence of short term-surgical complications. This technique could be considered for patients with long ureteric strictures in whom ureteral replacement with bowel interposition or kidney auto-transplantation is contraindicated. PMID:27551561

  13. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Schmutzhard, E

    2016-06-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome refers to a neurological disorder characterized by headache, disorders of consciousness, visual disturbances, epileptic seizures, and subcortical vasogenic edema. About two thirds of patients develop neurological symptoms, which are associated with blood pressure fluctuations. One hypothesis is that hypertensive episodes cause autoregulatory failure, and values above the upper limit of cerebral autoregulation result in a breakthrough followed by hyperperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In another hypothesis, endothelial dysfunction triggered by numerous factors including preeclampsia, immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutics, sepsis, or autoimmune disorders is thought to be the key pathomechanism. Endo- or exogenic toxic agents including pharmacological substances, cytokines, or bacterial toxins are supposed to trigger endothelial activation and dysfunction resulting in the release of vasoconstrictors, pro-inflammatory mediators, and vascular leakage. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical and neuroimaging findings that frequently show a bilateral, symmetric, and parietooccipital pattern. However, the diagnosis can often only be confirmed during the course of disease after excluding important differential diagnoses. Currently, there is no specific treatment available. Lowering of arterial blood pressure and eliminating the underlying cause usually leads to an improvement of clinical and neuroradiological findings. Admission to a critical care unit is required in about 40 % of patients due to complicating conditions including status epilepticus, cerebral vasoconstriction, ischemia, or intracerebral hemorrhage. Prognosis is favorable; in the majority of patients neurological deficits and imaging findings resolve completely. PMID:27272329

  14. Reappraisal of intergender differences in the urethral striated sphincter explains why a completely circular arrangement is difficult in females: a histological study using human fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Atsushi; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Murakami, Gen; Matsubara, Akio

    2012-01-01

    To investigate why the development of a completely circular striated sphincter is so rare, we examined histological sections of 11 female and 11 male mid-term human fetuses. In male fetuses, the striated muscle initially extended in the frontal, rather than in the horizontal plane. However, a knee-like portion was absent in the female fetal urethra because, on the inferior side of the vaginal end, a wide groove for the future vestibule opened inferiorly. Accordingly, it was difficult for the developing striated muscle to surround the groove, even though there was not a great difference in width or thickness between the female vestibule and the male urethra. The development of a completely circular striated sphincter seems to be impossible in females because of interruption of the frontal plane by the groove-like vestibule. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that before descent of the vagina, the urethral striated muscle extends posteriorly. PMID:22822461

  15. Parameatal Urethral Cyst in a Newborn–A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Spyridakis, Ioannis; Patoulias, Dimitrios; Tsioulas, Paschalis; Patoulias, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Parameatal urethral cysts are rare congenital lesions of the penis that are usually <1cm in diameter in the paediatric population and do not create any urinary difficulties. Their natural course is either to resolve or to be surgically excised without any postoperative complications. We report a case of a newborn with a parameatal urethral cyst that produced voiding difficulties and was treated by surgical excision. PMID:26894139

  16. Parameatal Urethral Cyst in a Newborn-A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Kaselas, Christos; Spyridakis, Ioannis; Patoulias, Dimitrios; Tsioulas, Paschalis; Patoulias, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Parameatal urethral cysts are rare congenital lesions of the penis that are usually <1cm in diameter in the paediatric population and do not create any urinary difficulties. Their natural course is either to resolve or to be surgically excised without any postoperative complications. We report a case of a newborn with a parameatal urethral cyst that produced voiding difficulties and was treated by surgical excision. PMID:26894139

  17. Palliative Surgery for Rare Cases of Anterior Urethral Metastasis in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Gómez, Enrique; Carrasco Aznar, Jose Carlos; Moreno Rodríguez, Maria del Mar; Valero Rosa, José; Requena Tapia, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    Penis metastasis from prostate cancer is very rare, and its management varies from case to case as there are very few cases reported in the literature. We describe a patient with prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy who presented with urethral bleeding as a symptom of anterior urethral metastasis during followup. We propose a way to manage this and review the literature. PMID:25161796

  18. Bilateral congenital midureteric strictures associated with multicystic dysplastic kidney and hydronephrosis: evaluation with MR urography.

    PubMed

    Grattan-Smith, J Damien; Jones, Richard A; Little, Stephen; Kirsch, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral congenital midureteric strictures diagnosed using MR urography. The severity of obstruction differed in the two ureters, resulting in a multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) with an atretic ureter on one side and hydronephrosis that worsened over time due to progressive stenosis on the other. Although midureteric strictures are usually misdiagnosed as ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) or ureterovesical junction (UVJ) obstruction on conventional imaging, MR urography was able to clearly demonstrate both the anatomical and functional abnormalities. Additionally, because of the excellent anatomical resolution, similarities in the underlying pathological lesions could be contrasted with the severity of the pathophysiological impact upon each kidney. PMID:20714713

  19. Recurrent pneumonia resulting from retained esophagus following esophageal replacement for corrosive stricture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Joe, J S; Chen, H C; Peng, H C; Chang, W T

    1993-08-01

    Benign corrosive stricture of the esophagus rarely requires esophageal replacement due to failed dilatation. A patient is presented with severe esophageal stricture from corrosive injury; the native esophagus was eventually replaced with an ileocolon interposition graft. He suffered from recurrent pneumonia one year after operation. Mucocele formation from the retained esophagus with compression of the tracheobronchial tree, was diagnosed by computerized tomographic (CT) scan, and was resected. The clinical status improved dramatically after the procedure. Tracheobronchial compression by mucocele from the retained esophagus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent pneumonia after esophageal replacement. PMID:8402368

  20. Structural and molecular features of intestinal strictures in rats with Crohn's-like disease

    PubMed Central

    Talapka, Petra; Berkó, Anikó; Nagy, Lajos István; Chandrakumar, Lalitha; Bagyánszki, Mária; Puskás, László Géza; Fekete, Éva; Bódi, Nikolett

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop a new rat model we wanted to gain a better understanding of stricture formation in Crohn’s disease (CD). METHODS: Chronic colitis was induced locally by the administration of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). The relapsing inflammation characteristic to CD was mimicked by repeated TNBS treatments. Animals were randomly divided into control, once, twice and three times TNBS-treated groups. Control animals received an enema of saline. Tissue samples were taken from the strictured colonic segments and also adjacent proximally and distally to its 60, 90 or 120 d after the last TNBS or saline administrations. The frequency and macroscopic extent of the strictures were measured on digital photographs. The structural features of strictured gut wall were studied by light- and electron microscopy. Inflammation related alterations in TGF-beta 2 and 3, matrix metalloproteinases 9 (MMP9) and TIMP1 mRNA and protein expression were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis. The quantitative distribution of caspase 9 was determined by post-embedding immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Intestinal strictures first appeared 60 d after TNBS treatments and the frequency of them increased up to day 120. From day 90 an intact lamina epithelialis, reversible thickening of lamina muscularis mucosae and irreversible thickening of the muscularis externa were demonstrated in the strictured colonic segments. Nevertheless the morphological signs of apoptosis were frequently seen and excess extracellular matrix deposition was recorded between smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Enhanced caspase 9 expression on day 90 in the SMCs and on day 120 also in myenteric neurons indicated the induction of apoptosis. The mRNA expression profile of TGF-betas after repeated TNBS doses was characteristic to CD, TGF-beta 2, but not TGF-beta 3 was up-regulated. Overexpression of MMP9 and down-regulation of TIMP1 were demonstrated. The progressive increase in the amount of

  1. The significance of Chlamydia trachomatis in urethritis and prostatitis - differences in therapeutic approach - Croatian experience.

    PubMed

    Skerk, Visnja; Markovinovic, L; Zekan, S; Jaksic, J; Zidovec Lepej, S; Markotic, A; Skerk, Vedrana; Radosevic, V; Cvitkovic, L; Begovac, J

    2009-02-01

    We examined a total of 1014 patients over 18 years of age; 252 with urethritis and 762 with chronic prostatitis syndrome. the mean age of patients with urethritis was 32.7 and with prostatitis syndrome 37.6 years. Clinical symptoms of urethritis were present from a few days to several months. in patients with chronic prostatitis syndrome, symptoms were present for at least 3 months. Chlamydia trachomatis alone was confirmed in 26 (10%) and in combination with Ureaplasma urealyticum in 6 (2%) patients with urethritis. in 171 (68%) patients with urethritis neither C. trachomatis nor U. urealyticum or Mycoplasma hominis were found. C. trachomatis alone was confirmed in 70 (9%), and in combination with other microorganisms in 7 (1%) patients with chronic prostatitis syndrome. in Croatia, the frequency of chronic chlamydial prostatitis has not significantly changed in the last 10 years, while the frequency of infections among adolescents decreased. the recommended regimen for acute chlamydial urethritis in Croatia is azithromycin 1.0 g as a single dose, and a total dose of 4-4.5 g azithromycin for chronic chlamydial prostatitis. PMID:19297275

  2. Evaluation of risk factors and treatment options in patients with ureteral stricture disease at a single institution

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Henry; Arsovska, Olga; Paterson, Ryan F.; Chew, Ben H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ureteral strictures are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, resulting in potential kidney damage requiring several surgical procedures. Non-malignant causes include radiation, trauma from calculi impaction, pelvic surgery, or ureteroscopy (URS). We identified risk factors in our patients with ureteral strictures and the success of their treatment outcomes. Methods: A retrospective chart review of 25 patients with 29 ureteral strictures was performed to determine the success of their treatment. Results: Twenty-five (25) patients with 29 benign ureteral strictures were identified. Most cases (60%) were caused by impacted stones where the median stone size was 1.15 cm (0.37–1.8 cm). Intervention for stones prior to stricture development included shockwave lithotripsy, URS, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Five patients with strictures from impacted stones had ureteric complications during stone treatment including perforation +/− urinoma (n=3), fractured guidewire left in situ (n=1), and ureteric orifice resection (n=1). Other stricture etiologies included radiation (28%) and endometriosis (4%). Treatment modalities used included ureteroureterostomy (n=2), ureteral re-implant (n=3), urinary diversion (n=3), autotrasplant (n=1), laser endoureterotomy +/− balloon dilation (n=8), nephrectomy (n=2), balloon dilation +/− stent (n=3), ureterovesical junction (UVJ) resection + stent (n=1), chronic stent changes (n=4), or surveillance (n=3). Conclusions: Our evaluation highlights important principles. Patients with complicated ureteroscopies or severely impacted calculi warrant close followup with imaging after stone treatment due to possibility of rapid renal deterioration from stricture formation. Radiation-induced strictures are difficult to manage, possibly requiring subsequent urinary diversion. Finally, endoscopic management of benign ureteral strictures via balloon dilation and laser endoureterotomy is an excellent choice in properly

  3. Normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangdong; Liu, Tieyan; Zhao, Jing; Sun, Jingyi; Chen, Yuefeng; Sun, Pengyu; Wang, Xuesong; Liu, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this research, the normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males has been studied. Methods: The sagittal, coronal, and axial T2-weighted non-fat suppressed fast spin-echo images of pelvic cavities of 86 Chinese young males were studied. Result: Urethral sphincter complex threaded through the prostate and divided it into 2 parts: transition zone (TZ), periurethral glands internal to the urethral sphincter and peripheral zone (PZ), central zone (CZ), anterior fibromuscular stroma (AFS) zone external to the urethral sphincter. The length of urethral striated sphincter is 12.26-20.94 mm (mean 16.59 mm) at membranous urethra. Conclusions: In this paper, we summarized the normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males with no urinary control problems. PMID:26629244

  4. A case of a urethral diverticular adenocarcinoma after the fenestration of the anterior vaginal wall for pelvic floor abscess

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ryuta; Sugahara, Takeshi; Hamada, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman presented to the gynecology department with complaints of atypical genital bleeding. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a localized urethral tumor extended to vagina. Histological test of the biopsy tissue of the mass suggested the adenocarcinoma. The patient was performed the fenestration of the anterior vaginal wall 15 years ago. Under the diagnosis of urethral diverticular adenocarcinoma, we performed standard open total cystectomy with lymph node excision and ileal conduit. We could not establish a diagnosis of urethral diverticulum from the histological test; however, we clinically diagnosed as urethral diverticular adenocarcinoma. Because carcinoma arising from urethral diverticula is reported, a close long-term follow-up for the recurrence or generation of malignant tumors by genitourinary examinations or images is necessary, for the patient with urethral diverticula. PMID:26941237

  5. Fully versus partially covered self-expandable metal stents in benign esophageal strictures.

    PubMed

    Gangloff, A; Lecleire, S; Di Fiore, A; Huet, E; Iwanicki-Caron, I; Antonietti, M; Michel, P

    2015-10-01

    Self-expandable plastic stents are currently recommended for refractory benign esophageal strictures but they show disappointing results in terms of migration and long-term efficacy. We report here our experience in the management of benign esophageal strictures with partially covered (PCSEMS) and fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS). We performed a retrospective analysis of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placements for benign esophageal strictures from 1998 to 2011 in Rouen University Hospital. Twenty-two patients (15 men, 7 women) attempted 40 esophageal SEMS placements (17 PCSEMS, 23 FCSEMS) during this period. All technical complications were migrations. Migration was noted after 3/17 PCSEMS (17.6%) and 4/23 FCSEMS placement (17.4%, P = ns). Clinical complications occurred after 6/17 PCSEMS and 2/23 FCSEMS placements (35.3% vs. 8.7%, P = 0.053). PCSEMS caused two major complications (fistulae) whereas FCSEMS did not cause any major complication (11.7% vs. 0%). Mean dysphagia score was significantly lower after SEMS placement (1.68 vs. 3.08, P < 0.001) with similar results for PCSEMS and FCSEMS. Stent placement resulted in long-term clinical success for 23.5% of PCSEMS and 34.7% of FCSEMS (P = 0.0505). FCSEMS provide satisfying clinical success rate with an acceptable complication rate and they could constitute a relevant therapeutic option in the management of benign esophageal strictures. PMID:25168061

  6. Role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the management of benign biliary strictures: What’s new?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rosa; Loureiro, Rui; Nunes, Nuno; Santos, António Alberto; Maio, Rui; Cravo, Marília; Duarte, Maria Antónia

    2016-01-01

    Benign biliary strictures comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases. The most common strictures amenable to endoscopic treatment are post-cholecystectomy, post-liver transplantation, related to primary sclerosing cholangitis and to chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic treatment of benign biliary strictures is widely used as first line therapy, since it is effective, safe, noninvasive and repeatable. Endoscopic techniques currently used are dilation, multiple plastic stents insertion and fully covered self-expandable metal stents. The main indication for dilation alone is primary sclerosing cholangitis related strictures. In the vast majority of the remaining cases, temporary placement of multiple plastic stents with/without dilation is considered the treatment of choice. Although this approach is effective, it requires multiple endoscopic sessions due to the short duration of stent patency. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents appear as a good alternative to plastic stents, since they have an increased radial diameter, longer stent patency, easier insertion technique and similar efficacy. Recent advances in endoscopic technique and various devices have allowed successful treatment in most cases. The development of novel endoscopic techniques and devices is still ongoing. PMID:26962404

  7. [Colorectal anastomotic stricture : transanal resection using the E.E.A. autostapler (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Le Treut, Y P; Castro, R; Bouloudnine, G; Boutboul, R; Bricot, R

    1982-01-01

    Anastomotic stricture is an unusual complication of the colo-rectal surgery ; this can be very difficult to manage, particularly in low anastomosis. About one case successfully treated, the authors suggest an original non operative treatment : a resection with simultaneous anastomosis only performed through a transanal approach, with upper coloscopic control. PMID:7061615

  8. Role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the management of benign biliary strictures: What's new?

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rosa; Loureiro, Rui; Nunes, Nuno; Santos, António Alberto; Maio, Rui; Cravo, Marília; Duarte, Maria Antónia

    2016-02-25

    Benign biliary strictures comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases. The most common strictures amenable to endoscopic treatment are post-cholecystectomy, post-liver transplantation, related to primary sclerosing cholangitis and to chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic treatment of benign biliary strictures is widely used as first line therapy, since it is effective, safe, noninvasive and repeatable. Endoscopic techniques currently used are dilation, multiple plastic stents insertion and fully covered self-expandable metal stents. The main indication for dilation alone is primary sclerosing cholangitis related strictures. In the vast majority of the remaining cases, temporary placement of multiple plastic stents with/without dilation is considered the treatment of choice. Although this approach is effective, it requires multiple endoscopic sessions due to the short duration of stent patency. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents appear as a good alternative to plastic stents, since they have an increased radial diameter, longer stent patency, easier insertion technique and similar efficacy. Recent advances in endoscopic technique and various devices have allowed successful treatment in most cases. The development of novel endoscopic techniques and devices is still ongoing. PMID:26962404

  9. Optimal management of distal ureteric strictures following renal transplantation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Justin; Schiefer, Danielle; Aboalsamh, Ghaleb; Archambault, Jason; Luke, Patrick P; Sener, Alp

    2016-05-01

    Our objective was to define optimal management of distal ureteric strictures following renal transplantation. A systematic review on PubMed identified 34 articles (385 patients). Primary endpoints were success rates and complications of specific primary and secondary treatments (following failure of primary treatment). Among primary treatments (n = 303), the open approach had 85.4% success (95% CI 72.5-93.1) and the endourological approach had 64.3% success (95% CI 58.3-69.9). Among secondary treatments (n = 82), the open approach had 93.1% success (95% CI 77.0-99.2) and the endourological approach had 75.5% success (95% CI 62.3-85.2). The most common primary open treatment was ureteric reimplantation (n = 33, 81.8% success, 95% CI 65.2-91.8). The most common primary endourological treatment was dilation (n = 133, 58.6% success, 95% CI 50.1-66.7). Fourteen complications, including death (4 weeks post-op) and graft loss (12 days post-op), followed endourological treatment. One complication followed open treatment. This is the first systematic review to examine the success rates and complications of specific treatments for distal ureteric strictures following renal transplantation. Our review indicates that open management has higher success rates and fewer complications than endourological management as a primary and secondary treatment for post-transplant distal ureteric strictures. We also outline a post-transplant ureteric stricture evaluation and treatment algorithm. PMID:26895782

  10. Probe-Based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy for Indeterminate Biliary Strictures: Refinement of the Image Interpretation Classification

    PubMed Central

    Giovannini, Marc; Jamidar, Priya; Gan, S. Ian; Cesaro, Paola; Caillol, Fabrice; Filoche, Bernard; Karia, Kunal; Smith, Ioana; Slivka, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Background. Accurate diagnosis and clinical management of indeterminate biliary strictures are often a challenge. Tissue confirmation modalities during Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) suffer from low sensitivity and poor diagnostic accuracy. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) has been shown to be sensitive for malignant strictures characterization (98%) but lacks specificity (67%) due to inflammatory conditions inducing false positives. Methods. Six pCLE experts validated the Paris Classification, designed for diagnosing inflammatory biliary strictures, using a set of 40 pCLE sequences obtained during the prospective registry (19 inflammatory, 6 benign, and 15 malignant). The 4 criteria used included (1) multiple thin white bands, (2) dark granular pattern with scales, (3) increased space between scales, and (4) thickened reticular structures. Interobserver agreement was further calculated on a separate set of 18 pCLE sequences. Results. Overall accuracy was 82.5% (n = 40 retrospectively diagnosed) versus 81% (n = 89 prospectively collected) for the registry, resulting in a sensitivity of 81.2% (versus 98% for the prospective study) and a specificity of 83.3% (versus 67% for the prospective study). The corresponding interobserver agreement for 18 pCLE clips was fair (k = 0.37). Conclusion. Specificity of pCLE using the Paris Classification for the characterization of indeterminate bile duct stricture was increased, without impacting the overall accuracy. PMID:25866506

  11. A Challenging Surgical Approach to Locally Advanced Primary Urethral Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Spilotros, Marco; Vavallo, Antonio; Palazzo, Silvano; Miacola, Carlos; Forte, Saverio; Matera, Matteo; Campagna, Marcello; Colamonico, Ottavio; Schiralli, Francesco; Sebastiani, Francesco; Di Cosmo, Federica; Bettocchi, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Buonerba, Carlo; Vincenti, Leonardo; Ludovico, Giuseppe; Ditonno, Pasquale; Battaglia, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary urethral carcinoma (PUC) is a rare and aggressive cancer, often underdetected and consequently unsatisfactorily treated. We report a case of advanced PUC, surgically treated with combined approaches. A 47-year-old man underwent transurethral resection of a urethral lesion with histological evidence of a poorly differentiated squamous cancer of the bulbomembranous urethra. Computed tomography (CT) and bone scans excluded metastatic spread of the disease but showed involvement of both corpora cavernosa (cT3N0M0). A radical surgical approach was advised, but the patient refused this and opted for chemotherapy. After 17 months the patient was referred to our department due to the evidence of a fistula in the scrotal area. CT scan showed bilateral metastatic disease in the inguinal, external iliac, and obturator lymph nodes as well as the involvement of both corpora cavernosa. Additionally, a fistula originating from the right corpus cavernosum extended to the scrotal skin. At this stage, the patient accepted the surgical treatment, consisting of different phases. Phase I: Radical extraperitoneal cystoprostatectomy with iliac-obturator lymph nodes dissection. Phase II: Creation of a urinary diversion through a Bricker ileal conduit. Phase III: Repositioning of the patient in lithotomic position for an overturned Y skin incision, total penectomy, fistula excision, and “en bloc” removal of surgical specimens including the bladder, through the perineal breach. Phase IV: Right inguinal lymphadenectomy. The procedure lasted 9-and-a-half hours, was complication-free, and intraoperative blood loss was 600 mL. The patient was discharged 8 days after surgery. Pathological examination documented a T4N2M0 tumor. The clinical situation was stable during the first 3 months postoperatively but then metastatic spread occurred, not responsive to adjuvant chemotherapy, which led to the patient's death 6 months after surgery. Patients with advanced stage tumors of

  12. Reinnervation of Urethral and Anal Sphincters With Femoral Motor Nerve to Pudendal Nerve Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ruggieri, Michael R.; Braverman, Alan S.; Bernal, Raymond M.; Lamarre, Neil S.; Brown, Justin M.; Barbe, Mary F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Lower motor neuron damage to sacral roots or nerves can result in incontinence and a flaccid urinary bladder. We showed bladder reinnervation after transfer of coccygeal to sacral ventral roots, and genitofemoral nerves (L1, 2 origin) to pelvic nerves. This study assesses the feasibility of urethral and anal sphincter reinnervation using transfer of motor branches of the femoral nerve (L2–4 origin) to pudendal nerves (S1, 2 origin) that innervate the urethral and anal sphincters in a canine model. Methods Sacral ventral roots were selected by their ability to stimulate bladder, urethral sphincter, and anal sphincter contraction and transected. Bilaterally, branches of the femoral nerve, specifically, nervus saphenous pars muscularis [Evans HE. Miller’s anatomy of the dog. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders; 1993], were transferred and end-to-end anastomosed to transected pudendal nerve branches in the perineum, then enclosed in unipolar nerve cuff electrodes with leads to implanted RF micro-stimulators. Results Nerve stimulation induced increased anal and urethral sphincter pressures in five of six transferred nerves. Retrograde neurotracing from the bladder, urethral sphincter, and anal sphincter using fluorogold, fast blue, and fluororuby, demonstrated urethral and anal sphincter labeled neurons in L2–4 cord segments (but not S1–3) in nerve transfer canines, consistent with rein-nervation by the transferred femoral nerve motor branches. Controls had labeled neurons only in S1–3 segments. Postmortem DiI and DiO labeling confirmed axonal regrowth across the nerve repair site. Conclusions These results show spinal cord reinnervation of urethral and anal sphincter targets after sacral ventral root transection and femoral nerve transfer (NT) to the denervated pudendal nerve. These surgical procedures may allow patients to regain continence. PMID:21953679

  13. Dynamics of the sensory response to urethral flow over multiple time scales in rat

    PubMed Central

    Danziger, Zachary C; Grill, Warren M

    2015-01-01

    The pudendal nerve carries sensory information from the urethra that controls spinal reflexes necessary to maintain continence and achieve efficient micturition. Despite the key role urethral sensory feedback plays in regulation of the lower urinary tract, there is little information about the characteristics of urethral sensory responses to physiological stimuli, and the quantitative relationship between physiological stimuli and the evoked sensory activation is unknown. Such a relation is critical to understanding the neural control of the lower urinary tract and how dysfunction arises in disease states. We systematically quantified pudendal afferent responses to fluid flow in the urethra in vivo in the rat. We characterized the sensory response across a range of stimuli, and describe a previously unreported long-term neural accommodation phenomenon. We developed and validated a compact mechanistic mathematical model capable of reproducing the pudendal sensory activity in response to arbitrary profiles of urethral flows. These results describe the properties and function of urethral afferents that are necessary to understand how sensory disruption manifests in lower urinary tract pathophysiology. Key points Sensory information from the urethra is essential to maintain continence and to achieve efficient micturition and when compromised by disease or injury can lead to substantial loss of function. Despite the key role urethral sensory information plays in the lower urinary tract, the relationship between physiological urethral stimuli, such as fluid flow, and the neural sensory response is poorly understood. This work systematically quantifies pudendal afferent responses to a range of fluid flows in the urethra in vivo and describes a previously unknown long-term neural accommodation phenomenon in these afferents. We present a compact mechanistic mathematical model that reproduces the pudendal sensory activity in response to urethral flow. These results have

  14. Newly designed “pieced” stent in a rabbit model of benign esophageal stricture

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Shang, Liang; Liu, Ji-Yong; Qin, Cheng-Yong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate a newly designed stent and its dilatation effect in a rabbit model of benign esophageal stricture. METHODS: Thirty-four New Zealand white rabbits underwent a corrosive injury in the middle esophagus for esophageal stricture formation. Thirty rabbits with a successful formation of esophageal strictures were randomly allocated into two groups. The control group (n = 15) was implanted with a conventional stent, and the study group (n = 15) was implanted with a detachable “pieced” stent. The study stent (30 mm in length, 10 mm in diameter) was composed of three covered metallic pieces connected by surgical suture lines. The stent was collapsed by pulling the suture lines out of the mesh. Two weeks after stricture formation, endoscopic placement of a conventional stent or the new stent was performed. Endoscopic extraction was carried out four weeks later. The extraction rate, ease of extraction, migration, complications, and survival were evaluated. RESULTS: Stent migration occurred in 3/15 (20%) animals in the control group and 2/15 (13%) animals in the study group; the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. At the end of four weeks, the remaining stents were successfully extracted with the endoscope in 100% (11/11) of the animals in the study group, and 60% (6/10) of the animals in the control group; this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the mean number of follow-up days between the control and study groups (25.33 vs 25.85). Minor bleeding was reported in five cases in the study group and four in the control group. There were no severe complications directly associated with stent implantation or extraction in either of the two groups. CONCLUSION: In this experimental protocol of benign esophageal strictures, the novel “pieced” stent demonstrated a superior removal rate with a similar migration rate compared to a conventional stent. PMID:26229404

  15. The role of stents in the treatment of Crohn’s disease strictures

    PubMed Central

    Loras Alastruey, Carme; Andújar Murcia, Xavier; Esteve Comas, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Stenosis is one of the most frequent local complications in Crohn’s disease (CD). Surgery is not the ideal treatment because of the high rate of postoperative recurrence. Endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD) currently is the current treatment of choice for short strictures amenable to the procedure. However, it is not applicable or effective in all the cases, and it is not without related complications. Our goal was to summarize the published information regarding the use and the role of the stents in the treatment of CD stricture. A Medline search was performed on the terms “stricture,” “stenosis,” “stent” and “Crohn’s disease.” Results: a total of 19 publications met our search criteria for an overall number of 65 patients. Placing a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) may be a safe and effective alternative to EBD and/or surgical intervention in the treatment of short stenosis in patients with CD. Indications are the same as those for EBD. In addition, SEMS may be useful in stenosis refractory to EBD and may be suitable in the treatment of longer or more complex strictures that cannot be treated by EBD. With the current information, it seems that the best treatment option is the placement of a fully covered stent for a mean time of 4 weeks. Regarding the use of biodegradable stents, the information is limited and showing poor results. Conclusions: the use of stents in the treatment of strictures in CD should be taken into account either as a first endoscopic therapy or in case of EBD failure. PMID:27014743

  16. Efficacy and safety of hydrostatic balloon dilatation of ileocolonic Crohn's strictures: a prospective longterm analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Couckuyt, H; Gevers, A M; Coremans, G; Hiele, M; Rutgeerts, P

    1995-01-01

    Preliminary reports have suggested that dilatation using hydrostatic through the scope balloons may be useful for the treatment of Crohn's strictures, A prospective longterm follow up (mean (SD) 33.6 (11.2) months) was carried out in 55 Crohn's patients with 59 ileocolonic strictures submitted to 78 dilatation procedures. Hydrostatic balloons were used (Rigiflator, Microvasive) with a diameter of 18 mm on inflation. As soon as the balloons became available dilatation up to a diameter of 20 and 25 mm was attempted. The dilatations were performed under general anaesthesia using propofol (Diprivan). The patients were kept for one night in the hospital after dilatation. Seventy (90%) procedures were technically successful and passage of the stricture with a 13.6 mm diameter colonoscope was possible after 73% of the dilatations. Complications occurred in six patients (11%; 8% of procedures), including sealed perforations (n = 2), retroperitoneal perforations (n = 2), and intraperitoneal perforations (n = 2). Two of the patients were treated surgically with a one stage resection of the stricture and recovered uneventfully. Four patients were treated conservatively with intravenous fluids and antibiotics. There was no mortality. Dilatation completely relieved obstructive symptoms in 20 patients after one procedure, in another 14 patients after two (n = 13) or three (n = 1) dilatations. Total longterm success rate was 34 of 55 patients (62%). Nineteen patients (38%) were operated on because of persistent obstructive symptoms. The data show that endoscopic dilatation using the through the scope hydrostatic balloon system relieves obstructive symptoms resulting from ileocolonic Crohn's strictures. The procedure, however, carries a definite risk of perforation. PMID:7737567

  17. Efficacy and safety of hydrostatic balloon dilatation of ileocolonic Crohn's strictures: a prospective longterm analysis.

    PubMed

    Couckuyt, H; Gevers, A M; Coremans, G; Hiele, M; Rutgeerts, P

    1995-04-01

    Preliminary reports have suggested that dilatation using hydrostatic through the scope balloons may be useful for the treatment of Crohn's strictures, A prospective longterm follow up (mean (SD) 33.6 (11.2) months) was carried out in 55 Crohn's patients with 59 ileocolonic strictures submitted to 78 dilatation procedures. Hydrostatic balloons were used (Rigiflator, Microvasive) with a diameter of 18 mm on inflation. As soon as the balloons became available dilatation up to a diameter of 20 and 25 mm was attempted. The dilatations were performed under general anaesthesia using propofol (Diprivan). The patients were kept for one night in the hospital after dilatation. Seventy (90%) procedures were technically successful and passage of the stricture with a 13.6 mm diameter colonoscope was possible after 73% of the dilatations. Complications occurred in six patients (11%; 8% of procedures), including sealed perforations (n = 2), retroperitoneal perforations (n = 2), and intraperitoneal perforations (n = 2). Two of the patients were treated surgically with a one stage resection of the stricture and recovered uneventfully. Four patients were treated conservatively with intravenous fluids and antibiotics. There was no mortality. Dilatation completely relieved obstructive symptoms in 20 patients after one procedure, in another 14 patients after two (n = 13) or three (n = 1) dilatations. Total longterm success rate was 34 of 55 patients (62%). Nineteen patients (38%) were operated on because of persistent obstructive symptoms. The data show that endoscopic dilatation using the through the scope hydrostatic balloon system relieves obstructive symptoms resulting from ileocolonic Crohn's strictures. The procedure, however, carries a definite risk of perforation. PMID:7737567

  18. Bile proteomics for differentiation of malignant from benign biliary strictures: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Lourdusamy, Vennisvasanth; GK Venkatesh, Preethi; Willard, Belinda; Sanaka, Madhusudhan R; Parsi, Mansour A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Determining the etiology of biliary strictures is challenging, and the sensitivities of the current tests to diagnose them are low. Protein biomarkers in bile, in combination with other tests, may improve sensitivity in diagnosing biliary strictures. Objective: To analyse the differential abundance of proteins in benign and malignant biliary strictures through proteomic analysis of bile. Methods: In this prospective, cross-sectional study, bile was aspirated in 24 patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) including six patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), three with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), ten with pancreatic cancer, and five with benign biliary conditions. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to examine the bile for differential abundance of protein biomarkers. The relative abundance of various proteins was compared in the malignant vs. benign groups and in CCA vs. PSC. Results: The majority of the proteins identified in bile were similar to those of the plasma (plasma proteins) and certain proteins were differentially expressed among the different groups (CCA, pancreatic cancer, PSC or benign). A total of 18 proteins were identified as being more abundant in the malignant group (CCA and pancreatic cancer) than in the benign strictures group, including myeloperoxidase, complement C3, inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4, apolipoprotein B-100, and kininogen-1 isoform 2. A total of 30 proteins were identified to be less abundant in the malignant group than in the benign group, including trefoil factor 2, superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn], kallikrein-1, carboxypeptidase B and trefoil factor 1. Conclusions: Protein biomarkers in bile may differentiate malignant from benign biliary strictures. Larger studies are warranted to validate these observations. PMID:25304323

  19. Efficacy and safety of hydrostatic balloon dilation of ileocolonic Crohn's strictures. A prospective long-term analysis.

    PubMed

    Gevers, A M; Couckuyt, H; Coremans, G; Hiele, M; Rutgeerts, P

    1994-01-01

    Gastro-intestinal stricture frequently is a complication in Crohn's disease and often recurs after surgical resection. Stenosis with acute inflammation can be treated by anti-inflammatory medication. A conservative approach of sclerotic strictures has been possible since the introduction of Gruentzig balloon catheters for dilating stenosis in different parts of the gastro-intestinal tract. We present a prospective follow-up study in 55 patients, on the long-term results and safety of hydrostatic balloon dilations of ileo-colonic Crohn's strictures. PMID:7709702

  20. Urethral Pain Among Prostate Cancer Survivors 1 to 14 Years After Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, Niclas; Olsson, Caroline; Tucker, Susan L.; Alsadius, David; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Steineck, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how treatment-related and non-treatment-related factors impact urethral pain among long-term prostate cancer survivors. Methods and Materials: Men treated for prostate cancer with radiation therapy at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Goeteborg, Sweden from 1993 to 2006 were approached with a study-specific postal questionnaire addressing symptoms after treatment, including urethral burning pain during urination (n=985). The men had received primary or salvage external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or EBRT in combination with brachytherapy (BT). Prescribed doses were commonly 70 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions for primary and salvage EBRT and 50 Gy plus 2 Multiplication-Sign 10.0 Gy for EBRT + BT. Prostatic urethral doses were assessed from treatment records. We also recruited 350 non-pelvic-irradiated, population-based controls matched for age and residency to provide symptom background rates. Results: Of the treated men, 16% (137 of 863) reported urethral pain, compared with 11% (27 of 242) of the controls. The median time to follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-14.3 years). Prostatic urethral doses were similar to prescription doses for EBRT and 100% to 115% for BT. Fractionation-corrected dose and time to follow-up affected the occurrence of the symptom. For a follow-up {>=}3 years, 19% of men (52 of 268) within the 70-Gy EBRT + BT group reported pain, compared with 10% of men (23 of 222) treated with 70 Gy primary EBRT (prevalence ratio 1.9; 95% confidence interval 1.2-3.0). Of the men treated with salvage EBRT, 10% (20 of 197) reported urethral pain. Conclusions: Survivors treated with EBRT + BT had a higher risk for urethral pain compared with those treated with EBRT. The symptom prevalence decreased with longer time to follow-up. We found a relationship between fractionation-corrected urethral dose and pain. Among long-term prostate cancer survivors, the occurrence of pain was not increased above the background rate for prostatic urethral

  1. Characterisation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in semen during urethral infection in men.

    PubMed Central

    Isbey, S F; Alcorn, T M; Davis, R H; Haizlip, J; Leone, P A; Cohen, M S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the number of Neisseria gonorrhoeae organisms in urine and semen in men with gonococcal urethritis, and to compare selected phenotypic characteristics of organisms harvested from the urethra and semen. DESIGN: Samples from two groups of subjects were examined. Patients with symptomatic urethritis receiving treatment at an STD clinic, as well as six subjects with experimental urethritis. Semen and urine specimens were obtained after the urethral exudate was sampled. RESULTS: Using quantitative cultures, we found an average of 6 x 10(6) gonococci in urine or semen of 17 men with symptomatic urethritis seeking treatment at an STD clinic, and 2 x 10(4) gonococci in secretions of six male subjects with early experimental infection. Gonococcal outer membrane opacity (Opa) proteins and lipo-oligosaccharide (LOS) recovered from urine and semen of these subjects were very similar. CONCLUSIONS: Men with symptomatic gonorrhoea excrete a large number of gonococci in semen which is not affected by the duration of symptoms. The similar phenotype of organisms in urine and semen suggests the bacteria come from the same compartment. These data help to explain the efficiency of gonococcal transmission from men to their partners, and identify an appropriate target for a preventative vaccine or immunotherapy designed to reduce the inoculum in infected patients. Images PMID:9534748

  2. Effect of Ovariectomy on External Urethral Sphincter Activity in Anesthetized Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chen-Li; de Groat, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The postmenopausal hypoestrogen condition is associated with various lower urinary tract dysfunctions, including frequency, urgency, stress urinary incontinence and recurrent urinary infection. We determined whether hypoestrogen induced lower urinary tract dysfunction after ovariectomy is also associated with an alteration in external urethral sphincter activity. Materials and Methods Bilateral ovariectomy was performed in female Sprague-Dawley® rats and sham operated rats served as controls. Transvesical cystometry and external urethral sphincter electromyogram activity were monitored 4, 6 and 12 weeks after sham operation or bilateral ovariectomy and at 6 weeks in bilaterally ovariectomized rats treated with estrogen. Results The micturition reflex was elicited in sham operated and bilaterally ovariectomized, urethane anesthetized animals. Post-void residual urine increased and voiding efficiency decreased in rats with 4 to 12 weeks of bilateral ovariectomy. The silent period of external urethral sphincter electromyogram activity was shortened significantly and progressively at increased times after bilateral ovariectomy. These effects were prevented by estradiol treatment. Conclusions As evidenced by shortening of the external urethral sphincter electromyogram silent period in ovariectomized rats, the disruption of coordination between the external urethral sphincter and the detrusor muscle could decrease urine outflow and in turn voiding efficiency. Estrogen replacement reverses these changes, suggesting that the central pathways responsible for detrusor-sphincter coordination are modulated by gonadal hormones. PMID:21600603

  3. Isolated Posterior Fossa Involvement in Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yukie; Tha, Khin Khin; Iguchi, Akihiro; Cho, Yuko; Yoshida, Atsushi; Fujima, Noriyuki; Tsukahara, Akiko; Shirato, Hiroki; Terae, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Summary Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by reversible vasogenic edema affecting the subcortical white matter of bilateral occipital and parietal lobes. We describe a case of isolated posterior fossa involvement of PRES which occurred during remission induction chemotherapy for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Both the brainstem and cerebellum were extensively involved, but the supratentorial structures were completely spared. The follow-up magnetic resonance images revealed reversibility of most lesions. The knowledge of atypical radiological features of PRES is essential for prompt diagnosis. PMID:24199811

  4. Urethritis-associated Pathogens in Urine from Men with Non-gonococcal Urethritis: A Case-control Study.

    PubMed

    Frølund, Maria; Lidbrink, Peter; Wikström, Arne; Cowan, Susan; Ahrens, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Skov

    2016-06-15

    The aetiology of non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU) remains unexplained in 30-40% of patients. Urine samples from men attending Swedish sexually transmitted disease clinics were examined by species-specific quantitative PCRs for Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, U. parvum, adenovirus, herpes simplex virus, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. A total of 187 men with acute NGU (symptoms ≤ 30 days) and 24 with chronic NGU (symptoms < 30 days) were cases, and 73 men without NGU were controls. Number of lifetime sexual partners was negatively associated with U. urealyticum bacterial load. C. trachomatis and M. genitalium were associated with NGU, as was U. urealyticum, with bacterial loads ≥ 1.3 × 103 genome equivalents/ml urine. Virus and H. influenzae might explain a few NGU cases, but the aetiology in at least 24% of patients with acute NGU was unexplained. In multivariate analysis, detection of U. urealyticum was significantly more common in acute NGU (20%) compared with controls (11%). PMID:26658669

  5. Posterior polar cataract: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kalantan, Hatem

    2011-01-01

    Posterior polar cataract is a rare form of congenital cataract. It is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant disease, yet it can be sporadic. Five genes have been attributed to the formation of this disease. It is highly associated with complications during surgery, such as posterior capsule rupture and nucleus drop. The reason for this high complication rate is the strong adherence of the opacity to the weak posterior capsule. Different surgical strategies were described for the handling of this challenging entity, most of which emphasized the need for gentle maneuvering in dealing with these cases. It has a unique clinical appearance that should not be missed in order to anticipate, avoid, and minimize the impact of the complications associated with it. PMID:23960967

  6. Rethinking "posterior" tongue-tie.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Currently, many clinicians who help with breastfeeding problems are diagnosing "posterior" tongue-tie in infants and performing or referring for frenotomy. In this "Speaking Out" article, I argue that the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie has successfully raised awareness of the importance of impaired tongue function in breastfeeding difficulty. However, the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie also applies a reductionist, medicalized theoretical frame to the complex problem of impaired tongue function, risking unintended outcomes. Impaired tongue function arises out of multiple interacting and co-evolving factors, including the interplay between social behaviors concerning breastfeeding and mother-infant biology. Consideration of theoretical frames is vital if we are to build an evidence base through efficient use of the scarce resources available for clinical breastfeeding research and minimize unintended outcomes. PMID:24143939

  7. Combined Use of the Mathieu and Incised Urethral Plate Techniques for Repair of Distal Penile Hypospadias.

    PubMed

    Nilamani, Mohanty; Bhusan, Nayak Bibhuti; Annadaprasad, Patnaik

    2015-12-01

    Though both the Mathieu and incised urethral plate techniques are individually described for single-stage repair of distal penile hypospadias, each has its own shortcomings. We describe the combination of the two techniques by taking their advantages and reducing their limitations. Thirteen patients belonging to the age group of 3-22 years with distal penile hypospadias and mild chordee were operated by this technique with a mean follow-up of 8 months. One patient had urethrocutaneous fistula, and another patient had partial skin necrosis which healed spontaneously without fistula. Both of these complications occurred in adult patients. None developed urethral stenosis, and the cosmesis of the glans was excellent in all cases. This technique is very helpful in patients having small flat glans and shallow urethral groove. PMID:26730091

  8. Feline urethral plugs and bladder uroliths: A review of 5484 submissions 1998–2003

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Doreen M.; Moore, Andrew E.P.; Favrin, Michael G.; Hoff, Brent

    2003-01-01

    The results of 5484 submissions from cats to the Canadian Veterinary Urolith Centre between February 1998 and February 2003 are presented. Of the submissions, 618 were urethral plugs and 4866 were bladder uroliths. The majority of the urethral plugs were from male domestic shorthair and longhair cats. Approximately 50% of the urolith submissions were oxalate, 44% were struvite. Oxalate uroliths were the most common mineral type in males and in Himalayan, Persian, and Siamese cats. Struvite uroliths were the most common mineral type in domestic shorthair and longhair cats. Females outnumbered males by 1.4:1 in struvite urolith submissions. A review of risk factors for urethral plugs and bladder uroliths is presented. PMID:14703082

  9. 2015 UK National Guideline on the management of non-gonococcal urethritis.

    PubMed

    Horner, P; Blee, K; O'Mahony, C; Muir, P; Evans, C; Radcliffe, K

    2016-02-01

    We present the updated British Association for Sexual Health and HIV guideline for the management of non-gonococcal urethritis in men. This document includes a review of the current literature on its aetiology, diagnosis and management. In particular it highlights the emerging evidence that azithromycin 1 g may result in the development of antimicrobial resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium and that neither azithromycin 1 g nor doxycycline 100 mg twice daily for seven days achieves a cure rate of >90% for this micro-organism. Evidence-based diagnostic and management strategies for men presenting with symptoms suggestive of urethritis, those confirmed to have non-gonococcal urethritis and those with persistent symptoms following first-line treatment are detailed. PMID:26002319

  10. Medical Devices; Gastroenterology-Urology Devices; Classification of the Metallic Biliary Stent System for Benign Strictures. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-07-13

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the metallic biliary stent system for benign strictures into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the metallic biliary stent system for benign strictures' classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:27411238

  11. Improved Accuracy of Percutaneous Biopsy Using “Cross and Push” Technique for Patients Suspected with Malignant Biliary Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Prashant; Rangarajan, Balaji; Mangat, Kamarjit E-mail: kamarjit.mangat@nhs.net

    2015-08-15

    PurposeVarious methods have been used to sample biliary strictures, including percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy, intraluminal biliary washings, and cytological analysis of drained bile. However, none of these methods has proven to be particularly sensitive in the diagnosis of biliary tract malignancy. We report improved diagnostic accuracy using a modified technique for percutaneous transluminal biopsy in patients with this disease.Materials and MethodsFifty-two patients with obstructive jaundice due to a biliary stricture underwent transluminal forceps biopsy with a modified “cross and push” technique with the use of a flexible biopsy forceps kit commonly used for cardiac biopsies. The modification entailed crossing the stricture with a 0.038-in. wire leading all the way down into the duodenum. A standard or long sheath was subsequently advanced up to the stricture over the wire. A Cook 5.2-Fr biopsy forceps was introduced alongside the wire and the cup was opened upon exiting the sheath. With the biopsy forceps open, within the stricture the sheath was used to push and advance the biopsy cup into the stricture before the cup was closed and the sample obtained. The data were analysed retrospectively.ResultsWe report the outcomes of this modified technique used on 52 consecutive patients with obstructive jaundice secondary to a biliary stricture. The sensitivity and accuracy were 93.3 and 94.2 %, respectively. There was one procedure-related late complication.ConclusionWe propose that the modified “cross and push” technique is a feasible, safe, and more accurate option over the standard technique for sampling strictures of the biliary tree.

  12. Photodynamic therapy of urethral condylomata acuminata using topically 5-aminolevulinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Haishan; Xu, Shizheng; Liao, Kanghuang; Hillemanns, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Background Electrocoagulation and laser evaporation for urethral condylomata acuminata have high recurrence rates and can be associated with urethral malformations. Objective To investigate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) on urethral condylomata acuminata and to examine the histological changes in lesions of condylomata acuminata after ALA-PDT. Methods One hundred and sixty-four urethral condylomata patients were given topical ALA followed by intraurethral PDT through a cylindrical fiber. Among the cases, 16 penile and vulval condylomatous lesions in 11 patients were treated with topical ALA-PDT at same time. After the treatment, biopsy specimens were collected from the 16 penile and vulval lesions. The histological changes were then evaluated by light microscope and electron microscope. Results The complete response rate for urethral condylomata by topical ALA-PDT was 95.12% and the recurrence rate was 5.13% after 6 to 24 months follow-up. Keratinocytes in middle and upper layers of the epidermis with marked vacuolation and some necrocytosis were detected one and three hours after PDT. Necrosis in all layers of the epidermis was noted five hours after PDT by microscopy. In electron microscopy of kerationcytes, distinct ultrastructural abnormalities of mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum and membrane damage were observed. Apoptotic bodies were detected three hours after PDT and a large number of the keratinocytes exhibited necrosis five hours after PDT by electron microscope. Conclusions Results suggests that topical ALA-PDT is a simple, effective, relatively safe, less recurrent and comparatively well tolerated treatment for urethral condylomata acuminata. The mechanisms might be that ALA-PDT could trigger apoptotic process and necrosis in the HPV infected keratinocytes. Key words:

  13. Urethral complications after tension-free vaginal tape procedures: A surgical management case series

    PubMed Central

    Sergouniotis, Fotios; Jarlshammar, Björn; Larsson, Per-Göran

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical features, diagnostic modalities, and the surgical management of urethral complications after tension-free vaginal tape procedures. METHODS: This study encompasses a retrospective review of nine patients presented with urethral complications after midurethral sling procedures. The patients underwent the procedures during a period from 1999 to 2012 in three different regional hospitals in the southwest part of Sweden. The time from sling placement to diagnosis, the risk factors, clinical features, diagnosis, surgical management, and functional outcome are presented. The presenting symptoms were described as either early onset (< 12 mo) or late onset (> 12 mo) according to when they were first reported. RESULTS: Eight cases of urethral erosion and one case of bladder-neck erosion were detected. The mean interval for diagnoses of the erosions ranged from 3 mo to 11 years. The most common presenting symptoms included de novo urgency with or without incontinence (7/9 patients), urinary retention/voiding dysfunction (4/9 patients), urethritis (4/9 patients), relapse of stress-incontinence (3/9 patients), recurrent urinary tract infections (5/9 patients), and hematuria (1/9 patient). In most cases, voiding dysfunction and urethritis occurred early after the operation. The surgical management applied in most cases was transurethral resection of the intraurethral part of the mesh. The removal of the intraurethral mesh resulted in improvement or complete cure of urgency symptoms in 5/7 patients with urgency. Four patients were reoperated with a new stress-incontinence surgery, one with laparoscopic Burch, and three with retropubic tension-free vaginal tape procedures. CONCLUSION: Urethral complications should be suspected in the case of de novo urgency and relapse of stress-incontinence. Transurethral excision of the intraurethral mesh is the recommended treatment. PMID:26167464

  14. Transhepatic Balloon Dilatation of Early Biliary Strictures in Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Successful Initial and Mid-Term Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Belenky, Alexander; Mor, Eytan; Bartal, Gabriel; Atar, Eli; Shapiro, Riki; Bar-Nathan, Nathan; Bachar, Gil N.

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the initial and mid-term outcomes of transhepatic balloon dilatation for the treatment of early biliary strictures in lateral left-segment liver transplants in young children.Methods: Between April 1997 and May 2001, seven children aged 9 months to 6 years with nine benign strictures in left-segment liver grafts were treated percutaneously. Sessions of two or three dilations were performed three or four times at average intervals of 10-20 days. In each session, the biliary stenoses were gradually dilated using balloons of 3-7 mm. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 54 months (mean 27 months, median 12 months). Clinical success was defined as resolution of the stenosis, normalization of liver enzymes and lack of clinical symptoms. Results: Technical success was achieved in all nine strictures. Hemobilia occurred in one patient and was successfully treated. On follow-up, all patients had complete clinical recovery with normalization of liver function and imaging of patent bile ducts. Conclusion: Balloon dilatation is an effective and relatively safe method for the treatment of early biliary strictures in left-segment liver transplantation in young children. We recommend this approach as the initial treatment for early strictures. Metal stents or surgery should be reserved for patients with late appearance of strictures or failure of balloon dilatation.

  15. Anterior Urethrectomy for Primary Carcinoma of the Female Urethra Mimicking a Urethral Caruncle

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Ji Sung; Oh, Mi Mi; Lee, Jeong Gu

    2013-01-01

    Here we report a case of primary carcinoma of the female urethra. A 52-year-old woman presented with a palpable urethral mass associated with intermittent pain that she first experienced a few months prior. Clinical examination showed a urethral mass that appeared to be a caruncle; therefore, simple carunclectomy was performed. However, on histological examination, the mass was revealed to be a squamous cell carcinoma; therefore, anterior urethrectomy was performed. During a 4-year follow-up period, the patient has been well with no dysuria, dyspareunia, or incontinence. PMID:24466468

  16. Urethral foreign body insertion for secondary gain in the incarcerated population.

    PubMed

    Mastromichalis, Michael; Sackman, Daniel; Tycast, James F; Chehval, Micheal J

    2011-10-01

    Not uncommonly, hostile prison environments can lead desperate prisoners to place foreign materials into natural orifices in an effort to gain transfer to an outside healthcare facility. In this article, we present a case series of urethral foreign body insertion of varying burdens and durations requiring transfer to our facility for surgical management. Endoscopic retrieval was the initial management in each case; one case required conversion to open cystotomy for complete removal due the orientation, amount of inserted foreign body, and erosion into the proximal urethral and bladder urothelium. PMID:22018157

  17. [Transurethral prostate resection prior to kidney transplantation leading to urethral cicatricial tissue].

    PubMed

    Schou-Jensen, Katrine; Mohammad, Wael

    2015-01-26

    In Denmark, kidney transplantations in patients above 50 years have increased during the last decade. Consequently, the number of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms due to prostate hypertrophy increases accordingly. We describe two patients, who both had a resection of the prostate while having anuria and waiting for a kidney transplantation from a deceased donor. In both cases it was impossible to place a urethral catheter during the following transplantation due to total urethral occlusion, so a suprapubic catheter was inserted until the scar tissue was dilated or resected by a later transurethral intervention. PMID:25612989

  18. Late Intrathoracic Tracheal Stricture After Blunt Chest Trauma: A Rare Life-Threatening Condition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Ikram; Aldulaijan, Fozan W; Alhajji, Zahra; Cheema, Ahsan; Mutairi, Hadi

    2016-02-01

    Tracheal injury after blunt chest trauma is a rare but life-threatening condition. If diagnosed and treated early, the outcome is excellent. We report a case of an 18-year-old man who sustained a fracture of the right femur in a traffic accident. He underwent operation under spinal anesthesia and was discharged home after 2 weeks. Six weeks later, he was readmitted with acute respiratory distress, stridor, and drowsiness. Arterial blood gas analysis showed hypercarbia (PCO2 of 80 mm Hg; PO2 of 60 mm Hg). He was intubated with difficulty and ventilated. A computed tomographic (CT) scan of the chest showed a very tight supracarinal tracheal stricture. Emergency surgical resection of the tracheal stricture was performed, and an end-to-end anastomosis was fashioned. The patient had an excellent recovery. PMID:26777938

  19. Management of Ureteral Strictures in Renal Transplants by Antegrade Balloon Dilatation and Temporary Internal Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, Audrey Alice; Ball, Simon Thomas; Pelling, Marc X.; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw Michal Witold; Morgan, Robert Anthony

    1999-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous balloon dilatation and temporary internal stenting in the treatment of transplant ureteral strictures. Methods: Nine patients presenting with obstructed renal transplants were treated by antegrade nephrostomy insertion, ureteroplasty, and temporary internal stenting. Following stent removal, patients were divided into two groups for analysis according to whether the obstruction occurred less than (group A) or more than (group B) 3 months following transplantation. Results: All procedures were technically successful. In group A (n= 6), all patients were successfully treated by one or two dilatations with stenting. In group B (n= 3), two patients were successfully treated by one dilatation with stenting. Overall, eight patients (89%) have had their primary or secondary stent removed successfully at a mean interval of 97.5 days after insertion, and remain well at a mean follow-up interval of 22 months. Conclusion: Balloon dilatation and temporary internal stenting is a useful method for treating transplant ureteral strictures.

  20. Use of paclitaxel-eluting balloons for endotherapy of anastomotic strictures following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kabar, I; Cicinnati, V R; Beckebaum, S; Cordesmeyer, S; Avsar, Y; Reinecke, H; Schmidt, H H

    2012-12-01

    Biliary anastomotic strictures after liver transplantation are a major source of morbidity and graft failure; however, repeated endoscopic therapy has shown variable long-term success rates. Thus the aim of this prospective case series was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of using paclitaxel-eluting balloons in 13 patients requiring treatment for symptomatic anastomotic strictures following liver transplantation. Sustained clinical success-defined as no need for further endoscopic intervention for at least 6 months - was achieved in 12 /13 patients (92 %). One, two, and three interventions were required in 9 (69 %), 1, and 2 patients, respectively (mean number of sessions was 1.46). Mean (± SD) bilirubin level dropped from 6.8 (± 4.1) mg/dL to 1.4 (± 0.9) mg/dL. These promising results justify carrying out a randomized comparative trial to confirm this innovative approach. PMID:23188664

  1. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) Text Size ... the arch, and an inward rolling of the ankle. As the condition progresses, the symptoms will change. ...

  2. Stereolithography for Posterior Fossa Cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Celso; Dujovny, Manuel; Evenhouse, Raymond; Charbel, Fady T.; Sadler, Lewis

    1998-01-01

    Posterior fossa cranioplasty has been suggested for improvement of neurological symptoms following craniectomy. However, there is no particular recommendation in the literature about techniques for prosthesis manufacture and implantation. We report our experience using rapid prototyping technology and stereolithography for pre-surgical implant design and production of cranioplasties. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171056

  3. Improved endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography brush increases diagnostic yield of malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Frederick K; Luong-Player, Adelina; Khara, Harshit S; Liu, Haiyan; Lin, Fan; Shellenberger, Matthew J; Johal, Amitpal S; Diehl, David L

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine if a new brush design could improve the diagnostic yield of biliary stricture brushings. METHODS: Retrospective chart review was performed of all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures with malignant biliary stricture brushing between January 2008 and October 2012. A standard wire-guided cytology brush was used prior to protocol implementation in July 2011, after which, a new 9 French wire-guided cytology brush (Infinity sampling device, US Endoscopy, Mentor, OH) was used for all cases. All specimens were reviewed by blinded pathologists who determined whether the sample was positive or negative for malignancy. Cellular yield was quantified by describing the number of cell clusters seen. RESULTS: Thirty-two new brush cases were compared to 46 historical controls. Twenty-five of 32 (78%) cases in the new brush group showed abnormal cellular findings consistent with malignancy as compared to 17 of 46 (37%) in the historical control group (P = 0.0003). There was also a significant increase in the average number of cell clusters of all sizes (21.1 vs 9.9 clusters, P = 0.0007) in the new brush group compared to historical controls. CONCLUSION: The use of a new brush design for brush cytology of biliary strictures shows increased diagnostic accuracy, likely due to improved cellular yield, as evidenced by an increase in number of cellular clusters obtained. PMID:25031790

  4. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents for treatment of malignant and benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Samie, Ahmed; Dette, Stephan; Vöhringer, Ulrich; Stumpf, Michael; Kopischke, Karolin; Theilmann, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To present a series of covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMS) placed for different indications and to evaluate the effectiveness, complications and extractability of these devices. METHODS: We therefore retrospectively reviewed the courses of patients who received CSEMS due to malignant as well as benign biliary strictures and post-sphincterotomy bleeding in our endoscopic unit between January 2010 and October 2011. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients received 28 stents due to different indications (20 stents due to malignant biliary strictures, six stents due to benign biliary strictures and two stents due to post-sphincterotomy bleeding). Biliary obstruction was relieved in all cases, regardless of the underlying cause. Hemostasis could be achieved in the two patients who received the stents for this purpose. Complications occurred in five patients (18%). Two patients (7%) developed cholecystitis, stents dislocated/migrated in other two patients (7%), and in one patient (3.6%) stent occlusion was documented during the study period. Seven stents were extracted endoscopically. Removal of stents was easily possible in all cases in which it was desired using standard forceps. Twelve patients underwent surgery with pylorus preserving duodenopancreatectomy. In all patients stents could be removed during the operation without difficulties. CONCLUSION: Despite the higher costs of these devices, fully covered self-expanding metal stents may be suitable to relief biliary obstruction due to bile duct stenosis, regardless of the underlying cause. CSEMS may also represent an effective treatment strategy of severe post-sphincterotomy bleeding, not controlled by other measures. PMID:23125898

  5. Esophageal Stricture Secondary to Candidiasis in a Child with Glycogen Storage Disease 1b

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Jae; Choi, Shin Jie; Kim, Woo Sun; Park, Sung-Sup; Moon, Jin Soo

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal candidiasis is commonly seen in immunocompromised patients; however, candida esophagitis induced stricture is a very rare complication. We report the first case of esophageal stricture secondary to candidiasis in a glycogen storage disease (GSD) 1b child. The patient was diagnosed with GSD type 1b by liver biopsy. No mutation was found in the G6PC gene, but SLC37A4 gene sequencing revealed a compound heterozygous mutation (p.R28H and p.W107X, which was a novel mutation). The patient's absolute neutrophil count was continuously under 1,000/µL when he was over 6 years of age. He was admitted frequently for recurrent fever and infection, and frequently received intravenous antibiotics, antifungal agents. He complained of persistent dysphagia beginning at age 7 years. Esophageal stricture and multiple whitish patches were observed by endoscopy and endoscopic biopsy revealed numerous fungal hyphae consistent with candida esophagitis. He received esophageal balloon dilatation four times, and his symptoms improved. PMID:27066451

  6. Useful strategies to prevent severe stricture after endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Uno, Kaname; Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-06-21

    The minimal invasiveness of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) prompted us to apply this technique to large-size early esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and Barrett's adenocarcinoma, despite the limitations in the study population and surveillance duration. A post-ESD ulceration of greater than three-fourths of esophageal circumference was advocated as an important risk factor for refractory strictures that require several sessions of dilation therapy. Most of the preoperative conditions are asymptomatic, but dilatation treatment for dysphagia associated with the stricture has potential risks of severe complications and a worsening of quality of life. Possible mechanisms of dysphasia were demonstrated based on dysmotility and pathological abnormalities at the site: (1) delayed mucosal healing; (2) severe inflammation and disorganized fibrosis with abundant extracellular matrices in the submucosa; and (3) atrophy in the muscularis proper. However, reports on the administration of anti-scarring agents, preventive dilation therapies, and regenerative medicine demonstrated limited success in stricture prevention, and there were discrepancies in the study designs and protocols of these reports. The development and consequent long-term assessments of new prophylactic technologies on the promotion of wound healing and control of the inflammatory/tumor microenvironment will require collaboration among various research fields because of the limited accuracy of preoperative staging and high-risk of local recurrence. PMID:26109798

  7. Development of a Swine Benign Biliary Stricture Model Using Endoscopic Biliary Radiofrequency Ablation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seok; Jeong, Seok; Kim, Joon Mee; Park, Sang Soon; Lee, Don Haeng

    2016-09-01

    The large animal model with benign biliary stricture (BBS) is essential to undergo experiment on developing new devices and endoscopic treatment. This study conducted to establish a clinically relevant porcine BBS model by means of endobiliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) was performed on 12 swine. The animals were allocated to three groups (60, 80, and 100 W) according to the electrical power level of RFA electrode. Endobiliary RFA was applied to the common bile duct for 60 seconds using an RFA catheter that was endoscopically inserted. ERC was repeated two and four weeks, respectively, after the RFA to identify BBS. After the strictures were identified, histologic evaluations were performed. On the follow-up ERC two weeks after the procedure, a segmental bile duct stricture was observed in all animals. On microscopic examination, severe periductal fibrosis and luminal obliteration with transmural inflammation were demonstrated. Bile duct perforations occurred in two pigs (100 W, n = 1; 80 W, n = 1) but there were no major complications in the 60 W group. The application of endobiliary RFA with 60 W electrical power resulted in a safe and reproducible swine model of BBS. PMID:27510388

  8. Useful strategies to prevent severe stricture after endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Kaname; Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    The minimal invasiveness of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) prompted us to apply this technique to large-size early esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and Barrett’s adenocarcinoma, despite the limitations in the study population and surveillance duration. A post-ESD ulceration of greater than three-fourths of esophageal circumference was advocated as an important risk factor for refractory strictures that require several sessions of dilation therapy. Most of the preoperative conditions are asymptomatic, but dilatation treatment for dysphagia associated with the stricture has potential risks of severe complications and a worsening of quality of life. Possible mechanisms of dysphasia were demonstrated based on dysmotility and pathological abnormalities at the site: (1) delayed mucosal healing; (2) severe inflammation and disorganized fibrosis with abundant extracellular matrices in the submucosa; and (3) atrophy in the muscularis proper. However, reports on the administration of anti-scarring agents, preventive dilation therapies, and regenerative medicine demonstrated limited success in stricture prevention, and there were discrepancies in the study designs and protocols of these reports. The development and consequent long-term assessments of new prophylactic technologies on the promotion of wound healing and control of the inflammatory/tumor microenvironment will require collaboration among various research fields because of the limited accuracy of preoperative staging and high-risk of local recurrence. PMID:26109798

  9. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anemia Swelling of the ureters ( hydronephrosis ) Urethral stricture Urinary incontinence When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your ... More Anemia Hydronephrosis of one kidney Invasive Stress urinary incontinence Tumor Urethral stricture Urinary tract infection - adults Update ...

  10. Prevalence of genital Mycoplasma, Ureaplasma, Gardnerella, and human papillomavirus in Japanese men with urethritis, and risk factors for detection of urethral human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Shohei; Sasagawa, Toshiyuki; Furubayashi, Keiichi; Shimamura, Masayoshi; Maeda, Yuji; Konaka, Hiroyuki; Mizokami, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Namiki, Mikio

    2011-08-01

    To analyze the risk factors for HPV infection in the urethra, we examined the prevalence of various microorganisms, for example Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Ureaplasma parvum, Gardnerella vaginalis, and human papillomavirus (HPV) in Japanese male patients with urethritis, and investigated their sexual backgrounds. Rubbed samples obtained from the distal urethra and questionnaires regarding sexual activity and demographic information were collected from 176 participants. N. gonorrhoeae, C. trachomatis, M. genitalium, M. hominis, U. urealyticum, U. parvum, G. vaginalis, and HPV were detected in 19, 26, 18, 12, 12, 8.5, 14, and 20%, respectively, of all cases in this study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that more than 4 sexual partners within the last year and presence of N. gonorrhoeae and/or C. trachomatis and/or M. genitalium infections were independent risk factors for urethral HPV infection, with odds ratios of 3.85 (95% CI 1.49-9.94) and 2.41 (95% CI 1.03-5.61), respectively. It is likely that urethral HPV detection is associated with current sexual activity and the presence of N. gonorrhoeae, C. trachomatis, and/or M. genitalium infections. PMID:21213011

  11. Main Bile Duct Stricture Occurring After Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Yamashiro, Masashi; Okuda, Miho; Yoshie, Yuichi; Nakashima, Yoshiko; Ikeno, Hiroshi; Orito, Nobuaki; Notsumata, Kazuo; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Toya, Daisyu; Tanaka, Nobuyoshi; Matsui, Osamu

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical course of main bile duct stricture at the hepatic hilum after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Among 446 consecutive patients with HCC treated by TACE, main bile duct stricture developed in 18 (4.0%). All imaging and laboratory data, treatment course, and outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had 1 to 2 tumors measuring 10 to 100 mm in diameter (mean {+-} SD 24.5 {+-} 5.4 mm) near the hepatic hilum fed by the caudate arterial branch (A1) and/or medial segmental artery (A4) of the liver. During the TACE procedure that caused bile duct injury, A1 was embolized in 8, A4 was embolized in 5, and both were embolized in 5 patients. Nine patients (50.0%) had a history of TACE in either A1 or A4. Iodized oil accumulation in the bile duct wall was seen in all patients on computed tomography obtained 1 week later. Bile duct dilatation caused by main bile duct stricture developed in both lobes (n = 9), in the right lobe (n = 3), in the left lobe (n = 4), in segment (S) 2 (n = 1), and in S3 (n = 1). Serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase increased in 13 patients. Biloma requiring drainage developed in 2 patients; jaundice developed in 4 patients; and metallic stents were placed in 3 patients. Complications after additional TACE sessions, including biloma (n = 3) and/or jaundice (n = 5), occurred in 7 patients and were treated by additional intervention, including metallic stent placement in 2 patients. After initial TACE of A1 and/or A4, 8 patients (44.4%), including 5 with uncontrollable jaundice or cholangitis, died at 37.9 {+-} 34.9 months after TACE, and 10 (55.6%) have survived for 38.4 {+-} 37.9 months. Selective TACE of A1 and/or A4 carries a risk of main bile duct stricture at the hepatic hilum. Biloma and jaundice are serious complications associated with bile duct strictures.

  12. Urethral metastasis from a sigmoid colon carcinoma: a quite rare case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Urethral metastatic adenocarcinoma is extremely rare. Moreover, only 9 previous cases with metastases from colorectal cancer have been reported to date, and not much information on urethral metastases from colorectum is available so far. Case presentation We report our experience in the diagnosis and the management of the case with urethral metastasis from a sigmoid colon cancer. A 68-year-old man, who underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for sigmoid colon carcinoma four years ago, presented gross hematuria with pain. Urethroscopy identified a papillo-nodular tumor 7 mm in diameter in the bulbar urethra. CT-scan imaging revealed the small mass of bulbous portion of urethra and solitary lung metastasis. Histological examination of the tumor obtained by transurethral resection showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, which was diagnosed as a metastasis of a sigmoid colon carcinoma pathologically by morphological examination. Immunohistochemical analysis of the urethral tumor revealed the positive for cytokertin 20 and CDX2, whereas negative for cytokertin 7. These features were consistent with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon cancer. As the management of this case with urethral and lung metastasis, 6-cycle of chemotherapy with fluorouracil with leucovorin plus oxaliplatin was administered to the patient, and these metastases were disappeared with no recurrence of disease for 34 months. Conclusion Urethral metastasis from colorectal cancer is a very rare occurrence. However, in the presence of urinary symptoms, the possibility of the urethral metastasis should be considered. PMID:24884559

  13. Outcomes of the Use of Fully Covered Esophageal Self-Expandable Stent in the Management of Colorectal Anastomotic Strictures and Leaks

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Chad J.; Morales, Angel; Othman, Mohamed O.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Colorectal anastomotic leak or stricture is a dreaded complication leading to significant morbidity and mortality. The novel use of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) in the management of postoperative colorectal anastomotic leaks or strictures can avoid surgical reintervention. Methods. Retrospective study with particular attention to the indications, operative or postoperative complications, and clinical outcomes of SEMS placement for patients with either a colorectal anastomotic stricture or leak. Results. Eight patients had SEMS (WallFlex stent) for the management of postoperative colorectal anastomotic leak or stricture. Five had a colorectal anastomotic stricture and 3 had a colorectal anastomotic leak. Complete resolution of the anastomotic stricture or leak was achieved in all patients. Three had recurrence of the anastomotic stricture on 3-month flexible sigmoidoscopy follow-up after the initial stent was removed. Two of these patients had a stricture that was technically too difficult to place another stent. Stent migration was noted in 2 patients, one at day 3 and the other at day 14 after stent placement that required a larger 23 mm stent to be placed. Conclusions. The use of SEMS in the management of colorectal anastomotic leaks or strictures is feasible and is associated with high technical and clinical success rate. PMID:25587210

  14. The appearances on ultrasound of the female urethral sphincter.

    PubMed

    Leonor de Gonzalez, E; Cosgrove, D O; Joseph, A E; Murch, C; Naik, K

    1988-08-01

    A rounded or ovoid midline structure with mean measurements of 1.30 cm x 1.33 cm x 0.96 cm in longitudinal, transverse and antero-posterior dimensions was routinely imaged at the bladder base in 97 female patients on pelvic ultrasound examination. Its position and appearance are reminiscent of a smaller version of the male prostate, and it has been dubbed the "female pseudoprostate". It appears to correspond with the external rhabdo-sphincter of the bladder. Its rounded shape may be confusing but it should not be misread as pathological. PMID:3046696

  15. Rotational and Axial Pattern Flaps in a Cat for Wound Reconstruction Secondary to Urethral Rupture.

    PubMed

    Watrous, Gwyneth K; Martin, Dawn M; Plesman, Rhea L; Ringwood, Brendon

    2016-01-01

    A 3 yr old intact male domestic shorthair cat was presented with urine extravasation from urethral rupture. Extensive skin necrosis developed in the perineal region and left hind limb that necessitated delayed primary wound closure with a caudal superficial epigastric axial pattern flap, scrotal and preputial rotational skin flaps, and perineal urethrostomy. PMID:26606210

  16. Vesicostomy as a Treatment Option for Epidermolisis Bullosa Case With Urethral and Meatal Involvement.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mahmoudreza; Rezaee, Haress; Kaseb, Kaveh; Ebrahimi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Epidermolisis Bullosa (EB) is a rare hereditary disorder that its junctional type is very rare one that involves epithelium, however, genitourinary epithelium involvement occurs so rarely. The present case is 5-year old boy; a known case of junctional EB whom had recurrent urinary retention due to meatal and urethral stenosis that was deteriorated by therapeutically interventions. PMID:27335789

  17. A systematic review of animal and clinical studies on the use of scaffolds for urethral repair.

    PubMed

    Qi, Na; Li, Wen-jiao; Tian, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Replacing urethral tissue with functional scaffolds has been one of the challenging problems in the field of urethra reconstruction or repair over the last several decades. Various scaffold materials have been used in animal studies, but clinical studies on use of scaffolds for urethral repair are scarce. The aim of this study was to review recent animal and clinical studies on the use of different scaffolds for urethral repair, and to evaluate these scaffolds based on the evidence from these studies. PubMed and OVID databases were searched to identify relevant studies, in conjunction with further manual search. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were systematically evaluated. Of 555 identified studies, 38 were included for analysis. It was found that in both animal and clinical studies, scaffolds seeded with cells were used for repair of large segmental defects of the urethra, such as in tubular urethroplasty. When the defect area was small, cell-free scaffolds were more likely to be applied. A lot of pre-clinical and limited clinical evidence showed that natural or artificial materials could be used as scaffolds for urethral repair. Urinary tissue engineering is still in the immature stage, and the safety, efficacy, cost-effectiveness of the scaffolds are needed for further study. PMID:26838750

  18. Urethral length measurement in women during sonographic urethrocystography – an analysis of repeatability and reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Kociszewski, Jacek; Suzin, Jacek; Dresler, Maria; Surkont, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    There has been a rise in the use of sonographic urethrocystography in patients with a full bladder. So far, no publications have been made on the analysis of repeatability and reproducibility of the measurements performed during this procedure. Aim An assessment of repeatability and reproducibility of urethral length measurements during sonographic urethrocystography in females with a full bladder in the introital approach, using real-time two-dimensional transvaginal ultrasound. Material and methods The ultrasound was performed in accordance with a standardized technique in female patients with a full bladder containing 200–300 mL of liquid. A total of 92 patients were included in the analysis. Results The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient for repeatability and reproducibility of urethral length measurements in sonographic urethrocystography ranged between 0.9217 and 0.9873 (p = 0.0000). The analysis of ultrasound urethral length measurements taken by two different physicians at an interval of several months confirmed their very high compatibility (ICC = 0.81, p = 0.000). Conclusions Very good repeatability and reproducibility of urethral length findings during sonographic urethrocystography performed in accordance with the presented technique support the possible use of this type of examination in both clinical practice and research. PMID:27104000

  19. Female sexual function following mid-urethral slings for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Alwaal, A; Tian, X; Huang, Y; Zhao, L; Ma, L; Lin, G; Deng, D

    2016-07-01

    The aim of our study was to describe the impact of mid-urethral sling procedure for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) on female sexual function. We used PubMed (updated March 2015) to conduct a literature electronic search that included peer-reviewed English language articles. We analyzed the studies about the impact of mid-urethral slings on female sexual function. There are different and contradictory results of the effects of mid-urethral sling on female sexual function. However, more papers show that women undergoing mid-urethral sling procedures report that their sexual function is improved or remains unchanged. The main mechanism of this improved sexuality is the complete relief from coital incontinence, reduction in anxiety and avoidance of sex, whereas the most common symptom related to worsened sexual activity is dyspareunia. Women undergoing sling procedures for SUI should be informed that their sexual activity is likely to remain unchanged or even improve after the operation, but that dyspareunia may occur. PMID:27146350

  20. Posterior cruciate ligament of the knee (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a powerful ligament extending from the top-rear surface of the tibia to the bottom-front surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from posterior instability.

  1. Bilateral posterior cerebral artery infarction.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Davinia; Murphy, Sinead M; Hennessey, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with short-term memory impairment and a homonymous left inferior quadrantanopia secondary to simultaneous bilateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territory infarction. As in more than a quarter of cases of PCA infarction, no aetiological cause was identified. Unlike the transient nature of symptoms in some cases following unilateral infarction, his deficits persisted on 2-month follow-up. PMID:22798298

  2. Spinal hemianesthesia: Unilateral and posterior

    PubMed Central

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The injection of a non-isobaric local anesthetic should induce a unilateral spinal anesthesia in patients in a lateral decubitus position. The posterior spinal hemianesthesia only be obtained with hypobaric solutions injected in the jackknife position. The most important factors to be considered when performing a spinal hemianesthesia are: type and gauge of the needle, density of the local anesthetic relative to the CSF, position of the patient, speed of administration of the solution, time of stay in position, and dose/concentration/volume of the anesthetic solution. The distance between the spinal roots on the right-left sides and anterior-posterior is, approximately, 10-15 mm. This distance allows performing unilateral spinal anesthesia or posterior spinal anesthesia. The great advantage of obtaining spinal hemianesthesia is the reduction of cardiovascular changes. Likewise, both the dorsal and unilateral sensory block predominates in relation to the motor block. Because of the numerous advantages of producing spinal hemianesthesia, anesthesiologists should apply this technique more often. This review considers the factors which are relevant, plausible and proven to obtain spinal hemianesthesia. PMID:25886320

  3. An Indwelling Urethral Catheter Knotted Around a Double-J Ureteral Stent: An Unusual Complication after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Warmerdam, E. G.; Toorop, R. J.; Abrahams, A. C.; Berger, P.

    2011-01-01

    Urethral catheterization is a common procedure with a relatively low complication rate. Knotting of an indwelling urethral catheter is a very rare complication, and there are only a few case reports on knotted catheters, most of them concerning children. We report an especially rare case where a urethral catheter formed a knot around a double-J ureteral stent after a kidney transplantation. We will discuss the various risk factors for knotting of a catheter and the methods to untangle a knot. PMID:24533194

  4. Randomized controlled clinical trial on the efficacy of fosfomycin trometamol for uncomplicated gonococcal urethritis in men.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Z; He, C; Yan, S; Ke, Y; Tang, W

    2016-06-01

    We assessed the efficacy of fosfomycin trometamol in treating uncomplicated gonococcal urethritis in men. We conducted an open randomized controlled trial in 152 consecutive men with any main complaints suggestive of uncomplicated gonococcal urethritis in Dujiangyan Medical Center between 1 September 2013 and 31 August 2015. In total, 126 patients completed all aspects of this study. Sixty were provided therapy with fosfomycin trometamol 3 g orally on days 1, 3 and 5 in the intervention group; the other 61 were provided ceftriaxone 250 mg intramuscularly plus azithromycin 1 g orally simultaneously as a single dose in the control group. The primary outcomes involved clinical and microbiologic cure on days 7 and 14 after receipt of all the study medications. At the day 7 follow-up visit, all the 121 participants had complete resolution of clinical symptoms and signs. In addition, five patients (two in the intervention group and three in the control group) discontinued intervention because of unsuccessful treatment. After receipt of all the study medications, these five patients still had urethral purulent discharge and were switched to other unknown treatment regimens by other doctors. The bacterial smears and cultures of urethral or urine specimens in the 121 patients who completed all aspects of the study were negative on a test-of-cure visit. In the per-protocol analysis, both clinical and microbiologic cure were experienced by 96.8% (60/62 patients) in the intervention group and 95.3% (61/64 patients) in the control group. There were no recurrences at the day 14 test-of-cure visit. This trial indicates that fosfomycin trometamol exhibits excellent efficacy for treatment of uncomplicated gonococcal urethritis in men. Serious adverse effects are rare. PMID:27064136

  5. BIODEGRADABLE BILIARY STENTS: A NEW APPROACH FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HEPATICOJEJUNOSTOMY STRICTURES FOLLOWING BILE DUCT INJURY. PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    GIMÉNEZ, Mariano E.; PALERMO, Mariano; HOUGHTON, Eduardo; ACQUAFRESCA, Pablo; FINGER, Caetano; VERDE, Juan M.; CÚNEO, Jorge Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Once a biliary injury has occurred, repair is done by a hepaticojejunostomy. The most common procedure is to perform a dilatation with balloon with a success of 70 %. Success rates range using biodegradable stents is from 85% to 95%. Biodegradable biliary stents should change the treatment of this complication. Aim: To investigate the use of biodegradable stents in a group of patients with hepaticojejunonostomy strictures. Methods: In a prospective study 16 biodegradable stents were placed in 13 patients with hepaticojejunostomy strictures secondary to bile duct repair of a biliary surgical injury. Average age was 38.7 years (23-67), nine were female and four male. All cases had a percutaneous drainage before at the time of biodegradable stent placement. Results: In one case, temporary haemobilia was present requiring blood transfusion. In another, pain after stent placement required intravenous medication. In the other 11 patients, hospital discharge was the next morning following stent placement. During the patient´s follow-up, none presented symptoms during the first nine months. One patient presented significant alkaline phosphatase elevation and stricture recurrence was confirmed. One case had recurrence of cholangitis 11 months after the stent placement. 84.6% continued asymptomatic with a mean follow-up of 20 months. Conclusion: The placement of biodegradable stents is a safe and feasible technique. Was not observed strictures caused by the stent or its degradation. It could substitute balloon dilation in strictures of hepaticojejunostomy. PMID:27438039

  6. A two-step multidisciplinary approach to treat recurrent esophageal strictures in children with epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica.

    PubMed

    Vowinkel, Thorsten; Laukoetter, Mike; Mennigen, Rudolf; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Gottschalk, Antje; Boschin, Matthias; Frosch, Michael; Senninger, Norbert; Tübergen, Dirk

    2015-06-01

    In children with severe generalized recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB), esophageal scarring leads to esophageal strictures with dysphagia, followed by malnutrition and delayed development. We describe a two-step multidisciplinary therapeutic approach to overcome malnutrition and growth retardation. In Step 1, under general anesthesia, orthograde balloon dilation of the esophagus is followed by gastrostomy creation using a direct puncture technique. In Step 2, further esophageal strictures are treated by retrograde dilation via the established gastrostomy; this step requires only a short sedation period. A total of 12 patients (median age 7.8 years, range 6 weeks to 17 years) underwent successful orthograde balloon dilation of esophageal strictures combined with direct puncture gastrostomy. After 12 and 24 months in 11 children, a substantial improvement of growth and nutrition was achieved (body mass index [BMI] standard deviation score [SDS] + 0.59 and + 0.61, respectively). In one child, gastrostomy was removed because of skin ulcerations after 10 days. Recurrent esophageal strictures were treated successfully in five children. The combined approach of balloon dilation and gastrostomy is technically safe in children with RDEB, and helps to promote catch-up growth and body weight. In addition, recurrent esophageal strictures can be treated successfully without general anesthesia in a retrograde manner via the established gastrostomy. PMID:25590175

  7. Proximal hypospadias with skin-covered shaft of penis and absent urethral plate: An unknown variant and its management

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Kumar A.; Bhat, Nisar A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of proximal hypospadias with an absent urethral plate having intact ventral shaft skin with hooded dorsal prepuce and a good glans groove. Such a variant of hypospadias has not been reported in the literature. PMID:22121320

  8. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  9. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  10. Posterior ankyloglossia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chu, Michael W; Bloom, David C

    2009-06-01

    Ankyloglossia, or tongue-tie, refers to an abnormally short lingual frenulum. Ankyloglossia is a recognized but poorly defined condition and has been reported to cause feeding difficulties, dysarthria, dyspnea, and social or mechanical problems. In infants, the most concerning symptoms are feeding difficulties and inability to breastfeed. While a recent trend toward breastfeeding has brought frenulectomy back into favor, the literature regarding treatment remains inconclusive. We report a case of posterior ankyloglossia with anterior mucosal hooding and a simple, safe, and effective way to treat it to improve breastfeeding. PMID:19303646

  11. Double-Layered PTFE-Covered Nitinol Stents: Experience in 32 Patients with Malignant Esophageal Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jung Gu; Jung, Gyoo-Sik Oh, Kyung Seung; Park, Seon-Ja

    2010-08-15

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a double-layered polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered nitinol stent in the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal strictures. A double-layered PTFE-covered nitinol stent was designed to reduce the propensity to migration of conventional covered stent. The stent consists of an inner PTFE-covered stent and an outer uncovered nitinol stent tube. With fluoroscopic guidance, the stent was placed in 32 consecutive patients with malignant esophageal strictures. During the follow-up period, the technical and clinical success rates, complications, and cumulative patient survival and stent patency were evaluated. Stent placement was technically successful in all patients, and no procedural complications occurred. After stent placement, the symptoms of 30 patients (94%) showed improvement. During the mean follow-up of 103 days (range, 9-348 days), 11 (34%) of 32 patients developed recurrent symptoms due to tumor overgrowth in five patients (16%), tumor ingrowth owing to detachment of the covering material (PTFE) apart from the stent wire in 3 (9%), mucosal hyperplasia in 2 (6%), and stent migration in 1 (3%). Ten of these 11 patients were treated by means of placing a second covered stent. Thirty patients died, 29 as a result of disease progression and 1 from aspiration pneumonia. The median survival period was 92 days. The median period of primary stent patency was 190 days. The double-layered PTFE-covered nitinol stent seems to be effective for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal strictures. We believe that the double-layer configuration of this stent can contribute to decreasing the stent's migration rate.

  12. Intraluminal Radioactive Stent Compared with Covered Stent Alone for the Treatment of Malignant Esophageal Stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhongmin; Huang Xunbo; Cao Jun; Huang Gang; Chen Kemin LIu Yu; Liu Fenju

    2012-04-15

    Objective: This study was designed to compare the clinical effectiveness of intraluminal radioactive stent loaded with iodine-125 seeds implantation versus covered stent alone insertion in patients with malignant esophageal stricture. Methods: We studied two groups of patients with malignant esophageal stricture. Group A comprised 28 patients (19 men and 9 women) who underwent intraluminal radioactive stent loaded with iodine-125 seeds implantation and were followed prospectively. Group B comprised 30 patients (18 men and 12 women) who had previously received covered stent alone insertion; these patients were evaluated retrospectively. There was no crossover between the two groups during follow-up. Informed consent was obtained from each patient, and our institutional review board approved the study. The dysphagia score, overall survival rates, complication rates, and reintervention rates were compared in the two groups. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics. Stent placement was technically successful and well tolerated in all patients. The dysphagia score was improved in both groups after stent placement. The median survival was significantly longer in group A than in group B: 11 versus 4.9 months, respectively (P < 0.001). The complications of chest pain, esophageal reflux, and stent migration was more frequent in group B, but this difference did not reach statistical significance. There was no statistical difference in reintervention between two groups. Conclusions: Intraluminal radioactive stent loaded with iodine-125 seeds implantation was a feasible and practical management in treating malignant esophageal stricture and was superior to covered stent alone insertion, as measured by survival.

  13. Cell Sheet Transplantation for Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Pidial, Laetitia; Camilleri, Sophie; Bellucci, Alexandre; Casanova, Amaury; Viel, Thomas; Tavitian, Bertrand; Cellier, Christophe; Clement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Extended esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is highly responsible for esophageal stricture. We conducted a comparative study in a porcine model to evaluate the effectiveness of adipose tissue-derived stromal cell (ADSC) double cell sheet transplantation. Methods Twelve female pigs were treated with 5 cm long hemi-circumferential ESD and randomized in two groups. ADSC group (n = 6) received 4 double cell sheets of allogenic ADSC on a paper support membrane and control group (n = 6) received 4 paper support membranes. ADSC were labelled with PKH-67 fluorophore to allow probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopie (pCLE) monitoring. After 28 days follow-up, animals were sacrificed. At days 3, 14 and 28, endoscopic evaluation with pCLE and esophagography were performed. Results One animal from the control group was excluded (anesthetic complication). Animals from ADSC group showed less frequent alimentary trouble (17% vs 80%; P = 0.08) and higher gain weight on day 28. pCLE demonstrated a compatible cell signal in 4 animals of the ADSC group at day 3. In ADSC group, endoscopy showed that 1 out of 6(17%) animals developed a severe esophageal stricture comparatively to 100% (5/5) in the control group; P = 0.015. Esophagography demonstrated a decreased degree of stricture in the ADSC group on day 14 (44% vs 81%; P = 0.017) and day 28 (46% vs 90%; P = 0.035). Histological analysis showed a decreased fibrosis development in the ADSC group, in terms of surface (9.7 vs 26.1 mm²; P = 0.017) and maximal depth (1.6 vs 3.2 mm; P = 0.052). Conclusion In this model, transplantation of allogenic ADSC organized in double cell sheets after extended esophegeal ESD is strongly associated with a lower esophageal stricture’s rate. PMID:26930409

  14. Comparison of Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Pharyngeal, Rectal, and Urethral Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Akbar; Asbel, Lenore; Baldwin, Tamara; Gratzer, Beau; Guerry, Sarah; Kerani, Roxanne P.; Pathela, Preeti; Pettus, Kevin; Soge, Olusegun O.; Stirland, Ali; Weinstock, Hillard S.

    2015-01-01

    U.S. surveillance for Neisseria gonorrhoeae antimicrobial susceptibilities is based exclusively on male urethral isolates. These data inform gonorrhea treatment guidelines, including recommendations for the treatment of extragenital infections, but data on the susceptibilities of extragenital isolates are limited. We compared the antimicrobial susceptibilities of pharyngeal, rectal, and urethral gonococcal isolates collected from men who have sex with men (MSM), at five sentinel sites throughout the United States. MICs were determined by the agar dilution method. Generalized linear models were used to compare (i) the proportions of isolates with elevated MICs and (ii) geometric mean MICs according to anatomic site, adjusted for city. In December 2011 to September 2013, totals of 205 pharyngeal, 261 rectal, and 976 urethral isolates were obtained. The proportions of isolates with elevated ceftriaxone MICs (≥0.125 μg/ml) did not differ according to anatomic site (0.5% of pharyngeal isolates, 1.5% of rectal isolates, and 1.7% of urethral isolates, with a city-adjusted odds ratio [aOR] of 0.4 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.0 to 3.9] for pharyngeal versus urethral isolates and an aOR of 0.9 [95% CI, 0.2 to 4.2] for rectal versus urethral isolates). The city-adjusted geometric mean ceftriaxone MICs of pharyngeal (0.0153 μg/ml) and rectal (0.0157 μg/ml) isolates did not differ from that of urethral isolates (0.0150 μg/ml) (ratios of geometric mean MICs of 1.02 [95% CI, 0.90 to 1.17] and 1.05 [95% CI, 0.93 to 1.19], respectively). Similar results were observed for other antimicrobials, including cefixime and azithromycin. These findings suggest that, at the population level, gonococcal antimicrobial susceptibility surveillance based on urethral isolates from MSM adequately reflects the susceptibilities of N. gonorrhoeae strains circulating among MSM. PMID:25691638

  15. Comparison of antimicrobial susceptibilities of pharyngeal, rectal, and urethral Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates among men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Sarah; Zaidi, Akbar; Asbel, Lenore; Baldwin, Tamara; Gratzer, Beau; Guerry, Sarah; Kerani, Roxanne P; Pathela, Preeti; Pettus, Kevin; Soge, Olusegun O; Stirland, Ali; Weinstock, Hillard S

    2015-05-01

    U.S. surveillance for Neisseria gonorrhoeae antimicrobial susceptibilities is based exclusively on male urethral isolates. These data inform gonorrhea treatment guidelines, including recommendations for the treatment of extragenital infections, but data on the susceptibilities of extragenital isolates are limited. We compared the antimicrobial susceptibilities of pharyngeal, rectal, and urethral gonococcal isolates collected from men who have sex with men (MSM), at five sentinel sites throughout the United States. MICs were determined by the agar dilution method. Generalized linear models were used to compare (i) the proportions of isolates with elevated MICs and (ii) geometric mean MICs according to anatomic site, adjusted for city. In December 2011 to September 2013, totals of 205 pharyngeal, 261 rectal, and 976 urethral isolates were obtained. The proportions of isolates with elevated ceftriaxone MICs (≥ 0.125 μg/ml) did not differ according to anatomic site (0.5% of pharyngeal isolates, 1.5% of rectal isolates, and 1.7% of urethral isolates, with a city-adjusted odds ratio [aOR] of 0.4 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.0 to 3.9] for pharyngeal versus urethral isolates and an aOR of 0.9 [95% CI, 0.2 to 4.2] for rectal versus urethral isolates). The city-adjusted geometric mean ceftriaxone MICs of pharyngeal (0.0153 μg/ml) and rectal (0.0157 μg/ml) isolates did not differ from that of urethral isolates (0.0150 μg/ml) (ratios of geometric mean MICs of 1.02 [95% CI, 0.90 to 1.17] and 1.05 [95% CI, 0.93 to 1.19], respectively). Similar results were observed for other antimicrobials, including cefixime and azithromycin. These findings suggest that, at the population level, gonococcal antimicrobial susceptibility surveillance based on urethral isolates from MSM adequately reflects the susceptibilities of N. gonorrhoeae strains circulating among MSM. PMID:25691638

  16. IgG4-related Sclerosing Cholangitis with No Biliary Stricture but Severe Thickening of the Bile Duct Wall.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Shuya; Naitoh, Itaru; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Hayashi, Kazuki; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Kondo, Hiromu; Nishi, Yuji; Yoshida, Michihiro; Umemura, Shuichiro; Hori, Yasuki; Kato, Akihisa; Ohara, Hirotaka; Kuno, Toshiya; Takahashi, Satoru; Joh, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of a 56-year-old man with IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) with no biliary stricture, but with a severely thickened bile duct wall. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed diffuse swelling of the pancreas and thickening of the common bile duct (CBD) wall with delayed enhancement. Obvious diffuse wall thickening of the CBD was observed on endoscopic ultrasonography. However, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography showed no biliary stricture in the CBD that had thickened. Although IgG4-SC has been classified by a stenotic lesion on cholangiography, we should be aware of some IgG4-SC cases showing only bile duct wall thickness without any biliary stricture. PMID:27301508

  17. Fulminant Pseudomembranous Colitis Presenting as Sigmoid Stricture and Severe Polyposis with Clinical Response to Intracolonic Vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kin Kong

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Severe diseases carry significant morbidities such as septic shock, acute kidney injury, bowel perforation, and mortality. Immunocompromising conditions increase the risk of developing the disease but whether these individuals suffer a more fulminant course or warrant a more potent first-line treatment is still controversial issue. Hereby we report a case of a cirrhotic patient with life-threatening pseudomembranous colitis complicated by colonic stricture, initially refractory to standard treatment but with subsequent improvement on intracolonic vancomycin. PMID:27034681

  18. Treatment of a Ruptured Anastomotic Esophageal Stricture Following Bougienage with a Dacron-Covered Nitinol Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Heindel, Walter; Gossmann, Axel; Fischbach, Roman; Michel, Olaf; Lackner, Klaus

    1996-11-15

    A patient suffering from esophagorespiratory fistula after bougienage of a benign stricture at the site of the anastomosis between a jejunal interposition and the esophagus was referred for interventional treatment. A prototype nitinol stent centrally covered with Dacron was implanted under regional anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance. The self-expanding prosthesis dilated the stenosis completely and closed the fistula, with consequent improvement in respiratory and nutritional status and thus the general quality of life. The patient was able to eat and drink normally until death 3 months later due to progression of his underlying malignant disease.

  19. Changes in plasma gonadotropin concentrations and urethral closure pressure in the bitch during the 12 months following ovariectomy.

    PubMed

    Reichler, Iris Margaret; Pfeiffer, Esther; Piché, Claude A; Jöchle, Wolfgang; Roos, Malgorzata; Hubler, Madeleine; Arnold, Susi

    2004-11-01

    Urinary incontinence due to acquired urethral sphincter incompetence is a common side effect of spaying, for which the underlying cause remains unknown. Spaying not only results in a significant reduction in the urethral closure pressure within 1 year but also in an increase in the plasma gonadotropin concentrations. To investigate the possible link between the post-ovariectomy changes in plasma gonadotropins and in urethral closure pressure, gonadotropin and urodynamic measurements were performed in 10 Beagle bitches before and for a period of 1 year after spaying. Plasma gonadotropin concentrations rose quickly after ovariectomy and peak levels were seen within 3-5 weeks, followed by a sharp drop until week 10. A steady increase was observed subsequently until week 42, when a plateau was reached. One year after spaying, the mean FSH concentration was 75.3 +/- 32.1 ng/ml, a 17-fold increase, and the LH was 8.3 +/- 3.8 ng/ml, an eightfold increase over the pre-spaying values. Ten months after spaying, the mean urethral closure pressure (9.7 cm H2O) was significantly reduced when compared to the mean pre-operative value of 15.4 cm H2O. However, there was no clear relationship between the gonadotropin concentrations and the urethral closure pressure. From these results it seems unlikely that chronically elevated gonadotropins are the underlying cause for reduced urethral closure pressure after spaying resulting in urinary incontinence. PMID:15451248

  20. Antral or Pyloric Deformity Is a Risk Factor for the Development of Postendoscopic Submucosal Dissection Pyloric Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Kyu Yeon; Park, Jun Chul; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Chan Hyuk; Chung, Hyunsoo; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Surgeons must be aware of risk factors for strictures before performing endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), to enable early interventions to prevent severe strictures. Methods This study was a single-center retrospective study. We reviewed the clinical data of patients who has undergone gastric ESD from January 2007 to December 2012. Results Among the 3,819 patients who had undergone gastric ESD, 11 patients (7.2%) developed pyloric strictures and received successful endoscopic balloon dilation. Significant differences were noted between the patients without and with post-ESD strictures for pretreatment of antral or pyloric deformities (46.4% vs 81.8%), the proportion of extension to the lumen circumference (>3/4, 9.4% vs 54.5%), the longitudinal extent of mucosal defects (27.9±10.1 mm vs 51.5±10.8 mm), and post-ESD bleeding (2.9% vs 27.3%). Multivariate analysis revealed that pretreatment antral or pyloric deformities (odds ratio [OR], 30.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.476 to 631.565; p=0.027), larger longitudinal extent of mucosal defects (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.074 to 1.340; p=0.001), and circumferential extension of 3/4 (OR, 13.69; 95% CI, 1.583 to 118.387; p=0.017) were independent risk factors for post-ESD stricture. Conclusions Antral or pyloric deformities, sub-circumferential resection over more than 75% of the circumference and greater longitudinal extent of mucosal defects are independent risk factors for post-ESD stricture. PMID:27282263

  1. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years’ follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  2. Huge interparietal posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Manuel Filipe Dias; de Santa Barbara, Rita de Cassia

    2015-01-01

    Congenital encephalocele is a neural tube defect characterized by a sac-like protrusion of the brain, meninges, and other intracranial structures through the skull, which is caused by an embryonic development abnormality. The most common location is at the occipital bone, and its incidence varies according to different world regions. We report a case of an 1-month and 7-day-old male child with a huge interparietal-posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele, a rare occurrence. Physical examination and volumetric computed tomography were diagnostic. The encephalocele was surgically resected. Intradural and extradural approaches were performed; the bone defect was not primarily closed. Two days after surgery, the patient developed hydrocephaly requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The surgical treatment of the meningohydroencephalocele of the interparietal-posterior fontanel may be accompanied by technical challenges and followed by complications due to the presence of large blood vessels under the overlying skin. In these cases, huge sacs herniate through large bone defects including meninges, brain, and blood vessels. The latter present communication with the superior sagittal sinus and ventricular system. A favorable surgical outcome generally follows an accurate strategy taking into account individual features of the lesion. PMID:26484324

  3. Comparison of low-power YAG laser and BICAP tumor probe for palliation of esophageal cancer strictures.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D M; Machicado, G; Randall, G; Tung, L A; English-Zych, S

    1988-06-01

    The purposes of this study were (a) to determine the applicability of endoscopic palliation for patients with esophagogastric cancer strictures in a referral center, and (b) to compare the efficacy and safety of the BICAP tumor probe with the neodymiumyttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) laser for such palliation. Forty-two consecutive patients with weight loss and obstructive symptoms from an unresectable, malignant esophageal stricture were referred for endoscopic palliation. Fourteen patients did not meet the criteria for YAG laser or BICAP tumor probe treatment and other therapies were recommended. Twenty-eight patients were treated, the first 14 with low-power YAG laser and the last 14 with BICAP tumor probe. All patients had coagulation of malignant strictures in one session. Treated patients were similar in background variables and stricture lengths but twice as much thermal energy was needed for the YAG laser as the BICAP tumor probe treatment. Treatment results were not statistically different during the median follow-up and survival of 16 wk. As minor complications, either pain or edema requiring dilatation was more common in the YAG laser-treated group than the BICAP tumor probe group. Treatment-related esophageal strictures developed in 21% of patients treated with YAG laser. A fistula developed in 1 patient with noncircumferential cancer in the BICAP tumor probe group. Compared with only the intake of liquids before treatment, 86% of patients could eat a soft or solid diet after initial treatment with BICAP tumor probe or YAG laser. Our conclusions were that for BICAP tumor probe and YAG laser, endoscopic palliation efficacy and safety for circumferential esophageal cancer strictures were similar. The advantages of using the BICAP tumor probe were portability, lower equipment costs, and the ability to treat submucosal, long, or high esophageal cancer strictures in one session. Treatment with YAG laser was safer than BICAP tumor probe for exophytic

  4. Anterior urethral valves without diverticulae: a report of two cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dig Vijay; Taneja, Rajesh

    2014-05-01

    Two unusual cases of anterior urethral valves (AUV) without diverticulae are presented. The first case is a male child born with prenatal diagnosis of bilateral hydronephrosis. On cystoscopy, iris-like diaphragm valves were encountered about 3 mm distal to the skeletal sphincter. In the second case, an 18-month-old male child was investigated for recurrent febrile urinary tract infections and obstructed urinary symptoms. Cystoscopy confirmed the presence of slit-like valves 5 mm distal to the skeletal sphincter. Fulguration of the AUVs was performed in both cases. It may be worthwhile to review all cases of anterior urethral obstruction collectively and re-categorize them appropriately to include the unusual AUVs without diverticulum in that classification. PMID:24118555

  5. Does antibacterial ointment applied to urethral meatus in women prevent recurrent cystitis?

    PubMed

    Meyhoff, H H; Nordling, J; Gammelgaard, P A; Vejlsgaard, R

    1981-01-01

    In a double-blind placebo controlled clinical trial the preventive value of the antibacterial ointment povidone-iodine 10% (Isodine, Betadine) applied to urethral meatus was evaluated in 17 females suffering from recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI). The patients applied povidone-iodine respectively placebo ointment twice daily and before sexual intercourse in two 6-month periods in a cross-over design. No difference was observed in number of UTI during povidone-iodine and placebo prophylaxis. A decrease in the incidence of UTI was seen during application of any ointment. The antibacterial properties of povidone-iodine ointment is unimportant in the prophylaxis of reinfections as also indicated from urethral and periurethral cultures during the study revealing no change in pathogenic bacterial flora. An improved perineal hygiene in the context of application of ointment may be responsible for the reduction in UTI incidence in females with recurrent cystitis. PMID:7036332

  6. Antibody isotypes in urethral swabs of symptomatic and asymptomatic men infected with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Imam, Naglaa F A; Eassa, Ahmed H A; Shoeib, Eman Y S; Abo-Raia, Gamal Y S

    2007-12-01

    Trichomoniasis may be asymptomatic or symptomatic in both sexes. The outcome of infection depends on the virulence factors of T. vaginalis, but these factors remain unclear. Genetic variability of the isolates and the host's immune response are likely to be key factors in that respect. Symptomatic and asymptomatic males infected with T. vaginalis were compared regarding the differences in antibody subclasses response in the urethral samples. In symptomatic cases there was a significant elevation in IgM, IgG1 & IgG2b levels in urethral samples, and a little, non-significant rise in IgG2a levels. However, there were no statistically significant differences between levels of IgA, IgG3 & IgG4. The results showed that specific IgG1 & IgM and to a lesser extent IgG2 may be involved in established symptomatic trichomoniasis in men, compared to asymptomatic ones. PMID:18383797

  7. Posterior musculofascial reconstruction after radical prostatectomy: an updated systematic review and a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Angelica A C; Mistretta, Francesco A; Sandri, Marco; Cozzi, Gabriele; De Lorenzis, Elisa; Rosso, Marco; Albo, Giancarlo; Palmisano, Franco; Mottrie, Alex; Haese, Alexander; Graefen, Markus; Coelho, Rafael; Patel, Vipul R; Rocco, Bernardo

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the influence of posterior musculofascial plate reconstruction (PR) on early return of continence after radical prostatectomy (RP); an updated systematic review of the literature. A systematic review of the literature was performed in June 2015, following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement and searching Medline, Embase, Scopus and Web of Science databases. We searched the terms posterior reconstruction prostatectomy, double layer anastomosis prostatectomy across the 'Title' and 'Abstract' fields of the records, with the following limits: humans, gender (male), and language (English). The authors reviewed the records to identify studies comparing cohorts of patients who underwent RP with or without restoration of the posterior aspect of the rhabdosphincter. A meta-analysis of the risk ratios estimated using data from the selected studies was performed. In all, 21 studies were identified, including three randomised controlled trials. The overall analysis of comparative studies showed that PR improved early continence recovery at 3-7, 30, and 90 days after catheter removal, while the continence rate at 180 days was statistically but not clinically affected. Statistically significantly lower anastomotic leakage rates were described after PR. There were no significant differences for positive surgical margins rates or for complications such as acute urinary retention and bladder neck stricture. The analysis confirms the benefits at 30 days after catheter removal already discussed in the review published in 2012, but also shows a significant advantage in terms of urinary continence recovery in the first 90 days. A multicentre prospective randomised controlled trial is currently being conducted in several institutions around the world to better assess the effectiveness of PR in facilitating an earlier recovery of postoperative urinary continence. PMID:26991606

  8. [Inflammatory pseudo-tumor of the bladder expelled through the urethral meatus in a girl].

    PubMed

    Sarr, A; Thiam, I; Gueye, D; Sow, Y; Fall, B; Thiam, A; Sine, B; Ba, M; Diagne, B A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory pseudo-tumors of the bladder are rare benign tumors that mostly arise in the differential diagnosis of sarcomas in children. The authors report an unusual case of pedunculated inflammatory pseudo-tumor of the bladder that externalized by the urethral meatus in a 13-year-old girl. The treatment consisted of a ligation-resection of the pedicle, followed by resection of the tumor. After regular follow-up for 18 months there was no tumor recurrence. PMID:26552617

  9. Evaluation of Onlay Island Flap Technique in Shallow Urethral Plate Hypospadiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mohajerzadeh, Leily; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Rouzrokh, Mohsen; Sadeghian, Naser; Khaleghnejad-Tabari, Ahmad; Mahdavi, Alireza; Poorhasan, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypospadias is one of the most common congenital genital anomalies in males that necessitates to be operated early in infancy (when 6 to 9 months old). On the other hand, hypospadias is a challenging field of pediatric urology with multiple reconstruction techniques. A perfect hypospadias repair is supposed to return urethral continuity with sufficient caliber, eradicate phallus curvature, and supply an acceptable appearance with low complications. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of using onlay island flap technique in the repair of hypospadias with shallow urethral plate. Patients and Methods: In this prospective study within June 2012 to December 2013, we performed onlay island flap procedure to repair hypospadias with shallow urethral plate measuring less than 6 millimeter. This technique was selected for all types of hypospadiasis except subcoronal type. Nesbit’s dorsal plication procedure was established for chordee. In cases with very small glans, urethroplasty was performed without glansplasty. Results: Twenty three patients with mean age of 30 (range 10 - 60) months underwent onlay island flap repair; all had a shallow urethral plate < 6 mm, 3 had a very small glans, and 18 had chordee. Meatus was located in distal shaft in 5 cases, mid shaft in 8, proximal in 6 and penoscrotal type in 4 patients. Chordee was corrected with Nesbit’s dorsal plication in 16 cases. Complications were: meatal stenosis in 2 cases and urethrocutaneous fistula in 2 patients, all of which were repaired surgically. Mean follow up time was 13 (3 - 20) months. All cases that had glansplasty have excellent esthetic appearance. Conclusions: This technique offers acceptable results regarding meatal stenosis, urethrocutaneous fistula and esthetic outcome. PMID:26848382

  10. Occult distal urethral carcinoma presenting as metastatic carcinoma in the inguinal lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Hammer-Hansen, Niels; Høyer, Søren; Jensen, Jørgen Bjerggaard

    2015-02-01

    A 65-year-old man presented with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma in the inguinal lymph nodes from an unknown primary tumour. The initial work-up lacked clinical examination of the glans penis, in part due to the patient having phimosis. More than a year after presentation, a primary tumour, located distally on the penis, was diagnosed. A discussion of urethral carcinoma as well as inguinal lymph-node metastasis of unknown primary tumour is presented. PMID:25313619

  11. The use of Coca-Cola in the management of bolus obstruction in benign oesophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Karanjia, N D; Rees, M

    1993-03-01

    Oesophageal stricture is a complication of oesophageal reflux and may itself be complicated by bolus obstruction. We reviewed the records of patients presenting with dysphagia and who were found to have benign oesophageal strictures. We studied the outcome of bolus obstruction in 13 episodes affecting eight patients. In six episodes Coca-Cola was administered on the day before endoscopy, and in all these patients the bolus had cleared. In seven episodes nothing was administered before endoscopy, and in all seven a bolus was evident at endoscopy. In five of these seven the bolus was removed piecemeal and in each of these instances the endoscope had to be passed between two and five times. In the remaining two instances the procedure was abandoned and the patients returned to the ward for the administration of Coca-Cola. At subsequent endoscopy these patients were found to be clear of any bolus. These results suggest that the administration of Coca-Cola (or other aerated drinks) may clear a bolus in the acutely obstructed oesophagus. PMID:8476194

  12. Preoperative drainage for malignant biliary strictures: is it time for self-expanding metallic stents?

    PubMed

    Roque, Jason; Ho, Shiaw-Hooi; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2015-01-01

    Palliation of jaundice improves the general health of the patient and, therefore, surgical outcomes. Because of the complexity and location of strictures, especially proximally, drainage has been accompanied by increased morbidity due to sepsis. Another concern is the provocation of an inflammatory and fibrotic reaction around the area of stent placement. Preoperative biliary drainage with self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) insertion can be achieved via a percutaneous method or through endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. A recently published multicenter randomized Dutch study has shown increased morbidity with preoperative biliary drainage. A Cochrane meta-analysis has also shown a significantly increased complication rate with preoperative drainage. However, few of these studies have used a SEMS, which allows better biliary drainage. No randomized controlled trials have compared preoperative deployment of SEMS versus conventional plastic stents. The outcomes of biliary drainage also depend on the location of the obstruction, namely the difficulty with proximal compared to distal strictures. Pathophysiologically, palliation of jaundice will benefit all patients awaiting surgery. However, preoperative drainage often results in increased morbidity because of procedure-related sepsis. The use of SEMS may change the outcome of preoperative biliary drainage dramatically. PMID:25674520

  13. Genetic Abnormalities in Biliary Brush Samples for Distinguishing Cholangiocarcinoma from Benign Strictures in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Timmer, Margriet R.; Lau, Chiu T.; Meijer, Sybren L.; Fockens, Paul; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Calpe, Silvia; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic inflammatory liver disease and is strongly associated with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). The lack of efficient diagnostic methods for CCA is a major problem. Testing for genetic abnormalities may increase the diagnostic value of cytology. Methods. We assessed genetic abnormalities for CDKN2A, TP53, ERBB2, 20q, MYC, and chromosomes 7 and 17 and measures of genetic clonal diversity in brush samples from 29 PSC patients with benign biliary strictures and 12 patients with sporadic CCA or PSC-associated CCA. Diagnostic performance of cytology alone and in combination with genetic markers was evaluated by sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve analysis. Results. The presence of MYC gain and CDKN2A loss as well as a higher clonal diversity was significantly associated with malignancy. MYC gain increased the sensitivity of cytology from 50% to 83%. However, the specificity decreased from 97% to 76%. The diagnostic accuracy of the best performing measures of clonal diversity was similar to the combination of cytology and MYC. Adding CDKN2A loss to the panel had no additional benefit. Conclusion. Evaluation of MYC abnormalities and measures of clonal diversity in brush cytology specimens may be of clinical value in distinguishing CCA from benign biliary strictures in PSC. PMID:27127503

  14. Biomarkers of intestinal fibrosis – one step towards clinical trials for stricturing inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Paolo; Pinzani, Massimo; Corazza, Gino R

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal fibrosis, caused by an excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components, and subsequent stricture development are a common complication of inflammatory bowel disease. However, currently there are no biomarkers which reliably predict the risk of developing intestinal strictures or identify early stages of fibrosis prior to clinical symptoms. Candidate biomarkers of intestinal fibrosis, including gene variants (i.e. nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 gene), serum microRNAs (miR-19, miR-29), serum extracellular matrix proteins (i.e. collagen, fibronectin) or enzymes (i.e. tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1), serum growth factors (i.e. basic fibroblast growth factor, YKL-40), serum anti-microbial antibodies (i.e. anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and circulating cells (i.e. fibrocytes) have shown conflicting results on relatively heterogeneous patients’ cohorts, and none of them was proven to be strictly specific for fibrostenosis, but rather predictive of a disease disabling course. In this review we critically reassess the diagnostic and prognostic value of serum biomarkers of intestinal fibrosis in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27536362

  15. Biomarkers of intestinal fibrosis - one step towards clinical trials for stricturing inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, Paolo; Pinzani, Massimo; Corazza, Gino R; Di Sabatino, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Intestinal fibrosis, caused by an excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components, and subsequent stricture development are a common complication of inflammatory bowel disease. However, currently there are no biomarkers which reliably predict the risk of developing intestinal strictures or identify early stages of fibrosis prior to clinical symptoms. Candidate biomarkers of intestinal fibrosis, including gene variants (i.e. nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 gene), serum microRNAs (miR-19, miR-29), serum extracellular matrix proteins (i.e. collagen, fibronectin) or enzymes (i.e. tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1), serum growth factors (i.e. basic fibroblast growth factor, YKL-40), serum anti-microbial antibodies (i.e. anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and circulating cells (i.e. fibrocytes) have shown conflicting results on relatively heterogeneous patients' cohorts, and none of them was proven to be strictly specific for fibrostenosis, but rather predictive of a disease disabling course. In this review we critically reassess the diagnostic and prognostic value of serum biomarkers of intestinal fibrosis in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27536362

  16. Intermittent catheterization in neurologic patients: Update on genitourinary tract infection and urethral trauma.

    PubMed

    Biardeau, X; Corcos, J

    2016-04-01

    Intermittent catheterization is considered the standard of care in most neurologic patients with lower urinary tract disorders. However, in this context, genitourinary tract infection and urethral trauma represent specific challenges. Such conditions have been found to significantly deteriorate quality of life and complicate subsequent treatments. Only optimal prevention associated with appropriate treatment allows for the long-term continuation of such bladder management. Here, we discuss the diagnosis and therapeutic and preventive approaches associated with genitourinary tract infection and urethral trauma in this specific population. This "state-of-the-art" article results from a literature review (MEDLINE articles and scientific society guidelines) and the authors' experience. It was structured in a didactic way to facilitate comprehension and promote the implementation of advice and recommendations in daily practice. Genitourinary tract infection and urethral trauma associated with intermittent catheterization in neurologic patients should be managed with a global approach, including patient and caregiver education, optimal catheterization with hydrophilic-coated or pre-lubricated catheters and adequate use of antibiotic therapy. PMID:27053002

  17. Hypothesis That Urethral Bulb (Corpus Spongiosum) Plays an Active Role in Male Urinary Continence

    PubMed Central

    Rehder, Peter; Staudacher, Nina M.; Schachtner, Joerg; Berger, Maria E.; Schillfahrt, Florian; Hauser, Verena; Mueller, Raphael; Skradski, Viktor; Horninger, Wolfgang; Glodny, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The proximal urethral bulb in men is enlarged, surrounds the bulbous urethra, and extends dorsally towards the perineum. During intercourse engorgement takes place due to increased blood flow through the corpus spongiosum. Antegrade ejaculation is facilitated by contraction of the bulbospongiosus muscles during climax. Micturition during sexual stimulation is functionally inhibited. Supporting the bulb may indirectly facilitate continence in a certain subset of patients with postprostatectomy incontinence. During physical activity with increased abdominal pressure, reflex contraction of the pelvic floor muscles as well as the bulbospongiosus muscles occurs to support sphincter function and limit urinary incontinence. Operations to the prostate may weaken urinary sphincter function. It is hypothesized that the distal urinary sphincter may be supported indirectly by placing a hammock underneath the urethral bulb. During moments of physical stress the “cushion” of blood within the supported corpus spongiosum helps to increase the zone of coaptation within the sphincteric (membranous) urethra. This may lead to urinary continence in patients treated by a transobturator repositioning sling in patients with postprostatectomy incontinence. This paper describes the possible role of the urethral bulb in male urinary continence, including its function after retroluminal sling placement (AdVance, AdVance XP® Male Sling System, Minnetonka, USA). PMID:27022393

  18. Bacteriology of the urethra in normal men and men with nongonococcal urethritis.

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, W R; Pollock, H M; Forsyth, P S; Floyd, J F; Alexander, E R; Wang, S P; Holmes, K K

    1977-01-01

    Sixty-nine Caucasian males without a previous history of urethritis and who developed nongonococcal urethritis (NGU) and 39 similar men without urethritis (NU) were cultured from the urethra for Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, aerobes, and anaerobes. C. trachomatis infection was proven by culture of serology in 26 (38%) of the NGU group and 1 (3%) of the NU group; the C. trachomatis-negative NGU group had significantly more U. urealyticum (81%) than the C. trachomatis-positive NGU group (42%) or the NU group (59%). Aerobes were isolated from significantly more NU men (91%) than from men with NGU (66%). The aerobic and anaerobic flora of the two NGU groups were similar. The NU group had significantly more aerobic lactobacilli. Haemophilus vaginalis, alpha-hemolytic streptococci (not Streptococcus faecalis), and anaerobes, predominantly Bacteroides species. This study has provided information about the prevalence and the variety of the aerobic and anaerobic microbiological flora of the anterior urethra of sexually active males. It does not implicate any bacteria other than C. trachomatis and U. urealyticum as potential causes of NGU. PMID:925148

  19. Proximal urethral reconstruction using a distally based ventral bladder tube flap. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J D; Holmberg, D L

    1987-01-01

    Reconstruction of the proximal urethra using a distally based tube flap mobilized from the ventral bladder wall was performed on 12 clinically normal dogs after total prostatectomy and resection of 2 cm of membranous urethra. One dog was euthanized at 6 hours and one at 36 hours after surgery because of surgical complications. Five dogs were euthanized at 10 days, two dogs at 6 weeks and three dogs at 12 weeks. Advancement of the tube flap allowed for tension-free anastomosis to the membranous urethra. Vascular integrity was maintained in all flaps. Intermittent to continuous postoperative urinary incontinence occurred in 7 of 10 dogs. The incontinence was transient in all 6 and 12 week dogs except one in which a persistent stress incontinence developed. Mild to severe dysuria was noted in 8 of 10 dogs, but was also transient in all of the 6 and 12 week dogs, with the exception of one dog. Postoperative urethral closure pressure profilometry revealed decreased tone in the membranous urethra in all 6 and 12 week dogs. It was concluded that proximal urethral reconstruction, using a ventral bladder tube flap, is a viable technique that may permit functional urodynamic recovery in dogs with significant proximal urethral loss. PMID:3507133

  20. Hypothesis That Urethral Bulb (Corpus Spongiosum) Plays an Active Role in Male Urinary Continence.

    PubMed

    Rehder, Peter; Staudacher, Nina M; Schachtner, Joerg; Berger, Maria E; Schillfahrt, Florian; Hauser, Verena; Mueller, Raphael; Skradski, Viktor; Horninger, Wolfgang; Glodny, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The proximal urethral bulb in men is enlarged, surrounds the bulbous urethra, and extends dorsally towards the perineum. During intercourse engorgement takes place due to increased blood flow through the corpus spongiosum. Antegrade ejaculation is facilitated by contraction of the bulbospongiosus muscles during climax. Micturition during sexual stimulation is functionally inhibited. Supporting the bulb may indirectly facilitate continence in a certain subset of patients with postprostatectomy incontinence. During physical activity with increased abdominal pressure, reflex contraction of the pelvic floor muscles as well as the bulbospongiosus muscles occurs to support sphincter function and limit urinary incontinence. Operations to the prostate may weaken urinary sphincter function. It is hypothesized that the distal urinary sphincter may be supported indirectly by placing a hammock underneath the urethral bulb. During moments of physical stress the "cushion" of blood within the supported corpus spongiosum helps to increase the zone of coaptation within the sphincteric (membranous) urethra. This may lead to urinary continence in patients treated by a transobturator repositioning sling in patients with postprostatectomy incontinence. This paper describes the possible role of the urethral bulb in male urinary continence, including its function after retroluminal sling placement (AdVance, AdVance XP® Male Sling System, Minnetonka, USA). PMID:27022393