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Sample records for posterior-stabilized total knee

  1. Rotational stability of a posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Amador, D D

    1989-05-01

    The effect of the posterior stabilizing mechanism on rotational stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was investigated in six cadaver knees using a special knee-testing device. The device evaluated varus-valgus, rotational, and anteroposterior (AP) stability in the normal knee compared to a posterior stabilized TKA with either a rotationally constrained or an unconstrained articular surface. None of the stability parameters was significantly different from normal in either configuration of the tibial surface, but the constrained surface did decrease rotational deflection compared to the rotationally unconstrained surfaces. These findings show that rotational constraint in a posterior stabilized TKA is not necessary to achieve rotational stability as long as varus-valgus stability is achieved by appropriately tensioning the collateral ligaments. PMID:2706852

  2. Primary posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty: analysis of different instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intercondylar femoral bone removal during posterior stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) makes many cruciate substituting implant designs less appealing than cruciate retaining implants. Bone stock conservation is considered fundamental in the prevision of future revision surgeries. The purpose of this study was to compare the quantity of intercondylar bone removable during PS housing preparation using three contemporary PS TKA instrumentations. Method We compared different box cutting jigs which were utilized for the PS housing of three popular PS knee prostheses. The bone removal area from every PS box cutting jig was three-dimensionally measured. Results Independently from the implant size, the cutting jig for a specific PS TKA always resected significantly less bone than the others: this difference was statistically significant, especially for small- to medium-sized total knee femoral components. Conclusion This study does not establish a clinical relevance of removing more or less bone at primary TKA, but suggests that if a PS design is indicated, it is preferable to select a model which possibly resects less distal femoral bone. PMID:25037275

  3. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Retention versus Posterior Stabilization for Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Bian, Yanyan; Feng, Bin; Weng, Xisheng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although being debated for many years, the superiority of posterior cruciate-retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and posterior-stabilized (PS) TKA remains controversial. We compare the knee scores, post-operative knee range of motion (ROM), radiological outcomes about knee kinematic and complications between CR TKA and PS TKA. Methods Literature published up to August 2015 was searched in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases, and meta-analysis was performed using the software, Review Manager version 5.3. Results Totally 14 random control trials (RCTs) on this topic were included for the analysis, which showed that PS and CR TKA had no significant difference in Knee Society knee Score (KSS), pain score (KSPS), Hospital for Special Surgery score (HSS), kinematic characteristics including postoperative component alignment, tibial posterior slope and joint line, and complication rate. However, PS TKA is superior to CR TKA regarding post-operative knee range of motion (ROM) [Random Effect model (RE), Mean Difference (MD) = -7.07, 95% Confidential Interval (CI) -10.50 to -3.65, p<0.0001], improvement of ROM (Fixed Effect model (FE), MD = -5.66, 95% CI -10.79 to -0.53, p = 0.03) and femoral-tibial angle [FE, MD = 0.85, 95% CI 0.46 to 1.25, p<0.0001]. Conclusions There are no clinically relevant differences between CR and PS TKA in terms of clinical, functional, radiological outcome, and complications, while PS TKA is superior to CR TKA in respects of ROM, while whether this superiority matters or not in clinical practice still needs further investigation and longer follow-up. PMID:26824368

  4. Posterior cruciate-retaining versus posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bercik, Michael J; Joshi, Ashish; Parvizi, Javad

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare outcomes of posterior cruciate-retaining and posterior stabilized prostheses. A computerized literature search was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials comparing the clinical outcomes of cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized designs. The table of contents of four major Orthopaedic journals and the references section of two arthroplasty text books were reviewed to identify other relevant studies. Ultimately, 1114 patients (1265 knees) were compared. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in flexion and range of motion in favor of posterior-stabilized knees, but no difference in complication rates. The clinical importance of this remains unknown. The decision to use one design versus the other should rest with the surgeon's preference and comfort with a particular design. PMID:23433255

  5. Differences in articular track area of posterior-stabilized and cruciate-retaining retrieved total knee implants.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Michael P; Mayor, Michael B; Collier, John P

    2004-12-01

    Press-fit condylar total knee arthroplasties removed at revision surgery from 27 knees were examined. Fourteen of the implants were posterior-stabilized press-fit condylar systems and 13 were cruciate-retaining press-fit condylar systems. The articular track areas were examined using a digital camera and manual measurements. Findings revealed the track area in posterior-stabilized implants (93%) was larger than in cruciate-retaining implants (59%). Mean posterior distance ratio of the articular track from the posterior limit of the polyethylene was 2% (.08 cm) for posterior-stabilized implants versus 23% (.97 cm) for cruciate-retaining implants. No differences in wear rating were noted. The pattern of articular contact in cruciate-retaining knees demonstrated little migration of the femoral contact surface across the tibial polyethylene plateau. PMID:15633958

  6. Patient function after a posterior stabilizing total knee arthroplasty: cam-post engagement and knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Jeremy F; Hanson, George R; Park, Sang Eun; Moynihan, Angela L; Li, Guoan

    2008-03-01

    Even though posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty has been widely used in surgery, how the cam-post mechanism (posterior substituting mechanism) affects knee joint kinematics and function in patients is not known. The objective of the present study was to investigate posterior femoral translation, internal tibial rotation, tibiofemoral contact, and cam-post engagement of total knee arthroplasty patients during in vivo weight-bearing flexion. Twenty-four knees with a PS TKA were investigated while performing a single leg weight-bearing lunge from full extension to maximum flexion as images were recorded using a dual fluoroscopic system. The in vivo knee position at each targeted flexion angle was reproduced using 3D TKA models and the fluoroscopic images. The kinematics of the knee was measured from the series of the total knee arthroplasty models. The cam-post engagement was determined when the surface model of the femoral cam overlapped with that of the tibial post. The mean maximum flexion angle for all the subjects was 112.5 +/- 13.1 degrees . The mean flexion angle where cam-post engagement was observed was 91.1 +/- 10.9 degrees . The femur moved anteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees and posteriorly through the rest of the flexion range. The internal tibial rotation increased approximately 6 degrees from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion and decreased slightly with further flexion. Both the medial and lateral contact point moved posteriorly from 0 degrees to 30 degrees , remained relatively constant from 30 degrees to 90 degrees , and then moved further posterior from 90 degrees to maximum flexion. The in vivo cam-post engagement corresponded to increased posterior translation and reduced internal tibial rotation at high flexion of the posterior substituting total knee arthroplasty. The initial cam-post engagement was also mildly correlated with the maximum flexion angle of the knee (R = 0.51, p = 0.019). A later cam-post engagement might

  7. Advantage of Minimal Anterior Knee Pain and Long-term Survivorship of Cemented Single Radius Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty without Patella Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Baek, Ji-Hoon; Ko, Young-Bong

    2015-01-01

    Background The single radius total knee prosthesis was introduced with the advantage of reduced patellar symptoms; however, there is no long-term follow-up study of the same. The purpose of this study was to determine the survival rate of single radius posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty and patellofemoral complication rates in a consecutive series. Methods Seventy-one patients (103 knees) who underwent arthroplasty without patellar resurfacing using a single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis were followed up for a minimum 10 years. Clinical evaluation using Knee Society knee and function scores and radiologic evaluation were performed at regular intervals. Anterior knee pain as well as patellofemoral complications were evaluated with a simple questionnaire. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to estimate survival. Results Seventeen patients (23 knees) were excluded due to death (12 knees) or lost to follow-up (11 knees). Of the 80 knees enrolled, all femoral components and 78 tibial components were well fixed without loosening at final follow-up. Two revisions were performed because of tibial component loosening and periprosthetic joint infection. One patient with tibial component loosening refused to have revision surgery. No obvious tibial insert polyethylene wear was observed. The survivorships at 132 months were 96.7% using revision or pending revision as end points. Anterior knee pain was present in 6 patients (6 knees, 7.5%) at the latest follow-up. No patellofemoral complication requiring revision was encountered. Conclusions The single radius posterior-stabilized total knee prosthesis demonstrated an excellent minimum 10-year survivorship. The low rates of implant loosening and 7.5% of anterior knee pain as a patellofemoral complication are comparable with those reported for other modern total knee prosthesis. PMID:25729519

  8. Traumatic Dislodgement of Tibial Polyethylene Insert after a High-Flex Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Astoul Bonorino, Juan Felix; Slullitel, Pablo Ariel Isidoro; Kido, Gonzalo Rodrigo; Bongiovanni, Santiago; Vestri, Renato; Carbó, Lisandro

    2015-01-01

    Many pathologic entities can produce a painful total knee replacement (TKR) that may lead to potential prosthetic failure. Polyethylene insert dissociation from the tibial baseplate has been described most frequently after mobile-bearing and cruciate-retaining TKRs. However, only 3 tibial insert dislocations in primary fixed-bearing High-Flex posterior-stabilized TKRs have been reported. We present a new case of tibial insert dislocation in a High-Flex model that shares similarities and differences with the cases reported, facilitating the analysis of the potential causes, which still remain undefined. PMID:26457215

  9. Biomechanical Consequences of Anterior Femoral Notching in Cruciate-Retaining Versus Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jethanandani, Rishabh; Patwary, Mahbubul B; Shellito, Adam D; Meehan, John P; Amanatullah, Derek F

    2016-01-01

    Anterior femoral notching during total knee arthroplasty is a potential risk factor for periprosthetic supracondylar femur fracture. We conducted a study to determine if the design of the femoral implant changes the risk for periprosthetic supracondylar femur fractures after anterior cortical notching. An anterior cortical defect was created in 12 femoral polyurethane models. Six femora were instrumented with cruciate-retaining implants and 6 with posterior-stabilized implants. Each femur was loaded in external rotation along the anatomical axis. Notch depth and distance from anterior cortical notch to implant were recorded before loading, and fracture pattern was recorded after failure. There were no statistically significant differences in notch depth, distance from notch to implant, torsional stiffness, torque at failure, final torque, or fracture pattern between cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized femoral component designs. Periprosthetic fracture after anterior femoral notching is independent of the bone removed from the intercondylar notch. After notching, there likely is no significant difference in femoral strength in torsion between cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized designs. PMID:27552464

  10. Double-concave deformity of the polyethylene tibial post in posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Niki, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hideo; Yoshimine, Fumihiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Suda, Yasunori; Banks, Scott A

    2010-04-01

    This report describes a unique case of bilateral total knee arthroplasty necessitating revision of the polyethylene insert, which showed prominent marks on the tibial post resulting from repeated seiza-style sitting. The patient presented 7 years postoperatively with knee pain and flexion disturbance due to continuous joint effusion persisting for more than 4 months. Proliferating synovia throughout the joint revealed reactive synovitis to polyethylene particles. The retrieved polyethylene inserts displayed double-concave deformity of the tibial post with burnishing and creep in tibiofemoral articulation. The damage pattern of retrieved polyethylene inserts reflected the data from tibiofemoral contact location obtained using a shape-matching technique in the early postoperative phase. This case provides an example of damage to the polyethylene tibial post caused by a floor-sitting lifestyle and the potential clinical sequelae. PMID:19261434

  11. Highly Cross-Linked Versus Conventional Polyethylene in Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty at a Mean 5-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, R Michael; Lovro, Luke R; Smits, Shelly A; Ireland, Philip H

    2015-10-01

    Concerns of highly cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) exist regarding fatigue resistance and oxidation, particularly in posterior-stabilized (PS) designs. A prospective cohort study of 114 consecutive PS TKAs utilized conventional polyethylene in 50 knees and second-generation annealed XLPE in 64 TKAs. Clinical (Short-Form 36, Knee Society Scores, and LEAS) and radiographic outcomes were evaluated at a mean of 5 years in 103 TKAs. Mean KSS scores were 12 points higher (P=0.01) and SF-36 physical function subset 14 points higher (P=0.005) in the XLPE group. There was no radiographic osteolysis or mechanical failure related to the tibial polyethylene in either group. At 5-year follow-up, no deleterious effects related to highly cross-linked posterior stabilized tibial polyethylene inserts were observed. PMID:26021902

  12. Revision total knee arthroplasty with a cemented posterior-stabilized or constrained condylar prosthesis: a minimum 3-year and average 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Peters, C L; Hennessey, R; Barden, R M; Galante, J O; Rosenberg, A G

    1997-12-01

    The results of 57 revision total knee arthroplasties performed for aseptic failure between 1984 and 1992 with a cemented posterior-stabilized or constrained condylar prosthesis were reviewed at follow-up examinations at a minimum of 36 and an average of 62 months (range, 36-120 months). The reason for revision was aseptic loosening of 1 or both components in 32 knees (56%), instability in 16 knees (28%), polyethylene wear and osteolysis in 4 knees (7%), supracondylar femur fracture in 2 knees (4%), and a failed allograft, pain, and arthrofibrosis in 1 knee each (5% total). The average age of the patients at the time of the revision was 74 years (range, 38-90), and the original diagnosis for the majority of patients was osteoarthritis (74%). All of the revision prostheses were cemented posterior stabilized or constrained condylar-type implants. Bone deficiencies were grafted with cancellous allograft in contained defects and cortical allograft in noncontained defects. Five knees were reconstructed with allograft-prosthesis composites. The average modified Hospital for Special Surgery knee score improved from 49 to 82 (100 points possible) at final follow-up evaluation (P < 0.001). Seventy-nine percent of knees were graded as good or excellent. Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis predicted 94%+/-6.2% survival at 40 months and 75%+/-25% at 99 months. There were 4 clinical failures, 3 of which were related to residual instability in patients with a posterior-stabilized prosthesis. Complications (3 knees) were exclusively related to the extensor mechanism. Radiographically, overall knee alignment improved from 0.3 degrees varus to 3.0 degrees valgus. Fifty-six percent of tibial components were placed in slight varus alignment. Radiolucent lines occurred in 33% of knees, but there were no complete or progressive radiolucencies. Radiolucent lines were more prevalent adjacent to press-fit intramedullary femoral stems compared with cemented stems (P < .02), but the

  13. Continuous sagittal radiological evaluation of stair-climbing in cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasties using image-matching techniques.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Satoshi; Okazaki, Ken; Shimoto, Takeshi; Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Higaki, Hidehiko; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the in vivo kinematics of stair-climbing after posterior stabilized (PS) and cruciate retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using radiographic-based image-matching techniques. Mid-flexion anteroposterior stability was demonstrated in all knees after CR TKA. However, paradoxical femoral translation at low flexion angles was seen in both designs. The post-cam mechanism did not function after PS TKA. Larger posterior tibial slope in PS TKA was linked to forward sliding of the femur at mid-flexion and unintended anterior tibial post impingement at knee extension. CR TKA is more sagittally stable in mid-flexion during stair climbing and attention must be given to minimize posterior tibial slope when using late cam-post engaging PS TKA designs. PMID:25618811

  14. Incidence of patellar clunk syndrome in fixed versus high-flex mobile bearing posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Snir, Nimrod; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Diskin, Brian; Takemoto, Richelle; Hamula, Mathew; Meere, Patrick A

    2014-10-01

    The geometry of the intercondylar box plays a significant role in the development of patellar clunk syndrome. We reviewed the incidence of patella clunk at mid-to-long-term follow-up of a rotating high-flex versus fixed bearing posterior stabilized TKA design. 188-mobile and 223-fixed bearing TKAs were reviewed for complications, incidence of patellar clunk, treatment, recurrence rates, range of motion, and patient satisfaction. Patellar clunk developed in 22 knees in the mobile (11.7%) and in 4 (1.8%) in the fixed bearing group (P<0.001). 23 out of 26 cases resolved with a single arthroscopic treatment and 2 resolved with a second procedure. The mean postoperative range of motion was 122.4°. All but one patient reported overall satisfaction with the index procedure. In contrast with other recent studies we found a significant incidence of patellar clunk in high-flex mobile bearings. Despite the high rate of patellar clunk syndrome, overall patients did well and were satisfied with their outcomes. PMID:24961894

  15. Spontaneous dislocation of a mobile-bearing polyethylene insert after posterior-stabilized rotating platform total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hideo; Akamatsu, Yasushi; Taki, Naoya; Ota, Hirohiko; Mitsugi, Naoto; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2011-12-01

    We describe a dislocation after Scorpio mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty. This system is a rotating platform posterior-stabilized design and utilizes a single post as part of the metal tibial tray. Only one locking ring inside the socket of the polyethylene insert secures a tight connection with the post. Spontaneous dislocation between the polyethylene insert and the metal tray occurred at 22 months post surgery while rising from the supine position with slight knee flexion. Operative findings revealed failure of the locking ring and the original insert was replaced with a thicker insert. Our case and a duplicated saw bone model demonstrated that failure of the locking system resulted in the dislocation of the insert. PMID:21115353

  16. Kinematic Analysis of a Posterior-stabilized Knee Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Wen, Liang; Qu, Tie-Bing; Hou, Li-Li; Xiang, Dong; Bin, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The goal of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is to restore knee kinematics. Knee prosthesis design plays a very important role in successful restoration. Here, kinematics models of normal and prosthetic knees were created and validated using previously published data. Methods: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of a healthy, anticorrosive female cadaver were used to establish a model of the entire lower limbs, including the femur, tibia, patella, fibula, distal femur cartilage, and medial and lateral menisci, as well as the anterior cruciate, posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. The data from the three-dimensional models of the normal knee joint and a posterior-stabilized (PS) knee prosthesis were imported into finite element analysis software to create the final kinematic model of the TKA prosthesis, which was then validated by comparison with a previous study. The displacement of the medial/lateral femur and the internal rotation angle of the tibia were analyzed during 0–135° flexion. Results: Both the output data trends and the measured values derived from the normal knee's kinematics model were very close to the results reported in a previous in vivo study, suggesting that this model can be used for further analyses. The PS knee prosthesis underwent an abnormal forward displacement compared with the normal knee and has insufficient, or insufficiently aggressive, “rollback” compared with the lateral femur of the normal knee. In addition, a certain degree of reverse rotation occurs during flexion of the PS knee prosthesis. Conclusions: There were still several differences between the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis and a normal knee, suggesting room for improving the design of the PS knee prosthesis. The abnormal kinematics during early flexion shows that the design of the articular surface played a vital role in improving the kinematics of the PS knee prosthesis. PMID:25591565

  17. International Comparative Evaluation of Knee Replacement with Fixed or Mobile Non-Posterior-Stabilized Implants

    PubMed Central

    Namba, Robert; Graves, Stephen; Robertsson, Otto; Furnes, Ove; Stea, Susanna; Puig-Verdié, Lluis; Hoeffel, Daniel; Cafri, Guy; Paxton, Elizabeth; Sedrakyan, Art

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mobile-bearing total knee prostheses were designed to reduce wear and improve implant survivorship following total knee arthroplasty. However, the benefit of mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty remains unproven. Both mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty implants are available in posterior-stabilized and non-posterior-stabilized designs. With the latter, the implant does not recreate the function of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with a posterior-stabilizing cam mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to compare mobile-bearing, non-posterior-stabilized devices with fixed-bearing, non-posterior-stabilized devices used in total knee arthroplasty through a novel multinational study design. Methods: Through the use of a distributed health data network, primary total knee arthroplasties performed for osteoarthritis from 2001 to 2010 were identified from six national and regional total joint arthroplasty registries. Multivariate meta-analysis was performed with use of linear mixed models, with the primary outcome of interest being revision for any reason. Survival probabilities and their standard errors were extracted from each registry for each unique combination of the covariates. Results: A total of 319,616 patients (60% female) underwent non-posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty. A fixed-bearing, non-posterior-stabilized design was used in 258,190 (81%) of the knees and a mobile-bearing, non-posterior-stabilized design in 61,426 (19%) of the knees. Sixty-nine percent of the patients who received a fixed-bearing implant were over sixty-five years of age, compared with 63% of those who received a mobile-bearing implant. Mobile-bearing designs had a higher risk of revision, with a hazard ratio of 1.43 (95% confidence interval, 1.36 to 1.51; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Previous comparisons of mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty outcomes have been inconclusive. The current study utilized an advanced

  18. Fifteen year outcome of the ceraver hermes posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty: safety of the procedure with experienced and inexperienced surgeons.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe; Manicom, Olivier; Flouzat-Lachaniete, Charles Henri; Roussignol, Xavier; Filippini, Paolo; Poignard, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    We wished to determine whether total knee replacement (TKA) performed by young surgeons increased rates of mortality and complications compared with TKA performed by senior surgeons using the same model of arthroplasty. There were no significant pre-operative differences between the groups in terms of age, gender, height, weight, body mass index, diagnosis, comorbidity and duration of follow-up, which was a mean of 15 years in both groups. Hence, we assessed the 15 year survival of the first 150 Ceraver Posterior-Stabilized total knee arthroplasties undertaken by young surgeons (aged of less than 30 years) in formation in a single university hospital setting (Group B). We used survival curve analysis, with strict definitions regarding end-points, and evaluated a number of different endpoint criteria to assess the outcome and to compare the results with those obtained by the two seniors (aged of more than 40 years) with their 50 first implantations (Group A). The clinical results and survival rate of implants at intermediate to long-term follow-up were similar in both Groups. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, with revision as the endpoint for failure, showed that the rate of survival at ten years was 96% (95% CI, 93 to 100) in both groups. At fifteen years the rate of survival was 91% (95% CI, 85 to 97) in group B, and 92% (95% CI, 90 to 94) in group A. The implant used in this series appears particularly safe since the usual complications observed with posterior stabilized arthroplasties were not observed even with young surgeons. PMID:19572035

  19. Fifteen Year Outcome of the Ceraver Hermes Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty: Safety of the Procedure with Experienced and Inexperienced Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Hernigou, Philippe; Manicom, Olivier; Flouzat-Lachaniete, Charles Henri; Roussignol, Xavier; Filippini, Paolo; Poignard, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    We wished to determine whether total knee replacement (TKA) performed by young surgeons increased rates of mortality and complications compared with TKA performed by senior surgeons using the same model of arthroplasty. There were no significant pre-operative differences between the groups in terms of age, gender, height, weight, body mass index, diagnosis, comorbidity and duration of follow-up, which was a mean of 15 years in both groups. Hence, we assessed the 15 year survival of the first 150 Ceraver Posterior-Stabilized total knee arthroplasties undertaken by young surgeons (aged of less than 30 years) in formation in a single university hospital setting (Group B). We used survival curve analysis, with strict definitions regarding end-points, and evaluated a number of different endpoint criteria to assess the outcome and to compare the results with those obtained by the two seniors (aged of more than 40 years) with their 50 first implantations (Group A). The clinical results and survival rate of implants at intermediate to long-term follow-up were similar in both Groups. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, with revision as the endpoint for failure, showed that the rate of survival at ten years was 96% (95% CI, 93 to 100) in both groups. At fifteen years the rate of survival was 91% (95% CI, 85 to 97) in group B, and 92% (95% CI, 90 to 94) in group A. The implant used in this series appears particularly safe since the usual complications observed with posterior stabilized arthroplasties were not observed even with young surgeons. PMID:19572035

  20. Effect of Joint Line Elevation after Posterior-stabilized and Cruciate-retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty on Clinical Function and Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Song-Jie; Zhou, Yi-Xin; Jiang, Xu; Cheng, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Guang-Zhi; Ding, Hui; Yang, Ming-Lei; Zhu, Zhong-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Joint line (JL) is a very important factor for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to restore. The objective of this study was to evaluate the early clinical and kinematic results of TKAs with posterior-stabilized (PS) or cruciate retaining (CR) implants in which the JL was elevated postoperatively. Methods: Data were collected from patients who underwent TKA in our department between April 2011 and April 2014. The patients were divided into two groups based on the prosthesis they received (PS or CR). At 1-year postoperatively, clinical outcomes were evaluated by the American Knee Society (AKS) knee score, AKS function score, and patella score. In vivo kinematic analysis after TKA was performed on all patients and a previously validated three-dimensional to two-dimensional image registration technique was used to obtain the kinematic data. Anteroposterior (AP) translation of the medial and lateral femoral condyles, and axial rotation relative to the tibial plateau, were analyzed. The data were assessed using the Mann–Whitney test. Results: At time of follow-up, there were differences in the AKS knee scores (P = 0.005), AKS function scores (P = 0.025), patella scores (P = 0.015), and postoperative range of motions (P = 0.004) between the PS group and the CR group. In the PS group, the magnitude of AP translation for the medial and lateral condyle was 4.9 ± 3.0 mm and 12.8 ± 3.3 mm, respectively. Axial rotation of the tibial component relative to the femoral component was 12.9 ± 4.5°. In the CR group, the magnitude of AP translation for the medial and lateral condyle was 4.3 ± 3.5 mm and 7.9 ± 4.2 mm, respectively. The axial rotation was 6.7 ± 5.9°. There were statistically different between PS group and CR group in kinematics postoperatively. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that postoperative JL elevation had more adverse effects on the clinical and kinematic outcomes of CR TKAs than PS TKAs. PMID:26521783

  1. Contact stress analysis of the anterior tibial post in bi-cruciate stabilized and mobile-bearing posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty designs.

    PubMed

    Kuwashima, Umito; Hamai, Satoshi; Okazaki, Ken; Ikebe, Satoru; Higaki, Hidehiko; Mizu-Uchi, Hideki; Akasaki, Yukio; Murakami, Koji; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-07-01

    In posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA), unexpected wear and fracture of the tibial post due to anterior post impingement have been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the contact stress on the anterior aspect of the tibial post in four contemporary TKA designs. We evaluated one bi-cruciate stabilized design (Journey II) and three mobile-bearing PS designs (Vanguard RP, PFC Sigma RP, and NexGen LPS Mobile). The contact conditions at the anterior aspect of the tibial post were determined upon application of a posterior force of 100N to individual implants. Each measurement was sequentially performed five times, and the data were compared within and across designs using analysis of variance and a post-hoc test. The contact stress of the Journey II and Vanguard RP was less than the compressive yield stress for polyethylene (10MPa) at all tested flexion angles and degrees of rotation. The PFC Sigma RP did not show anterior tibial post impingement under any experimental conditions. The NexGen LPS Mobile demonstrated bilateral edge loading at the anterior tibial post and exceeded 10MPa of contact stress in some test conditions. Thus, the differences among implants in terms of the dimensions of the femoral anterior cam or intercondylar notch and the anterior aspect of the tibial post in the axial and sagittal planes led to significant differences in contact conditions. The present study helps the surgeon to be more aware that various contact conditions of the anterior aspect of the tibial post can occur in individual TKA designs. PMID:26999701

  2. Posterior stabilized versus cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty designs: conformity affects the performance reliability of the design over the patient population.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Marzieh M; Moazen, Mehran; Maniei, Ehsan; Jin, Zhongmin

    2015-04-01

    Commercially available fixed bearing knee prostheses are mainly divided into two groups: posterior stabilized (PS) versus cruciate retaining (CR). Despite the widespread comparative studies, the debate continues regarding the superiority of one type over the other. This study used a combined finite element (FE) simulation and principal component analysis (PCA) to evaluate "reliability" and "sensitivity" of two PS designs versus two CR designs over a patient population. Four fixed bearing implants were chosen: PFC (DePuy), PFC Sigma (DePuy), NexGen (Zimmer) and Genesis II (Smith & Nephew). Using PCA, a large probabilistic knee joint motion and loading database was generated based on the available experimental data from literature. The probabilistic knee joint data were applied to each implant in a FE simulation to calculate the potential envelopes of kinematics (i.e. anterior-posterior [AP] displacement and internal-external [IE] rotation) and contact mechanics. The performance envelopes were considered as an indicator of performance reliability. For each implant, PCA was used to highlight how much the implant performance was influenced by changes in each input parameter (sensitivity). Results showed that (1) conformity directly affected the reliability of the knee implant over a patient population such that lesser conformity designs (PS or CR), had higher kinematic variability and were more influenced by AP force and IE torque, (2) contact reliability did not differ noticeably among different designs and (3) CR or PS designs affected the relative rank of critical factors that influenced the reliability of each design. Such investigations enlighten the underlying biomechanics of various implant designs and can be utilized to estimate the potential performance of an implant design over a patient population. PMID:25703743

  3. Fracture of the polyethylene tibial post in a NexGen posterior-stabilized knee prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yen-Shuo; Chen, Wei-Ming; Huang, Ching-Kuei; Chiang, Chao-Ching; Chen, Tain-Hsiung

    2004-12-01

    We reported a case of fracture of a polyethylene tibial post in a 44-year-old woman after 3 years of NexGen posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN). Burnishing and delamination of the polyethylene was found around the breakage site of the post, especially over the anterior aspect of the post base. It indicated that the possible failure mechanism was the repeated anterior impingement between the metal femoral cam and polyethylene tibial post. After replacement of the broken insert, the patient obtained complete relief of previous symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first report of post breakage of a NexGen posterior-stabilized knee prosthesis. PMID:15586342

  4. Analysis of surface damage in retrieved carbon fiber-reinforced and plain polyethylene tibial components from posterior stabilized total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Wright, T M; Rimnac, C M; Faris, P M; Bansal, M

    1988-10-01

    The performance of carbon fiber-reinforced ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene was compared with that of plain (non-reinforced) polyethylene on the basis of the damage that was observed on the articulating surfaces of retrieved tibial components of total knee prostheses. Established microscopy techniques for subjectively grading the presence and extent of surface damage and the histological structure of the surrounding tissues were used to evaluate twenty-six carbon fiber-reinforced and twenty plain polyethylene components that had been retrieved after an average of twenty-one months of implantation. All of the tibial components were from the same design of total knee replacement. The two groups of patients from whom the components were retrieved did not differ with regard to weight, the length of time that the component had been implanted, the radiographic position and angular alignment of the component, the original diagnosis, or the reason for removal of the component. The amounts and types of damage that were observed did not differ for the two materials. For both materials, the amount of damage was directly related to the length of time that the component had been implanted. The histological appearance of tissues from the area around the component did not differ for the two materials, except for the presence of fragments of carbon fiber in many of the samples from the areas around carbon fiber-reinforced components. PMID:3053722

  5. Fracture of a polyethylene tibial post in a Scorpio posterior-stabilized knee prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hong Chul; Bae, Ji Hoon; Hwang, Jin Ho; Kim, Seung Joo; Yoon, Ji Yeol

    2009-06-01

    We report the case of a polyethylene tibial post fracture in a 72-year-old woman 14 months after a Scorpio posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty. The polyethylene wear was found around the fracture site of the post, especially over the anterior aspect of the post base. The failure mechanism of the post fracture in the present case was anterior impingement with excessive wear over the base of the anterior aspect of the tibial post, which became a stress-riser of post and cam articulation. This is the first report of a polyethylene tibial post fracture of a Scorpio PS prosthesis. PMID:19885065

  6. In vivo kinematic analysis of a high-flexion posterior stabilized fixed-bearing knee prosthesis in deep knee-bending motion.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Masashi; Tomita, Tetsuya; Yamazaki, Takaharu; Hozack, William J; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugamoto, Kazuomi

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in vivo kinematics of a high-flexion, posterior-stabilized fixed-bearing, total knee arthroplasty in weight-bearing deep knee-bending motion. A total of 20 knees implanted with the Scorpio Non-Restrictive Geometry knee system in 17 patients were assessed in this study. The Scorpio Non-Restrictive Geometry is a recent implant design with modifications made to accommodate a higher flexion range of motion and greater axial rotation, particularly during more functionally demanding activities. Patients were examined during a deep knee-bending motion using fluoroscopy, and femorotibial motion was determined using a 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional registration technique. The average flexion angle was 126.5 degrees (110 degrees -149 degrees ). The femoral component demonstrated a mean of 13.5 degrees (5.2 degrees -21 degrees ) external rotation. The external rotation increased up to maximum flexion. The pivot pattern was a medial pivot pattern similar to that reported in normal knee kinematics. PMID:18555651

  7. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction. PMID:27327919

  8. Total knee arthroplasty in patients with a previous patellectomy.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Jed; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Immerman, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Post-patellectomy patients represent a specific subgroup of patients that may develop arthritis and persistent knee pain and potentially require treatment with total knee arthroplasty. This article reviews the treatment and functional outcomes following total knee arthroplasty in patients with prior patellectomy. A case report is presented as an example of the clinical management of a post-patellectomy patient with significant knee pain and disability treated with total knee arthroplasty. Emphasis will be placed in decision- making, specifically with the use of a posterior stabilized implant. In addition, postoperative strengthening of the quadriceps is essential to compensate for the lack of the patella and increase the success of total knee arthroplasty in this subgroup of patients. PMID:24151951

  9. Tourniquetless Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Tourniquetless Total Knee Arthroplasty You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2010 OR- ...

  10. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  11. Total Knee Arthroplasty in a Patient with an Ankylosing Knee after Previous Patellectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Seung Joon; Park, Shi Hwan; Hong, Sung Min

    2014-01-01

    Patellectomized patients may have less satisfactory clinical outcomes following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) due to a decreased extensor mechanism efficiency and potential instability. Furthermore, the existing literature does not provide concrete guidance on the expected results of TKA or the type of implant that should be used in patellectomized patients. We present a case of a patient with an ankylosing knee who had undergone patellectomy due to gunshot injury 45 years ago and was treated with primary TKA using a posterior stabilized prosthesis at our institution. TKA using this prosthesis in the ankylosed knee with a previous history of patellectomy yielded good results in terms of postoperative clinical scores, range of motion and joint stability. PMID:25229049

  12. Total Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... as anti- inflammatory medications, cortisone injections, lubricating injections, physical therapy, or other surgeries A knee that has become ... your function. Other treatment options — including medications, injections, physical therapy, or other types of surgery — will also be ...

  13. The effect of sagittal laxity on function after posterior cruciate-retaining total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Jones, David P Gwynne; Locke, Conlin; Pennington, Jonathon; Theis, Jean-Claude

    2006-08-01

    We studied sagittal laxity using the KT1000 arthrometer in 97 total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) in 83 patients using the porous-coated anatomic knee or Duracon TKA (Howmedica, Rutherford, NJ) with 5.4- to 9.9-year follow-up. Two differing tibial inserts were used: flat (group 1) and anteroposterior (AP) lipped (group 2). Greater posterior and total laxity at 75 degrees was seen in group 2 despite the AP-lipped insert. No differences were seen in functional outcome scores between groups. No significant relationship was seen between laxity and functional outcome. Knees with more than 10 mm of AP laxity at 75 degrees had significantly less flexion and lower Knee Society Scores than knees with 5 to 10 mm of AP laxity. We conclude that the optimal sagittal laxity in this cruciate-retaining TKA is between 5 and 10 mm, although this may not hold for posterior-stabilized designs. PMID:16877159

  14. Gap Balanced Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus

    Gap Balanced Total Knee Arthroplasty – SIGMA® with AOX™ You must have Javascript enabled in your web browser. View Program Transcript Click Here to view the OR-Live, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2010 OR-Live, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Spontaneous Knee Ankylosis through Heterotopic Ossification after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boulezaz, Samuel; Gibon, Emmanuel; Loriaut, Philippe; Casabianca, Laurent; Rousseau, Romain; Dallaudiere, Benjamin; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a case of total ankylosis of the knee after a cruciate-sacrificing cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An 82-year-old female patient previously underwent primary TKA for osteoarthritis twenty years ago in our institution. She had recovered uneventfully and returned to her regular activities. There was no history of postsurgical trauma; however, she progressively lost knee range of motion. Radiographs revealed severe bridging heterotopic ossification. PMID:27119034

  16. The Painful Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Mitchell; Park, Andrew; Gerlinger, Tad L

    2016-04-01

    There are many causes of residual pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Evaluation and management begins with a comprehensive history and physical examination, followed by radiographic evaluation of the replaced and adjacent joints, as well as previous films of the replaced joint. Further workup includes laboratory analysis, along with a synovial fluid aspirate to evaluate the white blood cell count with differential as well as culture. Advanced imaging modalities may be beneficial when the diagnosis remains unclear. Revision surgery is not advisable without a clear diagnosis, as it may be associated with poor results. PMID:26772940

  17. Common controversies in total knee replacement surgery: Current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Vasileios S; Chytas, Dimitrios; Babis, George C

    2014-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is a widely used operation that has radically improved the quality of life of millions of people during the last few decades. However, some technical details, concerning the surgical procedure and the rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty, are still a matter of a strong debate. In this review of the literature, we have included the best evidence available of the last decade, in an effort to shed light on some of the most controversial subjects related to TKR surgery. Posterior-stabilized or cruciate-retaining prosthesis? To use a tourniquet during operation or not? Do patients need continuous passive motion for their post-surgery rehabilitation? To resurface patella or not? These are some of the most controversial topics that until now have been persistent dilemmas for the orthopedic surgeon. Results of this systematic review of the literature are highly controversial. These conflicting results are an indication that larger and more well conducted high quality trials are needed in order to gain more secure answers. At the same time, it is becoming apparent that a meticulous operative technique, respecting the soft tissue envelope and knowing the principles of alignment and soft tissue balancing, are some of the parameters that might contribute more to achieving the optimal results for the patients. PMID:25232522

  18. Deprivation and outcome of total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Murray, James R D; Birdsall, Paul D; Sher, J Lester; Deehan, David J

    2006-03-01

    Deprivation correlates with poor health and psychosocial variables can affect the symptoms of knee arthritis. Our aim was to determine the effect of deprivation on the level of knee function and health-related quality of life at the time of arthroplasty and 12 months after total knee replacement. From our database of over 2500 knee replacements, we analysed both clinical and quality of life outcome measures. We analysed the relationship between deprivation (by Townsend score), knee function (Knee Society Score) and health-related quality of life (Nottingham Health Profile) before total knee replacement (TKR) and at 12 months post-operation. There was no significant correlation between Townsend score, Knee Society Score and Nottingham Health Profile preoperatively or at 12 months after knee replacement, thus showing that there was no association between deprivation and the severity of knee arthritis at the time of joint replacement nor was there a relationship between deprivation and the short-term outcome from total knee replacement. PMID:16469499

  19. NAVIGATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire

    2015-01-01

    Navigation was the most significant advance in instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty over the last decade. It provides surgeons with a precision tool for carrying out surgery, with the possibility of intraoperative simulation and objective control over various anatomical and surgical parameters and references. Since the first systems, which were basically used to control the alignment of bone cutting referenced to the mechanical axis of the lower limb, many other surgical steps have been incorporated, such as component rotation, ligament balancing and arranging the symmetry of flexion and extension spaces, among others. Its efficacy as a precision tool with an effective capacity for promoting better alignment of the lower-limb axis has been widely proven in the literature, but the real value of optimized alignment and the impact of navigation on clinical results and the longevity of arthroplasty have yet to be established. PMID:27026979

  20. Metal block augmentation for bone defects of the medial tibia during primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stable and well-aligned placement of tibial components during primary total knee arthroplasty is challenging in patients with bone defects. Although rectangular block-shaped augmentations are widely used to reduce the shearing force between the tibial tray and bone compared with wedge-shaped augmentations, the clinical result remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the outcome of primary total knee arthroplasty with metal block augmentation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the 3- to 6-year follow-up results of 33 knees that underwent total knee arthroplasty with metal block augmentation (metal-augmented group) for bone defects of the medial tibia and 132 varus knees without bone defects as the control group. All surgeries were performed using posterior-stabilized cemented prostheses in both groups. Cemented stems were routinely augmented when the metal block was used. Results There were no differences in implant survival rates (100% in metal-augmented and 99.2% in control) or knee function scores (82 points in metal-augmented and 84 points in control) between the two groups at the final follow-up examination (P = 0.60 and P = 0.09, respectively). No subsidence or loosening of the tibial tray was observed. Of 33 metal-augmented total knee arthroplasties, a nonprogressive radiolucent line beneath the metal was detected in 10 knees (30.3%), and rounding of the medial edge of the tibia was observed in 17 knees (51.5%). Conclusions The clinical results of total knee arthroplasty with metal augmentation were not inferior to those in patients without bone defects. However, radiolucent lines were observed in 30.3%. PMID:24139483

  1. Mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty: a full traumatic rotation of 180°.

    PubMed

    Sudanese, Alessandra; Castiello, Emanuela; Affatato, Saverio

    2013-06-25

    From February 2008 to September 2012 we implanted 204 mobile-bearing knee prostheses in 192 patients. All the prostheses were cemented (both femoral and tibial components), and the patella was not replaced. Only one early complication of the implants (1/204 = 0.004%) occurred after a traumatic event as a full 180° rotation of the mobile-bearing polyethylene insert. A 78-year-old woman presented with swelling and severe pain at her right knee. This traumatic event was the only case among our mobile-bearing insert patients. 
The failed polyethylene inserts were retrieved and studied using a scanning electron microscope (SEM, ZEISS EVO 50 EP, Cambridge, UK) operating at 20 kV. 
Scratching and pitting were found on the UHMWPE insert perpendicular to the machining tracks for the concave surface. SEM micrographs of the insert showed burnishing on the concave surfaces and longitudinal scratches were clearly detectable and well-marked on the analyzed surfaces. 
A traumatic, fully rotating, polyethylene insert is rare and our case is the first report describing a traumatic event with a complete 180 degree rotation mobile-bearing in a total knee prosthesis. 
In the literature few reports discuss clinical outcomes after total knee arthroplasty in patients with Parkinson's disease and they cite mixed results. However, some authors suggest that posterior-stabilized and cruciate-retaining TKA should work well while others prefer cruciate-retaining, condylar constrained kinetics, or hinged devices. Although we did not implant a posterior-stabilized mobile-bearing total knee prosthesis or a constrained prosthesis, we obtained good clinical and radiological results at the 2-year followup. PMID:23653296

  2. Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty: A report of six cases

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Manuel; Ríos-Luna, Antonio; Pereiro, Javier; Fahandez-Saddi, Homid; Pérez-Caballer, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background: Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the worst form of instability. The incidence is from 0.15 to 0.5%. We report six cases of TKA dislocation and analyze the patterns of dislocation and the factors related to each of them. Materials and Methods: Six patients with dislocation of knee following TKA are reported. The causes for the dislocations were an imbalance of the flexion gap (n=4), an inadequate selection of implants (n=1), malrotation of components (n=1) leading to incompetence of the extensor mechanism, or rupture of the medial collateral ligament (MCC). The patients presented complained of pain, giving way episodes, joint effusion and difficulty in climbing stairs. Five patients suffered posterior dislocation while one anterior dislocation. An urgent closed reduction of dislocation was performed under general anaesthesia in all patients. All patients were operated for residual instability by revision arthroplasty after a period of conservative treatment. Results: One patient had deep infection and knee was arthrodesed. Two patients have a minimal residual lag for active extension, including a patient with a previous patellectomy. Result was considered excellent or good in four cases and fair in one, without residual instability. Five out of six patients in our series had a cruciate retaining (CR) TKA designs: four were revised to a posterior stabilized (PS) TKA and one to a rotating hinge design because of the presence of a ruptured MCL. Conclusion: Further episodes of dislocation or instability will be prevented by identifying and treating major causes of instability. The increase in the level of constraint and correction of previous technical mistakes is mandatory. PMID:20924487

  3. Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... and drill her. And how much are you rotating there? This rotates 3 degrees externally with respect ... femoral components that can be used. With the rotating knee system, a class III device at this ...

  4. Changes in knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Yoo, Sam; Miller, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes the knee joint in both intentional and unintentional, known and unknown, ways. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics play an important role in postoperative pain, function, satisfaction and revision, yet are largely unknown. Preoperative kinematics, postoperative kinematics or changes in kinematics may help identify causes of poor clinical outcome. Patellofemoral kinematics are challenging to record since the patella is obscured by the metal femoral component in X-ray and moves under the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinematic degrees of freedom having significant changes and to evaluate the variability in individual changes to allow future study of patients with poor clinical outcomes. We prospectively studied the 6 degrees of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral weightbearing kinematics, tibiofemoral contact points and helical axes of rotation of nine subjects before and at least 1 year after total knee arthroplasty using clinically available computed tomography and radiographic imaging systems. Normal kinematics for healthy individuals were identified from the literature. Significant differences existed between pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics, with the post-TKA kinematics being closer to normal. While on average the pre-total knee arthroplasty knees in this group displayed no pivoting (only translation), individually only five knees displayed this behaviour (of these, two showed lateral pivoting, one showed medial pivoting and one showed central pivoting). There was considerable variability postoperatively as well (five central, two lateral and two medial pivoting). Both preop and postop, flexion behaviour was more hinge-like medially and more rolling laterally. Helical axes were more consistent postop for this group. An inclusive understanding of the pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics and changes in kinematics due to total knee arthroplasty could improve implant design, patient diagnosis and

  5. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. Method This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. Results 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). Interpretation In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties. PMID:25267502

  6. TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT IN PATIENTS WITH BELOW-KNEE AMPUTATION

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Matthew D; Willey, Michael; Shurr, Donald G

    2010-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is reserved for patients with severe and disabling arthritis that is non-responsive to conservative measures. Based on existing data, total knee replacement is a safe and cost-effective treatment for alleviating pain and improving physical function in patients who do not respond to conservative therapy. Despite the large variation in health status of patients and types of prosthesis implanted, total knee replacement has proven to be a relatively low risk and successful operation. Each year in the United States surgeons perform approximately 300,000 TKR.1 Likewise, lower extremity amputation is commonly performed in the United States with an annual incidence of 110,000 per year.2 Nearly 70% of all lower extremity amputations are performed as the result of chronic vascular disease, followed by trauma (22%), congenital etiology and tumor (4% each).3 Approximately 50% of all lower extremity amputations are performed secondary to complications from Diabetes Mellitus. Norvell et al. demonstrated that patients who have previously undergone transtibial amputation and ambulate with a prosthesis are more likely to develop degenerative joint disease in the con-tralateral extremity than the ipsilateral extremity.4 Further, radiographic changes consistent with osteoporosis have been demonstrated in up to 88% of limbs that have undergone transtibial amputation.8 To our knowledge, there have been only three reported cases of total knee replacement in patients with ipsilateral transtibial amputation.5,7 The purpose of the present study is to review the existing data on total knee replacement in patients who have undergone transtibial amputation. Further we present a patient with a transtibial amputation who underwent contralateral total knee replacement. PMID:21045987

  7. Proximal tibial fracture following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Krause, Heike; Dunleavy, Kim

    2011-09-01

    The patient was a 74-year-old man, with a history of total knee arthoplasty 14 years earlier, after having sustained a pathological fracture of the proximal diaphysis of the left tibia following a fall. Given the unstable nature of the fracture and the severe osteolysis noted below the total knee arthroplasty, surgical management 1 day after the fall entailed packing cancellous bone graft into the defect and realigning the fracture. PMID:21885911

  8. The Attenborough total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Attenborough, C G

    1978-08-01

    The stabilised gliding knee prosthesis is a compromise between hinged joints and condylar prostheses. It is a two-piece implant designed to allow normal gliding movements of flexion and extension and which, stabilised by a connecting rod between the femoral and tibial components, allows a designed laxity of rotation and lateral movements. A modification of the original femoral component is described. Two hundred and forty-five knee replacement operations have been done between January 1973 and September 1977 and the results are reported. The results using this prosthesis are at least equal to those using hinged or condylar prostheses. So far there has been no case of spontaneous loosening of the components and the implant can be used in patients who, because of severe deformities and instability, are unsuitable for condylar prostheses. PMID:681407

  9. Surgical approaches for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Demesugh, Daniel Mue; Agarwal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    There are various surgical approaches to the knee joint and its surrounding structures and such approaches are generally designed to allow the best access to an area of pathology whilst safeguarding important surrounding structures. Controversy currently surrounds the optimal surgical approach for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The medial parapatellar arthrotomy, or anteromedial approach, has been the most used and has been regarded as the standard approach for exposure of the knee joint. It provides extensive exposure and is useful for open anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, total knee replacement, and fixation of intra-articular fractures. Because this approach has been implicated in compromise of the patellar circulation, some authors have advocated the subvastus, midvastus, and trivector approaches for exposure of the knee joint. While these approaches expose the knee from the medial side, the anterolateral approach exposes the knee joint from the lateral side. With careful planning and arthrotomy selection, the anterior aspect of the joint can be adequately exposed for TKA in different clinical scenarios. PMID:27182142

  10. Reduced Operating Time but Not Blood Loss With Cruciate Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Vermesan, Dinu; Trocan, Ilie; Prejbeanu, Radu; Poenaru, Dan V; Haragus, Horia; Gratian, Damian; Marrelli, Massimo; Inchingolo, Francesco; Caprio, Monica; Cagiano, Raffaele; Tatullo, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background There is no consensus regarding the use of retaining or replacing cruciate implants for patients with limited deformity who undergo a total knee replacement. Scope of this paper is to evaluate whether a cruciate sparing total knee replacement could have a reduced operating time compared to a posterior stabilized implant. Methods For this purpose, we performed a randomized study on 50 subjects. All procedures were performed by a single surgeon in the same conditions to minimize bias and only knees with a less than 20 varus deviation and/or maximum 15° fixed flexion contracture were included. Results Surgery time was significantly shorter with the cruciate retaining implant (P = 0.0037). The mean duration for the Vanguard implant was 68.9 (14.7) and for the NexGen II Legacy was 80.2 (11.3). A higher range of motion, but no significant Knee Society Scores at 6 months follow-up, was used as controls. Conclusions In conclusion, both implants had the potential to assure great outcomes. However, if a decision has to be made, choosing a cruciate retaining procedure could significantly reduce the surgical time. When performed under tourniquet, this gain does not lead to reduced blood loss. PMID:25584102

  11. Introduction of total knee arthroplasty in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Stucinskas, Justinas; Robertsson, Otto; Wingstrand, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose We have previously reported that the first 10 years of hip arthroplasty in Lithuania resulted in a higher cumulative revision rate than that observed in Sweden. We thus compared the corresponding results after introduaction of total knee replacement in Lithuania. Methods The 10-year revision rate for the first 595 primary ScanKnee arthroplasties inserted in Klaipeda, Lithuania, was compared to that for the first 1,280 ScanKnee primary arthroplasties inserted in Sweden. As in the hip replacement study, only patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were included. Primary knee arthroplasties without patellar resurfacing were included, and the endpoint was revision for any reason other than addition of a patellar component. Results We found that the cumulative revision rate was not statistically significantly different between the groups. The revision pattern was different, however, and we observed 24 isolated patellar component additions in Sweden, but none in Klaipeda. Interpretation Contrary to the results of our previous hip arthroplasty study, the cumulative revision rate after total knee arthroplasty was similar in the two groups. This suggests that compared to hip arthroplasty, the outcome of total knee arthroplasty was less dependent on surgical experience. The large difference regarding isolated patellar component additions may be explained by long-term accumulation of severe OA cases in Lithuania. To patients subject to a newly introduced surgical treatment offering great improvement in quality of life, patellofemoral pain may be a minor problem. Furthermore, patellar problems may not have seemed particularly relevant for the surgeons, considering the disability of other patients waiting to be treated. PMID:19297790

  12. Soft tissue balancing in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    MELONI, MARIA CHIARA; HOEDEMAEKER, RUSSALKA W.; VIOLANTE, BRUNO; MAZZOLA, CLAUDIO

    2014-01-01

    A good outcome in total knee arthroplasty depends on many factors: joint alignment, range of motion, patellar tracking and ligament stability. A correct soft tissue balance keeps the joint aligned in flexion and extension, and therefore constitutes the most important factor for durability of the implant. Indeed, incorrect soft tissue balancing is the primary cause of early implant failure necessitating revision surgery. Soft tissue releases, serving to correct imbalances, are performed until the flexion and extension gaps appear symmetrical and balanced. A knee is considered perfectly balanced when the flexion and extension gaps are perfectly rectangular and all the measurements are absolutely equal. PMID:25606540

  13. The Difficult Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Malkani, Arthur L; Hitt, Kirby D; Badarudeen, Sameer; Lewis, Courtland; Cherian, Jeffrey; Elmallah, Randa; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for the treatment of knee arthritis has substantially increased over the past decade. Because of its success, the indications for primary TKA have expanded to include younger patients who are more active, elderly patients who have multiple comorbidities, and patients who have more complex issues, such as posttraumatic arthritis and severe deformity. TKA also has been used to salvage failed unicondylar arthroplasty and osteotomies about the knee. Exposure may be challenging and outcomes may not be as successful in patients with soft-tissue contractures, such as a stiff knee, who undergo TKA. Bone graft or augments may be required to correct deformity and attain proper knee alignment in patients who have a substantial varus or valgus deformity. TKA is somewhat challenging in patients who have deformity, bone loss, contracture, or multiple comorbidities, or have had prior surgery; therefore, it is necessary for surgeons to be aware of some general principles that may help minimize complications and improve outcomes. PMID:27049194

  14. Anterior knee pain following primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shervin, David; Pratt, Katelyn; Healey, Travis; Nguyen, Samantha; Mihalko, William M; El-Othmani, Mouhanad M; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvements in technique and technology for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), anterior knee pain impacts patient outcomes and satisfaction. Addressing the prosthetic and surgical technique related causes of pain after TKA, specifically as it relates to anterior knee pain, can aid surgeons in addressing these issues with their patients. Design features of the femoral and patellar components which have been reported as pain generators include: Improper femoral as well as patellar component sizing or designs that result in patellofemoral stuffing; a shortened trochlear groove distance from the flange to the intercondylar box; and then surgical technique related issues resulting in: Lateral patellar facet syndrome; overstuffed patella/flange combination; asymmetric patellar resurfacing, improper transverse plane component rotation resulting in patellar subluxation/tilt. Any design consideration that allows impingement of extensor mechanism anatomical elements has the possibility of impacting outcome by becoming a pain generator. As the number of TKA procedures continues to increase, it is increasingly critical to develop improved, evidence based prostheses that maximize function and patient satisfaction while minimizing pain and other complications. PMID:26601061

  15. Total Knee Replacement as a Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Dorais, Marc; Haraoui, Boulos; Choquette, Denis; Abram, François; Beaulieu, André; Bessette, Louis; Morin, Frédéric; Wildi, Lukas M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To predict, using clinical and qMRI data, the incidence of total knee replacement (TKR) during the long-term follow-up of knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients who formerly received chondroitin sulfate (CS) or placebo treatment. Design. A post hoc intention-to-treat analysis to evaluate the incidence of TKR was done on knee OA patients who had participated in a 12-month trial evaluating the impact of CS (800 mg/d) versus placebo for 6 months, followed by a 6-month open-phase in which all patients received CS. Additionally, the clinical and qMRI predictors of TKR were determined. Results. Thirteen TKRs were performed in the population after a 4-year follow-up. More TKRs were performed in the placebo group than in the CS group (69% vs. 31%, P = 0.150, logistic regression). The statistically significant predictors of TKRs were, at baseline, higher WOMAC pain and function scores, presence of bone marrow lesions (BMLs), and higher C-reactive protein levels. Loss of medial cartilage volume and increase in WOMAC pain and function at one-year were also predictors of TKR. Multivariate analyses revealed that baseline presence of BML and higher WOMAC pain score were independent predictors. Time to occurrence of the TKR also favored the CS group versus placebo (log-rank, P = 0.094). Conclusion. Symptoms such as knee pain and function, presence of BML, and cartilage volume loss predict the long-term occurrence of a “hard” outcome such as TKR. PMID:26069668

  16. Periprosthetic Fractures Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Ki

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty may occur in any part of the femur, tibia and patella, and the most common pattern involves the supracondylar area of the distal femur. Supracondylar periprosthetic fractures frequently occur above a well-fixed prosthesis, and risk factors include anterior femoral cortical notching and use of the rotational constrained implant. Periprosthetic tibial fractures are frequently associated with loose components and malalignment or malposition of implants. Fractures of the patella are much less common and associated with rheumatoid arthritis, use of steroid, osteonecrosis and malalignment of implants. Most patients with periprosthetic fractures around the knee are the elderly with poor bone quality. There are many difficulties and increased risk of nonunion after treatment because reduction and internal fixation is interfered with by preexisting prosthesis and bone cement. Additionally, previous soft tissue injury is another disadvantageous condition for bone healing. Many authors reported good clinical outcomes after non-operative treatment of undisplaced or minimally displaced periprosthetic fractures; however, open reduction or revision arthroplasty was required in displaced fractures or fractures with unstable prosthesis. Periprosthetic fractures around the knee should be prevented by appropriate technique during total knee arthroplasty. Nevertheless, if a periprosthetic fracture occurs, an appropriate treatment method should be selected considering the stability of the prosthesis, displacement of fracture and bone quality. PMID:25750888

  17. Joint Line Reconstruction in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-16

    Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty Because of; Loosening; Instability; Impingement; or Other Reasons Accepted as Indications for TKA Exchange.; The Focus is to Determine the Precision of Joint Line Restoration in Navigated vs. Conventional Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty

  18. Two- to Four-Year Follow-up Results of Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a New High-Flexion Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Man Soo; Koh, In Jun; Jang, Sung Won; Jeon, Neung Han

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate minimum 2-year follow-up results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) performed using a new high-flexion prosthesis design (LOSPA). Materials and Methods The 2- to 4-year results of 191 consecutive TKAs (177 patients) with the LOSPA posterior-stabilized prosthesis were evaluated. The patients were assessed clinically and radiographically using the Knee Society scoring system (KSS) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Results The mean range of motion (ROM) increased significantly from 117.4° (range, 75° to 140°) preoperatively to 126.7° (range, 80° to 144°) postoperatively (p<0.001). The mean KSS and WOMAC scores improved significantly from 121.4 (range, 42 to 185) and 56.1 (range, 23 to 88) preoperatively to 174.0 (range, 130 to 200) and 16.4 (range, 0 to 85) postoperatively, respectively (both, p<0.001). One knee required revision for deep infection. No knee had aseptic loosening or osteolysis. Radiolucent lines were noted in 15 knees (7.9%). Conclusions The new high-flexion total knee prosthesis resulted in no early aseptic loosening of the component and improved postoperative ROM comparable to other high-flexion TKA prostheses at 2- to 4-year follow-ups. PMID:26955612

  19. Single radius total knee arthroplasty: PCL sacrifice without substitution yields excellent outcomes minimum 8-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Harwin, Steven F; Kester, Mark

    2010-04-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is bone conserving and relies on the retained ligament to provide posterior stability. PCL sacrifice allows for easier correction of deformity, a better range of motion, and predictable kinematics. It was hypothesized that using a novel single radius TKA design, coupled with a double-dished articular geometry, would yield satisfactory stability and outcomes by sacrificing the PCL without substitution. A consecutive series of 94 cemented Scorpio (Stryker Orthopaedics) single radius PCL retaining total knee arthroplasties using that strategy, with a minimum 8-year follow-up, is presented. An early return of range of motion and extensor mechanism function was also demonstrated. No cases of instability and no revisions related to the technique occurred. As predicted, clinical and radiographic outcomes were excellent regarding pain relief and functional activities. PMID:20437364

  20. Fracture Blisters After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Halawi, Mohamad J

    2015-08-01

    Fracture blisters are tense vesicles that arise on markedly swollen skin overlying traumatized soft tissue. While this relatively uncommon complication has been well described in the trauma literature, this article reports for the first time a case of fracture blisters after primary total knee arthroplasty. The fracture blisters developed within 36 hours of surgery and were associated with profound swelling and erythema. There was no evidence of vascular injury, compartment syndrome, iatrogenic fracture, or deep venous thrombosis. The patient was treated with leg elevation, loosely applied nonadhesive dressings, and a short course of oral antibiotics after skin desquamation. Blood-filled blisters required longer time to reepithelialization than fluid-filled blisters. Knee stiffness developed because of pain and fear of participation with physical therapy, but the patient was able to resume intensive rehabilitation after resolution of the blisters. Patient factors, surgical factors, and review of the literature are discussed. PMID:26251947

  1. A low-riding patella in posterior stabilised total knee replacements alters quadriceps' mechanical advantage, resulting in reduced knee flexion moments.

    PubMed

    Ward, T R; Pandit, H; Hollinghurst, D; Zavatsky, A B; Gill, H S; Thomas, N P; Murray, D W

    2012-08-01

    Abnormal in vivo Total Knee Replacement (TKR) kinetics is influenced by a range of factors, particularly by changes to the knee's geometric parameters such as the patellar tendon moment arm (PTMA). In this study, ground reaction force (GRF) measurements were combined with simultaneous fluoroscopic image measurements to investigate the relationship between abnormal TKR kinetics and geometric parameters. Nine Scorpio Cruciate Retaining (CR) TKR (Stryker, Newbury, UK), nine Scorpio Posterior Stabilized (PS) TKR and seven normal subjects performed a step-up activity on a forceplate in view of a fluoroscope. The TKR subjects were part of a larger ongoing randomised controlled trial. The maximum external knee flexion moment was 22.0% lower in the Scorpio PS group compared to the Scorpio CR group. No significant differences in PTMA were found between the groups. The Scorpio PS had a low-riding patella, with a 30.7% reduction in patellar height compared to the Scorpio CR. This was probably due to using a thick tibial insert after PCL release in the PS, and led to an 8° increase in patellar flexion angle which altered the patellar mechanism and reduced quadriceps' mechanical advantage. Consequently, PS subjects stepped-up more cautiously with a reduced knee flexion moment. PMID:22015171

  2. Revision of the Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty with total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Memişoğlu, Kaya; Müezzinoğlu, U Sefa; Kesemenli, Cumhur Cevdet

    2010-01-01

    The Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty, first designed and performed by Frank Gunston in 1971, is the first prosthesis considering the natural knee biomechanics. Although the polycentric knee arthroplasty showed encouraging results to relieve pain and to preserve the preoperative range of motion and joint instability, the improvements in prosthesis design and arthroplasty technology rapidly made the polycentric knee prosthesis obsolete. Herein, we report a 58-year old male patient who had revision of the Gunston polycentric knee arthroplasty with total knee arthroplasty performed 32 years after the initial operation. PMID:21343693

  3. Postoperative Autologous Reinfusion in Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Crescibene, A.; Martire, F.; Gigliotti, P.; Rende, A.; Candela, M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgeries for total knee replacement (TKR) are increasing and in this context there is a need to develop new protocols for management and use of blood transfusion therapy. Autologous blood reduces the need for allogeneic blood transfusion and the aim of the present study was to verify the safety and the clinical efficacy. An observational retrospective study has been conducted on 124 patients, undergoing cemented total knee prosthesis replacement. Observed population was stratified into two groups: the first group received reinfusion of autologous blood collected in the postoperative surgery and the second group did not receive autologous blood reinfusion. Analysis of data shows that patients undergoing autologous blood reinfusion received less homologous blood bags (10.6% versus 30%; p = 0.08) and reduced days of hospitalization (7.88 ± 0.7 days versus 8.96 ± 2.47 days for the control group; p = 0.03). Microbiological tests were negative in all postoperatively salvaged and reinfused units. Our results emphasize the effectiveness of this procedure and have the characteristics of simplicity, low cost (€97.53 versus €103.79; p < 0.01), and easy reproducibility. Use of autologous drainage system postoperatively is a procedure that allows reducing transfusion of homologous blood bags in patients undergoing TKR. PMID:26442168

  4. Popliteal Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young-Soo; Hwang, Yeok-Gu; Savale, Abhijit Prakash

    2014-01-01

    An early diagnosis of popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm-a sequela of popliteal artery trauma-is difficult owing to its late presentation following total knee arthroplasty. The incidence of a popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm with a hematoma presenting only a peripheral nerve injury after total knee arthroplasty is also uncommon in the absence of common diagnostic features such as a pulsatile swelling with an audible bruit on auscultation. In the present report, we describe popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm following total knee arthroplasty. PMID:24944978

  5. Constrained Implants in Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Touzopoulos, Panagiotis; Drosos, Georgios I; Ververidis, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-05-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is a successful procedure for pain relief and functional restoration in patients with advanced osteoarthritis. The number of TKRs is increasing, and this has led to an increase in revision surgeries. The key to long-term success in both primary and revision TKR is stability, as well as adequate and stable fixation between components and underlying bone. In the vast majority of primary TKRs and in some revision cases, a posterior cruciate retaining or a posterior cruciate substituting device can be used. In some primary cases with severe deformity or ligamentous instability and in most of the revision cases, a more constrained implant is required. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature concerning the use of condylar constrained knee (CCK) and rotating hinge (RH) implants in primary and revision cases focusing on the indications and results. According to this review, although excellent and very good results have been reported, there are limitations of the existing literature concerning the indications for the use of constrained implants, the absence of long-term results, and the limited comparative studies. PMID:26055025

  6. Total knee replacement with and without patellar resurfacing: a prospective, randomised trial using the profix total knee system.

    PubMed

    Smith, A J; Wood, D J; Li, M-G

    2008-01-01

    We have examined the differences in clinical outcome of total knee replacement (TKR) with and without patellar resurfacing in a prospective, randomised study of 181 osteoarthritic knees in 142 patients using the Profix total knee system which has a femoral component with features considered to be anatomical and a domed patellar implant. The procedures were carried out between February 1998 and November 2002. A total of 159 TKRs in 142 patients were available for review at a mean of four years (3 to 7). The patients and the clinical evaluator were blinded in this prospective study. Evaluation was undertaken annually by an independent observer using the knee pain scale and the Knee Society clinical rating system. Specific evaluation of anterior knee pain, stair-climbing and rising from a seated to a standing position was also undertaken. No benefit was shown of TKR with patellar resurfacing over that without resurfacing with respect to any of the measured outcomes. In 22 of 73 knees (30.1%) with and 18 of 86 knees (20.9%) without patellar resurfacing there was some degree of anterior knee pain (p = 0.183). No revisions related to the patellofemoral joint were performed in either group. Only one TKR in each group underwent a re-operation related to the patellofemoral joint. A significant association between knee flexion contracture and anterior knee pain was observed in those knees with patellar resurfacing (p = 0.006). PMID:18160498

  7. Patellar meniscus in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lavernia, Carlos J; Sheldon, Daniel A; Hernández, Victor H; D'Apuzzo, Michele R; Lee, David J; Krackow, Kenneth A; Hungerford, David S

    2007-04-01

    Twenty-four clinically successful, autopsy retrieved porous-coated anatomic total knee arthroplasty (TKA) specimens were evaluated to determine the structure and function of the patellar meniscus. Mean implant duration was 76 months (range: 11-135 months). Histological examination showed the patellar meniscus to be composed of dense fibrous tissue with scattered regions of chronic granulomatous response to polyethylene debris. Patellar wear and polyethylene exposed patellar surface area were correlated with implant duration (r = 0.47, P = .03; r = 0.52, P = .06). Postoperative patellar tilt was also associated with patellar component wear (r = 0.64, P = .03). No other clinical measures were significantly associated with patellar wear or exposed surface area. Additional research is needed to determine what role, if any, the patellar meniscus plays in TKA outcomes. PMID:17486906

  8. Blood Management Strategies in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Michael; Martinez Martos, Sara; Beller, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    A perioperative blood management program is one of a number of important elements for successful patient care in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and surgeons should be proactive in its application. The aims of blood conservation are to reduce the risk of blood transfusion whilst at the same time maximizing hemoglobin (Hb) in the postoperative period, leading to a positive effect on outcome and cost. An individualized strategy based on patient specific risk factors, anticipated blood loss and comorbidities are useful in achieving this aim. Multiple blood conservation strategies are available in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods and can be employed in various combinations. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of preoperative Hb optimization, minimizing blood loss and evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Given TKA is an elective procedure, a zero allogenic blood transfusion rate should be the aim and an achievable goal. PMID:27595070

  9. Blood Management Strategies in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Liu, David; Dan, Michael; Martinez Martos, Sara; Beller, Elaine

    2016-09-01

    A perioperative blood management program is one of a number of important elements for successful patient care in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and surgeons should be proactive in its application. The aims of blood conservation are to reduce the risk of blood transfusion whilst at the same time maximizing hemoglobin (Hb) in the postoperative period, leading to a positive effect on outcome and cost. An individualized strategy based on patient specific risk factors, anticipated blood loss and comorbidities are useful in achieving this aim. Multiple blood conservation strategies are available in the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative periods and can be employed in various combinations. Recent literature has highlighted the importance of preoperative Hb optimization, minimizing blood loss and evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Given TKA is an elective procedure, a zero allogenic blood transfusion rate should be the aim and an achievable goal. PMID:27595070

  10. [Application and development of kinematical alighment during total knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Zhang Guo-dong; Yang, Chen; Yang, Guang; Qi, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty is an emerging process, and draws more and more attentions from scholars. Knee joint is close to normal joint after TKA through kinematical alighment, which has good clinical results and functional scores, and not increase failure probility. Thus, it may increase joint stress of patella-femur joint, lead to patellar maltracking and increase abrasion. The paper summarized defination and basical principle, operative method, clinical outcomes and deficiency of kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty, in order to choose a better way for kinematical alignment during total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26911130

  11. SCREW MIGRATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: CLINICAL REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernando; Tomé, José; Barreto, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Complications from total knee arthroplasty caused by the implanted material are rare, with the exception of polyethylene wear. Descriptions of screw migration into the knee joint cavity are very rare. The authors report intra-articular migration of a polyethylene safety screw in a case of total knee arthroplasty, with sacrifice of the posterior cruciate ligament (TKA Performance; Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA), which necessitated new surgery to remove the screw, replace the polyethylene insert and emplace a new fixation screw. PMID:27022526

  12. A Dutch Survey on Circumpatellar Electrocautery in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    van Jonbergen, Hans-Peter W.; Barnaart, Alexander F.W.; Verheyen, Cees C.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty is estimated to occur in 4-49% of patients. Some orthopedic surgeons use circumpatellar electrocautery (diathermy) to reduce the prevalence of postsurgical anterior knee pain; however, the extent of its use is unknown. Materials and Methodology: In April 2009, a postal questionnaire was sent to all 98 departments of orthopedic surgery in The Netherlands. The questions focused on the frequency of total knee arthroplasties, patellar resurfacing, and the use of circumpatellar electrocautery. Results: The response rate was 92%. A total of 18,876 TKAs, 2,096 unicompartmental knee arthroplasties, and 215 patellofemoral arthroplasties are performed yearly in The Netherlands by the responding orthopedic surgeons. Of the orthopedic surgeons performing TKA, 13% always use patellar resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, 49% use selective patellar resurfacing, and 38% never use it. Fifty-six percent of orthopedic surgeons use circumpatellar electrocautery when not resurfacing the patella, and 32% use electrocautery when resurfacing the patella. Conclusion: There is no consensus among Dutch orthopedic surgeons on the use of patellar resurfacing or circumpatellar electrocautery in total knee replacement performed for osteoarthritis. A prospective clinical trial is currently underway to fully evaluate the effect of circumpatellar electrocautery on the prevalence of anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty. PMID:21228917

  13. Backside wear in modern total knee designs.

    PubMed

    Jayabalan, Prakash; Furman, Bridgette D; Cottrell, Jocelyn M; Wright, Timothy M

    2007-02-01

    Although modularity affords various options to the orthopedic surgeon, these benefits come at a price. The unintended bearing surface between the back surface of the tibial insert and the metallic tray results in micromotion leading to polyethylene wear debris. The objective of this study was to examine the backside wear of tibial inserts from three modern total knee designs with very different locking mechanisms: Insall-Burstein II (IB II), Optetrak, and Advance. A random sample of 71 inserts were obtained from our institution's retrieval collection and examined to assess the extent of wear, depth of wear, and wear damage modes. Patient records were also obtained to determine patient age, body mass index, length of implantation, and reason for revision. Modes of wear damage (abrasion, burnishing, scratching, delamination, third body debris, surface deformation, and pitting) were then scored in each zone from 0 to 3 (0 = 0%, 1 = 0-10%, 2 = 10-50%, and 3 = >50%). The depth of wear was subjectively identified as removal of manufacturing identification markings stamped onto the inferior surface of the polyethylene. Both Advance and IB II polyethylene inserts showed significantly higher scores for backside wear than the Optetrak inserts. All IB II and Advance implants showed evidence of backside wear, whereas 17% (5 out of 30) of the retrieved Optetrak implants had no observable wear. There were no significant differences when comparing the depth of wear score between designs. The locking mechanism greatly affects the propensity for wear and should be considered when choosing a knee implant system. PMID:18751767

  14. Infection following total knee arthroplasty: prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Kevin L; Konigsberg, Beau S

    2012-01-01

    Despite diligent efforts to prevent infection, prosthetic knee infection occurs in up to 2% of patients treated with total knee arthroplasty. Although the risk of infection is relatively low, the effects are considerable. The number of total knee arthroplasties is projected to increase by more than 600% by 2030, resulting in 3.48 million knee replacements, with a possible 70,000 prosthetic knee infections. Infection will be the most common indication for revision total knee arthroplasty. Prophylactic antibiotics and minimizing patient risk factors are critical in preventing infections. Staphylococcus is the most common organism in infected total knee arthroplasties. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are crucial to the long-term outcomes of patients with prosthetic joint infections. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein level, and interleukin-6 serum level should be checked in all patients with clinical signs of infection or unexplained pain or stiffness. The surgical management of a prosthetic knee infection depends on several factors, but none is more important than the timing of infection in relationship to the index surgery. With a success rate of 80% to 90%, two-stage component exchange remains the treatment of choice for chronically infected total knee arthroplasties. PMID:22301250

  15. In vivo determination of total knee arthroplasty kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Bertin, Kim; Rosenberg, Aaron; Kennedy, William

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if consistent posterior femoral rollback of an asymmetrical posterior cruciate retaining (PCR) total knee arthroplasty was mostly influenced by the implant design, surgical technique, or presence of a well-functioning posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Three-dimensional femorotibial kinematics was determined for 80 subjects implanted by 3 surgeons, and each subject was evaluated under fluoroscopic surveillance during a deep knee bend. All subjects in this present study having an intact PCL had a well-functioning PCR knee and experienced normal kinematic patterns, although less in magnitude than the normal knee. In addition, a surprising finding was that, on average, subjects without a PCL still achieved posterior femoral rollback from full extension to maximum knee flexion. The findings in this study revealed that implant design did contribute to the normal kinematics demonstrated by subjects having this asymmetrical PCR total knee arthroplasty.

  16. Acute gouty arthritis in a patient after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fokter, Samo K; Repse-Fokter, Alenka

    2010-06-01

    Symptomatic gout in an artificial joint is exceptionally rare. We present a 68-year-old male patient who developed progressive knee pain and swelling one year after the cemented total arthroplasty of his left knee. The diagnosis was confirmed by crystal identification in the synovial fluid. Beside thorough workout to rule out infection in a painful and inflamed prosthetic knee, specific history of gout should be sought and fluid aspirate examined cytologically and under polarised light for crystal arthropathy. PMID:20552289

  17. Stress fracture of the proximal fibula after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vaish, Abhishek; Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of proximal fibular fatigue fracture developing 14 years after total knee arthroplasty in a known case of rheumatoid arthritis. A valgus deformity of the knee can put abnormal stress on the upper fibula leading to its failure. We believe that, as the fibula acts as an important lateral strut, its disruption due to a fracture led to rapid progress of the valgus deformity of the knee in this patient. PMID:27107057

  18. TREATMENT OF INFECTION AFTER TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Ricardo de Paula Leite; Cinagawa, Eduardo Hitoshi Tsuge; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Honda, Emerson Kiyoshi; Klautau, Giselle Burlamaqui; Salles, Mauro José Costa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To identify and compare the rate of success of therapeutic modalities applied in surgeries for the treatment of infections associated with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), and to evaluate the functional outcome and pain in different therapeutic modalities by means of quality of life scores. Methods: We evaluated all patients who developed periprosthetic infection after TKA for primary or secondary osteoarthritis, in the period from January 1st, 2008 to December 31st, 2010. Results: In the study period, 29 patients with TKA had infection, and 12 of these underwent debridement and retention of the prosthesis (D+R), seven received two-stage and six one-stage exchange arthroplasties, and four patients were treated with suppressive antibiotic therapy because they could not undergo another surgical procedure. Conclusion: The D+R, one-stage revision and two-stage revision success rates were 75%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively. The best results of quality of life (QoL) and function occur in patients undergoing D+R. In contrast, the worst QoL and functional results were obtained in patients treated with two-stage revision arthroplasty. Level of Evidence II, Prognostic Studies - Investigating the Effect of a Patient Characteristic on the Outcome of Disease. PMID:26981029

  19. Patient Satisfaction after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful and effective surgical options to reduce pain and restore function for patients with severe osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article was to review and summarize the recent literatures regarding patient satisfaction after TKA and to analyze the various factors associated with patient dissatisfaction after TKA. Patient satisfaction is one of the many patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). Patient satisfaction can be evaluated from two categories, determinants of satisfaction and components of satisfaction. The former have been described as all of the patient-related factors including age, gender, personality, patient expectations, medical and psychiatric comorbidity, patient's diagnosis leading to TKA and severity of arthropathy. The latter are all of the processes and technical aspects of TKA, ranging from the anesthetic and surgical factors, type of implants and postoperative rehabilitations. The surgeon- and patient-reported outcomes have been shown to be disparate occasionally. Among various factors that contribute to patient satisfaction, some factors can be managed by the surgeon, which should be improved through continuous research. Furthermore, extensive discussion and explanation before surgery will reduce patient dissatisfaction after TKA. PMID:26955608

  20. Patellar malalignment treatment in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giorgio; Familiari, Filippo; Ranuccio, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Summary The patella, with or without resurfacing, plays a fundamental role in the success of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Patellofemoral joint complications are due to problems related to the patient, to the surgical technique, or to the design of the components. Patellar tracking is influenced by several factors: a severe preoperative valgus, the presence of pre-existing patellofemoral dysplasia, the design of the femoral component, the surgical approach, the Q angle, the mechanical alignment of the limb, the tightness of the lateral retinaculum, the positioning of the patellar component in the proximal-distal and medial-lateral directions, the patella height, the patella (native or resurfaced) thickness, the size of the femoral and the tibial components, and the alignment and rotation of the components. Several factors are crucial to prevent patellar maltracking in TKA: the use of an anatomical femoral component, a meticulous surgical technique, careful dynamic intraoperative assessment of patellar tracking, and, if necessary, the achievement of an adequate lateral release. PMID:25606506

  1. Total knee arthroplasty after high tibial osteotomy. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    van Raaij, Tom M; Reijman, Max; Furlan, Andrea D; Verhaar, Jan AN

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous osteotomy may compromise subsequent knee replacement, but no guidelines considering knee arthroplasty after prior osteotomy have been developed. We describe a systematic review of non-randomized studies to analyze the effect of high tibial osteotomy on total knee arthroplasty. Methods A computerized search for relevant studies published up to September 2007 was performed in Medline and Embase using a search strategy that is highly sensitive to find nonrandomized studies. Included were observational studies in which patients had total knee arthroplasty performed after prior high tibial osteotomy. Studies that fulfilled these criteria, were assessed for methodologic quality by two independent reviewers using the critical appraisal of observational studies developed by Deeks and the MINORS instrument. The study characteristics and data on the intervention, follow-up, and outcome measures, were extracted using a pre-tested standardized form. Primary outcomes were: knee range of motion, knee clinical score, and revision surgery. The grade of evidence was determined using the guidelines of the GRADE working group. Results Of the 458 articles identified using our search strategy, 17 met the inclusion criteria. Fifteen studies were cohort study with a concurrent control group, one was a historical cohort study and one a case-control study. Nine studies scored 50% or more on both methodological quality assessments. Pooling of the results was not possible due to the heterogeneity of the studies, and our analysis could not raise the overall low quality of evidence. No significant differences between primary total knee arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty after osteotomy were found for knee range of motion in four out of six studies, knee clinical scores in eight out of nine studies, and revision surgery in eight out of eight studies after a median follow-up of 5 years. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that osteotomy does not compromise subsequent knee

  2. Total knee arthroplasty in a rheumatoid arthritic knee with large geode: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shih, H N; Hsu, K Y; Tan, C F; Hsueh, S; Hsu, R W

    1997-09-01

    Geodes (subchondral cysts) are a well-known manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis. Solitary cysts or cysts larger than 2 cm are not generally found in the knee joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We report a case of RA involving both knees with a giant geode over the right proximal tibia. Surgical treatment was performed including synovectomy, cyst enucleation and packing of autogenous bone chips followed by primary total knee arthroplasty. The postsurgical result was excellent with the knee restored to good function and complete healing of the cystic lesion. PMID:9397618

  3. Patients’ decision making in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, T.; Griffin, D.; Barlow, D.; Realpe, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A patient-centred approach, usually achieved through shared decision making, has the potential to help improve decision making around knee arthroplasty surgery. However, such an approach requires an understanding of the factors involved in patient decision making. This review’s objective is to systematically examine the qualitative literature surrounding patients’ decision making in knee arthroplasty. Methods A systematic literature review using Medline and Embase was conducted to identify qualitative studies that examined patients’ decision making around knee arthroplasty. An aggregated account of what is known about patients’ decision making in knee arthroplasties is provided. Results Seven studies with 234 participants in interviews or focus groups are included. Ten themes are replicated across studies, namely: expectations of surgery; coping mechanisms; relationship with clinician; fear; pain; function; psychological implications; social network; previous experience of surgery; and conflict in opinions. Conclusions This review is helpful in not only directing future research to areas that are not understood, or require confirmation, but also in highlighting areas that future interventions could address. These include those aimed at delivering information, which are likely to affect the satisfaction rate, demand, and use of knee arthroplasties. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4;163–169. PMID:26450640

  4. Total knee arthroplasty using subvastus approach in stiff knee: A retrospective analysis of 110 cases

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilen A; Patil, Hitendra Gulabrao; Vaishnav, Vinod O; Savale, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subvastus approach used in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is known to produce an earlier recovery but is not commonly utilized for TKA when the preoperative range of motion (ROM) of the knee is limited. Subvastus approach is known for its ability to give earlier recovery due to less postoperative pain and early mobilization (due to rapid quadriceps recovery). Subvastus approach is considered as a relative contraindication for TKA in knees with limited ROM due to difficulty in exposure which can increase risk of complications such as patellar tendon avulsion or medial collateral injury. Short stature and obesity are also relative contraindications. Tarabichi successfully used subvastus approach in knees with limited preoperative ROM. However, there are no large series in literature with the experience of the subvatus approach in knees with limited preoperative ROM. We are presenting our experience of the subvastus approach for TKA in knees with limited ROM. Materials and Methods: We conducted retrospective analysis of patients with limited preoperative ROM (flexion ≤90°) of the knee who underwent TKA using subvastus approach and presenting the 2 years results. There were a total 84 patients (110 knees) with mean age 64 (range 49–79 years) years. The mean preoperative flexion was 72° (range 40°–90°) with a total ROM of 64° (range 36°–90°). Results: Postoperatively knee flexion improved by mean 38° (P < 0.05) which was significant as assed by Student's t- test. The mean knee society score improved from 36 (range 20–60) to 80 (range 70–90) postoperatively (P < 0.05). There was one case of partial avulsion of patellar tendon from the tibial tubercle. Conclusions: We concluded that satisfactory results of TKA can be obtained in knees with limited preoperative ROM using subvastus approach maintaining the advantages of early mobilization. PMID:27053806

  5. Femoral Component Survival in Hybrid Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clayton R; Perry, Kevin I

    2016-05-01

    Although the majority of North American surgeons perform total knee arthroplasty by cementing both the femoral and the tibial components, hybrid fixation with a press-fit femur and cemented tibia is an alternative form of total knee arthroplasty performed by some. Currently, there is a paucity of literature evaluating long-term outcomes after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. As such, the purpose of the current study was to describe the long-term results of total knee arthroplasty performed using the hybrid technique. The authors retrospectively reviewed a total of 77 hybrid total knee arthroplasties with at least 12 years of follow-up. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed to determine patient function and the incidence of femoral component failure after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. At the time of last follow-up, 76 of 77 (99%) of the femoral components remained in place without evidence of loosening. One femoral component failed due to aseptic loosening and was ultimately revised to a cemented femoral component without further complication. In addition, 1 tibial component and 2 patellar components failed due to aseptic loosening. Four tibial polyethylene liners were revised for polyethylene wear. In conclusion, press-fit fixation of the femoral component is a reliable and durable alternative to cemented fixation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):181-186.]. PMID:27135453

  6. Computer-Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty Utilization.

    PubMed

    Bala, Abiram; Penrose, Colin Thomas; Seyler, Thorsten Markus; Mather, Richard Chad; Wellman, Samuel Secord; Bolognesi, Michael Paul

    2016-07-01

    Computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty (CN-TKA) has been used to improve component alignment, though the evidence is currently mixed on whether there are clinically significant differences in long-term outcomes. Given the established increased costs and operative time, we hypothesized that the utilization rate of CN-TKA would be decreasing relative to standard TKA in the Medicare population given the current health care economic environment. We queried 1,914,514 primary TKAs performed in the entire Medicare database from 2005 to 2012. Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify and separate CN-TKAs. Utilization of TKA was compared by year, gender, and region. Average change in cases per year and compound annual growth rate (CAGR) were used to evaluate trends in utilization of the procedure. We identified 30,773 CN-TKAs performed over this time period. There was an increase in utilization of CN-TKA per year from 984 to 5,352 (average = 572/year, R (2) = 0.85, CAGR = 23.58%) from 2005 to 2012. In contrast, there was a slight decrease in overall TKA utilization from 264,345 to 230,654 (average = 4297/year, R (2) = 0.74, CAGR = - 1.69%). When comparing proportion of CN-TKA to all TKAs, there was an increase from 0.37 to 2.32% (average 0.26%/year, R (2) = 0.88, CAGR = 25.70%). CN-TKA growth in males and females was comparable at 24.42 and 23.11%, respectively. The South region had the highest growth rate at 28.76%, whereas the Midwest had the lowest growth rate at 15.51%. The Midwest was the only region that peaked (2008) with a slow decline in utilization until 2012. Despite increased costs with unclear clinical benefit, CN-TKA is increasing in utilization among Medicare patients. Reasons could include patient preference, advertising, proper of coding the procedure, and increased publicly available information about

  7. CLINICAL OUTCOME AFTER INFECTED TOTAL KNEE AND TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Mittag, Falk; Leichtle, Carmen Ina; Schlumberger, Michael; Leichtle, Ulf Gunther; Wünschel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Infection after total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a serious complication which typically leads to a long lasting and intensive surgical and medicamentous treatment. The aim of this study was to identify factors that influence outcome after revision surgery caused by prosthetic infection. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 64 patients who had revision surgery between 1989 and 2009 due to periprosthetic infection. We examined a total of 69 joints (TKA: 36%, THA: 64%), follow-up 5.1 years (0.5-21 years) after the initial surgical intervention. The mean patient age at time of surgery was 67 years old (43-79 years old). Clinical data and scores including the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC)-Index, the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and the Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS) were surveyed. Results: There was no difference in clinical scores regarding treatment between a single and a multiple stage treatment regime. Infections with multiple microorganisms and Enterococcus spp. lead to a significantly higher number of interventions. Using a modified Tsukayama system we classified 24% as type I, 34% type II and 42% type III- infections, with no differences in clinical outcome. Overweight patients had a significantly lower HHS and WOMAC-score. Immunosuppression leads to a worse WOMAC and HSS-Score. An increased number of procedures was associated to a limping gait. Conclusion: Thorough surgical technique leads to good clinical results independent of infection-type and treatment philosophy. Level of Evidence III, Case Control Study. PMID:26997914

  8. A novel total knee arthroplasty infection model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Craig, Matthew R; Poelstra, Kornelis A; Sherrell, J Christopher; Kwon, Michael S; Belzile, Etienne L; Brown, Thomas E

    2005-09-01

    Infection of biomaterial implants is an expensive and devastating complication of orthopaedic surgery historically ranging from less than 1% in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to 10% in revision TKA. An in vivo animal model was developed to test the efficacy of innovative therapies for the prevention of biomaterial centered infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (MRSA). Twenty-two New Zealand White rabbits were used in this study. After proper anesthesia, a stainless-steel screw with a high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) washer was cemented in a defect created in the intra-articular, non-articulating portion of the lateral femoral condyle of each knee. After closure of the joint capsule, each knee was inoculated with 0, 10(2), 10(3), or 10(4) colony forming units (CFU) of MRSA. Animals were sacrificed after 7 days at which time joint aspirate, tissues and biomaterial samples were examined for evidence of infection. A total of 42 knees were used for analysis. When saline was injected into the knee, 0/10 of the knees demonstrated evidence of biomaterial centered infection (with the contralateral knee receiving 10(4)CFU MRSA). Four of 10 knees developed a biomaterial centered infection when 10(2)CFU MRSA was introduced. Seven out of 10 knees developed a biomaterial centered infection when either 10(3) or 10(4)CFU MRSA was injected. No evidence of septicemia (positive blood cultures) was found in any animal. This rabbit knee model utilizes commonly employed inexpensive orthopaedic implant materials in an in vivo milieu and provides an effective method for the evaluation of treatments for biomaterial centered infections. PMID:15927441

  9. Lateral dislocation of the knee joint after total knee arthroplasty: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ugutmen, Ender; Ozkan, Korhan; Unay, Koray; Mahirogullari, Mahir; Eceviz, Engin; Taser, Omer

    2008-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a successful therapy for functional improvement and pain relief in advanced symptomatic degeneration of the knee joint. But it can be associated with many complications, one of which is instability. Case presentation A 70-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of right knee dislocation after TKA was performed on her right knee due to severe varus deformity and flexion contracture. This instability was caused by persistent MCL tightness and iatrogenic lateral collateral, arcuate ligament, and popliteus tendon injury. The torn lateral collateral ligament and arcuate ligament were sutured with no. 2 non-absorbable (Ethibond) sutures with plication of the posterolateral knee capsule. A deep-dish liner was inserted to optimize soft tissue tension. Conclusion This is a very severe complication, and surgeons must be cautious about ligament balancing and soft tissue resection during TKA for severe varus and valgus deformities. PMID:18687153

  10. Evaluation of total knee mechanics using a crouching simulator with a synthetic knee substitute.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Michael; Rosenbaum, Heather; Walker, Peter S

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical evaluation of total knees is frequently required for aspects such as wear, strength, kinematics, contact areas, and force transmission. In order to carry out such tests, we developed a crouching simulator, based on the Oxford-type machine, with novel features including a synthetic knee including ligaments. The instrumentation and data processing methods enabled the determination of contact area locations and interface forces and moments, for a full flexion-extension cycle. To demonstrate the use of the simulator, we carried out a comparison of two different total knee designs, cruciate retaining and substituting. The first part of the study describes the simulator design and the methodology for testing the knees without requiring cadaveric knee specimens. The degrees of freedom of the anatomic hip and ankle joints were reproduced. Flexion-extension was obtained by changing quadriceps length, while variable hamstring forces were applied using springs. The knee joint was represented by three-dimensional printed blocks on to which the total knee components were fixed. Pretensioned elastomeric bands of realistic stiffnesses passed through holes in the block at anatomical locations to represent ligaments. Motion capture of the knees during flexion, together with laser scanning and computer modeling, was used to reconstruct contact areas on the bearing surfaces. A method was also developed for measuring tibial component interface forces and moments as a comparative assessment of fixation. The method involved interposing Tekscan pads at locations on the interface. Overall, the crouching machine and the methodology could be used for many different mechanical measurements of total knee designs, adapted especially for comparative or parametric studies. PMID:26802075

  11. Arthroscopic knee debridement can delay total knee replacement in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Gomez-Cardero, Primitivo

    2016-09-01

    The role of arthroscopic debridement of the knee in haemophilia is controversial in the literature. The purpose of this study is to describe the results of arthroscopic knee debridement (AKD), with the aim of determining whether it is possible to delay total knee replacement (TKR) for painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients. In a 14-year period (1998-2011), AKD was performed for moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in 27 patients with haemophilia A. Their average age at operation was 28.6 years (range 26-39 years). Indications for surgery were as follows: more than 90° of knee flexion, flexion deformity less than 30°, good axial alignment of the knee, good patellar alignment, and pain above >60 points in a visual analogue scale [0 (no pain) to 100 points]. Secondary haematological prophylaxis and rehabilitation (physiotherapy) was given for at least 3 months after surgery. Follow-up was for an average of 7.5 years (range 2-14 years). We assessed the clinical outcome before surgery and at the time of latest follow-up using the Knee Society pain and function scores, the range of motion, and the radiological score of the World Federation of Haemophilia. Knee Society pain scores improved from 39 preoperatively to 66 postoperatively, and function scores improved from 36 to 52. Range of motion improved on an average from -15° of extension and 90° of flexion before surgery, to -5° of extension and 110° of flexion at the last follow-up. A radiological deterioration of 2.8 points on average was found. There were two (7.4%) postoperative complications (haemarthroses resolved by joint aspiration). One patient (3.7%) required a TKR 12.5 years later. AKD should be considered in painful moderate haemophilic arthropathy of the knee in adult patients to delay TKR. PMID:26575489

  12. The rotating platform mobile bearing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, R B

    2000-01-01

    The recent evolution of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been substantial and unlike that of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The current THA technique is similar to that initially developed and perfected by Professor John Charnley in the mid 1960s. The ball-and-socket articulation of the hip is simple and reproducible biomechanically. The long term (20 years and longer) results with total hip arthroplasty have been very satisfactory. The THA prosthetic designs of today remain similar to those of years past. Improvements have been in biomaterials, methods of fixation and surgical technique. The total knee arthroplasty prostheses of today differ greatly from their predecessors. PMID:21136412

  13. The Rotating Platform Mobile Bearing Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, R Barry

    2000-10-01

    The recent evolution of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been substantial and unlike that of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The current THA technique is similar to that initially developed and perfected by Professor John Charnley in the mid 1960s. The ball-and-socket articulation of the hip is simple and reproducible biomechanically. The long term (20 years and longer) results with total hip arthroplasty have been very satisfactory. The THA prosthetic designs of today remain similar to those of years past. Improvements have been in biomaterials, methods of fixation and surgical technique. The total knee arthroplasty prostheses of today differ greatly from their predecessors. PMID:12219304

  14. Usefulness of the Korean Knee Score for Evaluation of the Results of Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Kyu; Shim, Ji-Hoon; Chung, Kyu-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Korean Knee score (KKS) was designed to reflect the floor-sitting lifestyle that necessitates high knee flexion. The purpose of this study is to assess whether the KKS reflects the floor-sitting lifestyle more accurately than the previously developed Knee Society clinical rating system. In addition, the presence of ceiling effects was compared between the two rating systems. Materials and Methods Eighty-one consecutive patients (120 knees) who were assessed regularly after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) on an outpatient basis between January 2012 and December 2012 were enrolled. All patients were asked to complete a questionnaire to assess the Knee Society Knee score (KSKS), Knee Society Function score (KSFS), and KKS. Results At the final follow-up, the mean KSKS, KSFS, and KKS were 91.2, 86.0, and 70.1, respectively, and the scores were similar between the ≥125° maximum flexion group and <125° maximum flexion group. However, the 'floor life' subdomain score of the KKS was significantly higher in the >125° maximum flexion group (15.13 vs. 11.24, p=0.001). The number of cases with the highest possible score was 24 (20%) for the KSKS and 47 (39%) for the KSFS, whereas none of the cases obtained the highest possible KKS. According to the standard deviation method, more substantial ceiling effects were present in the KSKS (83 cases, 69.1%) and KSFS (67 cases, 55.8%) than in the KKS (23 cases, 19.2%). Conclusions Although, the KKS was effective in reducing the ceiling effect, it demonstrated limited improvement in assessing the ability to perform high knee flexion after TKA. However, the 'floor life' subdomain of KSS appeared to be valid for evaluating high flexion of the knee. PMID:25750889

  15. Metallosis Presenting as Knee Pain 26 years after Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sharareh, Behnam; Phan, Duy L.; Goreal, Wamda; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Metallosis occurs when periprosthetic soft tissues, synovium, and/or bone is infiltrated by metallic debris secondary to metal-on-metal wear. This debris can cause a chronic inflammatory reaction leading to joint instability, pain, and swelling, and may cause osteolysis, implant looseningand ultimately implant failure. Case Report: An 81 year old female, with a history of primary left total knee arthroplasty, presented with a 6 month history of left knee pain, swelling, and limited range of motion following a fall. Radiographs and joint aspiration were performed, with results that showed no evidence of periprosthetic trauma or infection but were suspicious for chronic metallosis. The patient underwent revision total knee replacement of the left knee which revealed extensive necrotic black metal debris throughout the joint space. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a foreign body reaction consistent with metallosis. Conclusion: This case is a rare example of chronic metallosis presenting 26 years following total knee replacement. Treatment with revision total knee replacement is the consensus management choice to avoid further destruction of the bone and joint capsule that can occur with metal-induced inflammation. PMID:27299048

  16. Blastomycosis infection of the knee treated with staged total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Ian S; Day, Shandra R; Moore, Christopher C; Browne, James A

    2015-12-01

    Blastomycosis is a rare fungal disease that can cause intraarticular infection and joint destruction requiring surgical reconstruction. We describe a patient who presented with destruction of the knee joint of unknown etiology. The patient was initially treated with debridement and spacer placement followed by antifungal therapy after cultures grew blastomycosis. Following adequate treatment of the infection, the patient was taken back to the operating room for reconstruction with a total knee arthroplasty. The patient had a successful outcome with no evidence of infection at two years following surgery. To our knowledge, this case report represents the first documented case in which a blastomycotic infection of a native knee was successfully treated with a two-stage total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26081592

  17. A biomechanical evaluation of hinged total knee replacement prostheses.

    PubMed

    Long, Robin; Gheduzzi, Sabina; Bucher, Thomas A; Toms, Andrew D; Miles, Anthony W

    2013-08-01

    The number of total knee replacements being performed worldwide is undergoing an unprecedented increase. Hinged total knee replacements, used in complex salvage and revision procedures, currently account for a small but growing proportion of prostheses implanted. Modern hinged prostheses share the same basic configuration, allowing flexion-extension and tibial rotation. One aspect on which designs differ is the anteroposterior location of the hinge. A more posterior hinge is designed to increase the patellar tendon moment arm, reducing the quadriceps force required for a given activity and benefiting the patient. Five commonly used total knee replacements were evaluated in terms of quadriceps force and patellar tendon moment arm using a laboratory-based rig. Significant differences were identified between the five prostheses in quadriceps force and patellar tendon moment arm. Analysis of the correlation between these two parameters indicates that while patellar tendon moment arm influences quadriceps force, it is not the only factor. Also important is the lever function of the patella, and it is suggested here that the non-physiological nature of the prosthetic patellofemoral geometry may result in unnatural joint function. Thus, a thorough understanding of the resulting kinematic function of hinged total knee replacements is becoming increasingly important in complex revision total knee replacement to meet rising patient expectations and functional demands. PMID:23722496

  18. Current surgical strategies for total arthroplasty in valgus knee

    PubMed Central

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Michos, Ioannis; Safos, George; Safos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    The majority of orthopaedic surgeons even currently agree that primary total arthroplasty in valgus knees with a deformity of more than ten degrees may prove challenging. The unique sets of bone and soft tissue abnormalities that must be addressed at the time of the operation make accurate axis restoration, component orientation and joint stability attainment a difficult task. Understanding the specific pathologic anatomic changes associated with the valgus knee is a prerequisite so as to select the proper surgical method, to optimize component position and restore soft-tissue balance. The purpose of this article is to review the valgus knee anatomical variations, to assess the best pre-operative planning and to evaluate how to choose the grade of constraint of the implant. It will also be underlying the up-to-date main approaches and surgical techniques be proposed in the English literature both for bone cuts and soft tissue management of valgus knees. PMID:26191494

  19. Kinematics and Mechanical Properties of Knees following Patellar Replacing and Patellar Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rongying; Liu, Yanqiang; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Knee injury is a common medical issue. A full understanding of the kinematics and mechanical properties of knees following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) repair utilizing patellar replacement (only the base of the patella is replaced) versus patellar retaining surgical techniques is still lacking. In the current paper, we investigated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data from knees repaired by these two methods and evaluated total knee models created using imaging reconstruction technology that simulated gait conditions. Results revealed that patellar replacement had little influence on tibiofemoral kinematics, although the tibia-surface equivalent stress increased slightly. By contrast, patellar replacement had a significant influence on the patellofemoral joint; patellar internal rotation, external rotation, and medial-lateral translation were all increased. Moreover, the stress distribution on patellar prostheses was altered, resulting in an increased surface maximal equivalent stress on the corresponding area. Moreover, during the gait cycle, we found that the area with maximal equivalent stress shifted its position. Finally, the patellofemoral joint showed decreased motion stability. From the view of kinematics and mechanics, this paper suggests that patella should be retained during TKA if it is possible. The present study presented approaches and technologies for evaluating kinematics and mechanical properties of total knee joint after TKA under gait loads. PMID:27057134

  20. Kinematics and Mechanical Properties of Knees following Patellar Replacing and Patellar Retaining Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongying; Liu, Yanqiang; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Knee injury is a common medical issue. A full understanding of the kinematics and mechanical properties of knees following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) repair utilizing patellar replacement (only the base of the patella is replaced) versus patellar retaining surgical techniques is still lacking. In the current paper, we investigated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data from knees repaired by these two methods and evaluated total knee models created using imaging reconstruction technology that simulated gait conditions. Results revealed that patellar replacement had little influence on tibiofemoral kinematics, although the tibia-surface equivalent stress increased slightly. By contrast, patellar replacement had a significant influence on the patellofemoral joint; patellar internal rotation, external rotation, and medial-lateral translation were all increased. Moreover, the stress distribution on patellar prostheses was altered, resulting in an increased surface maximal equivalent stress on the corresponding area. Moreover, during the gait cycle, we found that the area with maximal equivalent stress shifted its position. Finally, the patellofemoral joint showed decreased motion stability. From the view of kinematics and mechanics, this paper suggests that patella should be retained during TKA if it is possible. The present study presented approaches and technologies for evaluating kinematics and mechanical properties of total knee joint after TKA under gait loads. PMID:27057134

  1. Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation of total knee arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R.; Soudry, M.

    1986-04-01

    Various radiographic and scintigraphic methods are used to supplement clinical findings in the evaluation of total knee arthroplasty and its complications. Serial roentgenograms offer reliable information for diagnosing mechanical loosening. Wide and extensive radiolucency at the cement-bone interface and shift in position and alignment of prosthetic components can be seen in almost all cases by the time revision is necessary. Radiographic abnormalities are usually not present in acute infection, but are often present in chronic infection. Bone scanning has a high sensitivity for diagnosis of infection or loosening, but is nonspecific because increased uptake is often present around asymptomatic total knee arthroplasties with normal radiographs. Differential bone and Gallium scanning and scanning with Indium 111-labeled leukocytes have a greater specificity for diagnosis of infection than does bone or Gallium scanning alone. Routine radiographic and scintigraphic studies have shown a high incidence of deep vein thrombosis in the calf after total knee arthroplasty. Clinically significant pulmonary embolization is infrequent.

  2. MOBILE TIBIAL POLYETHYLENE BEARING IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Barros Cobra, Hugo Alexandre; da Palma, Idemar Monteiro

    2015-01-01

    Debris of polyethylene tibial bearings have been recognized as a major cause for the onset of the cascade of biological events leading to osteolysis and loosening of prosthetic components after total knee arthroplasty. Since then, research has been focused on alternative bearing surfaces in order to minimize the amount and rate of polyethylene wear off and, in doing so, increasing the survivorship rate for knee arthroplasties. One such option is to have a mobile tibial bearing allowing more conformity and rotational self-alignment of the components, improving kinetics and kinematics of the prosthesis. The authors present a resumed but throughout and comprehensive review of the rationale, biomechanics fundamentals, indications, pitfalls, outcomes and complications for the use of mobile tibial bearings in total knee replacement. PMID:27077055

  3. Technical considerations in total knee surgery. Management of patella problems.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, V M; Figgie, H E; Figgie, M P

    1989-04-01

    Patellofemoral symptoms are now the most common cause of aseptic knee revision; however, the majority of patello-femoral problems are self-limited and may be managed symptomatically and nonoperatively. A trial of anti-inflammatory medications, stretching exercises, and appropriate bracing is always indicated. Patellofemoral symptoms are usually related to mechanical malalignment of all three components of the total knee arthroplasty. Attention to the fundamental principles of total knee arthroplasty, including restoration of the bony mechanical alignment, soft tissue stability, and maintenance of the anatomic joint line, prevents many of the problems. Meticulous preoperative planning and anatomic placement of the component parts are important for a satisfactory long-term outcome. Present research is directed to providing kinematic analysis of the patellofemoral tracking mechanism and to minimizing patellofemoral contact stresses with appropriate new designs. PMID:2646562

  4. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Cates, Harold E; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  5. Knee Joint Loads and Surrounding Muscle Forces during Stair Ascent in Patients with Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Rasnick, Robert; Standifird, Tyler; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Cates, Harold E.

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is commonly used to correct end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, difficulty with stair climbing often persists and prolongs the challenges of TKR patents. Complete understanding of loading at the knee is of great interest in order to aid patient populations, implant manufacturers, rehabilitation, and future healthcare research. Musculoskeletal modeling and simulation approximates joint loading and corresponding muscle forces during a movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if knee joint loadings following TKR are recovered to the level of healthy individuals, and determine the differences in muscle forces causing those loadings. Data from five healthy and five TKR patients were selected for musculoskeletal simulation. Variables of interest included knee joint reaction forces (JRF) and the corresponding muscle forces. A paired samples t-test was used to detect differences between groups for each variable of interest (p<0.05). No differences were observed for peak joint compressive forces between groups. Some muscle force compensatory strategies appear to be present in both the loading and push-off phases. Evidence from knee extension moment and muscle forces during the loading response phase indicates the presence of deficits in TKR in quadriceps muscle force production during stair ascent. This result combined with greater flexor muscle forces resulted in similar compressive JRF during loading response between groups. PMID:27258086

  6. Knee kinetics during walking at different speeds in people who have undergone total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Jodie A; Webster, Kate E; Feller, Julian A; Menz, Hylton B

    2010-06-01

    Previous research suggests that most people who have undergone total knee replacement (TKR) walk with a sagittal knee moment profile and peak knee moments that are different from normal. However, most previous research has consisted of small samples of patients with prostheses that are no longer in use. The aim of this study was to compare the peak knee moments and patterns of the moment waveforms of walking at different speeds between a large cohort of TKR patients with the Genesis-II PS prosthesis (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, USA) and matched control participants. Forty patients 12months following TKR and 40 control participants were assessed during walking at self-selected comfortable and fast speeds using motion analysis. Individual sagittal plane knee moment graphs were assessed for the presence of a biphasic pattern. Peak sagittal and coronal plane knee moments were compared between groups using a univariate ANOVA with walking speed as a covariate. A biphasic moment pattern was present in 87% and 92% of TKR patients when walking at comfortable and fast speeds, respectively. The knee flexor (p<0.001 at both speeds), extensor (p=0.004 at comfortable speed and p<0.001 at fast speed) and adductor (p<0.001 at both speeds) moments were reduced in the TKR patients. The high proportion of TKR patients with biphasic moment patterns was unexpected, but suggests that modern prostheses can result in more normal outcomes. Nonetheless, the peak knee moments of patients were reduced compared to controls. Although these reductions may be beneficial to the survival of the prosthesis, these abnormalities may also indicate suboptimal functional outcome from TKR. PMID:20510613

  7. Total Limb Rotation after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: Side-to-Side Discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Jun; Yoon, Seok-Tae; Ko, Young-Bong

    2016-08-01

    Total limb rotation, an important anatomical feature of the lower limb, is defined as any rotation of the lower limb on its longitudinal axis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the discrepancies of rotational profiles of total limb between nonoperated and operated limb following unilateral total knee arthroplasty. We conducted an analysis of the computed tomography (CT) data from 32 patients undergoing primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty. Using these CT scan, rotational profiles of total limb, such as femoral neck anteversion angle expressed as femoral torsion angle (FTA), tibial torsion angle (TTA), knee joint rotation angle (KJRA), and total limb rotation (TLR) were measured. There were significant discrepancies of FTA and KJRA between operated and nonoperated limb following unilateral total knee arthroplasty. The mean difference of operated and nonoperated side for FTA and KJRA were -6.51 ± 11.88 degrees (p = 0.0041) and -6.83 ± 5.04 degrees (p < 0.001), respectively. However, there were no significant discrepancies of TLR, TTA. These results are due to the compensation effect of KJRA. However, excessive external rotation of the femoral component beyond the compensation effect of prosthetic knee joint can lead to a total limb rotational discrepancy in patient undergoing unilateral total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26571050

  8. Correcting deformity in total knee arthroplasty: Techniques to avoid the release of collateral ligaments in severely deformed knees.

    PubMed

    Mullaji, A B; Shetty, G M

    2016-01-01

    Collateral ligament release is advocated in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to deal with significant coronal plane deformities, but is also associated with significant disadvantages. We describe steps to avoid release of the collateral (superficial medial and lateral collateral) ligaments during TKA in severely deformed knees, while correcting deformity and balancing the knee. PMID:26733653

  9. Calcaneal Insufficiency Fracture after Ipsilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min; Shin, Sung Jin; Kang, Byoung Youl

    2016-01-01

    Insufficiency fracture of the calcaneus is a rare entity. In the absence of trauma, evaluating a painful ankle in an elderly patient can be difficult and also it might be overlook the insufficiency fracture. We experienced a case of insufficiency calcaneus fracture that occurred after ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty. Here, we report our case with a review of literatures. PMID:26981521

  10. Rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, Daniele Antonio; Iapicca, Mario Luigi; Gotti, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    We describe here various surgical options to obtain a correct rotational alignment of femoral component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The correct rotational alignment is the key point to obtain a rectangular balanced flexion gap as well to have a good patellar tracking. For that reason, rotation alignment largely affects postoperative kinematic results particularly during flexion. PMID:26855940

  11. [Recovery from total knee arthroplasty through continuous passive motion].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mayo, B; Rodríguez-Mansilla, J; González Sánchez, B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the effects of continuous passive mobilization in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty. A search strategy was developed to retrieve all clinical trials, written in English and/or Spanish, published in the electronic search databases PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Dialnet, CSIC and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were: clinical trials published from January 2000 until November 2014 in English or Spanish. Out of 537 clinical trials that were potentially relevant, a total of 12 were included in this review. The evaluation of 1,153 patients shows that there is no significant difference in improving the range of the joint, pain, balance, motion, healing and hospital stay using continuous passive mobilization against the regular physiotherapy treatment for total knee arthroplasty. The application of continuous passive mobilization in the long-term does not provide any benefit in terms of the breadth of the range of the joint, pain and improvement of standing and motion in comparison with conventional postoperative physiotherapy treatment in total knee arthroplasty. In the short term an improvement is obtained in the range of joint motion in knee flexion. PMID:26486536

  12. Total Knee Arthroplasty Failure Induced by Metal Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ryan; Phan, Duy; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 70 Final Diagnosis: Metal hypersensitivity Symptoms: Joint pain • swelling • instability Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Revision total knee arthroplasty Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Metal hypersensitivity is an uncommon complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that can lead to significant functional impairment and aseptic prosthesis failure. Case Report: We describe a 70-year-old patient who presented with persistent pain, swelling, and instability 2 years after a primary TKA. The patient had a history of metal hypersensitivity following bilateral metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (THA) that was revised to ceramic-on-polyethylene implants. Knee radiographs showed severe osteolysis with implant loosening. Serum cobalt was elevated and serum chromium was significantly elevated, while joint aspiration and inflammatory marker levels ruled out a periprosthetic infection. Revision TKA was performed, with intraoperative tissue pathology and postoperative leukocyte transformation testing confirming metal hypersensitivity as the cause for aseptic implant failure. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates the clinical and laboratory signs that suggest metal hypersensitivity in total knee arthroplasty and the potential for joint function restoration with revision surgery. PMID:26278890

  13. Infection post-total knee replacement: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Alijanipour, Pouya; Parvizi, Javad

    2014-06-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection is a hot topic for investigation because it represents a challenging clinical problem with considerable burden for patients, institutions, and health systems. Despite our substantial knowledge, many details in prevention, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious complications following total knee arthroplasty remain to be controversial with the available evidence being insufficient and at times conflictive. This manuscript is an attempt to approach the most recently published literature regarding the aforementioned details and aims to provide the reader with an updated perspective in the management of periprosthetic joint infection of the knee. PMID:24706155

  14. Analysis of differences in bone removal during femoral box osteotomy for primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    GRACEFFA, ANGELO; INDELLI, PIER FRANCESCO; BASNETT, KAITLYN; MARCUCCI, MASSIMILIANO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose this study was conducted to compare the quantity of intercondylar bone removed during femoral box osteotomy for implantation of three contemporary posterior stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty designs: Sigma PS (DePuy), Vanguard (Biomet) and Persona (Zimmer). Methods we compared the maximum volumetric bone resection required for the housing of the PS mechanism of these three designs. Bone removal by each PS box cutting jig was three-dimensionally measured. The differences between the three designs were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used for pairwise comparisons. The level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results for small-size implants, the average box osteotomy volume of Persona was significantly smaller than the Vanguard and Sigma PS volumes (p=0.003). The mean difference between Vanguard and Sigma PS (p=0.01) was also significant. For medium size implants, the mean difference between Persona and Sigma PS (p=0.008) and the mean difference between Vanguard and Sigma PS (p=0.01) were statistically significant. For large size implants, the mean difference between Vanguard and Sigma PS (p=0.01) and the mean difference between Sigma PS and Persona (p=0.008) were statistically significant. Conclusions irrespective of implant size, the Persona cutting jig always resected significantly less bone than did Vanguard and Sigma PS. Clinical Relevance although this study does not establish any clinical relevance of removing more or less bone at primary TKA, its results suggest that if a PS design is indicated, it is preferable to select a model which resects less distal femoral bone. PMID:25606547

  15. Patellofemoral Crepitus after Total Knee Arthroplasty: Etiology and Preventive Measures

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Patellofemoral crepitus and clunk syndrome are infrequent, yet troublesome complications of total knee arthroplasty with a reported incidence of 0%-18%. They are primarily associated with implantation of posterior cruciate substituting designs. These entities are the result of peripatellar fibrosynovial hyperplasia at the junction of the superior pole of the patella and the distal quadriceps tendon which becomes entrapped within the superior aspect of the intercondylar box of the femoral component during knee flexion. When the knee extends, a crepitant sensation occurs as the fibrosynovial tissue exits the intercondylar box. Numerous etiologies have been proposed such as femoral component designs with a high intercondylar box ratio, previous knee surgery, reduced patellar tendon length, thinner patellar components, reduced patella-patellar component composite thickness, and smaller femoral components. Preventative measures include choice of femoral components with a reduced intercondylar box ratio, use of thicker patellar components, avoidance of over-resection of the patella, and debridement of the fibrosynovial tissue at the time of knee arthroplasty. Most patients with crepitus are unaware of the problem or have minimal symptoms so that no treatment is required. If significant disability is incurred, symptoms can be eliminated in a high percentage of patients with arthroscopic debridement of the fibrosynovial hyperplasia. PMID:24605184

  16. Current Controversies of Alignment in Total Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, James; Joyner, James; Tudor, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Total knee replacement is an increasingly popular operation for end stage knee arthritis. In the majority it alleviates pain and improves function. However up to 20% of patients remain dissatisfied, even with well-aligned and secure implants. Restoration of a neutral mechanical axis has traditionally been strived for, to improve both function and implant survival and there is historical data to support this. More recently this view has been questioned and some surgeons are trying to improve the function and outcomes by moving away from standard alignment principles in an attempt to reproduce the kinematics of the pre-arthritic knee of that individual. Others are using computers, robots and patient specific guides to improve accuracy. This article aims to review the traditional alignment concept and the newer techniques, along with the evidence behind it. PMID:26587067

  17. Preoperative Predictors of Pain Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Noiseux, Nicolas O.; Callaghan, John J.; Clark, Charles R.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Sluka, Kathleen A.; Rakel, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty has provided dramatic improvements in function and pain for the majority of patients with knee arthritis, yet a significant proportion of patients remain dissatisfied with their results. We performed a prospective analysis of 215 patients undergoing TKA who underwent a comprehensive array of evaluations to discover whether any preoperative assessment could predict high pain scores and functional limitations postoperatively. Patients with severe pain with a simple knee range-of-motion test prior to TKA had a 10x higher likelihood of moderate to severe pain at 6 months. A simple test of pain intensity with active flexion and extension preoperatively was a significant predictor of postoperative pain at 6 months after surgery. Strategies to address this particular patient group may improve satisfaction rates of TKA. PMID:24630598

  18. Acute Patellar Tendon Rupture after Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Seung Joon; Pham, The Hien

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is a catastrophic complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Though revision TKA has been suspected of being a predisposing factor for the occurrence of patellar tendon rupture, there are few reports on patellar tendon rupture after revision TKA. Here, we present a case of acute patellar tendon rupture that occurred after TKA revision. In the patient, the patellar tendon was so thin and could not be repaired, and accordingly was sutured end to end. We used the anterior tibialis tendon allograft to augment the poor quality patellar tendon tissue. Fixation of the allograft was done by using the bone tunnel created through tibial tuberosity and suturing the allograft to the patellar tendon and quadriceps tendon. The patient was instructed to wear a full extension knee splint and was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks after operation. Full knee extension could be achieved 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26060612

  19. Early Quadriceps Strength Loss After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mizner, Ryan L; Petterson, Stephanie C; Stevens, Jennifer E; Vandenborne, Krista; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Background: While total knee arthroplasty reduces pain and provides a functional range of motion of the knee, quadriceps weakness and reduced functional capacity typically are still present one year after surgery. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the role of failure of voluntary muscle activation and muscle atrophy in the early loss of quadriceps strength after surgery. Methods: Twenty patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis were tested an average of ten days before and twenty-seven days after primary total knee arthroplasty. Quadriceps strength and voluntary muscle activation were measured with use of a burst-superimposition technique in which a supramaximal burst of electrical stimulation is superimposed on a maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Maximal quadriceps cross-sectional area was assessed with use of magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Postoperatively, quadriceps strength was decreased by 62%, voluntary activation was decreased by 17%, and maximal cross-sectional area was decreased by 10% in comparison with the preoperative values; these differences were significant (p < 0.01). Collectively, failure of voluntary muscle activation and atrophy explained 85% of the loss of quadriceps strength (p < 0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that failure of voluntary activation contributed nearly twice as much as atrophy did to the loss of quadriceps strength. The severity of knee pain with muscle contraction did not change significantly compared with the preoperative level (p = 0.31). Changes in knee pain during strength-testing did not account for a significant amount of the change in voluntary activation (p = 0.14). Conclusions: Patients who are managed with total knee arthroplasty have profound impairment of quadriceps strength one month after surgery. This impairment is predominantly due to failure of voluntary muscle activation, and it is also influenced, to a lesser degree, by muscle atrophy. Knee pain with

  20. Mobile- vs. fixed-bearing total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Tjørnild, Michael; Søballe, Kjeld; Hansen, Per Møller; Holm, Carsten; Stilling, Maiken

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose It is unclear whether mobile-bearing (MB) total knee arthroplasties reduce the risk of tibial component loosening compared to fixed-bearing (FB) designs. This randomized study investigated implant migration, periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD), and patient-reported outcomes (Oxford knee score)—all at 2 years—for the P.F.C. Sigma Cruciate Retaining total knee arthroplasty. Patients and methods 50 osteoarthritis patients were allocated to either FB or MB tibial articulation. Resultsand interpretation At 2 years, the mean total translation (implant migration) was higher for the FB implant (0.30 mm, SD 0.22) than for the MB implant (0.17 mm, SD 0.09) (p = 0.04). BMD decreased between baseline and 1-year follow-up. At 2-year follow-up, BMD was close to the baseline level. The knee scores of both groups improved equally well. The FB tibial implant migrated more than the MB, but this was not clinically significant. The mobile polyethylene presumably partly absorbs the force transmitted to the metal tibial tray, thereby reducing micromotion. PMID:25280132

  1. Similar outcome for total knee arthroplasty after previous high tibial osteotomy and for total knee arthroplasty as the first measure.

    PubMed

    W-Dahl, Annette; Robertsson, Otto

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Patients having a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) after a previous high tibial osteotomy (HTO) constitute a minor group among those undergoing primary TKA for knee osteoarthritis (OA). There have been few reports on whether such patients differ pre- and postoperatively from those who undergo TKA as the first measure. We evaluated patient characteristics, knee-related pain, function, quality of life, and general health before and 1 year after TKA surgery in these 2 groups of patients. Patients and methods - We included 119 HTOs that were operated on for knee OA in the Skåne region, Sweden, in the period1998-2007 and that had been converted to a TKA during 2009-2013 (the C group). We also included 5,013 primary TKAs performed for knee OA in the same region, during the same period, and in patients of the same age range (42-82 years) (the P group). The patients were evaluated with the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and the EQ-VAS preoperatively and 1 year after the TKA surgery, when they were also asked about their satisfaction with the surgery. Case-mix variables available were Charnley category, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, sex, age, and body mass index (BMI). Results - Most of the HTOs were performed using open-wedge osteotomy with external fixation (81 of 119). Compared to the P group, the patients in the C group were more often men, were younger, and were healthier (according to the ASA classification). With respect to pre- and postoperative knee-related pain, function, quality of life, and general health, the 2 groups had similar mean values without any statistically significant differences. A similar proportion of patients in the 2 groups were satisfied with the surgery 1 year postoperatively (82% vs. 80%). Interpretation - Our findings indicate that HTO is a reasonable alternative for delaying TKA surgery in younger and/or physically active OA patients. PMID:27339330

  2. Primary total knee arthroplasty in infection sequelae about the native knee.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jai-Gon; Moon, Young-Wan; Park, Sang-Hoon; Han, Kye-Young; Kim, Sang-Min

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the results of primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) after bone or joint sepsis about the native knee and to analyze the risk factors of periprosthetic infection. Sixty-two patients (62 knees), considered to have prior sepsis history to be resolved, underwent primary TKA and were followed during a mean of 6.1years (range, 2-10.4years). Of the 62 patients, periprosthetic infection occurred in 6 after primary TKA (9.7%). Five of 6 patients grew the same organism as prior infection. The number of prior surgeries undertaken for deep infection was found to be an independent risk factor of periprosthetic infection. PMID:24703782

  3. Computer navigation of soft tissues in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Yogeesh D; Aurakzai, Kamran M; Adhikari, Ajeya R

    2013-06-01

    Following the success of computer navigation in producing consistently accurate alignment, the focus has shifted to use of these techniques for soft tissue assessment during total knee replacement (TKR). We undertook a prospectively randomized clinical study to compare two methods of tissue balancing in TKR. One method, called bone referencing (BR) employed independent cutting of the femur and tibia followed by subjective assessment with trial prostheses and soft tissue release as deemed necessary. The other method, termed ligament balancing (LB), involved cutting the tibia first and titration of tissue balance and alignment parameters to guide femoral cuts. Our total sample comprised 77 subjects with 80% statistical power. To assess tissue balance we used (a) coronal laxity testing and (b) computer navigation generated passive knee range of movement graphs. The graphical assessment was validated with coronal laxity testing. There was no difference between the resultant tissue balances achieved. However, correlation with preoperative status revealed the LB technique to show better results in a smaller subgroup of knees with greater preoperative tissue imbalance. We advocate variation of tissue balancing technique to suit the individual knee, based on preoperative assessment, to achieve an optimal result in all TKR. PMID:23288758

  4. Early outcomes of patella resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Warren J; Miller, Lisa; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Graves, Stephen E; Ryan, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Background Patella resurfacing in total knee arthroplasty is a contentious issue. The literature suggests that resurfacing of the patella is based on surgeon preference, and little is known about the role and timing of resurfacing and how this affects outcomes. Methods We analyzed 134,799 total knee arthroplasties using data from the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Hazards ratios (HRs) were used to compare rates of early revision between patella resurfacing at the primary procedure (the resurfacing group, R) and primary arthroplasty without resurfacing (no-resurfacing group, NR). We also analyzed the outcomes of NR that were revised for isolated patella addition. Results At 5 years, the R group showed a lower revision rate than the NR group: cumulative per cent revision (CPR) 3.1% and 4.0%, respectively (HR = 0.75, p < 0.001). Revisions for patellofemoral pain were more common in the NR group (17%) than in the R group (1%), and “patella only” revisions were more common in the NR group (29%) than in the R group (6%). Non-resurfaced knees revised for isolated patella addition had a higher revision rate than patella resurfacing at the primary procedure, with a 4-year CPR of 15% and 2.8%, respectively (HR = 4.1, p < 0.001). Interpretation Rates of early revision of primary total knees were higher when the patella was not resurfaced, and suggest that surgeons may be inclined to resurface later if there is patellofemoral pain. However, 15% of non-resurfaced knees revised for patella addition are re-revised by 4 years. Our results suggest an early beneficial outcome for patella resurfacing at primary arthroplasty based on revision rates up to 5 years. PMID:19968604

  5. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Severe Synovial Osteochondromatosis in an Osteoarthritic Knee.

    PubMed

    Deinum, Joukje; Nolte, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SO) can occur idiopathic or secondary to osteoarthritis. SO can be easily diagnosed with plain film radiography and clinical findings. In case of disabling osteoarthritis, total knee arthroplasty and removal of all corpora libra are indicated. We present a 71-year-old woman with significant osteoarthritis and severe SO intra-articular and in the suprapatellar bursa of the right knee. Total knee arthroplasty, extraction of the loose bodies, and partial synovectomy were performed. During a 2.5-year follow-up, the patient regained full function of her affected knee and there was no recurrence of SO. We choose to present this case to show the extensiveness SO can occur in. Our advice is to remove all the loose bodies carefully to prevent damage to the prosthesis. During follow-up, special attention should be paid to prevent recurrence of SO. When recurrence is associated with rapid growth or destruction of joints, malignant reoccurrence must be considered. PMID:27247750

  6. Total Knee Arthroplasty in Severe Synovial Osteochondromatosis in an Osteoarthritic Knee

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SO) can occur idiopathic or secondary to osteoarthritis. SO can be easily diagnosed with plain film radiography and clinical findings. In case of disabling osteoarthritis, total knee arthroplasty and removal of all corpora libra are indicated. We present a 71-year-old woman with significant osteoarthritis and severe SO intra-articular and in the suprapatellar bursa of the right knee. Total knee arthroplasty, extraction of the loose bodies, and partial synovectomy were performed. During a 2.5-year follow-up, the patient regained full function of her affected knee and there was no recurrence of SO. We choose to present this case to show the extensiveness SO can occur in. Our advice is to remove all the loose bodies carefully to prevent damage to the prosthesis. During follow-up, special attention should be paid to prevent recurrence of SO. When recurrence is associated with rapid growth or destruction of joints, malignant reoccurrence must be considered. PMID:27247750

  7. Relationship between obesity and early failure of total knee prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Bordini, Barbara; Stea, Susanna; Cremonini, Sara; Viceconti, Marco; De Palma, Rossana; Toni, Aldo

    2009-01-01

    Background Obesity is a risk factor for knee arthritis. Total knee arthroplasty is the definitive surgical treatment of this disease. Therefore, a high percentage of subjects treated are overweight. Since 2000 in the Emilia-Romagna Region the Register of Orthopedic Prosthetic Implantology, RIPO, has recorded data of all the primary and revision operations performed on the knee; height and weight of patients at the time of surgery have also been recorded. Methods To understand how overweight and obesity affect the outcome of knee arthroplasty, a population of subjects treated with cemented total knee arthroplasty between 2000 and 2005 was studied. 9735 knee prostheses were implanted in 8892 patients; 18.9% of the patients were normal weight, 48.2% were overweight (25 < Body Mass Index <= 30), 31.1% were obese (30 < BMI <= 40), and 1.8% were morbidly obese (BMI > 40). Mean and range of follow-up were respectively 3.1 and 1.5–6 yrs. Implant failure was defined as the exchange of at least one component for whatever reason. Results In normal weight patients there were 36 failures out of 1840 implants (1.96%), in overweight patients there were 87 out of 4692 (1.85%), in obese 59 out of 3031 (1.94%), and in morbidly obese there were 4 out of 172 (2.3%). The mean time to failure for each class was 1.57, 1.48, 1.60, 1.77 yrs. Cox regression analyses showed that the risk of implant failure was not influenced by BMI, absolute body weight, or sex. Conversely, an increased failure risk was observed in mobile meniscus prostheses in comparison with those with a fixed meniscus (Rate Ratio 1.88); an increased failure risk was also related to age (Rate Ratio 1.05 per year). These results were also confirmed when considering septic loosening as the end-point. There were no differences in the rate of perioperative complications and death in the 4 classes of BMI. Conclusion In conclusion, cemented knee prostheses, implanted in patients with arthritis do not have significantly

  8. No clinical benefit of gender-specific total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chen; Wang, Jiaxing; Cheng, Mengqi; Peng, Xiaochun; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xianlong

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus regarding the clinical relevance of gender-specific prostheses in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We summarize the current best evidence in a comparison of clinical and radiographic outcomes between gender-specific prostheses and standard unisex prostheses in female patients. Methods We used the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Science Citation Index, and Scopus databases. We included randomized controlled trials published up to January 2013 that compared gender-specific prostheses with standard unisex prostheses in female patients who underwent primary TKAs. Results 6 trials involving 423 patients with 846 knee joints met the inclusion criteria. No statistically significant differences were observed between the 2 designs regarding pain, range of motion (ROM), knee scores, satisfaction, preference, complications, and radiographic results. The gender-specific design (Gender Solutions; Zimmer Inc, Warsaw, Indiana) reduced the prevalence of overhang. However, it had less overall coverage of the femoral condyles compared to the unisex group. In fact, the femoral prosthesis in the standard unisex group matched better than that in the gender-specific group. Interpretation Gender-specific prostheses do not appear to confer any benefit in terms of clinician- and patient-reported outcomes for the female knee. PMID:24954488

  9. Acute Infection in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pastor, Juan Carlos; Maculé-Beneyto, Francisco; Suso-Vergara, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Infection is one of the most serious complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The current incidence of prosthetic knee infection is 1-3%, depending on the series. For treatment and control to be more cost effective, multidisciplinary groups made up of professionals from different specialities who can work together to eradicate these kinds of infections need to be assembled. About the microbiology, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococcus were among the most frequent microorganisms involved (74%). Anamnesis and clinical examination are of primary importance in order to determine whether the problem may point to a possible acute septic complication. The first diagnosis may then be supported by increased CRP and ESR levels. The surgical treatment for a chronic prosthetic knee infection has been perfectly defined and standardized, and consists in a two-stage implant revision process. In contrast, the treatment for acute prosthetic knee infection is currently under debate. Considering the different surgical techniques that already exist, surgical debridement with conservation of the prosthesis and polythene revision appears to be an attractive option for both surgeon and patient, as it is less aggressive than the two-stage revision process and has lower initial costs. The different results obtained from this technique, along with prognosis factors and conclusions to keep in mind when it is indicated for an acute prosthetic infection, whether post-operative or haematogenous, will be analysed by the authors. PMID:23919094

  10. Load transfer characteristics of a noncemented total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Pafford, J

    1989-02-01

    This study evaluated load transfer characteristics of femoral and tibial components of a total knee prosthesis that was designed to achieve distal femoral and proximal tibial compressive load-bearing. Strain gauge readings were highest on the cortex of the tibial metaphyseal flare. Roentgenograms of 110 patients with noncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with follow-up periods of 12-24 months were evaluated. Cancellous bone hypertrophy bridging from the undersurface of the tibial component to the metaphyseal cortical bone was noted on all roentgenograms at six months, suggesting stress transfer through cancellous bone to this area. Anterolateral sinking was noted in six of the first 46 patients but was not seen again in the series after a design change was made to more rigidly fix the stem in the bone of the upper tibia. Roentgenograms of the femoral components demonstrated distal bone hypertrophy suggesting compressive load bearing. None of the femoral components migrated or sank. PMID:2912617

  11. Total knee arthroplasty in valgus knees using minimally invasive medial-subvastus approach

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilen Amulak; Jain, Nimesh Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Background: An ideal approach for valgus knees must provide adequate exposure with minimal complications due to approach per se. Median parapatellar approach is most commonly used approach in TKA including valgus knees. A medial subvastus approach is seldom used for valgus knees and has definite advantages of maintaining extensor mechanism integrity and minimal effect on patellar tracking. The present study was conducted to evaluate outcomes of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and efficacy of subvastus approach in valgus knees in terms of early functional recovery, limb alignment and complications. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 112 knees with valgus deformity between January 2006 and December 2011. All patients were assessed postoperatively for pain using Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and quadriceps recovery in form of time to active straight leg raising (SLR) and staircase competency and clinical outcomes using American Knee Society (AKS) score and radiographic evaluation with average followup of 40 months (range 24–84 months). Results: The mean VAS on postoperative day (POD) 1 and POD2 at rest was 2.73 and 2.39, respectively and after mobilization was 3.28 and 3.08, respectively (P < 0.001). The quadriceps recovery was very early and 92 (86.7%) patients were able to do active SLR by POD1 with mean time of 21.98 h while reciprocal gait and staircase competency was possible at 43.05 h. The AKS and function score showed significant improvement from preoperative mean score of 39 and 36 to 91 and 79 (P < 0.001), respectively, and the mean range of motion increased from 102° preoperatively to 119° at recent followup (P < 0.001). The mean tibiofemoral valgus was corrected from preoperative 16° (range 10°–35°) to 5° (range 3°–9°) valgus (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Mini-subvastus quadriceps approach provides adequate exposure and excellent early recovery for TKA in valgus knees, without increase in incidence of complications. PMID:26955174

  12. The pathogenesis of bone loss following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lewis, P L; Brewster, N T; Graves, S E

    1998-04-01

    Bone loss following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may be focal or diffuse. It may be caused mechanically, either by unloading of the bone leading to disuse osteoporosis, or by overloading of the bone leading to trabecular fractures and bone destruction. Osteolysis, instigated by an inflammatory reaction to particulate wear debris, is an important and common cause of bone loss after TKA. Less common, though sometimes dramatic, causes of bone loss are infection and osteonecrosis. PMID:9553564

  13. [Extensor mechanism allograft reconstruction after total knee replacement].

    PubMed

    Bürde, C; Sweeney, Patrick

    2007-04-01

    We present three cases in which we used a complete extensor mechanism allograft for the reconstruction of an insufficient extensor mechanism after total knee arthroplasty (and failed reconstruction with local tissue in two of these cases). Early results are encouraging. Allograft reconstruction can be taken into consideration as an alternative to arthrodesis in those "worst-case scenarios". Late failure may occur in about 20%, probably due to a lack of revitalisation in the centre of the allograft. PMID:17262182

  14. The economic impact of minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Coon, Thomas M

    2006-07-01

    The goals of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are to minimize surgical trauma, minimize blood loss, and maximize the effect of analgesia. Assuming these surgical procedures are successful and rigid fixation is achieved, the result, in theory, should be shorter hospital stays and successful, early, aggressive rehabilitation at reduced cost relative to standard TKA surgical techniques. In this article, I address the economic benefits of applying MIS TKA surgical techniques compared with standard TKA surgical techniques. PMID:16927653

  15. Midflexion instability in primary total knee replacement: a review

    PubMed Central

    Ramappa, Manjunath

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Midflexion instability in primary total knee replacement (TKR) is an evolving concept. Successful treatment of instability requires an understanding of the different types of instability. Methods: A literature review was performed to identify information pertinent to midflexion instability in primary total knee replacement, utilising PRISMA guidelines. Databases searched included Embase, Medline, All of the Cochrane Library, PubMed and cross references. Results: Three factors, i.e., elevated joint line, multiradii femoral component and medial collateral ligament (MCL) laxity, were identified to influence midflexion instability. Literature suggested mediolateral instability at 30–60° of flexion as diagnostic of midflexion instability. Literature search also revealed paucity in clinical studies analysing midflexion instability. Most of the evidence was obtained from cadaveric studies for elevated joint line and MCL laxity. Clinical studies on multiradii femoral component were limited by their small study size and early followup period. Conclusion: Elevated joint line, multiradii femoral component and MCL laxity have been suggested to cause midflexion laxity in primary TKR. Due to limitations in available evidence, this review was unable to raise the strength of overall evidence. Future well-designed clinical studies are essential to make definitive conclusions. This review serves as a baseline for future researchers and creates awareness for routine assessment of midflexion instability in primary total knee replacement. PMID:27163080

  16. Conversion of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty to total knee arthroplasty: the challenges and need for augments.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Nawaz, Syed Z; Kahane, Steven; Esler, Colin; Chatterji, Urjit

    2013-12-01

    The potential advantages of unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) include lower morbidity and mortality, quicker recovery, good range of motion, good medium and long-term survival results, potential bone conservation and perceived easier revision. Converting a UKA to a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may be challenging due to issues of bone loss, need for augmentation, restoring joint line and rotation. We present the intraoperative findings of 201 cases of failed UKA's from the Trent Wales arthroplasty audit group (TWAAG) register. The objectives of the study were to determine the modes of failure, number of cases requiring augments and bone grafting, types of augments and implants used in revision surgery. This study does not include the clinical outcomes after revision knee surgery. The average age of the cohort at revision surgery was 67 years. There were 111 females and 90 males. The commonest modes of failure in young patients were unexplained pain/instability and aseptic loosening and in older patients they were aseptic loosening and progression of the disease. The survivorship of the implant was higher in the less than 55 years age group in comparison to the older patients. A total of 49 patients (25.9%) required bone grafting commonest in the 60 years and above age group (79.6%). Fifty patients (26.4%) required some form of augmentation, with the commonest site being tibia and commonest augment being tibial stem (35 cases). Only 8% of the cohort required revision knee implants whereas 78% of the cases received a cruciate retaining primary knee implant. To the author's knowledge, this is one of the largest studies in the literature which signifies the technical difficulties that might be experienced in revising the UKA's which will require appropriate pre-operative planning. PMID:24563977

  17. Myofascial pain in patients waitlisted for total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Richard; Cahill, Catherine M; Wood, Gavin; Hroch, Jennifer; Wilson, Rosemary; Cupido, Tracy; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knee pain is one of the major sources of pain and disability in developed countries, particularly in aging populations, and is the primary indication for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). OBJECTIVES: To determine the presence of myofascial pain in OA patients waitlisted for TKA and to determine whether their knee pain may be alleviated by trigger point injections. METHODS: Following ethics approval, 25 participants were recruited from the wait list for elective unilateral primary TKA at the study centre. After providing informed consent, all participants were examined for the presence of active trigger points in the muscles surrounding the knee and received trigger point injections of bupivacaine. Assessments and trigger point injections were implemented on the first visit and at subsequent visits on weeks 1, 2, 4 and 8. Outcome measures included the Timed Up and Go test, Brief Pain Inventory, Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire. RESULTS: Myofascial trigger points were identified in all participants. Trigger point injections significantly reduced pain intensity and pain interference, and improved mobility. All participants had trigger points identified in medial muscles, most commonly in the head of the gastrocnemius muscle. An acute reduction in pain and improved functionality was observed immediately following intervention, and persisted over the eight-week course of the investigation. CONCLUSION: All patients had trigger points in the vastus and gastrocnemius muscles, and 92% of patients experienced significant pain relief with trigger point injections at the first visit, indicating that a significant proportion of the OA knee pain was myofascial in origin. Further investigation is warranted to determine the prevalence of myofascial pain and whether treatment delays or prevents TKA. PMID:23061082

  18. Collateral soft tissue release in primary total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Deep, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the rate of collateral soft tissue release required in navigated total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to achieve an intra-operative coronal femoral tibial mechanical axis (FTMA) in extension of 0 ± 2°. The primary outcomes assessed were post-operative coronal plane alignment and rate of collateral soft tissue release. The secondary outcomes were range of motion, function, patient satisfaction, and complication rates at one-year follow-up. This is a prospective study of 224 knees. No exclusions were made on the basis of pathology or severity of deformity. Pre-operative FTMA ranged from 27° valgus to 25° varus (mean: −4.5° SD 7.6). Soft tissue release was carried out in 5 of 224 knees (2.2%). Post-operative weight-bearing radiological FTMA ranged from 7° valgus to 8° varus (mean: −0.4° SD 2.5°). Two hundred and ten knees (96%) were within 0 ± 5° of neutral. At one year, median maximum flexion was 100° (IQR 15°) and extension was 0°; mean post-operative Oxford Knee Score had improved from 42 to 23; and 91% of patients were satisfied or very satisfied, with only 2% being dissatisfied. We have found that in the vast majority of cases, including those with large pre-operative coronal deformity in extension, good outcomes in terms of coronal alignment, range of movement, function and patient satisfaction can be achieved. PMID:24720493

  19. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3–6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up. PMID:27120266

  20. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods - 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results - The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation - Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3-6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up. PMID:27120266

  1. Anatomic Versus Mechanically Aligned Total Knee Arthroplasty for Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Toliopoulos, Panagiota; LeBlanc, Marc-Andre; Hutt, Jonathan; Lavigne, Martin; Desmeules, Francois; Vendittoli, Pascal-Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the intra-operative benefits and the clinical outcomes from kinematic or mechanical alignment for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients undergoing revision of failed unicompartmental kneel arthroplasty (UKA) to TKA. Methods: Ten revisions were performed with a kinematic alignment technique and 11 with a mechanical alignment. Measurements of the hip-knee-ankle angle (HKA), the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA), and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) were performed using long-leg radiographs. The need for augments, stems, and constrained inserts was compared between groups. Clinical outcomes were compared using the WOMAC score along with maximum distance walked as well as knee range of motion obtained prior to discharge. All data was obtained by a retrospective review of patient files. Results: The kinematic group required less augments, stems, and constrained inserts than the mechanical group and thinner polyethylene bearings. There were significant differences in the lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA) and the medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) between the two groups (p<0.05). The mean WOMAC score obtained at discharge was better in the kinematic group as was mean knee flexion. At last follow up of 34 months for the kinematic group and 58 months for the mechanical group, no orthopedic complications or reoperations were recorded. Conclusion: Although this study has a small patient cohort, our results suggest that kinematic alignment for TKA after UKA revision is an attractive method. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27563365

  2. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  3. Compartment syndrome after total knee arthroplasty: regarding a clinical case☆

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana Alexandra da Costa; Marques, Pedro Miguel Dantas Costa; Sá, Pedro Miguel Gomes; Oliveira, Carolina Fernandes; da Silva, Bruno Pombo Ferreira; de Sousa, Cristina Maria Varino

    2015-01-01

    Although compartment syndrome is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty, it is one of the most devastating complications. It is defined as a situation of increased pressure within a closed osteofascial space that impairs the circulation and the functioning of the tissues inside this space, thereby leading to ischemia and tissue dysfunction. Here, a clinical case of a patient who was followed up in orthopedic outpatient consultations due to right gonarthrosis is presented. The patient had a history of arthroscopic meniscectomy and presented knee flexion of 10° before the operation, which consisted of total arthroplasty of the right knee. The operation seemed to be free from intercurrences, but the patient evolved with compartment syndrome of the ipsilateral leg after the operation. Since compartment syndrome is a true surgical emergency, early recognition and treatment of this condition through fasciotomy is crucial in order to avoid amputation, limb dysfunction, kidney failure and death. However, it may be difficult to make the diagnosis and cases may not be recognized if the cause of compartment syndrome is unusual or if the patient is under epidural analgesia and/or peripheral nerve block, which thus camouflages the main warning sign, i.e. disproportional pain. In addition, edema of the limb that underwent the intervention is common after total knee arthroplasty operations. This study presents a review of the literature and signals that the possible rarity of cases is probably due to failure to recognize this condition in a timely manner and to placing these patients in other diagnostic groups that are less likely, such as neuropraxia caused by using a tourniquet or peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26401507

  4. TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY IN A PATIENT WITH HOFFA FRACTURE PSEUDARTHROSIS: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires e; Giordano, Vincenzo; Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro do; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos Pires; Barretto, João Maurício

    2015-01-01

    A rare occurrence of a case of Hoffa fracture pseudarthrosis in an alcoholic patient with genu valgum associated with venous insufficiency who underwent total knee arthroplasty is reported. The literature is reviewed and the main factors for surgical indication of total knee arthroplasty after a fracture of the knee are discussed. Total knee arthroplasty was a viable option in a 60-year-old patient with Hoffa fracture pseudarthrosis and comorbidities. PMID:27027038

  5. Hospital volume affects outcome after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pamilo, Konsta J; Peltola, Mikko; Paloneva, Juha; Mäkelä, Keijo; Häkkinen, Unto; Remes, Ville

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose The influence of hospital volume on the outcome of total knee joint replacement surgery is controversial. We evaluated nationwide data on the effect of hospital volume on length of stay, re-admission, revision, manipulation under anesthesia (MUA), and discharge disposition for total knee replacement (TKR) in Finland. Patients and methods 59,696 TKRs for primary osteoarthritis performed between 1998 and 2010 were identified from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register and the Finnish Arthroplasty Register. Hospitals were classified into 4 groups according to the number of primary and revision knee arthroplasties performed on an annual basis throughout the study period: 1–99 (group 1), 100–249 (group 2), 250–449 (group 3), and ≥ 450 (group 4). The association between hospital procedure volume and length of stay (LOS), length of uninterrupted institutional care (LUIC), re-admissions, revisions, MUA, and discharge disposition were analyzed. Results The greater the volume of the hospital, the shorter was the average LOS and LUIC. Smaller hospital volume was not unambiguously associated with increased revision, re-admission, or MUA rates. The smaller the annual hospital volume, the more often patients were discharged home. Interpretation LOS and LUIC ought to be shortened in lower-volume hospitals. There is potential for a reduction in length of stay in extended institutional care facilities. PMID:25323798

  6. Finite element analysis of constrained total Condylar Knee Prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-13

    Exactech, Inc., is a prosthetic joint manufacturer based in Gainesville, FL. The company set the goal of developing a highly effective prosthetic articulation, based on scientific principles, not trial and error. They developed an evolutionary design for a total knee arthroplasty system that promised improved performance. They performed static load tests in the laboratory with similar previous designs, but dynamic laboratory testing was both difficult to perform and prohibitively expensive for a small business to undertake. Laboratory testing also cannot measure stress levels in the interior of the prosthesis where failures are known to initiate. To fully optimize their designs for knee arthroplasty revisions, they needed range-of-motion stress/strain data at interior as well as exterior locations within the prosthesis. LLNL developed computer software (especially NIKE3D) specifically designed to perform stress/strain computations (finite element analysis) for complex geometries in large displacement/large deformation conditions. Additionally, LLNL had developed a high fidelity knee model for other analytical purposes. The analysis desired by Exactech could readily be performed using NIKE3D and a modified version of the high fidelity knee that contained the geometry of the condylar knee components. The LLNL high fidelity knee model was a finite element computer model which would not be transferred to Exactech during the course of this CRADA effort. The previously performed laboratory studies by Exactech were beneficial to LLNL in verifying the analytical capabilities of NIKE3D for human anatomical modeling. This, in turn, gave LLNL further entree to perform work-for-others in the prosthetics field. There were two purposes to the CRADA (1) To modify the LLNL High Fidelity Knee Model to accept the geometry of the Exactech Total Knee; and (2) To perform parametric studies of the possible design options in appropriate ranges of motion so that an optimum design could be

  7. Cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, R Michael; Hanssen, Arlen D

    2008-10-01

    Cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has had limited use in recent decades due to past failures in the early generation of cementless designs. Screw track osteolysis, poor polyethylene, and metal-backed patellar component failures contributed to a controversial track record and created a reluctance to embrace cementless fixation in TKA; however, these failure mechanisms are correctable. In addition, there is renewed interest in cementless fixation due to the recent development of improved biomaterials, particularly highly porous metals and highly crosslinked polyethylene, as well as time-saving advantages and long-term osseointegration of cementless fixation. There are long-term reports of successful designs of cementless knee arthroplasty that are nearly equal to the results of cemented designs. This article discusses the past history, current long-term results, and future of cementless fixation in TKA. PMID:18979934

  8. Risk factors for renal dysfunction after total knee joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Basim K; Sahlström, Arne; Dessau, Ram B

    2015-12-01

    Renal injury and dysfunction are serious complications after major surgery, which may lead to increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of our study was to identify the possible risk factors for renal dysfunction after total knee joint replacement. A retrospective study was conducted among 702 consecutive primary knee joint replacements performed between January 2009 and December 2012 in our department. Increased postoperative serum creatinine was considered indicative of postoperative renal injury according to RIFLE criteria. Sixty three patients (9.7%) had significant moderate or severe postoperative renal dysfunction in which 8 patients (1.2%) ended with severe and permanent renal impairment. Advanced age, low intraoperative blood pressure, hypertension, general anaesthesia, and prophylactic dicloxacillin were identified as significant risk factors. Male gender and BMI were independent risk factors for postoperative increase in serum creatinine. Smoking, female gender, diabetes mellitus and duration of surgery were not identified as significant risk factors. PMID:26790786

  9. Posteromedial tibial polyethylene failure in total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Lewis, P; Rorabeck, C H; Bourne, R B; Devane, P

    1994-02-01

    This report details 16 cases of focal posteromedial tibial polyethylene wear and failure after total knee arthroplasty. This wear phenomenon was associated with an external rotatory subluxation of the tibial component relative to the femoral component. Failure occurred in ten Miller Galante 1, three Porous Coated Anatomic, two Kinematic, and one Press-Fit Condylar knee designs at a mean time of 45 months from their implantation. With this type of failure, there did not seem to be a relationship with metal type, fixation, polyethylene manufacturing method, or polyethylene thickness. A relatively flat design of the tibial articular surface was common to all of these components. In certain patients this articular design may allow excessive component translation, which leads to polyethylene deformity, wear, and subluxation. Some methods for preventing this failure mode are reported here. PMID:8119004

  10. Predictors of bone loss in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Michael R; Klika, Alison K; Lee, Ho H; Joyce, David M; Mehta, Priyesh; Barsoum, Wael K

    2010-03-01

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (RTKA) requires preoperative planning to enable the reconstruction of bony deficiencies. The objective of this project was to identify predictors of bone loss management at RTKA based on the preoperative failure mode and patient demographics known preoperatively. We retrospectively reviewed 245 consecutive RTKA procedures in which the same revision knee system was utilized. Patient demographic and treatment data were recorded, and locations of bone loss were identified based on the reconstructive management. We identified significant predictors for use of femoral augments at all four positions. Several predictors significantly predisposed to use of a thick (>19 mm) polyethylene; however, no predictors of tibial augments were significant. Although the reconstruction of bone loss is primarily based on the intraoperative assessment, these findings may provide additional information to help the surgeon prepare for difficult revision procedures. PMID:20812582

  11. Attitudes to knee osteoarthritis and total knee replacement in Arab women: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is offered to patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in the oil-rich countries in the Gulf region without adequate understanding of their perceptions, preferences or pain experiences. This study aimed to explore the pain experience and mobility limitation as well as the patient’s decision making process to undertake TKA among women with knee pain in the waiting list for surgery. Methods Five focus group discussions were conducted comprised of 39 women with severe knee OA from the waiting list for TKA in the only orthopaedic hospital in Kuwait. Discussions were recorded, transcribed and coded for themes to identify the factors considered to be important in decision-making for TKA. Results Experiencing knee pain was central to daily living and affected patients and their families. Mobility limitation was shaped by a strong sense of expected obligation to take care of the family. Two major sources of TKA delay were identified; one was due to late clinical advice to undergo TKA which was the result of receiving several consultations from different clinicians each of whom tried the medical management for OA. The second delay occurred after the clinical advice for TKA and was mainly due to ambivalence of patients because of fear of the operation and the lack of information about TKA that resulted in unclear expectations of the surgery. Conclusions Both verbal and written information about TKA should be provided as part of preoperative rehabilitation. This is critical to improve doctor-patient interactions and facilitate informed decision about the procedure and thus achieve patient-centered healthcare. PMID:24107658

  12. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) applied during total knee arthroplasty☆

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, João Paulo Fernandes; Danieli, Marcus Vinicius; Queiroz, Alexandre Oliveira; Deffune, Elenice; Ferreira, Rosana Rossi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma regarding healing, pain and hemostasis after total knee arthroplasty, by means of a blinded randomized controlled and blinded clinical study. Methods Forty patients who were going to undergo implantation of a total knee prosthesis were selected and randomized. In 20 of these patients, platelet-rich plasma was applied before the joint capsule was closed. The hemoglobin (mg/dL) and hematocrit (%) levels were assayed before the operation and 24 and 48 h afterwards. The Womac questionnaire and a verbal pain scale were applied and knee range of motion measurements were made up to the second postoperative month. The statistical analysis compared the results with the aim of determining whether there were any differences between the groups at each of the evaluation times. Results The hemoglobin (mg/dL) and hematocrit (%) measurements made before the operation and 24 and 48 h afterwards did not show any significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05). The Womac questionnaire and the range of motion measured before the operation and up to the first two months also did not show any statistical differences between the groups (p > 0.05). The pain evaluation using the verbal scale showed that there was an advantage for the group that received platelet-rich plasma, 24 h, 48 h, one week, three weeks and two months after the operation (p < 0.05). Conclusions In the manner in which the platelet-rich plasma was used, it was not shown to be effective for reducing bleeding or improving knee function after arthroplasty, in comparison with the controls. There was an advantage on the postoperative verbal pain scale. PMID:26229915

  13. Fibrosis is a common outcome following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Abdul, Nicole; Dixon, David; Walker, Andrew; Horabin, Joanna; Smith, Nick; Weir, David J.; Brewster, Nigel T.; Deehan, David J.; Mann, Derek A.; Borthwick, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful orthopaedic procedures that alleviates pain and restores function in patients with degenerative knee joint diseases. Arthrofibrosis, abnormal scarring in which dense fibrous tissue prevents normal range of motion, develops in ~3–10% of TKA patients. No prophylactic intervention is available and treatment is restricted to aggressive physiotherapy or revision surgery. Tissue was collected from patients undergoing primary (n = 30) or revision (n = 27) TKA. Revision patients were stratified as non-arthrofibrotic and arthrofibrotic. Tissue was macroscopically and histologically compared to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of arthrofibrosis. Macroscopically, tissue from primary TKA presents as homogenous, fatty tissue whereas tissue from revision TKA presents as dense, pigmented tissue. Histologically, there was dramatic tissue remodelling, increased collagen deposition and increased (myo)fibroblast staining in tissue from revision TKA. Significantly, tissue architecture was similar between revision patients regardless of clinically diagnosis. There are significant differences in architecture and composition of tissue from revision TKA over primary TKA. Surprisingly, whether revision TKA were clinically diagnosed as arthrofibrotic or non-arthrofibrotic there were still significant differences in fibrotic markers compared to primary TKA suggesting an ongoing fibrotic process in all revision knees. PMID:26553967

  14. Anatomic variations should be considered in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, R; Miura, H; Bravo, C V; Urabe, K; Matsuda, S; Miyanishi, K; Hirata, G; Iwamoto, Y

    2000-01-01

    The effect of anatomic variations on the operative techniques used in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was assessed. In 133 Japanese patients with medial osteoarthritis (OA), six parameters were measured on anteroposterior radiographs of the lower extremities taken with the patients in the supine position. The results showed that the characteristics of the knees were bowing of the femoral shaft and proximal tibia vara, with lateral offset of the tibial shaft with respect to the center of the tibial plateau. The angle between a perpendicular to the mechanical axis and the tangent to the distal femoral condyles can be used in determining the external rotation of the femoral component. This angle was more than 3 degrees in 20% of the patients. The femoral component should therefore be externally rotated more than 3 degrees relative to the posterior condylar line in such patients. Because the center of the tibial plateau is located medial to the central line of the tibial shaft in knees with medial OA, the central point of the tibial articular surface should not be used for alignment of the tibial component. The medial offset stem of the tibial component may impinge against the medial wall. Anatomic variations should be evaluated before TKA is attempted. PMID:10982663

  15. Accuracy of Patient Specific Cutting Blocks in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, Naeder; Kühnel, Stefanie P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Long-term survival of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is mainly determined by optimal positioning of the components and prosthesis alignment. Implant positioning can be optimized by computer assisted surgery (CAS). Patient specific cutting blocks (PSCB) seem to have the potential to improve component alignment compared to the conventional technique and to be comparable to CAS. Methods. 113 knees were selected for PSI and included in this study. Pre- and postoperative mechanical axis, represented by the hip-knee-angle (HKA), the proximal tibial angle (PTA), the distal femoral angle (DFA), and the tibial slope (TS) were measured and the deviation from expected ideal values was calculated. Results. With a margin of error of ±3°, success rates were 81.4% for HKA, 92.0% for TPA, and 94.7% for DFA. With the margin of error for alignments extended to ±4°, we obtained a success rate of 92.9% for the HKA, 98.2% for the PTA, and 99.1% for the DFA. The TS showed postoperative results of 2.86 ± 2.02° (mean change 1.76 ± 2.85°). Conclusion. PSCBs for TKA seem to restore the overall leg alignment. Our data suggest that each individual component can be implanted accurately and the results are comparable to the ones in CAS. PMID:25254210

  16. Modern perceptions and expectations regarding total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, Robert Michael; Russo, Glenn S; Lieberman, Jay R

    2014-04-01

    It is established that patients and surgeons share different perceptions regarding total knee replacement (TKA). This study's objective was to determine patient perceptions regarding TKA as well as the influence of the various information sources in shaping these perceptions. All patients presenting with knee pain for evaluation of TKA were offered a questionnaire. Multivariate statistical analysis correlated response and demographic variables. Approximately 81% of patients felt the main reason for TKA was to alleviate pain, whereas only 19% felt return to sports-related activities was the main reason. Approximately 37% of patients felt TKAs should last for 20 years or more, which was strongly correlated with TV, newspaper, or Internet exposure (p ≤ 0.01). Approximately 38% of respondents had heard of partial knee replacement, whereas relatively few had received information regarding patient-specific, gender-specific, mobile-bearing, or high-flexion TKA designs. Men were likelier than women to get their information from friends, family, or another patient (p = 0.04). Although most respondents perceived pain relief as the primary goal, patients getting information from the media are likelier to expect TKA to last longer than 20 years. This suggests direct-to-patient marketing with such claims as 30-year durability may influence patient perceptions regarding TKA. PMID:23775544

  17. Construction-conditioned rollback in total knee replacement: fluoroscopic results.

    PubMed

    Wachowski, Martin Michael; Fiedler, Christoph; Walde, Tim Alexander; Balcarek, Peter; Schüttrumpf, Jan Philipp; Frosch, Stephan; Frosch, Karl-Heinz; Fanghänel, Jochen; Gezzi, Riccardo; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Nägerl, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Firstly, the way of implementing approximatively the initial rollback of the natural tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) in a total knee replacement (AEQUOS G1 TKR) is discussed. By configuration of the curvatures of the medial and lateral articulating surfaces a cam gear mechanism with positive drive can be installed, which works under force closure of the femoral and tibial surfaces. Briefly the geometric design features in flexion/extension are described and construction-conditioned kinematical and functional properties that arise are discussed. Due to a positive drive of the cam gear under the force closure during the stance phase of gait the articulating surfaces predominantly roll. As a result of rolling, a sliding friction is avoided, thus the resistance to motion is reduced during the stance phase. Secondly, in vivo fluoroscopic measurements of the patella tendon angle during flexion/extension are presented. The patella tendon angle/ knee flexion angle characteristic and the kinematic profile in trend were similar to those observed in the native knee during gait (0°-60°). PMID:22098089

  18. Mycobacterium smegmatis infection of a prosthetic total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saffo, Zaid; Ognjan, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The most common organisms causing prosthetic knee joint infections are staphylococci. However, arthroplasty infections with atypical microbial pathogens, such as Mycobacteria can occur. Due to the rarity of mycobacterial prosthetic joint infections, diagnosis, treatment, and management of these atypical infections represent a clinical challenge. A 71-year old female post-operative day 40 after a left total knee arthroplasty was hospitalized secondary to left knee pain and suspected arthroplasty infection. She had failed outpatient oral antimicrobial treatment for superficial stitch abscess; and outpatient IV/Oral antimicrobials for a clinical postoperative septic bursitis. Ultimately, resection arthroplasty with operative tissue acid fast bacterial cultures demonstrated growth of the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Post-operatively, she completed a combination course of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin and successfully completed a replacement arthroplasty with clinical and microbial resolution of the infection. To our knowledge, literature review demonstrates three case of knee arthroplasty infection caused by the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Correspondingly, optimal surgical procedures and antimicrobial management including antimicrobial selection, treatment duration are not well defined. Presently, the best treatment options consists of two step surgical management including prosthesis hardware removal followed by extended antimicrobial therapy, followed by consideration for re-implantation arthroplasty. Our case illustrates importance of considering atypical mycobacterial infections in post-operative arthroplasty infections not responding to traditional surgical manipulations and antimicrobials. For an arthroplasty infection involving the atypical Mycobacterium smegmatis group, two step arthroplasty revision, including arthroplasty resection, with a combination of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin can lead to successful infection resolution, allowing for a

  19. Soft tissue releases, bone preservation and patient outcome following revision of the oldest total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Marson, Ben Arthur; Gleeson, Robert; Majkowski, Richard; Atrey, Amit

    2015-01-01

    The patient had a total knee replacement for arthritis secondary to Stills disease performed 35 years earlier, with 20 years of good function followed by 15 years of progressively worsening knee pain. A revision was completed, which improved the patient's quality of life and objective knee scores, with an increase in Oxford Knee Score from 22 to 42 and American Knee Society Score from 76 to 170. We discuss the technical aspects in revising this knee replacement, which is the oldest that we are aware of. The result has been a good recovery, which is the first available in the literature for future comparison. PMID:26055586

  20. Apparent Skin Discoloration about the Knee Joint: A Rare Sequela of Metallosis after Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jayasekera, Narlaka; Gouk, Conor; Patel, Amit; Eyres, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Metallosis is a phenomenon most commonly associated with hip replacement. However it can occur in any metallic implant subject to wear. Wear creates metal debris, which is deposited in the surrounding soft tissue. This leads to many local adverse reactions including, but not limited to, implant loosening/osteolysis, pain, and effusion. In the deeper joints, for example, the hip, metal deposits are mostly only seen intraoperatively. Case Study. A 74-year-old lady represented to orthopaedic outpatient clinic. Her principle complaint was skin discolouration, associated with pain and swelling over the left knee, on the background of a previous total knee replacement with a metal backed patella resurfacing six years. A plain radiograph revealed loosening of the patellar prosthesis. A diagnosis of metallosis was made; the patient underwent debridement of the stained soft tissue and primary revision of the prosthesis. She remained symptom-free five years after revision. Discussion. Metallosis results in metallic debris which causes tissue staining, often hidden within the soft tissue envelope of the hip, but more apparent in the knee. Metallosis may cause pain, effusion, and systemic symptoms because of raised levels of serum-metal ions. Surgical intervention with revision and debridement can have good functional results. PMID:25878914

  1. Is There an Ideal Patellar Thickness Following Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Pierce, Todd P; Jauregui, Julio J; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons resurface the patella during total knee arthroplasty to avoid complications such as pain, patello-femoral arthritis, and patellar maltracking and to reduce the risk for reoperation. However, many complications, such as decreased range of motion, increased fractures, and polyethylene wear, have been described with this procedure. One determinant when resurfacing a patella is the thickness of its cuts. This review aims to investigate the relationship between patellar thickness and outcome parameters such as range of motion, patient-reported outcomes, periprosthetic fractures, and reoperations. PMID:26726982

  2. Pulmonary and Cerebral Fat Embolism Syndrome After Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Soo Hyun; Chang, Hyuk Won; Sohn, Sung Il; Cho, Chul Hyun; Bae, Ki-Cheor

    2013-01-01

    Fat embolism occurs after long bone fracture or orthopedic surgery and usually shows mild symptom. But it rarely results in fat embolism syndrome, presenting as multiorgan dysfunction such as lung, brain and skin. Although the diagnosis of fat embolism syndrome is mostly based on clinical features, we experienced fat embolism syndrome involving lung and brain, showing typical imaging findings in pulmonary computed tomography and brain magnetic resonance image. So we present interesting case about fat embolism syndrome after total knee replacement with reviewing associated literatures including imaging findings. PMID:23671550

  3. PAIN FOLLOWING TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY – A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Wilson Mello; Migon, Eduardo Zaniol; Zabeu, Jose Luis Amim

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is known to be a successful procedure. The aging of the population and the growing demand for quality of life have greatly increased the indications for the procedure. Nonetheless, TKA presents some complications that still lack definitive resolution. Pain after TKA is caused by a myriad of reasons that need to be systematically studied in order to reach the correct diagnosis and treatment. History, physical examination, laboratory tests and imaging examinations must all be included in the workup and repeated until a plausible reason has been identified, since if pain is the only indication for TKA revision, the results may be catastrophic. PMID:27022583

  4. Osteolysis of the distal femur after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cadambi, A; Engh, G A; Dwyer, K A; Vinh, T N

    1994-12-01

    An 11.1% incidence of femoral osteolysis (30 cases in 28 patients) was identified in a series of 271 primary total knee arthroplasties. Two minimally constrained total knee designs (Synatomic [Depuy, Warsaw, IN] and Porous-Coated Anatomic [PCA, Howmedica, Rutherford, NJ] were used in this patient population. Femoral osteolysis was observed in 26 Synatomic and 4 PCA knees. The average follow-up period was 52 months (range, 24-96 months). Osteolytic lesions were identified radiographically, adjacent to the nonporous-coated (smooth) regions of the anterior and posterior flanges of the Synatomic and PCA femoral components. The average time to the diagnosis of femoral osteolysis was 31 months (range, 7-96 months). The average patient age at the time of primary total knee arthroplasty was 63 years (range, 43-83 years) and the average weight was 180 lb. (range, 107-278 lb.). Sixteen of the 30 cases were in men. All of the cases with femoral osteolysis had cementless implantation. Tissue specimens were obtained from the 18 cases requiring revision. Implants remained in situ an average of 66 months (range, 15-96 months) prior to revision. In 16 of the 18 cases revised, the femoral component was clinically and radiographically stable. Six of 18 cases were revised for severe osteolysis. The remaining 12 cases were revised for failed metal-backed patellae, failed cementless tibial fixation, or advanced polyethylene wear. Wear of the thin tibial inserts and patellar components were the two sources of particulate polyethylene. Polyethylene debris was observed in all tissue specimens. In cases with failed metal-backed patellae or impingement of the tibial locking pin-and-clip, fine metallic debris was also noted in tissue specimens. Microscopic evaluation of the osteolytic tissue revealed a florid histiocytic response with occasional giant cells. Intracellular submicron particulate polyethylene was identified with polarized light microscopy and oil-red-O staining techniques. In

  5. Immunohistochemical analysis of the neural structures of the posterior cruciate ligament in osteoarthritis patients submitted to total knee arthroplasty: an analysis of thirty-four cases

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Glaucus Cajaty; Camanho, Gilberto; Rodrigues, Mara Ibis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many authors recommend posterior cruciate ligament-retaining arthroplasty with the intention to maintain the proprioception properties of this ligament. Preservation of the neuroreceptors and nervous fibers may be essential for retaining the proprioception function of the posterior cruciate ligament. The present study was thus developed to evaluate the presence of neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament resected during posterior stabilized arthroplasty in osteoarthritis patients. In particular, clinical, radiographic and histological parameters were correlated with the presence or absence of neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament. METHODS: In total, 34 posterior cruciate ligament specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Gomori trichrome. An immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against the S100 protein and neurofilaments was also performed. The presence of neural structures was correlated with parameters such as tibiofemoral angulation, histological degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament, Ahlbäck radiological classification, age, gender and the histologic pattern of the synovial neurovascular bundle around the posterior cruciate ligament. RESULTS: In total, 67.5% of the cases presented neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament. In 65% of the cases, the neurovascular bundle was degenerated. Nervous structures were more commonly detected in varus knees than in valgus knees (77% versus 50%). Additionally, severe histologic degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament was related to neurovascular bundle degeneration. CONCLUSIONS: Severe posterior cruciate ligament degeneration was related to neurovascular bundle compromise. Neural structures were more commonly detected in varus knees. Intrinsic neural structures were detected in the majority of the posterior cruciate ligaments of patients submitted to knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. PMID:25789514

  6. Gonyautoxins: First evidence in pain management in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hinzpeter, Jaime; Barrientos, Cristián; Zamorano, Álvaro; Martinez, Álvaro; Palet, Miguel; Wulf, Rodrigo; Barahona, Maximiliano; Sepúlveda, Joaquín M; Guerra, Matias; Bustamante, Tamara; Del Campo, Miguel; Tapia, Eric; Lagos, Nestor

    2016-09-01

    Improvements in pain management techniques in the last decade have had a major impact on the practice of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Gonyautoxin are phycotoxins, whose molecular mechanism of action is a reversible block of the voltage-gated sodium channels at the axonal level, impeding nerve impulse propagation. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of Gonyautoxin infiltration, as a long acting pain blocker in TKA. Fifteen patients received a total dose of 40 μg of Gonyautoxin during the TKA operation. Postoperatively, all patients were given a standard painkiller protocol: 100 mg of intravenous ketoprofen and 1000 mg of oral acetaminophen every 8 hours for 3 days. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score and range of motion were recorded 12, 36, and 60 hours post-surgery. All patients reported pain of 2 or less on the VAS 12 and 36 hours post-surgery. Moreover, all scored were less than 4 at 60 hours post-surgery. All patients achieved full knee extension at all times. No side effects or adverse reactions to Gonyautoxin were detected in the follow-up period. The median hospital stay was 3 days. For the first time, this study has shown the effect of blocking the neuronal transmission of pain by locally infiltrating Gonyautoxin during TKA. All patients successfully responded to the pain control. The Gonyautoxin infiltration was safe and effective, and patients experienced pain relief without the use of opioids. PMID:27317871

  7. Knee awareness and functionality after simultaneous bilateral vs unilateral total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Roshan; Thomsen, Morten Grove; Kallemose, Thomas; Husted, Henrik; Troelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate knee awareness and functional outcomes in patients treated with simultaneous bilateral vs unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: Through a database search, we identified 210 patients who had undergone unilateral TKA (UTKA) and 65 patients who had undergone simultaneous bilateral TKA (SBTKA) at our institution between 2010 and 2012. All TKAs were cemented and cruciate retaining. The mean follow-up period was 3.2 (2 to 4) years. All the patients had symptomatic and debilitating unilateral or bilateral osteoarthritis for which all conservative and non-surgical treatments were failed, thus preoperatively the patients had poor functionality. All patients were asked to complete Forgotten Joint Score (FJS) and Oxford Knee Score (OKS) questionnaires. The patients were matched according to age, gender, year of surgery, Kellgren-Lawrence score and pre- and postoperative overall knee alignment. The FJS and OKS questionnaire results of the two groups were then compared. RESULTS: A mixed-effects model was used to analyze differences between SBTKA and UTKA. OKS: The mean difference in the OKS between the patients who had undergone SBTKA and those who had undergone UTKA was 1.5, which was not statistically significant (CI = -0.9:4.0, P-value = 0.228). The mean OKS of the SBTKA patients was 37.6 (SD = 9.0), and the mean OKS of the UTKA patients was 36.1 (SD = 9.9). FJS: The mean difference in the FJS between the patients who had undergone SBTKA and those who had undergone UTKA was 2.3, which was not statistically significant (CI = -6.2:10.8, P-value = 0.593). The mean FJS of the SBTKA patients was 59.9 (SD = 27.5), and the mean FJS of the UTKA patients was 57.5 (SD = 28.8). CONCLUSION: SBTKA and UTKA patients exhibited similar joint functionality and knee awareness. Our results support the use of SBTKA in selected patients suffering from clinically symptomatic bilateral osteoarthritis. PMID:27004168

  8. Patient satisfaction after total knee arthroplasty: an Asian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Thambiah, Matthew Dhanaraj; Nathan, Sahaya; Seow, Branden ZX; Liang, Shen; Lingaraj, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an effective method for alleviating pain and restoring knee function in patients with severe osteoarthritis. However, despite the improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, it has been reported that up to 19% of patients are dissatisfied after their operations. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction levels after TKA in an Asian cohort, as well as assess the correlation between patient satisfaction levels and the results of traditional physician-based scoring systems. METHODS The medical data of 103 Asian patients who underwent 110 TKAs between December 2008 and June 2009 were obtained from our hospital’s Joint Replacement Registry. The minimum follow-up period was one year and patient expectations were assessed before TKA. Patient satisfaction was assessed postoperatively using a 5-point Likert scale. Reasons for patient dissatisfaction were recorded. Standardised instruments (e.g. the Knee Society Score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC] and the generic Short Form-36 health survey) were used to assess the patient’s functional status and the severity of symptoms pre- and postoperatively. RESULTS Among the 110 TKAs performed, 92.8% resulted in patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction correlated with postoperative WOMAC function scores (p = 0.028), postoperative WOMAC final scores (p = 0.040) and expectations being met (p = 0.033). CONCLUSION Although there was a high level of patient satisfaction following TKA in our cohort of Asian patients, a significant minority was dissatisfied. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome measure and should be assessed in addition to traditional outcome scores. PMID:26034317

  9. Surgical waste audit of 5 total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Stall, Nathan M.; Kagoma, Yoan K.; Bondy, Jennifer N.; Naudie, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Background Operating rooms (ORs) are estimated to generate up to one-third of hospital waste. At the London Health Sciences Centre, prosthetics and implants represent 17% of the institution’s ecological footprint. To investigate waste production associated with total knee arthroplasties (TKAs), we performed a surgical waste audit to gauge the environmental impact of this procedure and generate strategies to improve waste management. Methods We conducted a waste audit of 5 primary TKAs performed by a single surgeon in February 2010. Waste was categorized into 6 streams: regular solid waste, recyclable plastics, biohazard waste, laundered linens, sharps and blue sterile wrap. Volume and weight of each stream was quantified. We used Canadian Joint Replacement Registry data (2008–2009) to estimate annual weight and volume totals of waste from all TKAs performed in Canada. Results The average surgical waste (excluding laundered linens) per TKA was 13.3 kg, of which 8.6 kg (64.5%) was normal solid waste, 2.5 kg (19.2%) was biohazard waste, 1.6 kg (12.1%) was blue sterile wrap, 0.3 kg (2.2%) was recyclables and 0.3 kg (2.2%) was sharps. Plastic wrappers, disposable surgical linens and personal protective equipment contributed considerably to total waste. We estimated that landfill waste from all 47 429 TKAs performed in Canada in 2008–2009 was 407 889 kg by weight and 15 272 m3 by volume. Conclusion Total knee arthroplasties produce substantial amounts of surgical waste. Environmentally friendly surgical products and waste management strategies may allow ORs to reduce the negative impacts of waste production without compromising patient care. Level of evidence Level IV, case series. PMID:23351497

  10. Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Survey of Korean Knee Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Ki; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kim, Jong Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to provide information on the actual status and prevailing trend of prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism (VTE) following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in South Korea. Materials and Methods The Korean Knee Society (KKS) developed a questionnaire with 6 clinical questions on VTE. The questionnaire was distributed to all members of KKS by both postal and online mail. Participants were asked to supply details on their specialty and to select methods of prophylaxis they employ. Of the total members of KKS, 27.9% participated in the survey. Results The percentage of surgeons who routinely performed prophylaxis for VTE was 60.4%; 19.4% performed prophylaxis depending on the patient's health condition; and the remaining 20.2% never implemented prophylaxis after surgery. The common prophylactic methods among the responders were compression stocking (72.9%), pneumatic leg compression (63.3%), perioral direct factor Xa inhibitor (46.9%), and low-molecular-weight heparin (39.5%). For the respondents who did not perform prophylaxis, the main reason (51.5%) was the low risk of postoperative VTE considering the low incidences in Asians. Conclusions The present study involving members of the KKS will help to comprehend the actual status of VTE prevention in South Korea. The results of this study may be useful to design VTE guidelines appropriate for Koreans in the future. PMID:27595074

  11. Comparison of cementless and hybrid cemented total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lass, Richard; Kubista, Bernd; Holinka, Johannes; Pfeiffer, Martin; Schuller, Spiro; Stenicka, Sandra; Windhager, Reinhard; Giurea, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Cementless total knee arthroplasty (TKA) implants were designed to provide long-term fixation without the risk of cement-associated complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of titanium-coated cementless implants compared with hybrid TKA implants with a cemented tibial and a cementless femoral component. The authors performed a case-control, single-center study of 120 TKAs performed between 2003 and 2007, including 60 cementless and 60 hybrid cemented TKAs. The authors prospectively analyzed the radiographic and clinical data and the survivorship of the implants at a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Ninety patients who underwent TKA completed the 5-year assessment. Knee Society Scores increased significantly in both groups (P<.001). In both groups, 2 patients underwent revision due to aseptic tibial component loosening, resulting in a 96% implant survival rate. Radiographs showed significantly less radiolucent lines around the tibial baseplate in the cementless group (n=12) than in the hybrid cemented group (n=26) (P=.009).At 6-year mean follow-up, no significant difference existed between the cementless and hybrid cemented tibial components in TKA in terms of clinical and functional results and postoperative complications. The significantly smaller number of radiolucent lines in the cementless group is an indicator of primary stability with the benefit of long-term fixation durability of TKA. PMID:23590780

  12. Physical activity after total knee arthroplasty: A critical review

    PubMed Central

    Paxton, Roger J; Melanson, Edward L; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E; Christiansen, Cory L

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most commonly performed elective surgery in the United States. TKA typically improves functional performance and reduces pain associated with knee osteoarthritis. Little is known about the influence of TKA on overall physical activity levels. Physical activity, defined as “any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that results in energy expenditure”, confers many health benefits but typically decreases with endstage osteoarthritis. The purpose of this review is to describe the potential benefits (metabolic, functional, and orthopedic) of physical activity to patients undergoing TKA, present results from recent studies aimed to determine the effect of TKA on physical activity, and discuss potential sources of variability and conflicting results for physical activity outcomes. Several studies utilizing self-reported outcomes indicate that patients perceive themselves to be more physically active after TKA than they were before surgery. Accelerometry-based outcomes indicate that physical activity for patients after TKA remains at or below pre-surgical levels. Several different factors likely contributed to these variable results, including the use of different instruments, duration of follow-up, and characteristics of the subjects studied. Comparison to norms, however, suggests that daily physical activity for patients following TKA may fall short of healthy age-matched controls. We propose that further study of the relationship between TKA and physical activity needs to be performed using accelerometry-based outcome measures at multiple post-surgical time points. PMID:26396937

  13. Conversion Total Knee Arthroplasty after Failed High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Lee, Chung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical results of high tibial osteotomy (HTO) deteriorate over time despite the initial satisfactory results. Several knees may require a conversion to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) because of failure such as the progression of degenerative osteoarthritis and the loss of the correction angle. It is important to know the long-term survival rate and common reason of failure in HTO to inform patients of postoperative expectations before surgery and to prevent surgical errors during surgery. In addition, it has been reported that clinical and radiological results, revision rate, and complication rate were poorer than those in patients without a previous HTO. There are few review articles that describe why conversion TKA after HTO is surgically difficult and the results are poor. Surgeons have to avoid the various complications and surgical errors in this specific situation. We would like to present the considering factors and technical difficulties during conversion TKA after HTO with a review of the literature. We could conclude through the review that the correction of deformity, lower amount of tibial bone resection, and sufficient polyethylene insert thickness, restoration of the joint line height, and adequate ligament balancing can be helpful in overcoming the technical challenges encountered during TKA following HTO. PMID:27274465

  14. Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sacrificing Medial Pivot Knee: Minimum 5-year Follow-up Results

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Seon-Ho; Cho, Hye-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate minimum 5-year follow-up clinical and radiological results of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using a posterior cruciate ligament sacrificing (PS), non-substituting Advance Medial Pivot Knee. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty knees in 80 patients who could be followed up for more than 5 years after TKA using the PS Advance Medial Pivot Knee were evaluated retrospectively. The evaluations included the preoperative and postoperative range of motion (ROM), tibiofemoral angle, Knee Society (KS) knee and function scores, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) score. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. Results The ROM increased from a preoperative mean flexion contracture of 7.6° and further flexion of 115.1° to a postoperative mean flexion contracture of 1.5° and further flexion of 120.5°. The tibiofemoral angle was changed from 4.6° varus preoperatively to 5.8° valgus postoperatively. The KS knee and function scores as well as WOMAC score significantly improved after surgery (p<0.05). Complications developed in 4 cases (3.3%): 2 cases of periprosthetic patellar fracture (1.7%) and 2 cases of aseptic loosening (1.7%). The seven-year survival rate was 98.1% in the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Conclusions The minimum 5-year follow-up results of TKA using the PS Medial Pivot Knee were satisfactory. PMID:25229042

  15. Is previous knee arthroscopy related to worse results in primary total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Piedade, Sérgio Rocha; Pinaroli, Alban; Servien, Elvire; Neyret, Philippe

    2009-04-01

    According to literature, knee arthroscopy is a minimal invasive surgery performed for minor surgical trauma, reduced morbidity and shortens the hospitalization period. Therefore, this type of surgery before total knee arthroplasty (TKA) could be considered a minor procedure with minimum postoperative complication. A retrospective and cohort series of 1,474 primary TKA was performed with re-assessment after a minimum follow-up period of 2 years: 1,119 primary TKA had no previous surgery (group A) and 60 primary TKA had arthroscopic debridement (group B). All the patients underwent a clinical and radiological evaluation as well as IKS scores. Statistical analysis of postoperative complications revealed that group B had a higher postoperative complication rate (P < 0.01). In this group, 30% of local complications were re-operated and 8.3% of these cases underwent revision TKA (P < 0.01). The mean interval between arthroscopy and primary TKA was 53 months. However, statistical analysis did not reveal a direct correlation between arthroscopy/primary TKA interval and postoperative complications/failures (P = 0.55). The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed a survival rate of 98.1 and 86.8% at 10 years follow-up for groups A and B, respectively. Our data allow us to conclude that previous knee arthroscopy should be considered a factor related to postoperative primary TKA outcomes as demonstrated by the higher rate of postoperative complications and failures (P < 0.001) as well as a worse survival curve than group A. PMID:19099293

  16. Severity of Diabetes Mellitus and Total Hip or Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Nielen, Johannes T.H.; Emans, Pieter J.; Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Boonen, Annelies; Lalmohamed, Arief; de Boer, Anthonius; van den Bemt, Bart J.F.; de Vries, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It is generally thought that people with diabetes mellitus (DM) are more likely to suffer from osteoarthritis (OA) due to an increased body mass index (BMI), resulting in mechanical destruction of cartilage. However, previous studies have suggested a coexisting metabolic causality. To evaluate the risk of hip or knee replacement, as a proxy for severe OA, in patients with DM. We additionally evaluated the risk of total joint replacement (TJR) with various proxies for increased DM severity. A population-based case–control study was performed, using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Cases (n = 94,609) were defined as patients >18 years who had undergone TJR between 2000 and 2012. Controls were matched by age, gender, and general practice. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of total knee (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR) surgery associated with use of antidiabetic drugs (ADs). We additionally stratified current AD users by proxies for DM severity. Current AD use was significantly associated with a lower risk of TKR (OR = 0.86 (95% CI = 0.78–0.94)) and THR (OR = 0.90 (95% CI = 0.82–0.99)) compared to patients not using ADs. Moreover, risk of TKR and THR was decreased with increasing HbA1c. This study does not support the theory that DM patients are more likely to suffer from severe OA as compared to patients without diabetes. Moreover, risk of severe OA necessitating TJR decreases with increasing DM severity. This is possibly due to dissimilarities in methodology, a decrease in eligibility for surgery, or variability of OA phenotypes. PMID:27196498

  17. Effects of Tourniquet Release on Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tie, Kai; Hu, Dongcai; Qi, Yongjian; Wang, Hua; Chen, Liaobin

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the clinical outcomes of early and late tourniquet release (tourniquet release after cementing the prosthesis vs tourniquet release after wound closure and pressure dressing) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The study was conducted by searching PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central databases for articles on randomized controlled trials comparing early and late tourniquet release in primary TKA that were published from 1966 to March 2015. Relevant data were extracted, and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) Scale was used to assess the methodologic quality. Stata software (StatCorp, College Station, Texas) was used to perform a meta-analysis. Sixteen articles were included with a total of 1073 patients and 1097 knees. For blood loss, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups in calculated blood loss, decrease in hemoglobin level, drop in hematocrit level, and measured postoperative blood loss, although total measured blood loss and postoperative blood transfusion rate were significantly higher in the early tourniquet release group than in the late tourniquet release group. No statistical differences were found for operative time and incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) between the 2 groups. Wound complication rate in the early tourniquet release group was significantly lower than in the late tourniquet release group. Primary TKA with early tourniquet release is similar to TKA with late tourniquet release regarding perioperative blood loss, operative time, and incidence of DVT. Early tourniquet release reduced the incidence of wound complications compared with late tourniquet release. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e642-e650.]. PMID:27286051

  18. Characterising knee motion and laxity in a testing machine for application to total knee evaluation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter S; Arno, Sally; Borukhoy, Ilya; Bell, Christopher P

    2015-10-15

    The goal of this study was to determine knee motions in specimens under combined input forces over a full range of flexion, so that the various flexion angles and loading combinations encountered in functional conditions would be contained. The purpose was that the data would act as a benchmark for the evaluation of TKR designs using the same testing methodology. We measured the neutral path of motion and laxity about the neutral path. The femur was flexed in a continuous movement, rather than at discrete flexion angles, using optical tracking. The motion of the femoral circular axis relative to the tibia was determined, as well as the contact patches on the tibial surfaces. The neutral path of motion was independent of compressive load, and consisted of a relatively constant medial contact and steady posterior displacement laterally, in agreement with previous studies. The anterior-posterior laxities of the lateral and medial condyles were similar whether AP forces or torques were applied. The lateral laxity was predominantly anterior with respect to the neutral path, while on the medial side, the laxity was less than lateral and predominantly posterior of the neutral path. Contact on the anterior surface of the medial tibial plateau only occurred in some cases in 5° hyperextension and at 0° flex when an anterior femoral shear or an external femoral torque were applied. The method can be regarded as a development of the ASTM constraint standard, with the addition of the benchmark, for the evaluation of total knee designs. PMID:26315916

  19. Analysis of stem tip pain in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kimpton, Christine I; Crocombe, Andrew David; Bradley, William Neil; Gavin Huw Owen, Brigstocke

    2013-06-01

    Stem tip pain following revision total knee arthroplasty is a significant cause of patient dissatisfaction, which in the presence of an aseptic well-fixed component has no widely accepted surgical solution. A definitive cause of stem tip pain remains elusive, however it has been suggested that high stress concentrations within the region of the stem tip may play a role. This paper reports a finite element study of a novel clinical technique where a plate is attached to the tibia within the region of the stem tip to reduce stem tip pain. The results demonstrate that the plate reduces stress concentrations in the bone at the stem tip of the implant. The magnitude of stress reduction is dependent upon plate location, material and attachment method. PMID:23523204

  20. Cemented versus cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Matassi, Fabrizio; Carulli, Christian; Civinini, Roberto; Innocenti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether to use cemented or cement-less fixation for a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is still debated. Discouraging preliminary results of cement-less TKAs have determined the worldwide use of cemented implants. However, with the development of biotechnologies and new biomaterials with high osteoconductive properties, biological fixation is now becoming an attractive option for improving the longevity of TKAs, especially in young patients. There is no evidence in the current literature to support the use of one method of fixation. The extensive clinical experience with cemented implants gathered over the years justifies their widespread use. New randomized clinical trials are necessary to compare cementless fixation based on the new ingrowth surfaces with standard cemented implants. PMID:25606521

  1. The patellofemoral joint in total knee prostheses. Design considerations.

    PubMed

    Freeman, M A; Samuelson, K M; Elias, S G; Mariorenzi, L J; Gokcay, E I; Tuke, M

    1989-01-01

    Some desirable design features of the patellofemoral joint in a total knee arthroplasty condylar prosthesis are proposed. These are that the femoral element should be grooved, have a high anterior flange, and be circular as viewed from the side. The groove should be about 5 mm deep and have relatively vertical walls. The patellar component should have a saddle-shaped articular surface matching the femur and should be countersunk into the patella. The components should be placed so as to position the joint automatically. Results with such a design are reported; loosening, wear, dislocation, and fracture have been rare. Osteolysis of the patella has not been seen after 9 years, so that the cementless press-fit fixation of an H.D.P. patellar prosthesis to date seems safe and efficacious. PMID:2584990

  2. Mobile bearing and fixed bearing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dolfin, Marco; Saccia, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The mobile bearing (MB) concept in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was developed as an alternative to fixed bearing (FB) implants in order to reduce wear and improve range of motion (ROM), especially focused on younger patients. Unfortunately, its theoretical advantages are still controversial. In this paper we exhibit a review of the more recent literature available comparing FB and MB designs in biomechanical and clinical aspects, including observational studies, clinical trials, national and international registries analyses, randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses and Cochrane reviews. Except for some minor aspects, none of the studies published so far has reported a significant improvement related to MBs regarding patient satisfaction, clinical, functional and radiological outcome or medium and long-term survivorship. Thus the presumed superiority of MBs over FBs appears largely inconsistent. The routine use of MB is not currently supported by adequate evidences; implant choice should be therefore made on the basis of other factors, including cost and surgeon experience. PMID:27162777

  3. Embolization of Spontaneous Hemarthrosis Post Total Knee Replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Given, M. F. Smith, P.; Lyon, S. M.; Robertson, D.; Thomson, K. R.

    2008-09-15

    Spontaneous nonhemophiliac hemarthrosis is an unusual entity, which has been little described. We present three cases of spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis post total knee replacement (TKR) and successful management with embolization. Three male patients were referred to our service for angiography and treatment of recurrent hemarthrosis post TKR. In all three patients antegrade ipsilateral common femoral artery punctures and selective angiography of the geniculate branches were performed with a microcatheter. Abnormal vasculature was noted in all cases. Subsequent embolization was performed with Contour (Boston Scientific, Target Vascular, Cork, Ireland) embolization particles (150-250 and 250-355 {mu}m) in two patients and microcoils in the third (TornadoR; Cook Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA). Technical success was 100%. One patient had a recurrence of symptoms requiring a repeat procedure 6 months later. No complications were encountered. Selective angiography and particle embolization is an effective technique for management of this unusual but problematic postoperative sequelae.

  4. Cemented versus cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    MATASSI, FABRIZIO; CARULLI, CHRISTIAN; CIVININI, ROBERTO; INNOCENTI, MASSIMO

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether to use cemented or cement-less fixation for a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is still debated. Discouraging preliminary results of cement-less TKAs have determined the worldwide use of cemented implants. However, with the development of biotechnologies and new biomaterials with high osteoconductive properties, biological fixation is now becoming an attractive option for improving the longevity of TKAs, especially in young patients. There is no evidence in the current literature to support the use of one method of fixation. The extensive clinical experience with cemented implants gathered over the years justifies their widespread use. New randomized clinical trials are necessary to compare cementless fixation based on the new ingrowth surfaces with standard cemented implants. PMID:25606521

  5. Computer Assisted Total Knee Arthroplasty: Does it Make a Difference?

    PubMed Central

    HARITINIAN, Emil G.; PIMPALNERKAR, Ashvin L.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The longevity of total knee prostheses depends mostly on the correct alignment (frontal, sagittal and axial) of the prosthetic components, soft tissue balancing and restoring the mechanical axis of the lower limb. The use of computer-assisted navigation allows more accurate and reproducible restoration of mechanical axis and component positioning, better results in patients with extra-articular deformities and it has an important role in surgical training. Better alignment should lead to an improved functional outcome and an increased long-term survival of the prosthesis. Several studies have proven an improved function in the short and mid-term but we still lack long-term data regarding functional outcome and longevity of the prostheses. PMID:24371482

  6. Health outcome after total knee replacement in the very elderly.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, P D; Hayes, J H; Cleary, R; Pinder, I M; Moran, C G; Sher, J L

    1999-07-01

    Between 1992 and 1994 we performed a prospective study of the effect of total knee replacement (TKR) on the health status of 119 patients over the age of 80 years who had had a primary unilateral TKR. The Nottingham Health Profile was used to assess this before and at three and 12 months after operation. We found a significant improvement in the scores for pain, emotional reaction, sleep and physical mobility at three months. After 12 months, the scores for pain and sleep were well maintained. The other factors had deteriorated slightly but remained better than before operation. Our findings show that TKR leads to a significant improvement in the general health status of the very elderly. PMID:10463740

  7. Rotational alignment of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Graceffa, Angelo; Marcucci, Massimiliano; Baldini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Many surgical techniques, correlated to different anatomical landmarks, have been proposed to allow a satisfactory rotational alignment of the tibial component in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Unfortunately, an accurate landmark has not yet been established although many computer models using CT reconstructions and standard radiologic studies have been performed. In this review article, the authors propose a new anatomical rotational reference for a correct positioning of the tibial component during primary TKA; the authors compared the results of their studies with the current literature on rotational alignment references and previously proposed surgical techniques. The authors also analyzed the correlation between classic and newer tibial baseplate designs and different tibial rotational landmarks. PMID:26855939

  8. Manipulation under Anesthesia for Stiffness after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ju-Hyung; Oh, Jin-Cheol; Park, Sang-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the incidence of manipulation under anesthesia (MUA) for stiffness after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and the degree of joint motion recovery after MUA. Materials and Methods A total of 4,449 TKAs (2,973 patients) were performed between March 2000 and August 2014. Cases that underwent MUA for stiffness after TKA were reviewed. TKAs were performed using the conventional procedure in 329 cases and using the minimally invasive procedure in 4,120 cases. The preoperative range of joint motion, timing of manipulation, diagnosis and the range of joint motion before and after MUA were retrospectively investigated. Results MUA was carried out in 22 cases (16 patients), resulting in the incidence of 0.5%. The incidence after the conventional procedure was 1.2% and 0.4% after the minimally invasive procedure. In the manipulated knees, the preoperative range of motion (ROM) was 102.5°±26.7°, and the preoperative diagnosis was osteoarthritis in 19 cases, rheumatoid arthritis in two, and infection sequela in one. MUA was performed 4.7±3.0 weeks after TKA. The average ROM was 64.5°±13.5° before manipulation. At an average of 64.3±41.3 months after manipulation, the ROM was recovered to 113.4°±31.2°, which was an additional 49.9° improvement in flexion. Conclusions The satisfactory recovery of joint movement was achieved when MUA for stiffness was performed relatively early after TKA. PMID:26676186

  9. Damage in total knee replacements from mechanical overload.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, William F; Miller, Mark A; Cleary, Richard J; Izant, Timothy H; Mann, Kenneth A

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical loads acting across the knee joint following total knee replacements (TKR) during activities of daily living have recently been measured using instrumented TKRs. Using a series of postmortem retrieved TKR constructs we investigated whether these mechanical loads could result in damage to the implant bone interface or supporting bone in the tibia. Eighteen cemented en bloc tibial components (0 to 22 years in service) were loaded under axial compression in increments from 1 to 10 times body weight and digital image correlation was used to measure bone strain and interface micromotion during loading and unloading. Failure was considered to occur when micromotion exceeded 150µm or compressive bone strain exceeded 7300με. The results show that all retrieved specimens had sufficient bone strength to support most activities of daily living, but ~40% would be at risk under larger physiologic loads that might occur secondary to a higher impacts such as jogging or a stumble. The tray-bone micromotion (regression model R(2)=0.48, p=0.025) was greater for donors with lower age at implantation (p=0.0092). Proximal bone strain (model R(2)=0.46, p=0.03) was greater for donors with longer time in service (p=0.021). Distal bone strain (model R(2)=0.58, p=0.005) was greater for donors with more time in service (p=0.0054) and lower peri-implant BMD (p=0.049). High mechanical overload of a single or repetitive nature may be an initiating factor in aseptic loosening of total joint arthroplasties and should be avoided in order to prolong the life of the implant. PMID:27237382

  10. The Influence Of Component Alignment On The Life Of Total Knee Prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugariu, Delia; Bereteu, Liviu

    2012-12-01

    An arthritic knee affects the patient's life by causing pain and limiting movement. If the cartilage and the bone surfaces are severely affected, the natural joint is replaced with an artificial joint. The procedure is called total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Lately, the numbers of implanted total knee prostheses grow steadily. An important factor in TKA is the perfect alignment of the total knee prosthesis (TKP) components. Component misalignment can lead to the prosthesis loss by producing wear particles. The paper proposes a study on mechanical behaviors of a TKP based on numerical analysis, using ANSYS software. The numerical analysis is based on both the normal and the changed angle of the components alignment.

  11. Outcomes of Varus Valgus Constrained Versus Rotating-Hinge Implants in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Tennison L; Bederman, S Samuel; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-01-01

    The stability of a total knee arthroplasty is determined by the ability of the prosthesis components in concert with supportive bone and soft tissue structures to sufficiently resist deforming forces transmitted across the knee joint. Constrained prostheses are used in unstable knees due to their ability to resist varus and valgus transformative forces across the knee. Constraint requires inherent rigidity, which can facilitate early implant failure. The purpose of this study was to describe the comparative indications for surgery and postoperative outcomes of varus valgus constrained knee (VVK) and rotating-hinge knee (RHK) total knee arthroplasty prostheses. Seven retrospective observational studies describing 544 VVK and 254 RHK patients with an average follow-up of 66 months (range, 7-197 months) were evaluated. Patients in both groups experienced similar failure rates (P=.74), ranges of motion (P=.81), and Knee Society function scores (P=.29). Average Knee Society knee scores were 4.2 points higher in VVK patients compared with RHK patients, indicating minimal mid-term clinical differences may exist (P<.0001). Absent collateral ligament support is an almost universal indication for RHK implantation vs VVK. Constrained device implantation is routinely guided by inherent stability of the knee, and, when performed, similar postoperative outcomes can be achieved with VVK and RHK prostheses. PMID:26730689

  12. Risk of Anterior Femoral Notching in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background We retrospectively investigated the prevalence of femoral anterior notching and risk factors after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using an image-free navigation system. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 148 consecutive TKAs in 130 patients beginning in July 2005. Seventy knees (62 patients) underwent conventional TKA, and 78 knees (68 patients) received navigated TKA. We investigated the prevalence of femoral anterior notching and measured notching depth by conventional and navigated TKA. Additionally, the navigated TKA group was categorized into two subgroups according to whether anterior femoral notching had occurred. The degree of preoperative varus deformity, femoral bowing, and mediolateral suitability of the size of the femoral component were determined by reviewing preoperative and postoperative radiographs. The resection angle on the sagittal plane and the angle of external rotation that was set by the navigation system were checked when resecting the distal femur. Clinical outcomes were compared using range of motion (ROM) and the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAX) scores between the two groups. Results The prevalence of anterior femoral notching by conventional TKA was 5.7%, and that for navigated TKA was 16.7% (p = 0.037). Mean notching depth by conventional TKA was 2.92 ± 1.18 mm (range, 1.8 to 4.5 mm) and 3.32 ± 1.54 mm (range, 1.55 to 6.93 mm) by navigated TKA. Preoperative anterior femoral bowing was observed in 61.5% (p = 0.047) and both anterior and lateral femoral bowing in five cases in notching group during navigated TKA (p = 0.021). Oversized femoral components were inserted in 53.8% of cases (p = 0.035). No differences in clinical outcomes for ROM or the HSS and WOMAX scores were observed between the groups. A periprosthetic fracture, which was considered a notching-related side effect, occurred in one case each in the conventional and navigated TKA groups

  13. Doubtful effect of continuous intraarticular analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdulemir; Sundberg, Martin; Hansson, Ulrik; Malmvik, Johan; Flivik, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Local infiltration analgesia (LIA) is well established for effective postoperative pain relief in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). To prolong the effect of LIA, infusion pumps with local intraarticular analgesia can be used. We evaluated the effect of such an infusion pump for the first 48 h postoperatively regarding pain, knee function, length of stay (LOS) in hospital, and complications. Patients and methods 200 patients received peroperative LIA and a continuous intraarticular elastomeric infusion pump set at 2 mL/h. The patients were randomized either to ropivacaine (7.5 mg/mL) or to NaCl (9 mg/mL) in the pump. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain (0–100 mm), analgesic consumption, side effects of medicine, range of motion (ROM), leg-raising ability, LOS, and complications during the first 3 months were recorded. Results On the first postoperative day, the ropivacaine group had lower VAS pain (33 vs. 40 at 12 noon and 36 vs. 43 at 8 p.m.; p = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively), but after that all recorded variables were similar between the groups. During the first 3 months, the ropivacaine group had a greater number of superficial and deep surgical wound infections (11 patients vs. 2 patients, p = 0.02). There were no other statistically significant differences between the groups. Interpretation Continuous intraarticular analgesia (CIAA) with ropivacaine after TKA has no relevant clinical effect on VAS pain and does not affect LOS, analgesic consumption, ROM, or leg-raising ability. There may, however, be a higher risk of wound-healing complications including deep infections. PMID:25428755

  14. Revision after early aseptic failures in primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Piedade, Sérgio Rocha; Pinaroli, Alban; Servien, Elvire; Neyret, Philippe

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cases of early aseptic failures presented during the first 5-year follow-up in a group of 981 primary total knee arthroplasty (primary TKA). Predisposing factors as well causes of failures and postoperative complications in different groups of aseptic failures were re-assessed and compared to a control group. A retrospective and cohort study compared one group of 944 primary TKA without surgical revision (890 patients) (Group A) with 22 primary TKA (22 patients) (Group B) that had revision TKA secondary to aseptic failure during the first five years follow-up. The cases of isolated patellar button replacement (n = 8) and infection (n = 7) were not considered in this study. All patients underwent a systematic assessment that included clinical and radiographic examinations, and IKS scores. Aseptic failure was more prevalent at the first 2-year follow-up (63%). TKA loosening (n = 11) and undiagnosed pain (n = 7) were considered the most frequent modes of failures, and laxity (n = 1) was a very rare early cause of failure. The aseptic failure group was characterized as average 5 years younger with a greater number of previous knee surgeries, lower IKS scores improvement, and more postoperative pain compared to control group, despite the fact that the aseptic failure group showed a prevalence of cases during the first 2-year follow-up. Inside this group, the undiagnosed pain group had lower improvement of IKS scores, a remarkable prevalence in prior surgical procedure (71%) and a minor mean interval between primary and revision TKA (11.6 months). PMID:19082578

  15. Evolution of trochlear compartment geometry in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Demey, Guillaume; Nover, Luca; Dejour, David

    2016-01-01

    Background The study aimed to compare trochlear profiles in recent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) models and to determine whether they feature improvements compared to their predecessors. The hypothesis was that recent TKA models have more anatomic trochlear compartments and would display no signs of trochlear dysplasia. Methods The authors analyzed the geometry of the 6 following TKA models using engineering software: PFC and Attune (DePuy), NexGen and Persona (Zimmer), Noetos and KneeTec (Tornier). The mediolateral trochlear profiles were plotted at various flexion angles (0°, 15°, 30° and 45°) to deduce the sulcus angle. Results Analysis of sulcus angles reveals general convergence of recent designs towards anatomic values. At 0° of flexion, sulcus angles of recent implant models were between 156.0–157.4°, while those of previous generation models between 154.5–165.5°. At 30° of flexion, sulcus angles of recent models also lie within 145.7–148.6°, but those of previous models are between 149.5–152.0°. All three manufacturers deepened their trochlear profile at 30° of flexion in recent models compared to earlier designs. Sulcus angles converge towards anatomic values but still exceed radiologic signs of dysplasia by 2–5°. Conclusions Recent TKA designs have more anatomic trochlear geometries than earlier TKA models by the same manufacturers, but trochlear compartments still exceed radiologic signs of trochlear dysplasia by 2° to 5°. The hypothesis that recent TKA models display no signs of trochlear dysplasia is therefore refuted. Surgeons should be aware of design limitations to optimize choice of implant and extensor mechanisms alignment. Level of evidence: IV geometric implant analysis. PMID:26855943

  16. Popliteal pseudoaneurysm after total knee arthroplasty: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Dorien; Defoort, Koen C; van Hellemondt, Gijs G

    2012-09-01

    Although the incidence of vascular injuries after total knee arthroplasty is quite low, clinical outcome could be significantly impaired. Quick response and accurate management are important to achieve the best possible outcome. We present 3 cases of popliteal pseudoaneurysm formation after total knee arthroplasty and their treatment by endovascular stenting together with a review of literature. PMID:22425296

  17. Elongation of the collateral ligaments after cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty and the maximum flexion of the knee.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwan Kyu; Hosseini, Ali; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Kwon, Young-Min; Li, Guoan

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms that affect knee flexion after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are still debatable. This study investigated the elongation of the superficial medial (sMCL) and lateral collateral ligaments (LCL) before and after a posterior cruciate retaining (CR) TKA. We hypothesized that overstretching of the collateral ligaments in high flexion after TKA could reduce maximal flexion of the knee. Three-dimensional models of 11 osteoarthritic knees of 11 patients including the insertions of the collateral ligaments were created using MR images. Each ligament was divided into three equal portions: anterior, middle and posterior portions. The shortest 3D wrapping length of each ligament portion was determined before and after the TKA surgery along a weight-bearing, single leg flexion path. The relationship between the changes of ligament elongation and the changes of the maximal knee flexion after TKAs was quantitatively analyzed. The sMCL showed significant increases in length only at low flexion after TKA; the LCL showed decreases in length at full extension, but increases with further flexion after TKA. The amount of increases of the maximum flexion angle after TKA was negatively correlated with the increases of the elongations of the anterior portion (p=0.010, r=0.733) and middle portion (p=0.049, r=0.604) of the sMCL as well as the anterior portion (p=0.010, r=0.733) of the LCL at maximal flexion of the knee. The results indicated that the increases of the length of the collateral ligaments at maximal flexion after TKA were associated with the decreases of the maximal flexion of the knee. Our data suggest that collateral ligament management should also be evaluated at higher knee flexion angles in order to optimize maximal flexion of the knee after TKAs. PMID:25555307

  18. Durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dion, Neil T; Bragdon, Charles; Muratoglu, Orhun; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the history of the development of highly cross-linked polyethylene and provides an in-depth review of the clinical results regarding the durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The use of polyethylene as a bearing surface has contributed to the success of THA and TKA; however, polyethylene wear and osteolysis can lead to failure. Ongoing clinical and retrieval studies are required to analyze outcomes at longer-term follow-up. PMID:26043046

  19. Results of Revision Surgery and Causes of Unstable Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Doo-Hoon; Chon, Jae-Gyun; Jang, Sung-Won; Sun, Dong-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate causes of unstable total knee arthroplasty and results of revision surgery. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 24 knees that underwent a revision arthroplasty for unstable total knee arthroplasty. The average follow-up period was 33.8 months. We classified the instability and analyzed the treatment results according to its cause. Stress radiographs, postoperative component position, and joint level were measured. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score and range of motion. Results Causes of instability included coronal instability with posteromedial polyethylene wear and lateral laxity in 13 knees, coronal instability with posteromedial polyethylene wear in 6 knees and coronal and sagittal instability in 3 knees including post breakage in 1 knee, global instability in 1 knee and flexion instability in 1 knee. Mean preoperative/postoperative varus and valgus angles were 5.8°/3.2° (p = 0.713) and 22.5°/5.6° (p = 0.032). Mean postoperative α, β, γ, δ angle were 5.34°, 89.65°, 2.74°, 6.77°. Mean changes of joint levels were from 14.1 mm to 13.6 mm from fibular head (p = 0.82). The mean HSS score improved from 53.4 to 89.2 (p = 0.04). The average range of motion was changed from 123° to 122° (p = 0.82). Conclusions Revision total knee arthroplasty with or without a more constrained prosthesis will be a definite solution for an unstable total knee arthroplasty. The solution according to cause is very important and seems to be helpful to avoid unnecessary over-constrained implant selection in revision surgery for total knee instability. PMID:24900897

  20. Cement or cementless fixation in total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Rand, J A

    1991-12-01

    A prospectively studied group of 59 knees with cementless fixation were compared to a retrospectively studied but matched group of 59 knees with cement fixation using a Press Fit Condylar prosthesis. The only significant preoperative difference between the patient groups was mean age; the cemented group was on average nine years older than the cementless group (p less than 0.0001). At an average of 2.8 years after surgery, there were no significant differences in knee scores between the two groups. Radiolucent lines adjacent to the tibial component were similar in both groups. The complication rate of 20% in the cementless knees was higher than the 12% rate in the cemented knees; this was primarily related to polyethylene wear of metal-backed patellar components. Cement or cementless fixation of this prosthesis appears to provide equivalent early results. PMID:1959287

  1. Acute hypotension after total knee arthroplasty and its nursing strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Mei; He, Jie; Zhou, Chang; Li, Yu; Yi, De-Kun; Zhang, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the factors affecting postoperative acute hypotension after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and provide a basis for guiding the clinical prevention. Methods: Between May 2001 and May 2013, a total of 495 patients undergoing routine TKA were analyzed retrospectively. Independent risk factors related to postoperative acute hypotension after TKA were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: Of the 495 patients undergoing TKA, 61 (12.32%) developed postoperative acute hypotension after surgery. Univariate analysis showed that preoperative Neu, time of surgery, time of anesthesia, pressure of tourniquet, time of using tourniquet, preoperative hypertension, age and type of surgery were significant influencing factors, whereas by multivariate analysis, only age, pressure of tourniquet and type of surgery were significant influencing factors. Conclusion: Factors those were associated with a significantly increased postoperative acute hypotension after TKA included age, pressure of tourniquet and type of surgery. Achieving a good preoperative and postoperative evaluation and monitoring vital signs and disease change contribute to the detection, intervention and salvage for the acute hypotension. PMID:26550351

  2. Impact of Alprazolam on Comorbid Pain and Knee Functions in Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients Diagnosed with Anxiety and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Barış; Kömür, Baran; Aktaş, Erdem; Sonnur Yılmaz, Firdes; Çopuroğlu, Cem; Özcan, Mert; Çiftdemir, Mert; Çopuroğlu, Elif

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Studies report 19-33% postoperative moderate-severe pain and dissatisfaction in uncomplicated total knee arthroplasty (TKA), even after 1 year. High rates of undiagnosed depression and anxiety may have a strong impact on these unfavourable outcomes. Here we aimed to investigate the efficacy of alprazolam on postoperative analgesic use and knee functions. Methods: Seventy-six patients with a mean age of 65 ± 9.3 years (range 46-80) diagnosed with mild-moderate anxiety or depression according to the Hamilton anxiety scale (HAS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) that underwent TKA were evaluated in the study. Group 1 patients were subjected to alprazolam treatment in addition to an analgesic/antiinflammatory drug, whereas Group 2 consisted of patients receiving only the standard postoperative pain management protocol. Visual analog scale (VAS) and postoperative analgesic use (g/day) were calculated to evaluate the magnitude of pain experienced. Preoperative and postoperative knee functions were assessed from the patients’ Knee Society Score and Knee Society Functional Score records. Results: A positive correlation was found between the preoperative HAS, BDI, and total postoperative analgesic use in both groups. Although the decrease in VAS was significant in both groups, postoperative analgesic need (4.25 ± 0.30 g) in Group 1 was less compared to Group 2 (4.81 ± 0.41 g) (p=0.01). The mean change in postoperative (1 month) Knee Society Score and Knee Society Functional Score were also significantly improved in Group1 compared to Group 2. Conclusion: Alprazolam can reduce postoperative analgesic use and improve knee functions by reducing the pain threshold, and enhancing overall mood via its antidepressive and anxiolytic properties in patients undergoing TKA diagnosed with mild-moderate anxiety/depression. PMID:26664498

  3. Physiotherapy Rehabilitation After Total Knee or Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy analysis was to determine, where, how, and when physiotherapy services are best delivered to optimize functional outcomes for patients after they undergo primary (first-time) total hip replacement or total knee replacement, and to determine the Ontario-specific economic impact of the best delivery strategy. The objectives of the systematic review were as follows: To determine the effectiveness of inpatient physiotherapy after discharge from an acute care hospital compared with outpatient physiotherapy delivered in either a clinic-based or home-based setting for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of outpatient physiotherapy delivered by a physiotherapist in either a clinic-based or home-based setting in addition to a home exercise program compared with a home exercise program alone for primary total joint replacement patients To determine the effectiveness of preoperative exercise for people who are scheduled to receive primary total knee or hip replacement surgery Clinical Need Total hip replacements and total knee replacements are among the most commonly performed surgical procedures in Ontario. Physiotherapy rehabilitation after first-time total hip or knee replacement surgery is accepted as the standard and essential treatment. The aim is to maximize a person’s functionality and independence and minimize complications such as hip dislocation (for hip replacements), wound infection, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. The Therapy The physiotherapy rehabilitation routine has 4 components: therapeutic exercise, transfer training, gait training, and instruction in the activities of daily living. Physiotherapy rehabilitation for people who have had total joint replacement surgery varies in where, how, and when it is delivered. In Ontario, after discharge from an acute care hospital, people who have had a primary total knee or hip replacement may

  4. The effect of mechanical massage on early outcome after total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Sang-Rim; Lee, Yong Ki; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical massage via Endermologie® after total knee arthroplasty in reducing edema and pain and improving knee range of motion, in the early postoperative period. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen patients with knee edema following total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=8) or the control group (n=10). The intervention group received mechanical massage therapy using Endermologie® and the control group received conventional physical therapy for 20 minutes a day, 5 times a week from the seventh day postsurgery. Clinical assessments included active knee flexion and extension range of motion, knee pain using a numeric rating scale, the operated limb circumference, the soft tissue cross-sectional area using ultrasonography, the extracelluar fluid volume, and single frequency bioimpedance analysis at 5 kHz using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. [Results] Both groups showed significant reduction in edema and pain, and improvement in active knee flexion at the end of treatment. There were no significant inter-group differences before or after treatment. [Conclusion] Mechanical massage could be an alternative way of managing knee edema after total knee arthroplasty in early postoperative recovery. PMID:26696709

  5. Knee Flexion and Daily Activities in Patients following Total Knee Replacement: A Comparison with ISO Standard 14243

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Markus A.; Nechtow, William; Schwenke, Thorsten; Moisio, Kirsten C.

    2015-01-01

    Walking is only one of many daily activities performed by patients following total knee replacement (TKR). The purpose of this study was to examine the hypotheses (a) that subject activity characteristics are correlated with knee flexion range of motion (ROM) and (b) that there is a significant difference between the subject's flexion/extension excursion throughout the day and the ISO specified input for knee wear testing. In order to characterize activity, the number of walking and stair stepping cycles, the time spent with dynamic and stationary activities, the number of activity sequences, and the knee flexion/extension excursion of 32 TKR subjects were collected during daily activity. Flexion/extension profiles were compared with the ISO 14243 simulator input profile using a level crossing classification algorithm. Subjects took an average of 3102 (range: 343–5857) walking cycles including 65 (range: 0–319) stair stepping cycles. Active and passive ROMs were positively correlated with stair walking time, stair step counts, and stair walking sequences. Simulated knee motion according to ISO showed significantly fewer level crossings at the flexion angles 20–40° and beyond 50° than those measured with the monitor. This suggests that implant wear testing protocols should contain more cycles and a variety of activities requiring higher knee flexion angles with incorporated resting/transition periods to account for the many activity sequences. PMID:26347875

  6. Fracture of the Anterior Locking Flange of a Total Knee Arthroplasty Polyethylene Liner Presenting with Pain following Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jeavons, Richard; Dowen, Daniel; Rushton, Paul; Ryan, Daniel; Gill, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fracture of the modern polyethylene insert of a total knee arthroplasty is rare. We describe the first case of a fractured anterior locking flange of the commonly used Depuy Press-fit Condylar (PFC) Sigma prosthesis. Case Report: The 80 year old Caucasian gentleman presented 8 years following previously uncomplicated and successful primary total knee replacement with pain, swelling and symptoms of instability of the knee. He was able to sublux his knee posteriorly using his hamstrings. Dissociation of the liner was evident on radiographs. He underwent revision of the polyethylene liner. It was evident during the revision that the anterior locking flange of the polyethylene liner had fractured allowing it to dissociate from the tibial tray. At 12 months following this revision he continues to do well and has similar range of movement and function to prior to the episode. This cause of the failure is not clear. Conclusion: Surgeons should be aware of this rare complication when assessing a painful or unstable total knee replacement. PMID:27298962

  7. Rotation flaps for coverage after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pozzobon, Leonardo Rafael; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Guimarães, Tales Mollica; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results obtained using local myocutaneous rotation flaps in cases of wound dehiscence after total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: Patients undergoing these surgical procedures were selected in the 2000-2012 period. The nine selected cases during this period were subjected to flap coverage due to skin dehiscence associated with infection. In eight cases we used rotation flaps of the medial gastrocnemius, and in one case we used advancing skin. RESULTS: Eighty nine percent of the cases were successful in the coverage of the prosthesis and the viability of the flaps. In four cases it was possible to maintain or review the prosthesis. Four other cases progressed to amputation due to failure on treatment of infections, and one case remained without the prosthesis. The functional evaluation showed an unsatisfactory outcome in 89% of cases. CONCLUSION: Coverage flaps are a good option for the treatment of cases of dehiscence with exposure of the prosthesis and the functional failure was associated with the inability to control the infection and the damage it caused. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453672

  8. Pharmacological thromboprophylaxis and total hip or knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Frostick, Simon

    Pharmacological and mechanical thromboprophylaxis reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients undergoing total knee/hip replacement (TKR/THR). Nurses play a key role in VTE prevention through clinical care, before and after discharge from hospital, and patient education. Conventional pharmacological agents for VTE prophylaxis include low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) and fondaparinux. However, parenteral administration, increased bleeding risk, and patient/physician non-adherence to treatment and guidelines, are important limitations. Three non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants--dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban and apixaban--are available in the UK for VTE prevention following THR/TKR. In common with LMWHs and fondaparinux, these offer rapid onset of action and fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. An agent for emergency reversal of dabigatran is in development, while there is no antidote for fondaparinux and LMWHs can be partially neutralised by protamine. Oral administration may result in better adherence to treatment and guidelines, reducing the nurse burden after discharge, and enhancing cost-effectiveness. PMID:26768045

  9. Finite element assessment of block-augmented total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frehill, B; Crocombe, A D; Agarwal, Y; Bradley, W N

    2015-01-01

    Loosening and migration of tibial prostheses have been identified as causes of early total knee replacement (TKR) failure. The problem is made more complex when defects occur in the proximal tibia compromising fixation and alignment. Clinical studies using metal augments have shown these to be an alternative to other means of defect treatment. Finite element (FE) analysis can be used to identify regions that may be prone to loosening and migration. In the current work, 3D FE models of TKR uncontained type-2 defects treated with block augments have been constructed and analysed. It has been shown that a metal augment is the most suitable. The use of bone cement (PMMA) to fill proximal defects is not considered suitable as stresses carried by the cement block exceed those of the fatigue limit of bone cement. It has been shown that the stresses in the proximal cancellous bone of block-augmented models are significantly below levels likely to cause damage due to overloading. Furthermore, the use of stem extensions has been shown to reduce the cancellous bone stresses in the proximal region thus increasing the likelihood of bone resorption. Given this, it is recommended that stem extensions are not required unless necessary to mitigate some other problem. PMID:25204616

  10. Influence of body mass index in revision total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Santos, Diego Benone; Chammas, Victor; Arrebola, Lucas Simões; Colombo, Mauricio Lebre; Scalizi, Caetano

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To evaluate the influence of the body mass index (BMI) on the functional assessment of patients who underwent revision total knee arthroplasty (RTKA). METHODS : Thirty patients who un-derwent RTKA between January 2008 and January 2012 were retrospectively assessed using the WOMAC questionnaire. The patients were divided into three groups according to the BMI ca-tegories defined by the World Health Organization (WHO): Group I with normal BMI (18-24.9 Kg/m2), with eight patients; Group II, overweight (BMI 25-29.9 Kg/m2), with 15 patients, and Group III obesity with BMI ≥ 30 Kg/m2, with seven patients. The post-ope-rative function scores obtained through the WOMAC questionnaire were compared with the BMI of each group. The statistical analysis between BMI and WOMAC scores was performed with the Spe-arman correlation test. RESULTS : The average functional WOMAC score for individuals in Group I was 16.7; in Group II it was 47.7; and in Group III it was 69.9, with a statistically significant differen-ce between groups I, II and III (p< 0.0001). CONCLUSION : Patients with BMI > 25 Kg/m2 had a worse functional evaluation through WOMAC scores when compared to patients with normal BMI after RTKA. Level of Evidence III, Tranversal Retrospective Study. PMID:27057139

  11. Predicting Poor Physical Performance after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Michael J; Wolfe, Pamela; Zeni, Joseph A; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a preliminary decision algorithm predicting functional performance outcomes to aid in the decision of when to undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA). One hundred nineteen patients undergoing primary unilateral TKA were evaluated before and 6 months after TKA. A regression tree analysis using a recursive partitioning function was performed with the Timed Up and Go (TUG) time, Six-Minute Walk (6MW) distance, and Stair Climbing Test (SCT) time as measured 6 months after TKA as the primary outcomes. Preoperative measures of functional performance, joint performance, anthropometrics, demographics, and self reported status were evaluated as predictors of the primary outcomes 6 months after surgery. Individuals taking ≥ 10.1 seconds on the TUG and aged 72 years or older before surgery had the poorest performance on the TUG 6 months after surgery. Individuals walking < 314 meters on the 6MW before surgery had the poorest performance on the 6MW test 6 months after surgery. Individuals taking ≥ 17 seconds to complete the SCT and scoring < 40 on the SF-36 mental component score before surgery had the poorest performance on the SCT 6 months after surgery. Poorer performance preoperatively on the 6MW, SCT, and TUG, was related to poorer performance in the same measure after TKA. Age and decreased mental health were secondary predictors of poorer performance at 6 months on the TUG and SCT, respectively. These measures may help further develop models predicting thresholds for poor outcomes after TKA. PMID:22539338

  12. Evaluation and management of the infected total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D; Scuderi, Giles R

    2013-01-01

    Infection after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a difficult complication to treat. The risk of infection ranges from 0.5% to 2% for primary TKAs and 2% to 4% for revision TKAs. Several demographic studies indicate that more infections are occurring after these procedures, and infection is one of the most common reasons for TKA failure. Prevention remains the key to minimizing the risk of infection; however, little evidence-based literature exists to establish the optimal approach. Every patient with a painful TKA should be suspected of having an infection until proven otherwise. An algorithmic approach to these patients should include standard laboratory screening tests to rule out infection. Synovial fluid aspiration remains the best test for diagnosing infection. Synovial fluid white blood cell counts greater than 1,700 cells/µL and a differential greater than 69% polymorphonuclear cells should raise a high index of suspicion for infection. Several options are available to treat deep periprosthetic infection. The timing of the infection as it relates to surgery and the onset of symptoms are critical in determining treatment success. Prosthetic retention is indicated only in patients with an acute onset of infection, but its limited success reported in recent literature brings into question its role in infected TKAs. A two-stage exchange arthroplasty remains the gold standard for treatment of infection following TKA. PMID:23395040

  13. Tranexamic Acid Administration in Total Knee Arthroplasty Without Tourniquet

    PubMed Central

    Bohler, Iain R M; Howse, Louise; Baird, Andrew; Giles, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There are multiple documented advantages of undertaking total knee arthroplasty (TKA) without tourniquet, however, increased rates of blood loss and transfusion are often cited as contraindications to this approach. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of intra-operative TA administration on blood loss and transfusion rates in TKA without pneumatic tourniquet, using Rivaroxaban as thrombo-embolic prophylaxis. Method: 120 patients split into two continuous data sets, (A+B), underwent TKA without application of above knee tourniquet, receiving a post-operative dose of oral Rivaroxaban within 8 hours. Group B patients received an intra-operative dose of 1 gram of Tranexamic Acid intravenously before the first cut, whilst those in group A did not. Haemoglobin and Haematocrit levels were recorded peri-operatively. A revised Gross formula was used to calculate blood loss. Four patients were excluded from the study for incomplete data. Result: 58 patients (M34F24) in Group A, average age 6, had a mean Haemoglobin drop of 33gram/litre, Haematocrit drop of 0.097litre/litre (9.7%), with an average calculated blood loss of 1393 ml. 58 (M34, F24) patients in group B, average age 67, had a Haemoglobin drop of 25.2gram/litre, Haematocrit drop of 0.076litre/litre (7.6%) with an average calculated blood loss of1079 ml. Thus Group A patients were seen to sustain significantly more blood loss without TA administration, with a 29.1% larger calculated blood loss, a 25.5% larger drop in Haemoglobin and a 27.6% larger fall in Haematocrit. Transfusion rate was 5.2%(3 patients) per group. Conclusion: TA was shown to be effective in reducing blood loss in TKA without tourniquet using Rivaroxaban. Transfusion rates of 5.2% across both groups is close to 1/10th of the transfusion rate reported for major studies of TKA using Rivaroxaban with tourniquet application, and 1/8th of the transfusion rate in studies of TKA with administration of TA and use of tourniquet.

  14. Use of antibiotic-loaded cement in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hinarejos, Pedro; Guirro, Pau; Puig-Verdie, Lluis; Torres-Claramunt, Raul; Leal-Blanquet, Joan; Sanchez-Soler, Juan; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    Bone cement has the capacity to release antibiotic molecules if any antibiotic is included in it, and these elution properties are improved as cement porosity is increased. In vitro studies have shown high local antibiotic concentration for many hours or few days after its use. Antibiotic loaded bone cement (ALBC) is helpful when treating an infection in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision surgery. The purpose of this paper was to review the evidence for the routine use of ALBC in TKA in the literature, its pros and cons. Many authors have recommended the use of ALBC also in primary TKA for infection prophylaxis, but the evidence based on data from National Registries, randomized clinical trials and meta-analysis suggest a protective effect of ALBC against infection when used in hips, but not (or only mild) in knees. A possible explanation to this finding is that the duration and quantity of locally elevated antibiotic levels after surgery are smaller in TKA, due to the smaller amount of cement used for fixation in TKA-only a layer in the bone surface. There are some concerns about the routine use of ALBC in primary TKA as prophylaxis against infection: Firstly, there is a risk of hypersensivity or toxicity even when the chance is highly improbable. Secondly, there is a reduction in the mechanical properties of the cement, but this can be probably neglected if the antibiotic is used in low doses, not more than 1 g per 40 g cement package. Another significant concern is the increased economic cost, which could be overlooked if there were enough savings in treating fewer prosthetic infections. Finally, there is also a risk of selection of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria and this could be the main concern. If used, the choice of the antibiotic mixed in ALBC should consider microbiological aspects (broad antimicrobial spectrum and low rate of resistant bacteria), physical and chemical aspects (thermal stability, high water solubility), pharmacological

  15. Total knee arthroplasty in a patient with neglected congenital patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Tunay, Servet; Ozkan, Huseyin; Köse, Ozkan; Atik, Aziz; Basbozkurt, Mustafa

    2009-10-01

    Late presentation of congenital patellar dislocation with advanced osteoarthritis is rare. This article presents a case of 56-year-old woman with advanced osteoarthritis due to right neglected congenital patellar dislocation treated with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with release of the lateral retinaculum and proximal extensor mechanism realignment. One year later, the patient had improvement of her Knee Society scores and painless function, stability, and better extensor strength. A literature search revealed a limited number of similar cases in which congenital patellar dislocation was treated with TKA. Total knee arthroplasty provides a valid treatment option for adults with congenital patellar dislocation who have absence of the femoral sulcus and associated osteoarthritis. Total knee arthroplasty has the ability to correct the pathologies seen with congenital patellar dislocation, eg, external tibial rotation, absence of femoral groove, and patellar hypoplasia. Realignment of extensor mechanism restores quadriceps strength, normal knee biomechanics, and may prevent complications such as dislocation. PMID:19824599

  16. Press-fit condylar total knee arthroplasty. 5- to 9-year follow-up evaluation.

    PubMed

    Martin, S D; McManus, J L; Scott, R D; Thornhill, T S

    1997-09-01

    Between November 1984 and December 1987, 378 consecutive Press-Fit Condylar (PFC, Johnson & Johnson Professional, Raynham, MA) total knee arthroplasties were performed in 290 patients. The average age at surgery was 67 years (range, 22-91 years). The average follow-up period was 6.5 years (range, 5-9 years). Scoring was carried out according to the Knee Society scoring system. The average preoperative knee score was 28, and the average postoperative knee score was 88. The average preoperative functional knee score was 49, and the average postoperative functional knee score was 72. Ninety-five percent of the patients had no pain on level walking and were satisfied with their functional result. The average postoperative knee flexion was 110 degrees. No implant showed any evidence of radiographic loosening. There were 17 complications, all requiring reoperation. Complications included excessive wear of a metal-backed patella in 8 knees. If complications resulting from the earlier use of a metal-backed patella are eliminated, the overall complication rate is 2.9%, which is comparable to or lower than the rates for other total knee systems with similar follow-up periods. PMID:9306210

  17. Systematic review of periprosthetic tibia fracture after total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Ebraheim, Nabil A; Ray, Joseph R; Wandtke, Meghan E; Buchanan, Grant S; Sanford, Chris G; Liu, Jiayong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the known incidences, treatment options, and related outcomes of periprosthetic tibia fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A literature search was done to identify studies that fit the inclusion criteria. The database search yielded 185 results, which were further reduced by the exclusion criteria to 13 papers, totaling 157 patients that met these criteria. Incidence rates of the different types of periprosthetic tibia fractures were determined and their treatments were subsequently analyzed based on the fracture’s subclass, with patient outcomes being overall favorable. RESULTS: Of the 144 documented patients, 54 (37.5%) had a subclass C fracture, which are frequently seen in revision arthroplasties or when using cement intraoperatively. The fractures of subclasses A and B occur postoperatively. There were 90 subclass A and B fractures with incidences of 18.75% and 43.75% respectively. When broken down by type, 62 (55.36%) were type 1, 24 (21.4%) were type 2, 24 (21.4%) were type 3, and 2 (1.8%) were type 4. Furthermore, from the studies that included origin of injury, the types were further classified as having non-traumatic or traumatic origins. Type 1 had 78% (40/51) non-traumatic origin and 22% (11/51) traumatic origin. Fifteen fractures were type 2, but 5 were falls and 1 through a motor vehicle accident, giving a trauma causation of 40% (6/15). Of the 24 type 3 fractures, 12 were falls and 2 vehicular accidents, leading to a trauma causation of 58% (14/24). CONCLUSION: Type 1 fractures were the most common. Subclass A was treated with locking plates, B required a revision TKA, and C was treated intraoperatively or nonoperatively. PMID:26396942

  18. Periarticular regional analgesia in total knee arthroplasty: a review of the neuroanatomy and injection technique.

    PubMed

    Guild, George N; Galindo, Rubin P; Marino, Joseph; Cushner, Fred D; Scuderi, Giles R

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain control after total knee arthroplasty may be insufficient, resulting in insomnia, antalgic ambulation, and difficulty with rehabilitation. Current strategies, including the use of femoral nerve catheters, may control pain but have been associated with falls, motor blockade, and quadriceps inhibition. Periarticular infiltration using the appropriate technique and knowledge of intraarticular knee anatomy may increase pain control and maximize rehabilitation. PMID:25435030

  19. Lower Limbs Function and Pain Relationships after Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tali, Maie; Maaroos, Jaak

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate gait characteristics, lower limbs joint function, and pain relationships associated with knee osteoarthritis of female patients before and 3 months after total knee arthroplasty at an outpatient clinic rehabilitation department. Gait parameters were registered, the active range of lower extremity joints was…

  20. Relationship between Improvements in Physical Measures and Patient Satisfaction in Rehabilitation after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazzal, Mahmoud I.; Bashaireh, Khaldoon H.; Alomari, Mahmoud A.; Nazzal, Mohammad S.; Maayah, Mikhled F.; Mesmar, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine patient satisfaction with rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fifty-six patients, aged 45-77 years, were enrolled in a post-TKA comprehensive therapy program focusing on knee strengthening and functional activities. The program lasted 3 months and was conducted for 1 h, twice a day, 5 days per…

  1. Trends and predictors of opioid use after total knee and total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Goesling, Jenna; Moser, Stephanie E; Zaidi, Bilal; Hassett, Afton L; Hilliard, Paul; Hallstrom, Brian; Clauw, Daniel J; Brummett, Chad M

    2016-06-01

    Few studies have assessed postoperative trends in opioid cessation and predictors of persistent opioid use after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA). Preoperatively, 574 TKA and THA patients completed validated, self-report measures of pain, functioning, and mood and were longitudinally assessed for 6 months after surgery. Among patients who were opioid naive the day of surgery, 8.2% of TKA and 4.3% of THA patients were using opioids at 6 months. In comparison, 53.3% of TKA and 34.7% of THA patients who reported opioid use the day of surgery continued to use opioids at 6 months. Patients taking >60 mg oral morphine equivalents preoperatively had an 80% likelihood of persistent use postoperatively. Day of surgery predictors for 6-month opioid use by opioid-naive patients included greater overall body pain (P = 0.002), greater affected joint pain (knee/hip) (P = 0.034), and greater catastrophizing (P = 0.010). For both opioid-naive and opioid users on the day of surgery, decreases in overall body pain from baseline to 6 months were associated with decreased odds of being on opioids at 6 months (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.72, P = 0.050; aOR = 0.62, P = 0.001); however, change in affected joint pain (knee/hip) was not predictive of opioid use (aOR = 0.99, P = 0.939; aOR = 1.00, P = 0.963). In conclusion, many patients taking opioids before surgery continue to use opioids after arthroplasty and some opioid-naive patients remained on opioids; however, persistent opioid use was not associated with change in joint pain. Given the growing concerns about chronic opioid use, the reasons for persistent opioid use and perioperative prescribing of opioids deserve further study. PMID:26871536

  2. Comparison of Difference in Hematologic and Hemodynamic Outcomes between Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty and Revision of Infected Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Oog-Jin; Lee, Dong-Chul; Ryu, Seung Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study is to identify preoperative cautions for revision of infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA) by understanding the differences in hematologic and hemodynamic changes between primary TKA and revision of infected TKA. Materials and Methods The study included 40 patients in each of the two groups: one group with patients who underwent TKA and the other group with patients who underwent revision of infected TKA. All patients matched for age and body mass index. The following data were compared between the groups: changes in blood pressure, variations in hemoglobin level, amount of postoperative blood loss and transfused blood, incidence of blood transfusion, white blood cell (WBC) count, albumin level, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and liver enzyme level. Results The hemoglobin levels, transfusion rate, and the amount of blood loss were significantly higher in the revision group (p=0.012). In both groups, CRP reached the highest level on the 3rd postoperative day but it was normalized 2 weeks postoperatively; however, the revision TKA group showed a greater tendency to normalization (p=0.029). There were significant differences between the groups in ESR, WBC, blood pressure, and changes in liver enzyme levels. Conclusions Revision of infected TKA results in greater hemodynamic variations than primary TKA. Therefore, more efforts should be made to identify pre- and postoperative hemodynamic changes and hematologic status. PMID:27274469

  3. Effect of Pedal Deformity on Gait in a Patient With Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wynes, Jacob; Lamm, Bradley M; Bhave, Anil; Elmallah, Randa K; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the case of an 81-year-old man who, despite an anatomically aligned total knee arthroplasty, continued to have knee pain. The patient's ipsilateral rigid flatfoot caused by an earlier partial pedal amputation resulted in a valgus moment during gait, thus creating clinical symptoms in the total knee arthroplasty. Because of the deformity and scarring within the flatfoot, this valgus deformity was corrected through a varus distal femoral osteotomy. The result was normalization of the mechanical axis of the lower limb and a pain-free total knee arthroplasty with an excellent clinical outcome. This case shows the importance of comprehensive lower-extremity clinical and radiographic examination as well as gait analysis to understand the biomechanical effect on total knee arthroplasty. Recognition of pedal deformities and lower limb malalignment is paramount for achieving optimal outcomes and long-term success of total knee arthroplasty. The authors show that a rigid or nonflexible pedal deformity can have negative biomechanical effects on total knee arthroplasty. PMID:26709556

  4. Variability of TKR Knee Kinematics and Relationship with Gait Kinetics: Implications for Total Knee Wear

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Several factors, including compressive load and knee kinematics, have been shown to influence wear. External knee moments (a surrogate for load) have recently been correlated with the medial and lateral wear scar areas of an unconstrained, PCL retaining knee design. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether differences in kinetics during level walking are accompanied by specific differences in relative knee kinematics. Thirty TKR patients were gait tested using the point cluster technique to obtain 3D motions of the knee. External knee moments were calculated from ground reaction forces recorded with a multicomponent force plate. The subjects were separated into two distinct anteroposterior (AP) motion categories: a low motion group and a high motion group. Similarly, the low and high motion groups for internal-external (IE) rotation were also identified. For the IE motion, there was no significant difference between the transverse internal rotation moments between the two IE motion groups. However for the AP motion groups, a higher external peak flexion moment was found for the group displaying less AP motion. These observations suggest that subjects with higher joint moments execute smaller ranges of AP motion and thus are likely to incur less wear. PMID:25866770

  5. Stair ascent kinematics affect UHMWPE wear and damage in total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Jocelyn M; Babalola, Omotunde; Furman, Bridgette S; Wright, Timothy M

    2006-07-01

    Investigations were performed to characterize the wear patterns of tibial inserts in a load-controlled knee simulator by incorporating both normal gait and clinically acquired stair climbing kinematics and load conditions. Two different tibial insert designs were evaluated: the NexGen Cruciate Retaining Augmentable and NexGen Legacy Posterior Stabilized inserts. Two test conditions were run: standard gait only, and gait with bouts of stair climbing at a ratio of 70:1. Gravimetric wear measurements, damage and contact area assessments, and kinematic evaluations were performed. The addition of stair climbing kinematics significantly affected the wear behavior. Regardless of design, wear rates for standard gait tests were significantly higher than those that included bouts of stair climbing. The damage modes seen in both test conditions were primarily burnishing with secondary scratching and pitting. At 2 Mc, the damage areas were not significantly different between the two designs, but the damage area with stair climbing was significantly larger than that with gait alone. The fact that even small bouts of an additional activity of daily living could markedly impact wear simulator results calls into question the usefulness of studies that rely solely on kinematics and load inputs assumed from level gait. PMID:16278843

  6. Mechanical and kinematic alignment in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bonzanini, Giancarlo; Chirillo, Danilo; de Tullio, Vito

    2016-01-01

    In the last 10 years many studies have questioned if the strive to mechanical align any knee may pose some problems related to ligament misbalancing that could explain the high rate of disappointed patients, almost 20% in some reports. Proper indication and difference between patient’s and surgeon’s expectations are among the most important one’s but it must be underlined that, there is indeed a sharp difference between normal knee kinematics, prosthetic knee kinematics and arthritic knee kinematics being the last one extremely variable. A so called kinematic alignment has recently been developed in order to improve patient’s knee function and pain control minimizing any surgical gesture focused on ligaments balance. The amount of bone resections may not affect limb alignment but has an important consequence in ligament tension and balance, clinical result and function therefore a measured bone resection technique is essential in order to perform a proper kinematic alignment. Purpose of this paper is to briefly review the different alignment procedures used for TKA and to discuss their definitions, concepts and evidence on outcome. PMID:27162780

  7. Osteolysis around total knee arthroplasty: a review of pathogenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gallo, J; Goodman, S B; Konttinen, Y T; Wimmer, M A; Holinka, M

    2013-09-01

    Aseptic loosening and other wear-related complications are some of the most frequent late reasons for revision of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Periprosthetic osteolysis (PPOL) pre-dates aseptic loosening in many cases, indicating the clinical significance of this pathogenic mechanism. A variety of implant-, surgery- and host-related factors have been delineated to explain the development of PPOL. These factors influence the development of PPOL because of changes in mechanical stresses within the vicinity of the prosthetic device, excessive wear of the polyethylene liner, and joint fluid pressure and flow acting on the peri-implant bone. The process of aseptic loosening is initially governed by factors such as implant/limb alignment, device fixation quality and muscle coordination/strength. Later, large numbers of wear particles detached from TKA trigger and perpetuate particle disease, as highlighted by progressive growth of inflammatory/granulomatous tissue around the joint cavity. An increased accumulation of osteoclasts at the bone-implant interface, impairment of osteoblast function, mechanical stresses and increased production of joint fluid contribute to bone resorption and subsequent loosening of the implant. In addition, hypersensitivity and adverse reactions to metal debris may contribute to aseptic TKA failure, but should be determined more precisely. Patient activity level appears to be the most important factor when the long-term development of PPOL is considered. Surgical technique, implant design and material factors are the most important preventative factors, because they influence both the generation of wear debris and excessive mechanical stresses. New generations of bearing surfaces and designs for TKA should carefully address these important issues in extensive preclinical studies. Currently, there is little evidence that PPOL can be prevented by pharmacological intervention. PMID:23669623

  8. OSTEOLYSIS AROUND TOTAL KNEE ARTHOPLASTY: A REVIEW OF PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Jiri; Goodman, Stuart B.; Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Wimmer, Markus A.; Holinka, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Aseptic loosening and other wear-related complications are one of the most frequent late reasons for revision of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Periprosthetic osteolysis (PPOL) predates aseptic loosening in many cases indicating the clinical significance of this pathogenic mechanism. A variety of implant-, surgery-, and host-related factors have been delineated to explain the development of PPOL. These factors influence the development of PPOL due to changes in mechanical stresses within the vicinity of the prosthetic device, excessive wear of the polyethylene liner, and joint fluid pressure and flow acting on the peri-implant bone. The process of aseptic loosening is initially governed by factors such as implant/limb alignment, device fixation quality, and muscle coordination/strength. Later large numbers of wear particles detached from TKAs trigger and perpetuate particle disease, as highlighted by progressive growth of inflammatory/granulomatous tissue around the joint cavity. An increased accumulation of osteoclasts at the bone-implant interface, an impairment of osteoblast function, mechanical stresses, and an increased production of joint fluid contribute to bone resorption and subsequent loosening of the implant. In addition, hypersensitivity and adverse reactions to metal debris may contribute to aseptic TKA failure but should be determined more precisely. Patient activity level appears to be the most important factor when the long-term development of PPOL is considered. Surgical technique, implant design, and material factors are the most important preventative factors because they influence both the generation of wear debris and excessive mechanical stresses. New generations of bearing surfaces and designs for TKA should carefully address these important issues in extensive preclinical studies. Currently, there is little evidence that PPOL can be prevented with pharmacological interventions. PMID:23669623

  9. Sensitivity to implant materials in patients with total knee arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Granchi, Donatella; Cenni, Elisabetta; Tigani, Domenico; Trisolino, Giovanni; Baldini, Nicola; Giunti, Armando

    2008-04-01

    Materials used for total knee arthroplasty (TKA), may elicit an immune response whose role in the outcome of the arthroplasty is still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of sensitization in patients who had undergone TKA, and the clinical impact of this event on the outcome of the implant. Ninety-four subjects were recruited, including 20 patients who had not yet undergone arthroplasty, 27 individuals who had a well-functioning TKA, and 47 patients with loosening of TKA components. Sensitization was detected by using patch testing including haptens representative of cobalt-based alloys (CoCrMo), titanium-based alloys (TiAlV), and bone cements. The frequency of positive skin reactions to metals increased significantly after TKA, either stable or loosened (No Implant 20%; Stable TKA 48.1%, p=0.05; Loosened TKA 59.6%, p=0.001, respectively). We found a higher frequency of positive patch testing to vanadium in patients who had a Stable TKA with at least one TiAlV component (39.1%, p=0.01). The medical history for metal allergy seems to be a risk factor, because the TKA failure was fourfold more likely in patients who had symptoms of metal hypersensitivity before TKA. The prognostic value was supported by survival analysis, because in these individuals the outcome of the implant was negatively influenced (the logrank test Chi square 5.1, p=0.02). This study confirms that in patients with a TKA the frequency of positive patch testing is higher than in the normal population, although no predictive value is attributable to the sensitization because patch testing was not able to discriminate between stable and loose implants. On the contrary, the presence of symptoms of metal allergy before implantation should be taken into account as a potential risk factor for TKA failure. PMID:18155140

  10. Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty Improves Early Knee Strength but Not Functional Performance: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.; Bade, Michael J.; Shulman, Benjamin C.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Dayton, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    A prospective, randomized investigation compared early clinical outcomes of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using conventional (CONTROL) or minimally invasive surgical (MIS) approaches (n=44). Outcome measures included isometric quadriceps and hamstrings strength, quadriceps activation, functional performance, knee pain, active knee range of motion (AROM), muscle mass, the SF-36, and WOMAC, assessed preoperatively and 4 and 12 weeks after TKA. Four weeks after TKA, the MIS group had greater hamstring strength (p=0.02) and quadriceps strength (p=0.07), which did not translate to differences in other outcomes. At 12 weeks, there were no clinically meaningful differences between groups on any measure. Although MIS may lead to faster recovery of strength in patients undergoing TKA, there was no benefit on longer-term recovery of strength or functional performance. PMID:22459124

  11. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt; Kehlet, Henrik; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2014-01-01

    Background Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. Objective To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark, receiving a TKA, between November 2012 and April 2013. Participants Seventeen patients, no more than 3 weeks after their TKA. Main outcome measures: In a randomized order, the patients performed 1 set of 4 standardized knee extensions, using relative loads of 8, 14, and 20 repetition maximum (RM), and ended with 1 single set to contraction failure (14 RM load). The individual loadings (kilograms) were determined during a familiarization session >72 hours prior. The patients rated their knee pain during each repetition, using a numerical rating scale (0–10). Results Two patients were lost to follow up. Knee pain increased with increasing load (20 RM: 3.1±2.0 points, 14 RM: 3.5±1.8 points, 8 RM: 4.3±2.5 points, P = 0.006), and repetitions to contraction failure (10% failure: 3.2±1.9 points, 100% failure: 5.4±1.6 points, P<0.001). Resting knee pain 60 seconds after the final repetition (2.7±2.4 points) was not different from that recorded before strength training (2.7±1.8 points, P = 0.88). Conclusion Both loading and repetitions performed to contraction failure during knee- extension strength-training, increased post-operative knee pain during strength training implemented shortly following TKA. However, only the increase in pain during repetitions to contraction failure exceeded that defined as clinically relevant, and was very short-lived. Trial Registration

  12. Lateral patellar burnishing in total knee arthroplasty following medialization of the patellar button.

    PubMed

    Doerr, T E; Eckhoff, D G

    1995-08-01

    This case report describes a total knee revision necessitated by painful contact between the exposed lateral facet of the patella and the femoral component. Pain was resolved following repositioning and enlarging the patellar component. The clinical significance of this report is that the contemporary practice of medializing the patellar component to improve patellar tracking should be performed in moderation to avoid overexposure of the lateral patella. In the setting of persistent anterior knee pain following total knee arthroplasty, the etiology of the pain may be identified as contact between the patellar and femoral component on the sunrise radiograph. PMID:8523016

  13. Development of Total Knee Replacement Digital Templating Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Siti Fairuz; Sulaiman, Riza; Thian Seng, Lee; Mohd. Kassim, Abdul Yazid; Abdullah, Suhail; Yusof, Shahril; Omar, Masbah; Abdul Hamid, Hamzaini

    In this study, by taking full advantage of digital X-ray and computer technology, we have developed a semi-automated procedure to template knee implants, by making use of digital templating method. Using this approach, a software system called OrthoKneeTMhas been designed and developed. The system is to be utilities as a study in the Department of Orthopaedic and Traumatology in medical faculty, UKM (FPUKM). OrthoKneeTMtemplating process employs uses a technique similar to those used by many surgeons, using acetate templates over X-ray films. Using template technique makes it easy to template various implant from every Implant manufacturers who have with a comprehensive database of templates. The templating functionality includes, template (knee) and manufactures templates (Smith & Nephew; and Zimmer). From an image of patient x-ray OrthoKneeTMtemplates help in quickly and easily reads to the approximate template size needed. The visual templating features then allow us quickly review multiple template sizes against the X-ray and thus obtain the nearly precise view of the implant size required. The system can assist by templating on one patient image and will generate reports that can accompany patient notes. The software system was implemented in Visual basic 6.0 Pro using the object-oriented techniques to manage the graphics and objects. The approaches for image scaling will be discussed. Several of measurement in orthopedic diagnosis process have been studied and added in this software as measurement tools features using mathematic theorem and equations. The study compared the results of the semi-automated (using digital templating) method to the conventional method to demonstrate the accuracy of the system.

  14. Patient-Specific Computer Model of Dynamic Squatting after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mizu-uchi, Hideki; Colwell, Clifford W.; Flores-Hernandez, Cesar; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Matsuda, Shuichi; D’Lima, Darryl D.

    2015-01-01

    Knee forces are highly relevant to performance after total knee arthroplasty especially during high flexion activities such as squatting. We constructed subject-specific models of two patients implanted with instrumented knee prosthesis that measured knee forces in vivo. In vivo peak forces ranged from 2.2 to 2.3 times bodyweight but peaked at different flexion angles based on the type of squatting activity. Our model predicted tibiofemoral contact force with reasonable accuracy in both subjects. This model can be a very useful tool to predict the effect of surgical techniques and component alignment on contact forces. In addition, this model could be used for implant design development, to enhance knee function, to predict forces generated during other activities, and for predicting clinical outcomes. PMID:25662671

  15. Histopathological Evaluation of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in Patients Undergoing Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mont, Michael A; Elmallah, Randa K; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Banerjee, Samik; Kapadia, Bhaveen H

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed gross and histopathological ACL changes in arthritic knees (n=174) undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Histopathological changes were assessed and graded as absent (0), mild (1), moderate (2), or marked (3). These were correlated to demographic and clinical factors, and radiographic evaluations. The ACL was intact in 43, frayed in 85, torn in 15, and absent in 31 knees. Eighty-five percent had histological changes. Overall, there were significant associations between greater age and BMI, and histological changes. Grade IV knees had significantly greater calcium pyrophosphate deposits, microcyst formation, and number of pathologic changes. These correlations may aid decision-making when determining suitability for unicompartmental or bicruciate-retaining arthroplasties, though further studies should correlate these histological findings to mechanical and functional knee status. PMID:26239235

  16. Failure of total knee arthroplasty with or without patella resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Patella resurfacing during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is disputed and new prosthesis designs have been introduced without documentation of their survival. We assessed the impact on prosthesis survival of patella resurfacing and of prosthesis brand, based on data from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. Patients and methods 5 prosthesis brands in common use with and without patella resurfacing from 1994 through 2009 were included n = 11,887. The median follow-up times were 9 years for patella-resurfaced implants and 7 years for implants without patella resurfacing. For comparison of prosthesis brands, also brands in common use with only one of the two treatment options were included in the study population (n = 25,590). Cox regression analyses were performed with different reasons for revision as endpoints with adjustment for potential confounders. Results We observed a reduced overall risk of revision for patella resurfaced (PR) TKAs, but the statistical significance was borderline (RR = 0.84, p = 0.05). At 15 years, 92% of PR and 91% of patella non resurfaced (NR) prostheses were still unrevised. However, PR implants had a lower risk of revision due to pain alone (RR = 0.1, p < 0.001), but a higher risk of revision due to loosening of the tibial component (RR = 1.4, p = 0.03) and due to a defective polyethylene insert (RR = 3.2, p < 0.001). At 10 years, the survival for the reference NR brand AGC Universal was 93%. The NR brands Genesis I, Duracon, and Tricon (RR = 1.4–1.7) performed statistically significantly worse than NR AGC Universal, while the NR prostheses e.motion, Profix, and AGC Anatomic (RR = 0.1–0.7), and the PR prostheses NexGen and AGC Universal (RR = 0.4–0.5) performed statistically significantly better. LCS, NexGen, LCS Complete (all NR), and Tricon, Genesis I, LCS, and Kinemax (all PR) showed no differences in this respect from the reference brand. A lower risk of revision (crude) was found for TKAs

  17. A systematic literature review of the Profix in primary total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Viganò, Roberto; Marega, Luca; Breemans, Eric; Miró, Rafael Llopis

    2012-02-01

    Despite more than a decade of use, there are currently no comprehensive reviews summarising clinical results with the Profix Total Knee System in primary total knee arthroplasty. Searching the PubMed and Google Scholar databases revealed 17 potentially relevant Profix manuscripts. After author review and exclusion of studies not meeting predetermined variables, 8 manuscripts were selected. Knee Society data were provided in all 8 and implant survival data in 4. Data for 987 patients (1152 knees) were available. The overall estimated implant survival was 98.6% at 5 years and 94.2% at 10 years with revision for any reason as an endpoint, and 100% at both time points with radiographic loosening as an endpoint. Mean/median preoperative Knee Society knee scores improved from 39.2/24.7 at baseline, to 91.4/92.1 at the last postoperative follow-up visit. Good medium-to long-term clinical results can be expected with the Profix in primary total knee arthroplasty. PMID:22523928

  18. Comparison of pain perception between open and minimally invasive surgery in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Biagio; Vitale, Elsa; Esposito, Antonio; Colella, Antonio; Cassano, Maria; Notarnicola, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was a well-established procedure that had shown excellent long-term results in terms of reduced pain and increased mobility. Pain was one of the most important outcome measures that contributed to patient dissatisfaction after TKA. After a computerized search of the Medline and Embase databases, we considered articles from January 1st, 1997 to October 31st, 2009 that underlined the impact on patient pain perception of either standard open total knee arthroplasty or minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty. We included articles that used the visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Knee Score, Hospital for Special Surgery Score (HSS), Oxford Knee Score (OKS) as postoperative pain indicators, and we included studies with a minimum follow-up period of two months. We excluded studies that monitored only functional postoperative knee activities. It was shown that TKA with the open technique was a better treatment for knees with a positive effect on pain and function than the minimally invasive technique. PMID:21042568

  19. Total knee arthroplasty in human immunodeficiency virus-infected hemophiliacs.

    PubMed

    Unger, A S; Kessler, C M; Lewis, R J

    1995-08-01

    Twenty-six knee arthroplasties were performed in 15 patients with hemophilia A and human immunodeficiency virus infection from 1984 to 1991. Patient age range was 27 to 48 years. After an average follow-up period of 6.4 years (range, 1-9 years) all patients were alive and none of the implants had become infected. T4 lymphocyte counts showed some deterioration, which was not clinically significant. All of the patients were improved following surgery. Nineteen implants were rated excellent, four good, and three fair. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus did not adversely affect the clinical outcome of knee arthroplasty at follow-up periods up to 9 years. PMID:8523002

  20. Acute Metallosis Following Total Knee Replacement – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Klontz, Karl C.; Smith, William I; Jonathan C., Klontz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Metallosis involving the knee joint most often results from metal-on-metal contact late in the life of a failing implant following polyethylene wear. We report a case of acute metallosis following knee arthroplasty in a previously healthy 59-year old male. Case Report: In June 2011, the patient underwent left knee arthroplasty for severe osteoarthritis with necrosis and bone edema in the medial femoral condyle and tibial plateau. Nine months later, because of persistent pain and swelling in the joint, revision arthroplasty was undertaken along with partial synovectomy. Examination revealed pristine prosthetic implants in the absence of loose fragments of bone or glue. Synovial pathology exhibited marked chronic inflammation and hyperplasia with extensive finely granular foreign material resembling metallic debris. Laboratory analysis of synovium revealed a predominance of iron, the principal component of the saw blades. Conclusion: We hypothesize the patient experienced acute metallosis resulting from deposition of metallic fragments from three saw blades used during arthroplasty. We believe the increased density of the patient’s bone that required use of multiple blades may have resulted, in part, from heavy lifting the patient partook in during the two years preceding arthroplasty. PMID:27298939

  1. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): physical activity, knee function, pain, exertion, and well-being.

    PubMed

    Würth, S; Finkenzeller, T; Pötzelsberger, B; Müller, E; Amesberger, G

    2015-08-01

    This study focused on the psychological and quality of life aspects of resuming alpine skiing practice after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in elderly skilled skiers. Two data pools were used in order to analyze psychological states: (a) at the beginning, at the end, and 8 weeks after a 12-week skiing intervention; and (b) concerning diurnal variations of states (i.e., skiing days compared with everyday life during intervention and retention phase). In particular, effects of skiing on amount of physical activity and perceived exertion, perceived pain and knee function, and subjective well-being were analyzed using a control group design. Results reveal that the skiing intervention substantially increases the amount of physical activity by the intervention group (122.30 ± 32.38 min/day), compared with the control group (75.14 ± 21.27 min/day) [F (2, 32) = 8.22, P < 0.01, η(2)  = 0.34)]. Additionally, the analyses of psychological states demonstrated that skiing goes along with enhanced well-being and no significant impact on perceived pain, exertion or knee function. In sum, alpine skiing can be recommended for older persons with TKA with respect to well-being, perceived pain and knee function, and perceived exertion. PMID:26083705

  2. MEDIUM-TERM ASSESSMENT OF TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY WITH IMPLANT MADE IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Barretto, João Maurício; Malta, Márcio; e Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; de Assis, Daniel Pinho; Campos, André Siqueira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed 47 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with implants manufactured in Brazil, with a mean follow-up of five years. Methods: This was a retrospective study at Santa Casa de Misericordia Hospital in Rio de Janeiro, from January 1993 to December 2002. The sample comprised 47 patients (44 females and three males) who underwent TKA, totaling 58 knees. The patients’ ages ranged from 46 to 83 years. A diagnosis of osteoarthritis or rheumatic disease was confirmed in all the patients. Results: In this investigation, all the patients underwent cemented TKA with preservation of the posterior cruciate ligament. The length of follow-up ranged from 5 to 17 years. The functional assessment criterion used was the one of the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), and this yielded an average of 87 points after the operation. The radiographic criterion used was the Knee Society Total Knee Arthroplasty Roentgenographic Evaluation and Scoring System. We had three cases with a radiolucent line without implant loosening, which were asymptomatic from a clinical standpoint. Conclusion: The total knee arthroplasty procedures using an implant made in Brazil were performed by a trained and experienced team. To date, over the clinical follow-up on these patients with knee osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, the results have been seen to be satisfactory. PMID:27027051

  3. Flat-on-flat, nonconstrained, compression molded polyethylene total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Ritter, M A; Worland, R; Saliski, J; Helphenstine, J V; Edmondson, K L; Keating, E M; Faris, P M; Meding, J B

    1995-12-01

    Flat-on-flat, posterior cruciate ligament-sparing total knee prostheses recently have shown problems of wear, loosening, and multiple design changes. Two thousand one Anatomical Graduated Components total knee arthroplasties with compression molded, nonmodular polyethylene tibial components were done between 1983 and 1991 at 3 institutions. All knees were evaluated clinically and radiographically every 2 to 3 years; 71 knees were seen in followup > 10 years. There were 8 failures secondary to revision (5 tibial failures; 2 secondary to metalosis from patellar polyethylene dissociation; and 3 femoral failures) resulting in a 98% survival rate at 10 years. The tibial design was flat-on-flat with a compression molded polyethylene that the authors believe is the primary reason for its success. PMID:7497689

  4. Mid- term results of stryker® scorpio plus mobile bearing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mobile bearing knee system was introduced to lessen contact stress on the articular bearing surface and reduce polyethylene wear. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the mid-term results of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) using Scorpio Plus Mobile Bearing Knee System (Stryker, Mahwah, NJ), and compare the outcomes between patients with osteoarthritis and osteonecrosis (OA·ON group) and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA group). Methods Eight males and 58 females were followed up for a period of 4.4- 7.6 years from June 1, 2003 to December 31, 2005. There were 53 knees with osteoarthritis, 17 knees with rheumatoid arthritis, and 6 knees with osteonecrosis. Clinical and radiographic follow- up was done using The Japanese Orthopedic Association knee rating score (JOA score) and Knee Society Total Knee Arthroplasty Roentgenographic Evaluation and Scoring System. Results With regard to the JOA score, there was significant improvement in both groups. The postoperative range of motion was between 0.8°and 116.8° in OA·ON group, and between 0.0° and 113.7° in RA group. There were no significant differences with the radiographic evaluation between two groups. Spontaneous dislocation of a polyethylene insert occurred in one patient, and deep infection was occurred in one patient. Conclusion There was significant improvement with regard to the clinical and radiographic results of patients undergoing TKAs using the model. The risk of polyethylene insert dislocation related to the mobile bearing TKA is a cause for concern. PMID:23075162

  5. A Standardized Protocol for the Treatment of Early Postoperative Stiffness following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Werner, Steven; Jacofsky, Marc; Kocisky, Sarah; Jacofsky, David

    2015-10-01

    Manipulation under anesthesia (MUA) and continuous passive motion (CPM) are commonly used to optimize range of motion (ROM) for the treatment of early stiffness following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The addition of systemic glucocorticoid as an adjunct to a standardized protocol of MUA and aggressive CPM treatment is outlined. Results demonstrate an average postoperative increase in knee ROM of 45 degrees in 78 TKAs at 10 weeks from MUA procedure with no complications reported. PMID:26030262

  6. Total Knee Arthroplasty Designed to Accommodate the Presence or Absence of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Melinda K.; Bonin, Stephanie J.; Leslie, Chris J.; Banks, Scott A.; Hodge, W. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for selecting the same total knee arthroplasty prosthesis whether the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is retained or resected is rarely documented. This study reports prospective midterm clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes of a fixed-bearing design implanted using two different surgical techniques. The PCL was completely retained in 116 knees and completely resected in 43 knees. For the entire cohort, clinical knee (96 ± 7) and function (92 ± 13) scores and radiographic outcomes were good to excellent for 84% of patients after 5–10 years in vivo. Range of motion averaged 124° ± 9°, with 126 knees exhibiting ≥120° flexion. Small differences in average knee flexion and function scores were noted, with the PCL-resected group exhibiting an average of 5° more flexion but an average function score that was 7 points lower compared to the PCL-retained group. Fluoroscopic analysis of 33 knees revealed stable tibiofemoral translations. This study demonstrates that a TKA articular design with progressive congruency in the lateral compartment can provide for femoral condyle rollback in maximal flexion activities and achieve good clinical and functional performance in patients with PCL-retained and PCL-resected TKA. This TKA design proved suitable for use with either surgical technique, providing surgeons with the choice of maintaining or sacrificing the PCL. PMID:25374697

  7. Iodine-impregnated incision drape and bacterial recolonization in simulated total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Milandt, Nikolaj; Nymark, Tine; Jørn Kolmos, Hans; Emmeluth, Claus; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Iodine-impregnated incision drapes (IIIDs) are used to prevent surgical site infection (SSI). However, there is some evidence to suggest a potential increase in SSI risk as a result of IIID use, possibly from promotion of skin recolonization. A greater number of viable bacteria in the surgical field of an arthroplasty, and surgery in general, may increase the infection risk. We investigated whether IIID use increases bacterial recolonization compared to no drape use under conditions of simulated total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods - 20 patients scheduled for TKA were recruited. Each patient had 1 knee randomized for draping with IIID, while the contralateral knee was left bare. The patients thus served as their own control. The operating room conditions and perioperative procedures of a TKA were simulated. Cylinder samples were collected from the skin of each knee prior to disinfection, and again on 2 occasions after skin preparation-75 min apart. Quantities of bacteria were estimated using a spread plate technique under aerobic conditions. Results - We found similar quantities of bacteria on the intervention and control knees immediately after skin disinfection and after 75 min of simulated surgery. These quantities had not increased at the end of surgery when compared to baseline, so no recolonization was detected on the draped knees or on the bare knees. Interpretation - The use of IIIDs did not increase bacterial recolonization in simulated TKA. This study does not support the hypothesis that IIIDs promote bacterial recolonization and postoperative infection risk. PMID:27168308

  8. Clinical and Biomechanical Evaluations of Staged Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients with Two Different Implant Designs

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Alexandre; Fuentes, Alexandre; Hagemeister, Nicola; Lavigne, Martin; Vendittoli, Pascal-André

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various implants of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are used in clinical practice and each presents specific design characteristics. No implant managed this day to reproduce perfectly the biomechanics of the natural knee during gait. Objectives: We therefore asked whether (1) differences in tridimensional (3D) kinematic data during gait could be observed in two different designs of TKA on the same patients, (2) if those gait kinematic data are comparable with those of asymptomatic knees and (3) if difference in clinical subjective scores can be observed between the two TKA designs on the same patient. Methods: We performed knee kinematic analysis on 15 patients (30 TKAs) with two different TKA implant designs (Nexgen, Zimmer and Triathlon, Stryker) on each knee and on 25 asymptomatic subjects (35 knees). Clinical evaluation included range of motion, weight bearing radiographs, questionnaire of joint perception, KOOS, WOMAC and SF-12. Results: Comparison between TKAs and asymptomatic knees revealed that asymptomatic knees had significantly less knee flexion at initial contact (p < 0.04) and more flexion for most of the swing phase (p between 0.004 and 0.04). Asymptomatic knees also had less varus at loading response, during stance phase and during most of the swing phase (p between 0.001 - 0.05). Transverse plane analysis showed a tendency for asymptomatic knees to be more in internal rotation during stance phase (p 0.02 - 0.04). Comparing both TKA designs, NexgenTM implant had significantly more flexion at the end of swing phase (p = 0.04) compared to knees with the TriathlonTM implant. In frontal plane, from initial contact to maximum mid stance angle and between the mean mid stance angle and initial contact NexgenTM TKA had significantly more adduction (varus, p =0.02 – 0.03). Clinical scores of both TKAs did not have significant difference. Conclusions: TKA with the tested implants did not reproduce natural knee kinematics during gait. In our cohort

  9. Complications of perioperative warfarin therapy in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Phil M S; Brew, Chris J; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Crawford, Ross W; Donnelly, Bill J

    2014-02-01

    Patients presenting for knee replacement on warfarin for medical reasons often require higher levels of anticoagulation peri-operatively than primary thromboprophylaxis and may require bridging therapy with heparin. We performed a retrospective case control study on 149 consecutive primary knee arthroplasty patients to investigate whether anti-coagulation affected short-term outcomes. Specific outcome measures indicated significant increases in prolonged wound drainage (26.8% of cases vs 7.3% of controls, P<0.001); superficial infection (16.8% vs 3.3%, P<0.001); deep infection (6.0% vs 0%, P<0.001); return-to-theatre for washout (4.7% vs 0.7%, P=0.004); and revision (4.7% vs 0.3%, P=0.001). Management of patients on long-term warfarin therapy following TKR is particularly challenging, as the surgeon must balance risk of thromboembolism against post-operative complications on an individual patient basis in order to optimise outcomes. PMID:24209787

  10. Total or Partial Knee Arthroplasty Trial - TOPKAT: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the majority of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee the disease originates in the medial compartment. There are two fundamentally different approaches to knee replacement for patients with unicompartmental disease: some surgeons feel that it is always best to replace both the knee compartments with a total knee replacement (TKR); whereas others feel it is best to replace just the damaged component of the knee using a partial or unicompartment replacement (UKR). Both interventions are established and well-documented procedures. Little evidence exists to prove the clinical and cost-effectiveness of either management option. This provides an explanation for the high variation in treatment of choice by individual surgeons for the same knee pathology. The aim of the TOPKAT study will be to assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of TKRs compared to UKRs in patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis. Methods/Design The design of the study is a single layer multicentre superiority type randomised controlled trial of unilateral knee replacement patients. Blinding will not be possible as the surgical scars for each procedure differ. We aim to recruit 500 patients from approximately 28 secondary care orthopaedic units from across the UK including district general and teaching hospitals. Participants will be randomised to either UKR or TKR. Randomisation will occur using a web-based randomisation system. The study is pragmatic in terms of implant selection for the knee replacement operation. Participants will be followed up for 5 years. The primary outcome is the Oxford Knee Score, which will be collected via questionnaires at 2 months, 1 year and then annually to 5 years. Secondary outcomes will include cost-effectiveness, patient satisfaction and complications data. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN03013488; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01352247 PMID:24028414