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Sample records for postinfarction scar size

  1. Rapid Surface Cooling by ThermoSuit System Dramatically Reduces Scar Size, Prevents Post-Infarction Adverse Left Ventricular Remodeling, and Improves Cardiac Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wangde; Herring, Michael J; Hale, Sharon L; Kloner, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Background The long-term effects of transient hypothermia by the non-invasive ThermoSuit apparatus on myocardial infarct (MI) scar size, left ventricular (LV) remodeling, and LV function were assessed in rat MI model. Methods and Results Rats were randomized to normothermic or hypothermic groups (n=14 in each group) and subjected to 30 minutes coronary artery occlusion and 6 weeks of reperfusion. For hypothermia therapy, rats were placed into the ThermoSuit apparatus at 2 minutes after the onset of coronary artery occlusion, were taken out of the apparatus when the core body temperature reached 32°C (in ≈8 minutes), and were then allowed to rewarm. After 6 weeks of recovery, rats treated with hypothermia demonstrated markedly reduced scar size (expressed as % of left ventricular area: hypothermia, 6.5±1.1%; normothermia, 19.4±1.7%; P=1.3×10−6); and thicker anterior LV wall (hypothermia, 1.57±0.09 mm; normothermia, 1.07±0.05 mm; P=3.4×10−5); decreased postmortem left ventricular volume (hypothermia, 0.45±0.04 mL; normothermia, 0.6±0.03 mL; P=0.028); and better LV fractional shortening by echocardiography (hypothermia, 37.2±2.8%; normothermia, 18.9±2.3%; P=0.0002) and LV ejection fraction by LV contrast ventriculography (hypothermia, 66.8±2.3%; normothermia, 56.0±2.0%; P=0.0014). Conclusions Rapid, transient non-invasive surface cooling with the ThermoSuit apparatus in the acute phase of MI decreased scar size by 66.5%, attenuated adverse post-infarct left ventricular dilation and remodeling, and improved cardiac function in the chronic phase of experimental MI. PMID:26116692

  2. Imaging techniques in the evaluation of post-infarction function and scar.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Eduardo; Sanz, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Imaging techniques are essential in the clinical evaluation of patients with a myocardial infarction. They are of value for both initial assessment of the ischemic injury and for detection of the subgroup of patients at higher risk of developing cardiovascular events during follow-up. Echocardiography remains the technique of choice for the initial evaluation, owing to its bedside capability to determine strong predictors, such as ventricular volumes, global and regional systolic function, and valvular regurgitation. New techniques for evaluating ventricular mechanics, mainly assessment of ventricular deformation, are revealing important aspects of post-infarction ventricular adaptation. The main alternative to echocardiography is cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. This technique is highly accurate for determining ventricular volumes and ventricular function and has the additional advantage of being able to characterize the myocardium and demonstrate changes associated with the ischemic insult such as necrosis/fibrosis, edema, microvascular obstruction, and intramyocardial hemorrhage. These features not only allow detection and quantification of the infarct size, but also reveal additional characteristics of the scar tissue with prognostic value. PMID:25172072

  3. Postinfarct Left Ventricular Remodelling: A Prevailing Cause of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Alessio; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic disease with high morbidity and mortality, which represents a growing challenge in medicine. A major risk factor for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is a history of myocardial infarction. The expansion of a large infarct scar and subsequent regional ventricular dilatation can cause postinfarct remodelling, leading to significant enlargement of the left ventricular chamber. It has a negative prognostic value, because it precedes the clinical manifestations of heart failure. The characteristics of the infarcted myocardium predicting postinfarct remodelling can be studied with cardiac magnetic resonance and experimental imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging can identify the changes in the architecture of myocardial fibers. This review discusses all the aspects related to postinfarct left ventricular remodelling: definition, pathogenesis, diagnosis, consequences, and available therapies, together with experimental interventions that show promising results against postinfarct remodelling and heart failure. PMID:26989555

  4. Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia in Patients with Post-Infarction Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nazer, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) in patients with post-infarction cardiomyopathy (CMP) is caused by reentry through slowly conducting tissue with in areas of myocardial scar. The use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) has helped to decrease the risk of arrhythmic death in patients with post-infarction CMP, but the symptomatic and psychological burden of ICD shocks remains significant. Experience with catheter ablation has progressed substantially in the past 20 years, and is now routinely used to treat patients with post-infarction CMP who experience VT or receive ICD therapy. Depending on the hemodynamic tolerance of VT, a variety of mapping techniques may be used to identify sites for catheter ablation, including activation and entrainment mapping for mappable VTs, or substrate mapping for unmappable VTs. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology of VT in post-infarction CMP patients, and the contemporary practice of catheter ablation. PMID:25089131

  5. Durable Scar Size Reduction Due to Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy Regulates Whole‐Chamber Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Adam R.; Suncion, Viky Y.; McCall, Frederic; Guerra, Danny; Mather, Jacques; Zambrano, Juan P.; Heldman, Alan W.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intramyocardial injection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy is associated with reverse remodeling in experimental models and humans. Here, we tested the hypothesis that allogeneic MSC therapy drives ventricular remodeling by producing durable and progressive scar size reduction in ischemic cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results Gottingen swine (n=12) underwent left anterior descending coronary artery myocardial infarction (MI), and 3 months post‐MI animals received either intramyocardial allogeneic MSC injection (200 mol/L cells; n=6) or left ventricle (LV) catheterization without injection (n=6). Swine were followed with serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for 9 months to assess structural and functional changes of the LV. Intramyocardial injection was performed using an integrated imaging platform combining electroanatomical mapping unipolar voltage and 3‐dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging angiography–derived anatomy to accurately target infarct border zone injections. MSC‐treated animals had a 19.62±2.86% reduction in scar size at 3 months postinjection, which progressed to 28.09±2.31% from 3 to 6 months postinjection (P<0.0001). MSC‐treated animals had unchanged end‐diastolic volume (EDV; P=0.08) and end‐systolic volume (ESV; P=0.28) from preinjection to 6 months postinjection, whereas controls had progressive dilatation in both EDV (P=0.0002) and ESV (P=0.0002). In addition, MSC‐treated animals had improved LV sphericity index. Percentage change in infarct size correlated with percentage change in EDV (r=0.68; P=0.01) and ESV (r=0.77; P=0.001). Ejection fraction increased from 29.69±1.68% to 35.85±2.74% at 3 months post‐MSC injection and progressed to 39.02±2.42% 6 months postinjection (P=0.0001), whereas controls had a persistently depressed ejection fraction during follow‐up (P=0.33). Conclusion Intramyocardial injection of allogeneic MSCs leads to a sustained and

  6. Comparing a novel automatic 3D method for LGE-CMR quantification of scar size with established methods.

    PubMed

    Woie, Leik; Måløy, Frode; Eftestøl, Trygve; Engan, Kjersti; Edvardsen, Thor; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Ørn, Stein

    2014-02-01

    Current methods for the estimation of infarct size by late-enhanced cardiac magnetic imaging are based upon 2D analysis that first determines the size of the infarction in each slice, and thereafter adds the infarct sizes from each slice to generate a volume. We present a novel, automatic 3D method that estimates infarct size by a simultaneous analysis of all pixels from all slices. In a population of 54 patients with ischemic scars, the infarct size estimated by the automatic 3D method was compared with four established 2D methods. The new 3D method defined scar as the sum of all pixels with signal intensity (SI) ≥35 % of max SI from the complete myocardium, border zone: SI 35-50 % of max SI and core as SI ≥50 % of max SI. The 3D method yielded smaller infarct size (-2.8 ± 2.3 %) and core size (-3.0 ± 1.7 %) than the 2D method most similar to ours. There was no difference in the size of the border zone (0.2 ± 1.4 %). The 3D method demonstrated stronger correlations between scar size and left ventricular (LV) remodelling parameters (LV ejection fraction: r = -0.71, p < 0.0005, LV end-diastolic index: r = 0.54, p < 0.0005, and LV end-systolic index: r = 0.59, p < 0.0005) compared with conventional 2D methods. Infarct size estimation by our novel 3D automatic method is without the need for manual demarcation of the scar; it is less time-consuming and has a stronger correlation with remodelling parameters compared with existing methods. PMID:24249515

  7. Modulation of the inflammatory response by increasing fetal wound size or interleukin-10 overexpression determines wound phenotype and scar formation.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael W; Allukian, Myron; Herdrich, Benjamin J; Caskey, Robert C; Zgheib, Carlos; Xu, Junwang; Dorsett-Martin, Wanda; Mitchell, Marc E; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    Wound size impacts the threshold between scarless regeneration and reparative healing in the fetus with increased inflammation showed in fetal scar formation. We hypothesized that increased fetal wound size increases pro-inflammatory and fibrotic genes with resultant inflammation and fibroplasia and that transition to scar formation could be reversed by overexpression of interleukin-10 (IL-10). To test this hypothesis, 2-mm and 8-mm dermal wounds were created in mid-gestation fetal sheep. A subset of 8-mm wounds were injected with a lentiviral vector containing the IL-10 transgene (n = 4) or vehicle (n = 4). Wounds were harvested at 3 or 30 days for histology, immunohistochemistry, analysis of gene expression by microarray, and validation with real-time polymerase chain reaction. In contrast to the scarless 2-mm wounds, 8-mm wounds showed scar formation with a differential gene expression profile, increased inflammatory cytokines, decreased CD45+ cells, and subsequent inflammation. Lentiviral-mediated overexpression of the IL-10 gene resulted in conversion to a regenerative phenotype with decreased inflammatory cytokines and regeneration of dermal architecture. In conclusion, increased fetal wounds size leads to a unique gene expression profile that promotes inflammation and leads to scar formation and furthermore, these results show the significance of attenuated inflammation and IL-10 in the transition from fibroplasia to fetal regenerative healing. PMID:24844340

  8. Acne Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... scars. Cryosurgery : This treatment freezes the scar tissue. Freezing the tissue causes it to die and gradually ... et al . “Which Type of Atrophic Acne Scar (Ice-pick, Boxcar, or Rolling) Responds to Nonablative Fractional ...

  9. Scar revision

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mohit; Wakure, Abhijeet

    2013-01-01

    Most surgical patients end up with a scar and most of these would want at least some improvement in the appearance of the scar. Using sound techniques for wound closure surgeons can, to a certain extent, prevent suboptimal scars. This article reviews the principles of prevention and treatment of suboptimal scars. Surgical techniques of scar revision, i.e., Z plasty, W plasty, and geometrical broken line closure are described. Post-operative care and other adjuvant therapies of scars are described. A short description of dermabrasion and lasers for management of scars is given. It is hoped that this review helps the surgeon to formulate a comprehensive plan for management of scars of these patients. PMID:24516292

  10. Scarring alopecia.

    PubMed

    Newton, R C; Hebert, A A; Freese, T W; Solomon, A R

    1987-07-01

    The scarring alopecias are a diverse group of diseases characterized by the combination of follicular destruction and dermal scarring. In this article we divide scarring alopecias into three broad categories, pediatric diseases, perifollicular lymphocytic diseases, and folliculopustular diseases, and discuss selected entities from each category. PMID:3301117

  11. Keloid scar (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Keloids are an overgrowth of scar tissue at the site of a healed skin injury. They often create a thick, puckered effect simulating a tumor. Keloids may be reduced in size by freezing (cryotherapy), ...

  12. Scar Tissue.

    PubMed

    McLean, Haydn J

    2015-12-01

    Scar tissue is associated with physical wounds and their mending, but it is also descriptive in portraying the emotional scarring that occurs following adversity, resulting in potential psychological morbidity. Provided the adversity is not severe, such challenges to adaptability may provoke Andrew Solomon's process of forging meaning and building identity. Perceiving an emotional constitution as analogous to the immune system provides a metaphor for appreciating the benefits of emotional challenges, which may provoke greater emotional resilience or posttraumatic growth. PMID:26631526

  13. PARP inhibition and postinfarction myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Halmosi, Robert; Deres, Laszlo; Gal, Roland; Eros, Krisztian; Sumegi, Balazs; Toth, Kalman

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease accounts for the greatest proportion of cardiovascular diseases therefore it is the major cause of death worldwide. Its therapeutic importance is indicated by still high mortality of myocardial infarction, which is one of the most severe forms of CVDs. Moreover, the risk of developing heart failure is very high among survivors. Heart failure is accompanied by high morbidity and mortality rate, therefore this topic is in the focus of researchers' interest. After a myocardial infarct, at first ventricular hypertrophy develops as a compensatory mechanism to decrease wall stress but finally leads to left ventricular dilation. This phenomenon is termed as myocardial remodeling. The main characteristics of underlying mechanisms involve cardiomyocyte growth, vessel changes and increased collagen production, in all of which several mechanical stress induced neurohumoral agents, oxidative stress and signal transduction pathways are involved. The long term activation of these processes ultimately leads to left ventricular dilation and heart failure with decreased systolic function. Oxidative stress causes DNA breaks producing the activation of nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) enzyme that leads to energy depletion and unfavorable modulation of different kinase cascades (Akt-1/GSK-3β, MAPKs, various PKC isoforms) and thus it promotes the development of heart failure. Therefore inhibition of PARP enzyme could offer a promising new therapeutical approach to prevent the onset of heart failure among postinfarction patients. The purpose of this review is to give a comprehensive summary about the most significant experimental results and mechanisms in postinfarction remodeling. PMID:27392900

  14. Obtaining magnitude-cumulative frequency curves from rockfall scar size distribution using cosmogenic chlorine-36 in the Montsec area (Eastern Pyrenees, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domènech, Guillem; Mavrouli, Olga; Corominas, Jordi; Abellán, Antonio; Merchel, Silke; Pavetich, Stefan; Rugel, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Magnitude-cumulative frequency (MCF) relations are commonly used components for assessing the rockfall hazard using databases of recorded events. However, in some cases, data are lacking or incomplete. To overcome this restriction, the volume distribution of the rockfall scars has been used instead. The latter may yield the temporal probability of occurrence if the time span required to generate the scars is known. The Montsec range, located in the Eastern Pyrenees, Spain, was chosen as a pilot study area for investigating MCF distributions. This cliff, which is composed of limestones from Upper Cretaceous age, shows distinct evidences of rockfall activity, including large recent rockfall scars. These areas are identifiable by their orange colour, which contrasts in front of the greyish old stable (reference) surface of the cliff face. We present a procedure to obtain the MCF of the rockfall scars by dating an old reference cliff surface and measuring the total volume released since then. The reference cliff surface was dated using the terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) chlorine-36 (Merchel et al., 2013). We used the Rockfall Scar Size Distribution (RSSD) obtained in Domènech et al. (2014) that considers several rockfall pattern scenarios. Scenario 1 allows for, mostly, large rockfall scar volumes, scenario 2 considers smaller occurrences and scenario 3 suggests that rockfall scars can be the result of one or several rockfall events, and thus contemplating a wider range of scar volumes. The main steps of the methodology are: a) Obtaining the RSSD, b) Volume calculation of material lost, c) Calculation of time (T0) elapsed for the cliff to retreat (age of the old reference surface), and d) generation of the MCF curve from the RSSD. A total volume of material lost of 78900 m3 was obtained as well as an elapsed period of time of 15350 years. The MCF curves for different rockfall scenarios are found to be well fitted by a power law with exponents -1.7, -1.1 and -1

  15. Radiology of epiploic appendages: acute appendagitis, post-infarcted appendages, and imaging natural history.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, S C; Strickland, C D; Epstein, K N

    2016-08-01

    Our aim was to demonstrate the imaging characteristics of epiploic appendages in native, acute inflamed/ischemic and post-infarcted states through retrospective imaging analysis, with clinical and pathologic correlation, and to discuss clinical implications. Cases were gathered mostly retrospectively and reviewed for inclusion based on established diagnostic criteria. Radiology report text search was used to find cases, using terms "epiploic," "appendage," "appendagitis," and "peritoneal body." Data records included patient demographics, relevant clinical data, lesion size, location and apparent imaging composition, and the presence of change or stability in features over multiple studies. Pathologic and clinical data were sought and assessed for correlation. Imaging studies of 198 individuals were included (mean age 50, range 9-95), with a total of 228 lesions: 63 acute and 165 non-acute presentations. All included subjects had CT imaging and some had lesions visible on radiographs, MRI, PET/CT, and sonography. 23 subjects had more than one studied lesion. In addition to classic acute appendagitis, more frequently encountered are post-infarcted appendages either in situ along the colon, adhered to peritoneal or serosal surfaces, or freely mobile in the peritoneum as loose bodies. The majority of the non-acute varieties are recognizable due to peripheral calcification that develops over time following ischemic insult. Multiple cases demonstrated the imaging natural history and confirmed pathologic basis for imaging findings. In summary, acute and post-infarcted epiploic appendages have characteristic imaging appearances and natural history which should provide correct diagnosis in most cases. Incidental post-infarcted epiploica are more commonly encountered than acute presentations. PMID:27142382

  16. Human Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with CD105+CD34- Phenotype Enhance the Function of Post-Infarction Heart in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiśniewska, Ewa; Jarosz-Biej, Magdalena; Smolarczyk, Ryszard; Cichoń, Tomasz; Głowala-Kosińska, Magdalena; Śliwka, Joanna; Garbacz, Marcin; Szczypior, Mateusz; Jaźwiec, Tomasz; Langrzyk, Agnieszka; Zembala, Michał; Szala, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to isolate mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) with CD105+CD34- phenotype from human hearts, and to investigate their therapeutic potential in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia and myocardial infarction (MI). The study aimed also to investigate the feasibility of xenogeneic MSCs implantation. Methods and Results MSC isolated from human hearts were multipotent cells. Separation of MSC with CD105+CD34- phenotype limited the heterogeneity of the originally isolated cell population. MSC secreted a number of anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic cytokines (mainly IL-6, IL-8, and GRO). Human MSC were transplanted into C57Bl/6NCrl mice. Using the mouse model of hindlimb ischemia it was shown that human MSC treated mice demonstrated a higher capillary density 14 days after injury. It was also presented that MSC administrated into the ischemic muscle facilitated fast wound healing (functional recovery by ischemic limb). MSC transplanted into an infarcted myocardium reduced the post-infarction scar, fibrosis, and increased the number of blood vessels both in the border area, and within the post-infarction scar. The improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction was also observed. Conclusion In two murine models (hindlimb ischemia and MI) we did not observe the xenotransplant rejection. Indeed, we have shown that human cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells with CD105+CD34- phenotype exhibit therapeutic potential. It seems that M2 macrophages are essential for healing and repair of the post-infarcted heart. PMID:27415778

  17. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving ...

  18. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure.

    PubMed

    Richardson, William J; Clarke, Samantha A; Quinn, T Alexander; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2015-10-01

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure, and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following a myocardial infarction, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction. PMID:26426470

  19. Successful device closure of a post-infarction ventricular septal defect

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Si-Wan; Han, Ji Hye; Jin, Seon-Ah; Kim, Mijoo; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Jeong, Jin-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Ventricular septal defect (VSD) is a lethal complication of myocardial infarction. The event occurs 2–8 days after an infarction and patients should undergo emergency surgical treatment. We report on successful device closure of post-infarction VSD. A previously healthy 66-year-old male was admitted with aggravated dyspnea. Echocardiography showed moderate left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction with akinesia of the left anterior descending (LAD) territory and muscular VSD size approximately 2 cm. Coronary angiography showed mid-LAD total occlusion without collaterals. Without percutaneous coronary intervention due to time delay, VSD repair was performed. However, a murmur was heard again and pulmonary edema was not controlled 3 days after the operation. Echocardiography showed remnant VSD, and medical treatment failed. Percutaneous treatment using a septal occluder device was decided on. After the procedure, heart failure was controlled and the patient was discharged without complications. This is the first report on device closure of post-infarction VSD in Korea. PMID:27462148

  20. Possibilities of scar treatment after thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Maragakis, M; Willital, G H; Michel, G; Görtelmeyer, R

    1995-01-01

    During a ten year observation period it was found that scar formation after thoracic surgery is influenced by various factors: metabolism, operative technique and factors of a general nature. On the basis of these findings, a study was carried out to investigate the effect of the scar-specific Contractubex gel (Merz+Co., D-Frankfurt/Main), containing 10% onion extract, 50 U sodium heparin per g of gel and 1% allantoin, in the treatment of children who underwent thoracic surgery and to evaluate its effect on scar development. Before and during the six-month treatment period, both macromorphology and scar colour were assessed; furthermore, a global evaluation of the therapeutic result was made. Additionally, the scars were characterized after a six-month treatment-free follow-up period. The results of 38 Contractubex-treated and 27 untreated patients were compared. In the treated scars, the global evaluation of the therapeutic result was better than in the untreated scars. In the Contractubex group, the rating was "good" and "very good" in 84% of cases, as compared to 59% of the untreated cases. In the treated group, the increase in scar size was markedly lower than in the untreated patients. The treated scars showed a tendency towards quicker paling than the untreated scars. In the treated group, the conversion of primary physiological scars to unphysiological scars (hypertrophic or keloidal scars) was less frequent than in the untreated group. The tolerability of the product was very good in 37 of the 38 treated patients, and good in one patient. All scar-specific effects of Contractubex continued to persist after the end of treatment. PMID:8846750

  1. Treatment of acne scarring.

    PubMed

    Alam, M; Dover, J S

    Acne scarring is common but surprisingly difficult to treat. Scars can involve textural change in the superficial and deep dermis, and can also be associated with erythema, and less often, pigmentary change. In general, treatment of acne scarring is a multistep procedure. First, examination of the patient is necessary to classify the subtypes of scarring that are present. Then, the patient's primary concerns are elicited, and the patient is offered a menu of procedures that may address the various components of the scarring process. It is important to emphasize to the patient that acne scarring can be improved but never entirely reversed. PMID:17180246

  2. Scar revision - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... entire body, and acts as a protective barrier. Scar tissue forms as skin heals after an injury ( ... heredity; and skin characteristics including color (pigmentation). No scar can be removed completely. The degree of improvement ...

  3. Relativistic Quantum Scars

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Liang; Lai Yingcheng; Ferry, David K.; Goodnick, Stephen M.; Akis, Richard

    2009-07-31

    The concentrations of wave functions about classical periodic orbits, or quantum scars, are a fundamental phenomenon in physics. An open question is whether scarring can occur in relativistic quantum systems. To address this question, we investigate confinements made of graphene whose classical dynamics are chaotic and find unequivocal evidence of relativistic quantum scars. The scarred states can lead to strong conductance fluctuations in the corresponding open quantum dots via the mechanism of resonant transmission.

  4. California Burn Scars

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Burn Scars Across Southern California     ... California between October 21 and November 18, 2003. Burn scars and vegetation changes wrought by the fires are illustrated in these ... Nov 18, 2003 Images:  California Burn Scars location:  United States region:  ...

  5. Post-burn scars and scar contractures

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Arun; Shrivastava, Prabhat

    2010-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity from burns have diminished tremendously over the last six to seven decades. However, these do not truly reflect whether the victim could go back to society as a useful person or not and lead a normal life because of the inevitable post-burn scars, contractures and other deformities which collectively have aesthetic and functional considerations. This article gives an overview of the post-burn scars and scar contractures, especially their prevention, minimisation and principles of management. PMID:21321660

  6. PDE5 inhibitors protect against post-infarction heart failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Shuang; Zeng, Cao; Yu, Wenjun; Shen, Mingzhi; Zhang, Rongqing; Li, Congye; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Haichang

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the main causes for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This study was designed to examine the effect of PDE-5 inhibition on cardiac geometry, function and apoptosis in post-infarct HF. Our data revealed that treatment of the PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil, beginning 3 days after left anterior descending coronary artery ligation, attenuated LV remodeling, cardiac dysfunction, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and mitochondrial anomalies including ATP production, mitochondrial respiratory defects, decline of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and compromised mitochondrial ultrastructure. Sildenafil partially ameliorated the downregulation of Sirt3 protein and acetylation of PGC-1alpha in peri-infarct myocardial regions. In cultured neonatal mouse ventricular myocytes subjected to hypoxia for 24 hrs, sildenafil suppressed apoptosis, promoted ATP production and elevated MMP, along with the increased Sirt3 protein expression and decreased PGC-1alpha acetylation. Interestingly, knock down of Sirt3 attenuated or nullified sildenafil-offered beneficial effects. Our findings demonstrated that sildenafil exerts its cardioprotective effect against post-infarction injury by improving mitochondrial ultrastructure and function via the Sirt3/PGC-1alpha pathway. This observation should shed some lights towards application of sildenafil in energy-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27100500

  7. Laser Scar Management Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ohshiro, Toshio; Sasaki, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: Scars are common and cause functional problems and psychological morbidity. Recent advances in optical technologies have produced various laser systems capable of revising the appearance of scars from various etiologies to optimize their appearance. Methods: Laser treatment can commence as early as the time of the initial injury and as late as several years after the injury. Several optical technologies are currently available and combined laser/light treatments are required for treatment of scars. Since 2006, we have set up a scar management department in our clinic and more than 2000 patients have been treated by our combined laser irradiation techniques. Herein, we review several available light technologies for treatment of surgical, traumatic, and inflammatory scars, and discuss our combined laser treatment of scars, based upon our clinical experience. Results and Conclusions: Because scars have a variety of potential aetiologies and take a number of forms, no single approach can consistenty provide good scar treatment and management. The combination of laser and devices is essential, the choice of wavelength and approach being dictated by each patient as an individual. PMID:24511202

  8. Complicated transcatheter closure of postinfarction ventricular acute septal defect.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Nuno; Silva, João Carlos; Andrade, Aurora

    2011-10-01

    The ventricular septal rupture is an uncommon complication of myocardial infarction (MI) with a reported incidence of 0.2% in the thrombolytic era. The outcome remains extremely poor, and surgical defect closure still remains the only therapeutic option improving survival. There are single reports based on a small series of case reports about transcatheter closure of postinfarction ventricular septal defects (VSD) and experience is limited. We present a case of a 71-year-old man with a posteroinferior MI complicated by a ventricular septal rupture with 24 mm width. Due to the severity of the case, surgical approach was denied; we attempted transcatheter closure of the defect in a lifesaving situation. The VSD was partially closed with a 26 mm Amplatzer® septal occluder (AGA Medical Corp., Plymouth, Minnesota) without adequate expansion of the right disc, due the complexity of the tract. The patient died one day after the procedure. PMID:21972171

  9. Laser radiation of blood in treating patients with postinfarction heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashchuk, V.; Polyanskaya, O.; Chaplinsky, R.; Ilashchuk, I.; Kulyk, T.

    1999-11-01

    168 patients on the postclinical stage of treatment of acute myocardial infarction were examined by means of the use of basic antiischemic therapy and intravenous laser radiation of blood (LRB). All patients were studied with the help of transesophageal electrocardiostimulation, bicycle ergometry, echocardiography and Holter ECG monitoring in the dynamics of prolonged observation and treatment. The analysis of efficiency of the LRB has shown that the most minimal degree of myocardial ischemization was marked in patients after intravenous LRB. The patients before LRB had the greater reduction of coronary reserve. The use of LRB has given the possibility to the optimization of therapy in patients on the stage of the forming of `the postinfarction heart'.

  10. SCAR-B AERONET

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-19

    ... SCAR-B Discipline:  Tropospheric Chemistry Field Campaigns Radiation Budget Aerosols ... Parameters:  Aerosol Optical Depth Precipitable Water Vapor Solar Irradiance Order Data:  ASDC Order ...

  11. Scar revision - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a year after a wound has healed. A keloid is an abnormal scar that is thicker, different ... creates a thick, puckered effect simulating a tumor. Keloids are removed at the point where it meets ...

  12. Primary scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Rigopoulos, Dimitrios; Stamatios, Gregoriou; Ioannides, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Scarring alopecia or cicatricial alopecia results from follicular damage that is sufficient to cause the destruction and replacement of pilosebaceous structures by scar tissue. Primary scarring alopecias represent a group of disorders that primarily affect the hair follicles, as opposed to secondary scarring alopecias, which affect the dermis and secondarily cause follicular destruction. Inflammation may predominantly involve lymphocytes or neutrophils. Cicatricial alopecias that mainly involve lymphocytic inflammation include discoid lupus erythematosus, lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia, central centrifugal alopecia, and pseudopelade (Brocq). Cicatricial alopecias that are due to predominantly neutrophilic inflammation include folliculitis decalvans, tufted folliculitis, and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. Folliculitis keloidalis is a cicatricial alopecia with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. PMID:26370646

  13. Incomplete Cesarean Scar Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Siahbazi, Shiva; Akhbari, Farnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background Uterine rupture at the site of a previous cesarean scar is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of pregnancy, which is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Case Presentation A 30-year old woman at 24th week of gestation and complaint of pain, contractions and spotting was admitted in Royan Institute in Tehran, Iran. She had a past medical history of an EP and a cesarean section delivery, respectively 4 and 2 years before hospitalization. Herniation of an amniotic membrane into the maternal bladder was found on ultrasound examination. Conclusion Risk factors of cesarean scar rupture should be considered in women undergoing subsequent pregnancies as they need extra care. Ultrasonography can be used to evaluate women with previous cesarean section to assess the risks of scar rupture during subsequent pregnancies. PMID:23926561

  14. A Review of Scar Scales and Scar Measuring Devices

    PubMed Central

    Fearmonti, Regina; Bond, Jennifer; Erdmann, Detlev; Levinson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Pathologic scarring affects millions of people worldwide. Quantitative and qualitative measurement modalities are needed to effectively evaluate and monitor treatments. Methods: This article reviews the literature on available tools and existent assessment scales used to subjectively and objectively characterize scar. Results: We describe the attributes and deficiencies of each tool and scale and highlight areas where further development is critical. Conclusion: An optimal, universal scar scoring system is needed in order to better characterize, understand and treat pathologic scarring. PMID:20596233

  15. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can Acne ... eliminarse las marcas de acne? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — ...

  16. Pseudopod growth and evolution during cell movement is controlled through SCAR/WAVE dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ura, Seiji; Pollitt, Alice Y.; Veltman, Douwe M.; Morrice, Nicholas A.; Machesky, Laura M.; Insall, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Background SCAR/WAVE is a principal regulator of pseudopod growth in crawling cells. It exists in a stable pentameric complex, which is regulated at multiple levels that are only beginning to be understood. SCAR/WAVE is phosphorylated at multiple sites, but how this affects its biological activity is unclear. Here we show that dephosphorylation of Dictyostelium SCAR controls normal pseudopod dynamics. Results We demonstrate that the C-terminal acidic domain of most Dictyostelium SCAR is basally phosphorylated at four serine residues. A small amount of singly phosphorylated SCAR is also found. SCAR phosphorylation site mutants cannot replace SCAR’s role in the pseudopod cycle, though they rescue cell size and growth. Unphosphorylatable SCAR is hyperactive – excessive recruitment to the front gives large pseudopods that fail to bifurcate because they continually grow forwards. Conversely, phosphomimetic SCAR is weakly active, causing frequent small, disorganised pseudopods. Even in its regulatory complex, SCAR is normally held inactive by an interaction between the phosphorylated acidic and basic domains. Loss of basic residues complementary to the acidic phosphosites yields a hyperactive protein similar to unphosphorylatable SCAR. Conclusions Regulated dephosphorylation of a fraction of the cellular SCAR pool is a key step in SCAR activation during pseudopod growth. Phosphorylation increases autoinhibition of the intact complex. Dephosphorylation weakens this interaction and facilitates SCAR activation, but also destabilizes the protein. We show that SCAR is specifically dephosphorylated in pseudopods, increasing activation by Rac and lipids and supporting positive feedback of pseudopod growth. PMID:22386315

  17. Emerging Therapies for Scar Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Block, Lisa; Gosain, Ankush; King, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: There are ∼12 million traumatic lacerations treated in the United States emergency rooms each year, 250 million surgical incisions created worldwide every year, and 11 million burns severe enough to warrant medical treatment worldwide. In the United States, over $20 billion dollars per year are spent on the treatment and management of scars. Recent Advances: Investigations into the management of scar therapies over the last decade have advanced our understanding related to the care of cutaneous scars. Scar treatment methods are presented including topical, intralesional, and mechanical therapies in addition to cryotherapy, radiotherapy, and laser therapy. Critical Issues: Current treatment options for scars have significant limitations. This review presents the current and emerging therapies available for scar management and the scientific evidence for scar management is discussed. Future Directions: Based upon our new understanding of scar formation, innovative scar therapies are being developed. Additional research on the basic science of scar formation will lead to additional advances and novel therapies for the treatment of cutaneous scars. PMID:26487979

  18. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Farina Júnior, Jayme Adriano

    2014-08-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  19. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Júnior, Jayme Adriano Farina

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  20. [Cesarean scar pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Matyszkiewicz, Anna; Jach, Robert; Nocuń, Agnieszka; Posadzka, Ewa; Huras, Hubert; Pityński, Kazimierz; Wolski, Hubert; Basta, Paweł

    2015-10-01

    Pregnancy in the uterine scare after previous caesarean section is the rarest type of ectopic pregnancy Due to the possibility of life-threatening complications, cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) needs rapid and proper diagnosis and management. Hereby we present 3 cases of women with CSP, diagnosed and treated at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of Jagiellonian University Medical College, in Krakow, in 2013, as well as literature review. PMID:26677591

  1. Nd:YAG Laser Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Akaishi, Satoshi; Koike, Sachiko; Dohi, Teruyuki; Kobe, Kyoko; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Ogawa, Rei

    2012-01-01

    Pathological cutaneous scars such as keloids and hypertrophic scars (HSs) are characterized by a diffuse redness that is caused by the overgrowth of capillary vessels due to chronic inflammation. Our group has been using long-pulsed, 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser in noncontact mode with low fluence and a submillisecond pulse duration to treat keloids and hypertrophic scars since 2006 with satisfactory results. The present study examined the efficacy of this approach in 22 Japanese patients with keloids (n = 16) or hypertrophic scars (n = 6) who were treated every 3 to 4 weeks. Treatment settings were as follows: 5 mm spot size diameter; 14 J/cm2 energy density; 300 μs exposure time per pulse; and 10 Hz repetition rate. The responses of the pathological scars to the treatment were assessed by measuring their erythema, hypertrophy, hardness, itching, and pain or tenderness. Moreover, skin samples from 3 volunteer patients were subjected to histological evaluation and 5 patients underwent thermography during therapy. The average total scar assessment score dropped from 9.86 to 6.34. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and Elastica Masson-Goldner staining showed that laser treatment structurally changed the tissue collagen. This influence reached a depth of 0.5 to 1 mm. Electron microscopy revealed plasma protein leakage, proteoglycan particles, and a change in the collagen fiber fascicles. Further analyses revealed that noncontact mode Nd:YAG laser treatment is highly effective for keloids and hypertrophic scars regardless of patient age, the origin and multiplicity of scarring, the location of the scar(s), or the tension on the scar. PMID:22259645

  2. Cutaneous Scar Prevention and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan; Al-Bulushi, Taimoor

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous scarring is common after trauma, surgery and infection and occurs when normal skin tissue is replaced by fibroblastic tissue during the healing process. The pathophysiology of scar formation is not yet fully understood, although the degree of tension across the wound edges and the speed of cell growth are believed to play central roles. Prevention of scars is essential and can be achieved by attention to surgical techniques and the use of measures to reduce cell growth. Grading and classifying scars is important to determine available treatment strategies. This article presents an overview of the current therapies available for the prevention and treatment of scars. It is intended to be a practical guide for surgeons and other health professionals involved with and interested in scar management. PMID:26909210

  3. Longitudinal burn scar quantification.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; de Oliveira, Ana; LaSalle, Leo; Perrault, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative studies of the clinical recovery of burn scars are currently lacking. Previous reports validate the objective, precise, diagnostic capabilities of high-frequency ultrasound to measure thickness, the Cutometer(®) to measure pliability and the Mexameter(®) to measure erythema and pigmentation of scars. Thus, we prospectively quantified clinical characteristics of patient-matched, after burn hypertrophic scar (HSc), donor site scar (D) and normal skin (N) using these instruments. One investigator measured 3 sites (HSc, D, N) in 46 burn survivors at 3, 6, and 12 months after-burn. A mixed model regression analysis, adjusting p-values for multiplicity of testing, was used to compare means among sites and time points. Participants were 41.2±13.5 years old, 87% males, predominantly Caucasian, with an average of 19.5% body surface area burned. HSc thickness decreased significantly between 3 and 6, 6 and 12, and 3 and 12 months (all p<0.0001), but remained thicker than D and N skin (all p<0.0001). Pliability differed significantly between HSc, D and N sites at all time points (all p<0.0001), with HSc and D increasing between 3 and 12 months (p<0.05) but not reaching normal. HSc and D sites were significantly more erythematous than normal skin (p<0.05) at 3 and 6 months but D sites approached normal by 12 months. The only time points at which pigmentation significantly differed were the HSc and D sites at 6 months. Thickness, pliability, erythema and pigmentation of N skin remained similar over the 12 months. We found that post-burn HSc thickness, pliability and erythema differed significantly from D and N skin at 3, 6, and 12 months and does not return to normal by 12 months after-injury; however, significant improvements towards normal can be expected. Donor sites are redder than normal skin at 3 and 6 months but can be expected to return to normal by 12 months. Although the color of HSc and D sites change markedly with time these color changes are

  4. Dune Avalanche Scars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    05 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows large, low albedo (dark) sand dunes in Kaiser Crater near 47.2oS, 340.4oW. The dunes are--ever so slowly--moving east to west (right to left) as sand avalanches down the steeper, slip face slopes of each. Avalanching sand in the Kaiser dune field has left deep scars on these slopes, suggesting that the sand is not loose but is instead weakly cemented. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  5. Coupled agent-based and finite-element models for predicting scar structure following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Rouillard, Andrew D; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2014-08-01

    Following myocardial infarction, damaged muscle is gradually replaced by collagenous scar tissue. The structural and mechanical properties of the scar are critical determinants of heart function, as well as the risk of serious post-infarction complications such as infarct rupture, infarct expansion, and progression to dilated heart failure. A number of therapeutic approaches currently under development aim to alter infarct mechanics in order to reduce complications, such as implantation of mechanical restraint devices, polymer injection, and peri-infarct pacing. Because mechanical stimuli regulate scar remodeling, the long-term consequences of therapies that alter infarct mechanics must be carefully considered. Computational models have the potential to greatly improve our ability to understand and predict how such therapies alter heart structure, mechanics, and function over time. Toward this end, we developed a straightforward method for coupling an agent-based model of scar formation to a finite-element model of tissue mechanics, creating a multi-scale model that captures the dynamic interplay between mechanical loading, scar deformation, and scar material properties. The agent-based component of the coupled model predicts how fibroblasts integrate local chemical, structural, and mechanical cues as they deposit and remodel collagen, while the finite-element component predicts local mechanics at any time point given the current collagen fiber structure and applied loads. We used the coupled model to explore the balance between increasing stiffness due to collagen deposition and increasing wall stress due to infarct thinning and left ventricular dilation during the normal time course of healing in myocardial infarcts, as well as the negative feedback between strain anisotropy and the structural anisotropy it promotes in healing scar. The coupled model reproduced the observed evolution of both collagen fiber structure and regional deformation following coronary

  6. Preprocedural magnetic resonance imaging for image-guided catheter ablation of scar-related ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qian; Piers, Sebastiaan R D; Lamb, Hildo J; Zeppenfeld, Katja; van der Geest, Rob J

    2015-02-01

    To present and validate a highly automated MRI analysis workflow for image-guided catheter ablation of scar-related ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation procedures. A cohort of 15 post-infarction patients underwent MRI prior to VT ablation. The MRI study included a black-blood turbo spin echo sequence for visualizing the aortic root and ostium of the left main (LM) coronary artery, and a 3D late gadolinium enhanced sequence for visualizing the LV anatomy and myocardial scar substrate. Semi-automated segmentation of the LV, aortic root and ostium of LM was performed, followed by fully automated segmentation of myocardial scar. All segmented structures were aligned using an automated image registration algorithm to remove inter-scan displacement. MRI was integrated at the beginning of the procedure after mapping a single LM point. The integration performance was compared to that of the traditional iterative closest point (ICP) method. The proposed method required a single LM mapping point only, compared to 255 ± 43 points with the ICP method. The single-point method achieved a mean point-to-surface distance of 4.9 ± 1.5 mm on the LV surface and 5.1 ± 1.7 mm on the aorta surface (ICP: 3.7 ± 0.8 and 9.2 ± 7.2 mm, P < 0.05). The Cohen's kappa coefficient between the MRI-defined and EAM-defined scar was 0.36 ± 0.16 for the presented method, significantly higher than that of ICP method (0.23 ± 0.21, P = 0.03), indicating more accurate scar substrate localization during integration. This study demonstrated the feasibility of preprocedural MRI integration into the VT ablation procedure, with highly automated image analysis workflow and minimal mapping effort. PMID:25341408

  7. Laser treatment of hypertrophic scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrjakova, Olga B.; Gulev, Valerii S.

    2001-10-01

    For prophylaxis and treatment, the pulsed solid state neodymium yttrium-aluminum garnet laser was used. It has been shown that this kind of radiation inhibits the proliferative process and prevents the scar hyperfibrotization. In this paper author's reports about the development of the method for improving the scar quality using Nd:YAG laser are presented.

  8. Cutaneous Scarring: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Richard; Urso-Baiarda, Fulvio; Linge, Claire; Grobbelaar, Adriaan

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous scarring can cause patients symptoms ranging from the psychological to physical pain. Although the process of normal scarring is well described the ultimate cause of pathological scarring remains unknown. Similarly, exactly how early gestation fetuses can heal scarlessly remains unsolved. These questions are crucial in the search for a preventative or curative antiscarring agent. Such a discovery would be of enormous medical and commercial importance, not least because it may have application in other tissues. In the clinical context the assessment of scars is becoming more sophisticated and new physical, medical and surgical therapies are being introduced. This review aims to summarise some of the recent developments in scarring research for non-specialists and specialists alike. PMID:20585482

  9. CaM Kinase II mediates maladaptive post-infarct remodeling and pro-inflammatory chemoattractant signaling but not acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Weinreuter, Martin; Kreusser, Michael M; Beckendorf, Jan; Schreiter, Friederike C; Leuschner, Florian; Lehmann, Lorenz H; Hofmann, Kai P; Rostosky, Julia S; Diemert, Nathalie; Xu, Chang; Volz, Hans Christian; Jungmann, Andreas; Nickel, Alexander; Sticht, Carsten; Gretz, Norbert; Maack, Christoph; Schneider, Michael D; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Müller, Oliver J; Katus, Hugo A; Backs, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    CaMKII was suggested to mediate ischemic myocardial injury and adverse cardiac remodeling. Here, we investigated the roles of different CaMKII isoforms and splice variants in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury by the use of new genetic CaMKII mouse models. Although CaMKIIδC was upregulated 1 day after I/R injury, cardiac damage 1 day after I/R was neither affected in CaMKIIδ-deficient mice, CaMKIIδ-deficient mice in which the splice variants CaMKIIδB and C were re-expressed, nor in cardiomyocyte-specific CaMKIIδ/γ double knockout mice (DKO). In contrast, 5 weeks after I/R, DKO mice were protected against extensive scar formation and cardiac dysfunction, which was associated with reduced leukocyte infiltration and attenuated expression of members of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand family, in particular CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, MIP-1α). Intriguingly, CaMKII was sufficient and required to induce CCL3 expression in isolated cardiomyocytes, indicating a cardiomyocyte autonomous effect. We propose that CaMKII-dependent chemoattractant signaling explains the effects on post-I/R remodeling. Taken together, we demonstrate that CaMKII is not critically involved in acute I/R-induced damage but in the process of post-infarct remodeling and inflammatory processes. PMID:25193973

  10. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  11. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  12. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  13. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  14. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  15. Efficacy of Contractubex gel in the treatment of fresh scars after thoracic surgery in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Willital, G H; Heine, H

    1994-01-01

    Scar development was investigated in 45 young patients who had undergone thoracic surgery. Patients were randomly assigned either to a group which was treated topically with Contractubex gel (Merz + Co., D-Frankfurt/Main), containing 10% onion extract, 50/U of sodium heparin per one g of gel and 1% allantoin, or to a group receiving no treatment. The treatment began on average 26 days after the operation and was continued for one year. The scars of all treated and untreated patients were evaluated at monthly intervals. The appearance of the scar, including scar type and scar size as well as scar colour, was assessed by the physician. A reduction of the increase of scar width was seen in the Contractubex-treated group as compared with the untreated group. Further, physiological scars and skin-coloured scars were more frequent in the treated group than in the untreated group. Hypertrophic or keloidal scars were less frequent in the treated group. No differences in scar length and scar height were seen. At the end of the observation period, the clinical course of scar development was rated as "very good" or "good" in more than 90% of the treated patients, "good" in less than 40% and "moderate" or "bad" in more than 60% of the untreated cases. The tolerability of the drug was "good" or "very good" in all cases. In conclusion, Contractubex gel is useful in scar treatment after thoracic surgery. PMID:7672876

  16. Umbilical scarring in hatchling American alligators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiebe, J.J.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Buckland, J.E.; Anderson, S.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Umbilical scarring is the presence of excess scar tissue deposited between abdominal dermal layers at the site of yolk sac absorption in hatchling American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). The presence of this dermal condition plays a key evaluatory role in the overall quality and subsequent value for various commercial leather products. Despite the prevalent nature of this condition, currently the industry has no standardized protocols for its quantification. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between hatchling weight and age and incidence of umbilical scarring and to develop a quantifiable and reproducible technique to measure this dermal condition in hatchling American alligators. Thirty eggs from each of nine clutches were incubated in two separate incubators at different facilities and hatchling umbilical scarring was measured at 2 and 10 days of age using digital calipers. Umbilical area was calculated by multiplying umbilical length times umbilical width. There was a significant effect of both age and clutch on umbilical area (overall decline of 64%) by 10 days post-hatch. However, only five of the nine clutches utilized expressed a noticeable decline in the size of this dermal condition (range 67-74%). We had hypothesized that larger hatchlings would have larger umbilical areas and a slower rate of improvement in this condition during the first few days post-hatch. The differences in umbilical area and percent decline with age across clutches, however, were not associated with differences in initial hatchling weights. Within clutches and time periods, hatchling weight had no significant effect on the size and/or rate of decline of this condition. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Topical treatments for hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Zurada, Joanna M; Kriegel, David; Davis, Ira C

    2006-12-01

    Hypertrophic scars represent an abnormal, exaggerated healing response after skin injury. In addition to cosmetic concern, scars may cause pain, pruritus, contractures, and other functional impairments. Therapeutic modalities include topical medications, intralesional corticosteroids, laser therapy, and cryosurgery. Topical therapies, in particular, have become increasingly popular because of their ease of use, comfort, noninvasiveness, and relatively low cost. This review will discuss the properties and effectiveness of these agents, including pressure therapy, silicone gel sheeting and ointment, polyurethane dressing, onion extract, imiquimod 5% cream, and vitamins A and E in the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic scars. PMID:17097399

  18. [The scars of Andy Warhol].

    PubMed

    Scholz, A

    1996-02-01

    The biographical and artistic documents describing to the attempted assassination of the artist Andy Warhol are reviewed. The visible scars are interpreted as symbols of the damaged integrity of the skin. PMID:8868460

  19. [Dermatological laser- and light treatments of scars].

    PubMed

    Karmisholt, Katrine; Borch, Jakob E; Omland, Silje Haukali; Hædersdal, Merete

    2016-08-01

    Many patients struggle with tender, rigid and erythematous scars. Various modalities are used to treat cutaneous scars and in recent years, laser treatments are emerging as promising procedures. This article describes laser systems used for scar treatment according to scar type, evaluates the highest available level of evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and introduces a guideline for laser treatment of scars. Twelve RCTs documented effect on acne, burn and surgical scars. It is recommended that laser- and light-based treatments are considered according to the scar type. PMID:27507028

  20. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed. PMID:26491364

  1. Keloid scar (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin injury. They often create a thick, puckered effect simulating a tumor. Keloids may be reduced in size by freezing (cryotherapy), external pressure, corticosteroid injections, laser treatments, radiation, ...

  2. Antiarrhythmic activity of phytoadaptogens in short-term ischemia-reperfusion of the heart and postinfarction cardiosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Lishmanov, Yu B; Arbuzov, A G; Krylatov, A V; Budankova, E V; Konkovskaya, Yu N; Burkova, V N; Severova, E A

    2009-03-01

    A course of treatment (16 mg/kg orally during 5 days) by Aralia mandshurica or Rhodiola rosea extracts reduced the incidence of ischemic and reperfusion ventricular arrhythmias during 10-min ischemia and 10-min reperfusion. Extracts of Eleutherococcus senticosus, Leuzea carthamoides, and Panax ginseng did not change the incidence of ischemic and reperfusion arrhythmias. Chronic treatment by aralia, rhodiola, and eleutherococcus elevated the ventricular fibrillation threshold in rats with postinfarction cardiosclerosis. Ginseng and leuzea did not change this parameter in rats with postinfarction cardiosclerosis. PMID:19529855

  3. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with overcorrected strabismus (and several patients with undercorrection after extraocular muscle resection) underwent exploration of previously operated muscles, with the intention of advancing their tendons to prevent the need for surgery on additional muscles. Unexpectedly, it was found that, in many cases, an elongated scar segment of variable length was interposed between the muscle and its insertion site on the sclera. Laboratory investigations were carried out to elucidate the underlying mechanism(s) and to create an animal model of the disorder. METHODS: Lengthened scars were repaired on 198 muscles during 134 procedures performed on 123 patients. The scars consisted of amorphous connective tissue interposed between the globe and normal tendon. Repair was accomplished by excision of the scar and reattachment of the muscle to sclera, using absorbable sutures in 64 cases and nonabsorbable sutures in 70 cases. Histopathologic examination was performed on 82 clinical specimens, and tissue culture studies were performed on 7 specimens. To develop an animal model, 10 New Zealand white rabbits underwent bilateral superior rectus resection. Half of the eyes received sub-Tenon's injections of collagenase over the operative site during weeks 2, 3, 5, and 6 postoperatively; the other half received saline solution injections on the same schedule. At 10 weeks, half the sites were studied histologically, and the other half underwent collagen creep analysis. In a second study, the use of absorbable versus nonabsorbable sutures was compared in the rabbit model. RESULTS: In the clinical cases, the mean length of the elongated scar segments was 4.2 mm. A total of 105 of the 134 repair procedures were judged successful. Thirty-one procedures resulted in recurrence of the original overcorrection; 7 of these had documented restretches. Factors that distinguished patients with stretched scars from patients with classic slipped muscles included minimal or no

  4. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hamid; Nourizad, Samad; Momeni, Mahnoush; Rahbar, Hosein; Momeni, Mazdak; Farhadi, Khosro

    2013-07-01

    An 18-year-old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs. At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected.She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients. PMID:23456048

  5. Modified Dovetail-Plasty in Scar Revision

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Suk Joon; Yang, Jihoon; Kim, Seon Gyu; Jung, Sung Won; Koh, Sung Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Scar revision is one of the fundamental techniques in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Local flaps, such as a Z-plasty, W-plasty, or geometric broken-line closure, have been used for scar revision. Camouflaging a scar during scar revision for marginal scars from skin grafts and flaps, trapdoor scars, and linear scars is difficult. We describe our experience with the use of modified dovetail-plasty for scar revision in these difficult areas. Our study group consisted of 28 cases among 22 patients (9 males and 13 females) with a mean age of 33.6 years (range, 6–61 years). The conspicuous scars were located on the face (50%) and extremities (50%). The authors designed Y-shaped incision lines to relax the skin tension lines on one side of the excision line and trapezoid incision lines on the other side. There were 16 follow-up operations performed over 6 months after the initial operation among a total of 22 patients. There were scar depressions (2 patients) and a hypertrophic scar (1 patient) at the interval area between the dovetail flaps. A diffuse hypertrophic scar occurred in 1 patient with a dorsal foot scar. The overall success rates of the procedure as assessed by the surgeons were as follows: excellent (75%), good (12.4%), fair (6.3%), and poor (6.3%). This new local flap can achieve an inconspicuous scar using a blurred scar line and reducing tension. The authors recommend a modified dovetail-plasty for the revision of trapdoor scars and scars under excessive tension. PMID:24577307

  6. Postmastectomy radiotherapy with integrated scar boost using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Yi; Yadav, Poonam; Welsh, James S.; Fahner, Tasha; Paliwal, Bhudatt

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate helical tomotherapy dosimetry in postmastectomy patients undergoing treatment for chest wall and positive nodal regions with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in the scar region using strip bolus. Six postmastectomy patients were scanned with a 5-mm-thick strip bolus covering the scar planning target volume (PTV) plus 2-cm margin. For all 6 cases, the chest wall received a total cumulative dose of 49.3-50.4 Gy with daily fraction size of 1.7-2.0 Gy. Total dose to the scar PTV was prescribed to 58.0-60.2 Gy at 2.0-2.5 Gy per fraction. The supraclavicular PTV and mammary nodal PTV received 1.7-1.9 dose per fraction. Two plans (with and without bolus) were generated for all 6 cases. To generate no-bolus plans, strip bolus was contoured and overrode to air density before planning. The setup reproducibility and delivered dose accuracy were evaluated for all 6 cases. Dose-volume histograms were used to evaluate dose-volume coverage of targets and critical structures. We observed reduced air cavities with the strip bolus setup compared with what we normally see with the full bolus. The thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) in vivo dosimetry confirmed accurate dose delivery beneath the bolus. The verification plans performed on the first day megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) image verified that the daily setup and overall dose delivery was within 2% accuracy compared with the planned dose. The hotspot of the scar PTV in no-bolus plans was 111.4% of the prescribed dose averaged over 6 cases compared with 106.6% with strip bolus. With a strip bolus only covering the postmastectomy scar region, we observed increased dose uniformity to the scar PTV, higher setup reproducibility, and accurate dose delivered beneath the bolus. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a strip bolus over the scar using tomotherapy for SIB dosimetry in postmastectomy treatments.

  7. Answers to Common Questions about Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donation Volunteer Efforts Answers to Common Questions About Scars skip to submenu Parents & Individuals Information for Parents & Individuals Answers to Common Questions About Scars To download the PDF version of this factsheet, ...

  8. Scar Wars: Preferences in Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Siun; Murphy, Stephen; Kelly, Jack L; Morrison, Colin M

    2015-01-01

    Background The uptake of breast reconstruction is ever increasing with procedures ranging from implant-based reconstructions to complex free tissue transfer. Little emphasis is placed on scarring when counseling patients yet they remain a significant source of morbidity and litigation. The aim of this study was to examine the scarring preferences of men and women in breast oncoplastic and reconstructive surgery. Methods Five hundred men and women were asked to fill out a four-page questionnaire in two large Irish centres. They were asked about their opinions on scarring post breast surgery and were also asked to rank the common scarring patterns in wide local excisions, oncoplastic procedures, breast reconstructions as well as donor sites. Results Fifty-eight percent of those surveyed did not feel scars were important post breast cancer surgery. 61% said that their partners' opinion of scars were important. The most preferred wide local excision scar was the lower lateral quadrant scar whilst the scars from the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap were most favoured. The superior gluteal artery perforator flap had the most preferred donor site while surprisingly, the DIEP had the least favourite donor site. Conclusions Scars are often overlooked when planning breast surgery yet the extent and position of the scar needs to be outlined to patients and it should play an important role in selecting a breast reconstruction option. This study highlights the need for further evaluation of patients' opinions regarding scar patterns. PMID:26430631

  9. Mapping Fire Scars in the Brazilian Cerrado Using AVHRR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, C. A.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Brass, J. A.; Rezendez, A.; Alexander, S.; Guild, L. S.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Brazilian cerrado, or savanna, spans an area of 1,800,000 square kilometers on the great plateau of Central Brazil. Large fires covering hundreds of square kilometers, frequently occur in wildland areas of the cerrado, dominated by grasslands or grasslands mixed with shrubs and small trees, and also within area in the cerrado used for agricultural purposes, particularly for grazing. Smaller fires, typically extending over arm of a few square kilometers or less, are associated with the clewing of crops, such as dry land rice. A method for mapping fire scars and differentiating them from extensive areas of bare sod with AVHRR bands 1 (.55 -.68 micrometer) and 3 (3.5 - 3.9 micrometers) and measures of performance based on comparison with maps of fires with Landsat imagery will be presented. Methods of estimating total area burned from the AVHRR fire scar map will be discussed and related to land use and scar size.

  10. Stimulated infrared thermography applied to differentiate scar tissue from peri-scar tissue: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Riquet, Damien; Houel, Nicolas; Bodnar, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    Every human injury leads to a scar formation. The healing process leads to the formation of new tissue: the scar, which is different from the original tissue. This process is influenced by mechanical strength and the local vasculature is modified. The purpose of this study is to show that there are various temperatures between the scar and the peri-scar area associated with the healing process that can be estimated using the thermal infrared camera. In the study, 12 scars were stimulated by cold. Several changes of temperature were observed between scar and peri-scar area for 10 min. Scars appeared significantly colder with a Wilcoxon test (p = 0.01). Results showed that stimulated infrared thermography can be used to monitor the temperature difference between the scar and peri-scar tissue. PMID:27270169

  11. Clinical and histological results in the treatment of atrophic and hypertrophic scars using a combined method of radiofrequency, ultrasound, and transepidermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Trelles, Mario A; Martínez-Carpio, Pedro A

    2016-08-01

    Scars are problematic for thousands of patients. Scarring is a natural part of the healing process after an injury. However, the appearance of a scar and its treatment depend on multiple factors and on the experience of the therapist and the options available. Despite a plethora of rapidly evolving treatment options and technical advances, the management of atrophic and hypertrophic scars remains difficult. Innovative technologies provide an attractive alternative to conventional methods in the treatment of scars. The purpose of this trial was to determine the clinical and histological results of a method of treatment that combines radiofrequency, ultrasound, and transepidermal drug delivery. This was a prospective study conducted on 14 patients with scars of different sizes, types, and characteristics. All patients underwent six treatment sessions with the Legato device. Atrophic scars were treated with retinoic acid and hypertrophic scars with triamcinolone. Photographs and biopsies were taken before treatment and at 6 months after the last treatment session. The scars improved significantly (P < 0.0001). The mean attenuation in the severity of scars was 67% (range: 50-75%), where 100% indicates complete disappearance of the scar. Clinical and histological images of scar tissue in six patients in whom attenuation in the range of 55-75% was achieved are shown. Biopsies show regenerative changes in the scar tissue, in both the epidermis and dermis. The method makes it possible to treat extensive, heterogeneous scars on different sites with good results that are similar and predictable. PMID:26967960

  12. A Mathematical Model of Regenerative Axon Growing along Glial Scar after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuning; Zhu, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    A major factor in the failure of central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration is the formation of glial scar after the injury of CNS. Glial scar generates a dense barrier which the regenerative axons cannot easily pass through or by. In this paper, a mathematical model was established to explore how the regenerative axons grow along the surface of glial scar or bypass the glial scar. This mathematical model was constructed based on the spinal cord injury (SCI) repair experiments by transplanting Schwann cells as bridge over the glial scar. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) was used in this model for three-dimensional numerical simulation. The advantage of this model is that it provides a parallel and easily implemented algorithm and has the capability of handling complicated boundaries. Using the simulated data, two significant conclusions were made in this study: (1) the levels of inhibitory factors on the surface of the glial scar are the main factors affecting axon elongation and (2) when the inhibitory factor levels on the surface of the glial scar remain constant, the longitudinal size of the glial scar has greater influence on the average rate of axon growth than the transverse size. These results will provide theoretical guidance and reference for researchers to design efficient experiments. PMID:27274762

  13. A Mathematical Model of Regenerative Axon Growing along Glial Scar after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuning; Zhu, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    A major factor in the failure of central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration is the formation of glial scar after the injury of CNS. Glial scar generates a dense barrier which the regenerative axons cannot easily pass through or by. In this paper, a mathematical model was established to explore how the regenerative axons grow along the surface of glial scar or bypass the glial scar. This mathematical model was constructed based on the spinal cord injury (SCI) repair experiments by transplanting Schwann cells as bridge over the glial scar. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) was used in this model for three-dimensional numerical simulation. The advantage of this model is that it provides a parallel and easily implemented algorithm and has the capability of handling complicated boundaries. Using the simulated data, two significant conclusions were made in this study: (1) the levels of inhibitory factors on the surface of the glial scar are the main factors affecting axon elongation and (2) when the inhibitory factor levels on the surface of the glial scar remain constant, the longitudinal size of the glial scar has greater influence on the average rate of axon growth than the transverse size. These results will provide theoretical guidance and reference for researchers to design efficient experiments. PMID:27274762

  14. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  15. Involvement of impaired desmosome-related proteins in hypertrophic scar intraepidermal blister formation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianglin; He, Weifeng; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one of the unique fibrotic diseases in human. Intraepidermal blister is a common clinical symptom following the hypertrophic scar formation. However, little is known about the reason of blister creation. In this study, we selected three patients with hypertrophic scar as manifested by raised, erythematous, pruritic, blister and thickened appearance undergoing scar resection. The first scar sample was 6 months after burn from the neck of a 3 years old male patient with 10 score by Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). The second scar sample was 12 months after burn from the dorsal foot of a 16 years old female patient with 13 score by VSS. The third one was 9 months after burn from the elbow of a 34 years old male patients with 13 score by VSS. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of blister formation, we screened the different protein expression between hypertrophic scar and normal skin tissue by means of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technology and high throughput 2D LC-MS/MS. There were 48 proteins found to be downregulated in hypertrophic scar. Among the downregulated ones, plakophilin1 (PKP1), plakophilin3 (PKP3) and desmoplakin (DSP) were the desmosome-related proteins which were validated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting assay. Transmission electron microscopy further showed the considerably reduced size and intensity of hemidesmosome and desmosome in hypertrophic scar tissue, compared to control normal skin. Our data indicted for the first time that downregulation of DSP, PKP1 and PKP3 in hypertrophic scar might be responsible for intraepidermal blister formation. PMID:25922301

  16. Pulmonary scar carcinoma. A clinicopathologic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bakris, G.L.; Mulopulos, G.P.; Korchik, R.; Ezdinli, E.Z.; Ro, J.; Yoon, B.H.

    1983-08-01

    To delineate differences between scar and non-scar pulmonary carcinoma, the charts, autopsy protocols and chest roentgenograms of 80 male patients (autopsied) between 1975 and 1980, were reviewed. Nineteen patients (24%) had documented scar carcinomas. The comparison revealed scar carcinomas to possess certain distinctive features: A higher histologic distribution of adenocarcinoma (58% versus 15% in non-scars) and the frequent presentation (53%) with only nonpulmonary symptoms and signs related to metastasis. In scar carcinomas both bronchoscopy and sputum cytology were ineffective as initial diagnostic tools since chest findings were absent or minimal. Chest x-ray was negative in 9 of the 19 patients with scar cancer and remained negative until death in seven. In 10 of 19 instances, pulmonary scar carcinomas presented with only nonpulmonary symptoms and showed a tendency to metastasize while clinically undetectable. The differences noted between scar and non-scar carcinomas of the lung appear to depend on the peripheral location of these tumors and not on the adenocarcinoma histology.

  17. Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ... Non-ablative Laser Rejuvenation Non-invasive Body Contouring Treatments Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Information Free Skin Cancer Screenings Skin ...

  18. Inhibition of Let-7 microRNA attenuates myocardial remodeling and improves cardiac function postinfarction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tolonen, Anna-Maria; Magga, Johanna; Szabó, Zoltán; Viitala, Pirkko; Gao, Erhe; Moilanen, Anne-Mari; Ohukainen, Pauli; Vainio, Laura; Koch, Walter J; Kerkelä, Risto; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Serpi, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    The members of lethal-7 (Let-7) microRNA (miRNA) family are involved in regulation of cell differentiation and reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. However, their function in the heart is not known. In this study, we examined the effect of inhibiting the function of Let-7c miRNA on the progression of postinfarction left ventricular (LV) remodeling in mice. Myocardial infarction was induced with permanent ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery with a 4-week follow-up period. Let-7c miRNA was inhibited with a specific antagomir administered intravenously. The inhibition of Let-7c miRNA downregulated the levels of mature Let-7c miRNA and its other closely related members of Let-7 family in the heart and resulted in increased expression of pluripotency-associated genes Oct4 and Sox2 in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro and in adult mouse heart in vivo. Importantly, Let-7c inhibitor prevented the deterioration of cardiac function postinfarction, as demonstrated by preserved LV ejection fraction and elevated cardiac output. Improvement in cardiac function by Let-7c inhibitor postinfarction was associated with decreased apoptosis, reduced fibrosis, and reduction in the number of discoidin domain receptor 2–positive fibroblasts, while the number of c-kit+ cardiac stem cells and Ki-67+ proliferating cells remained unaltered. In conclusion, inhibition of Let-7 miRNA may be beneficial for the prevention of postinfarction LV remodeling and progression of heart failure. PMID:25505600

  19. Acne Scars: Pathogenesis, Classification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Annunziata, M. C.; D'Arco, V.; De Vita, V.; Lodi, G.; Mauriello, M. C.; Pastore, F.; Monfrecola, G.

    2010-01-01

    Acne has a prevalence of over 90% among adolescents and persists into adulthood in approximately 12%–14% of cases with psychological and social implications. Possible outcomes of the inflammatory acne lesions are acne scars which, although they can be treated in a number of ways, may have a negative psychological impact on social life and relationships. The main types of acne scars are atrophic and hypertrophic scars. The pathogenesis of acne scarring is still not fully understood, but several hypotheses have been proposed. There are numerous treatments: chemical peels, dermabrasion/microdermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, dermal grafting, needling and combined therapies for atrophic scars: silicone gels, intralesional steroid therapy, cryotherapy, and surgery for hypertrophic and keloidal lesions. This paper summarizes acne scar pathogenesis, classification and treatment options. PMID:20981308

  20. A Case of Multiple Spontaneous Keloid Scars

    PubMed Central

    Jfri, Abdulhadi; Rajeh, Nawal; Karkashan, Eman

    2015-01-01

    Keloid scars result from an abnormal healing response to cutaneous injury or inflammation that extends beyond the borders of the original wound. Spontaneous keloid scars forming in the absence of any previous trauma or surgical procedure are rare. Certain syndromes have been associated with this phenomenon, and few reports have discussed the evidence of single spontaneous keloid scar, which raises the question whether they are really spontaneous. Here, we present a 27-year-old mentally retarded single female with orbital hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, repaired cleft lip and high-arched palate who presented with progressive multiple spontaneous keloid scars in different parts of her body which were confirmed histologically by the presence of typical keloidal collagen. This report supports the fact that keloid scars can appear spontaneously and are possibly linked to a genetic factor. Furthermore, it describes a new presentation of spontaneous keloid scars in the form of multiple large lesions in different sites of the body. PMID:26351423

  1. [Surgical controversy. Limiting postoperative scarring].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2005-06-01

    Postoperative follow-up of glaucoma surgery must be rigorous and carried out over the long term. Data acquired on the make-up of the filtering bleb justifies using postoperative anti-inflammatory drugs, even if the eye is clinically quiet. When using antimetabolites, the risk factors for failure must be well known and either 5-fluorouracile or mitomycin should be chosen depending on the level of risk of scarring. Their use in needle revision must be adapted case by case. anti-TGF-beta-2 antibody, currently being investigated, may prove advantageous in the very near future. PMID:16208245

  2. Scar Revision Surgery: The Patient's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Anna Y; Butler, Daniel P; Cussons, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Background Insufficient satisfaction outcome literature exists to assist consultations for scar revision surgery; such outcomes should reflect the patient's perspective. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate scar revision patient satisfaction outcomes, according to specified patient-selection criteria. Methods Patients (250) were randomly selected for telephone contacting regarding scar revisions undertaken between 2007-2011. Visual analogue scores were obtained for scars pre- and post-revision surgery. Surgery selection criteria were; 'presence' of sufficient time for scar maturation prior to revision, technical issues during or wound complications from the initial procedure that contributed to poor scarring, and 'absence' of site-specific or patient factors that negatively influence outcomes. Patient demographics, scar pathogenesis (elective vs. trauma), underlying issue (functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic) and revision surgery details were also collected with the added use of a real-time, hospital database. Results Telephone contacting was achieved for 211 patients (214 scar revisions). Satisfaction outcomes were '2% worse, 16% no change, and 82% better'; a distribution maintained between body sites and despite whether surgery was functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic. Better outcomes were reported by patients who sustained traumatic scars vs. those who sustained scars by elective procedures (91.80% vs. 77.78%, P=0.016) and by females vs. males (85.52% vs. 75.36%, P<0.05), particularly in the elective group where males (36.17%) were more likely to report no change or worse outcomes versus females (16.04%) (P<0.01). Conclusions Successful scar revision outcomes may be achieved using careful patient selection. This study provides useful information for referring general practitioners, and patient-surgeon consultations, when planning scar revision. PMID:26618120

  3. Effective Treatments of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bingrong

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic scarring is often an unfortunate and permanent complication of acne vulgaris. It has high prevalence, significant impact on quality of life, and therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. The treatment of atrophic acne scars varies depending on the types of acne scars and the limitations of the treatment modalities in their ability to improve scars. Therefore, many options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, fat transplantation, other tissue augmenting agents, needling, subcision, and combined therapy. Various modalities have been used to treat scars, but limited efficacy and problematic side effects have restricted their application. In order to optimally treat a patient’s scar, we need to consider which treatment offers the most satisfactory result. There are also promising procedures in the future, such as stem cell therapy. In this article, the authors review the different treatment options of atrophic acne scars. This may be useful for selecting the best therapeutic strategy, whether it be single or combined therapy, in the treatment of atrophic acne scars while reducing or avoiding the side effects and complications. PMID:26029333

  4. Clustered parrotfish feeding scars trigger partial coral mortality of massive Porites colonies on the inshore Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, J. Q.; Bonaldo, R. M.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-03-01

    Coral predation by parrotfishes can cause damage to coral colonies, but research into the dynamics of their feeding scars on Indo-Pacific corals is limited. We monitored feeding scars of the parrotfish Chlorurus microrhinos on massive Porites colonies at Orpheus Island (inshore Great Barrier Reef) over 4 months. Of the 30 marks monitored, 11 were single feeding scars, which all healed completely. The remaining 19 feeding marks consisted of clusters of scars. Eight began to recover, while 11 increased in size by 1,576 ± 252 % (mean ± SE). A logistic regression predicted that a single feeding scar on a Porites colony had a 97 % probability of healing; however, where more than three feeding scars were present, this dropped below 50 %. As excavating parrotfishes in the Indo-Pacific often take multiple focused bites, they may have a significant impact on the growth and mortality of massive Porites colonies at Orpheus Island.

  5. The cost of post-burn scarring.

    PubMed

    Mirastschijski, U; Sander, J T; Zier, U; Rennekampff, H O; Weyand, B; Vogt, P M

    2015-09-30

    Deep burns lead to scarring and contractures for which there is little or no published data on treatment costs. The purpose of this study was to fill this gap by analysing treatment costs for burn sequelae. To do this, German-DRG for in-patient treatment was collected from the Burn Centre Lower Saxony. DRG-related T95.-coding served as a tool for burn-associated sequelae. Data on scar occurrence, plastic-reconstructive surgery and sick leave were collected by a questionnaire. The findings showed that 44.6% patients reported post-burn scarring and 31% needed surgical intervention. The expected risk for readmission was significantly higher (p=0.0002) with scars compared to without. Significantly higher costs for pressure garments were noted for scarred patients (p=0.04). No differences were found for ointments, silicone dressings or pain medication. Treatment costs for patients with scars were 5.6 times higher compared with no scar assessed by G-DRG. No differences were stated subsuming multiple readmissions for post-burn treatment per individual. Significantly higher costs (p=0.03) were noted for patients with burn sequelae other than scars with regard to individual readmissions. It has been revealed that treatment of scars causes higher costs than for other burn sequelae because of multiple surgical interventions. To reduce post-burn scarring and costs, specialized burn centres provide optimal and state-of-the-art treatment. As well as this, more emphasis should be laid on promoting research for the development of novel anti-scarring therapies. PMID:27279810

  6. [The method for the postmortem verification of ventricular fibrillation as a mechanism of death from myocardial infarction and post-infarction cardiosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Korneva, Yu S; Dorosevich, A E

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop the objective method for the verification of death from ventricular fibrillation (VF) as a complication of myocardial infarction and post-infarction cardiosclerosis (PICS). A total of 20 cases of death during different periods after myocardial infarction and PICS were available for the analysis in which EGC-confirmed ventricular fibrillation was the immediate cause of the fatal outcome. The control group was comprised of 29 cases of death from other complications. The special emphasis was laid on the investigation of the affected region, the boundary areas, and intact zones of the heart. The size of cardiac cell populations surrounding capillaries was determined. The statistical treatment of the results of the study revealed the difference in the cellular infiltrate composition between the groups of patients who had died from ventricular fibrillation and other causes. The differences were largely reduced to the number of lymphocytes, neutrophils, and leukocytes. The data thus obtained provided a basis for the development of the method for the objective postmortem verification of the complication being considered. PMID:25874320

  7. Prevention and treatment of excessive dermal scarring.

    PubMed Central

    Roseborough, Ingrid E.; Grevious, Mark A.; Lee, Raphael C.

    2004-01-01

    Today, wound management to avoid excessive scar formation is increasingly important, especially in populations with Fitzpatrick 3 or higher skin pigmentation. Medical science and industrial development are devoting more effort toward understanding and offering better therapy to control scars. However, advances in scar management have been hampered by the confusing or ambiguous terminology. There is no consensus on what amount of post-traumatic skin scar formation is "normal" and what should be considered "hypertrophic". In the World Health Organization's ICD-9, there is no diagnostic code for hypertrophic scar--only keloid is listed. Yet, the medical and scientific literature distinguishes them as different conditions. Our experience suggests that the diagnosis of keloid disease is greatly over-rendered. For black patients, an elevated scar seems, by default, diagnosed as keloid by most. This confusion results in inappropriate management of scar formation, and occasionally contributes to decision making related to elective or cosmetic surgery. Given that patients are expecting better outcomes from wound care today than in the past, this review article attempts to capture the essential biological factors related to wound scar production and discusses treatment options and indications used by the authors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:14746360

  8. Solanidine and tomatidine trigger scar pruritus.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Pedro E; Rioja, Luis F

    2016-05-01

    Scar pruritus is frequently encountered in clinical practice (particularly in burn patients) owing to its poorly known pathogenesis and difficult treatment. In previous work, we demonstrated the usefulness of a diet excluding edible solanaceae (viz., potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and aubergines) in patients with antihistamine-resistant scar pruritus. We hypothesized that alkaloids in solanaceae (particularly their secondary metabolites or aglycones) might be the actual pruritogens. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted a single-blind prospective study on patients responding favourably to a solanaceae-free diet whose scar pruritus could be ascribed to one of the four foods. The study involved applying the aglycones solanidine and tomatidine to each scar and checking whether, and which, had a pruritogenic effect. A total of 18 patients (90%) responded by developing pruritus; also, the triggering aglycone coincided with that prevailing in the pruritogenic food. We concluded that solanaceae aglycones are directly involved in the pathogenesis of scar pruritus. PMID:26777454

  9. Lamellipodin and the Scar/WAVE complex cooperate to promote cell migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ah-Lai; Vehlow, Anne; Kotini, Maria; Dodgson, Lauren; Soong, Daniel; Theveneau, Eric; Bodo, Cristian; Taylor, Eleanor; Navarro, Christel; Perera, Upamali; Michael, Magdalene; Dunn, Graham A.; Bennett, Daimark; Mayor, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration is essential for development, but its deregulation causes metastasis. The Scar/WAVE complex is absolutely required for lamellipodia and is a key effector in cell migration, but its regulation in vivo is enigmatic. Lamellipodin (Lpd) controls lamellipodium formation through an unknown mechanism. Here, we report that Lpd directly binds active Rac, which regulates a direct interaction between Lpd and the Scar/WAVE complex via Abi. Consequently, Lpd controls lamellipodium size, cell migration speed, and persistence via Scar/WAVE in vitro. Moreover, Lpd knockout mice display defective pigmentation because fewer migrating neural crest-derived melanoblasts reach their target during development. Consistently, Lpd regulates mesenchymal neural crest cell migration cell autonomously in Xenopus laevis via the Scar/WAVE complex. Further, Lpd’s Drosophila melanogaster orthologue Pico binds Scar, and both regulate collective epithelial border cell migration. Pico also controls directed cell protrusions of border cell clusters in a Scar-dependent manner. Taken together, Lpd is an essential, evolutionary conserved regulator of the Scar/WAVE complex during cell migration in vivo. PMID:24247431

  10. Microneedling Therapy for Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Manal; Awad, Sherif; Medhat, Walid; El-Fakahany, Hasan; Farag, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of acne scarring is always a challenge. Microneedling therapy or percutaneous collagen induction is a new addition to the treatment modalities for such scars and has been reported to be simple and effective in atrophic acne scar treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effect and objectively quantify the histological changes of acne scarring in response to skin microneedling. Design: A prospective clinical study. Participants: Ten patients with different types of atrophic acne scars were subjected to three months of skin microneedling treatment (six sessions at two-week intervals). Measurements: Patients were photographed, and skin biopsies were obtained at baseline as well as one and three months from the start of treatment. Histometry for epidermal thickness and quantitative evaluation of total elastin; newly synthesized tropoelastin; collagen types I, III, and VII; and newly synthesized collagen were performed for all biopsies. Results: Compared to the baseline, patients’ evaluations revealed noticeable clinical improvement in atrophic post-acne scars in response to skin microneedling. There was a statistically significant increase (p<0.05) in the mean of collagen types I, III, and VII and newly synthesized collagen, while total elastin was significantly decreased (p<0.05) after the end of treatment. Conclusions: Multiple minimally invasive sessions of skin microneedling are an effective treatment for post-acne atrophic scars as it stimulates the repair processes with the advantage of being a relatively risk-free, in-office procedure with minimal patient recovery time. PMID:26203319

  11. Phase and Texture Characterizations of Scar Collagen Second-Harmonic Generation Images Varied with Scar Duration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guannan; Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-08-01

    This work developed a phase congruency algorithm combined with texture analysis to quantitatively characterize collagen morphology in second-harmonic generation (SHG) images from human scars. The extracted phase and texture parameters of the SHG images quantified collagen directionality, homogeneity, and coarseness in scars and varied with scar duration. Phase parameters showed an increasing tendency of the mean of phase congruency with scar duration, indicating that collagen fibers are better oriented over time. Texture parameters calculated from local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) and Haar wavelet transform, demonstrated that the LD-LBP variance decreased and the energy of all subimages increased with scar duration. It implied that collagen has a more regular pattern and becomes coarser with scar duration. In addition, the random forest regression was used to predict scar duration, demonstrating reliable performance of the extracted phase and texture parameters in characterizing collagen morphology in scar SHG images. Results indicate that the extracted parameters using the proposed method can be used as quantitative indicators to monitor scar progression with time and can help understand the mechanism of scar progression. PMID:26036282

  12. Analysis of Frequency of Use of Different Scar Assessment Scales Based on the Scar Condition and Treatment Method

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Seong Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of scars in various conditions is essential, but no consensus had been reached on the scar assessment scale to select for a given condition. We reviewed papers to determine the scar assessment scale selected depending on the scar condition and treatment method. We searched PubMed for articles published since 2000 with the contents of the scar evaluation using a scar assessment scale with a Journal Citation Report impact factor >0.5. Among them, 96 articles that conducted a scar evaluation using a scar assessment scale were reviewed and analyzed. The scar assessment scales were identified and organized by various criteria. Among the types of scar assessment scales, the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was found to be the most frequently used scale. As for the assessment of newly developed operative scars, the POSAS was most used. Meanwhile, for categories depending on the treatment methods for preexisting scars, the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) was used in 6 studies following a laser treatment, the POSAS was used in 7 studies following surgical treatment, and the POSAS was used in 7 studies following a conservative treatment. Within the 12 categories of scar status, the VSS showed the highest frequency in 6 categories and the POSAS showed the highest frequency in the other 6 categories. According to our reviews, the POSAS and VSS are the most frequently used scar assessment scales. In the future, an optimal, universal scar scoring system is needed in order to better evaluate and treat pathologic scarring. PMID:24665417

  13. Scar State on Time-evolving Wavepacket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiya, Mitsuyoshi; Tsuyuki, Hiroyoshi; Kawamura, Kentaro; Sakamoto, Shoichi; Heller, Eric J.

    2015-09-01

    The scar-like enhancement is found in the accumulation of the time-evolving wavepacket in stadium billiard. It appears close to unstable periodic orbits, when the wavepackets are launched along the orbits. The enhancement is essentially due to the same mechanism of the well-known scar states in stationary eigenstates. The weighted spectral function reveals that the enhancement is the pileup of contributions from scar states on the same periodic orbit. The availavility of the weighted spectrum to the semiclassical approximation is also disscussed.

  14. MicroRNA-208b Alleviates Post-Infarction Myocardial Fibrosis in a Rat Model by Inhibiting GATA4

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chaoyuan; Cui, Qintao; Su, Guobao; Guo, Xiaoliang; Liu, Xiaochen; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction affects the health of many people. Post-infarction myocardial fibrosis has attracted much attention, but details of the mechanism remain elusive. In this study, the role of microRNA-208b (miR-208b) in modulating post-infarction myocardial fibrosis and the related mechanism were investigated. Material/Methods A rat model of myocardial infarction induced by ligating the left anterior descending artery was used to analyze the expression and roles of miR-208b by overexpression with the lentivirus vector of pre-miR-208b. Myocardial function was assessed and the expression of fibrosis-related factors type I collagen (COL1) and ACTA2 (alias αSMA) was detected. Myocardial fibroblasts isolated from newborn rats were transfected with luciferase reporter vectors containing wild-type or mutant Gata4 3′ UTR to verify the relationship between Gata4 and miR-208b. We then transfected the specific small interference RNA of Gata4 to detect changes in COL1 and ACTA2. Results miR-208b was down-regulated in hearts of model rats (P<0.01). Overexpressing miR-208b improved myocardial functions, such as reducing the infarction area (P<0.05) and promoting LVEF and LVFS (P<0.01), and inhibited COL1 and ACTA2 (P<0.01). Luciferase reporter assay proved Gata4 to be the direct target of miR-208b, with the target sequence in the 3′UTR. Inhibiting GATA4 resulted in the down-regulation of COL1 and ACTA2, suggesting that the role of miR-208b was achieved via regulating GATA4. Conclusions This study demonstrates the protective function of miR-208b via GATA4 in post-infarction myocardial fibrosis, providing a potential therapeutic target for treating myocardial fibrosis. PMID:27236543

  15. [The impact of the intravenous He-Ne laser therapy on the antioxidant system in patient with stable exertion angina and postinfarct cardiosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Boev, S S; Selivonenko, V G

    1997-01-01

    The authors' study show that intravenous He-Ne laser therapy (HNLT) in patients with stable angina of effort (functional class II-III) and postinfarction cardiosclerosis irrespective of ejection fraction increased plasma katalase and red cell vitamin A concentrations. HNLT aroused vitamin E concentration in red cells in anginal patients with intact ejection fraction whereas in those with reduced ejection fraction it elevated blood peroxidase, plasma vitamin A and E concentrations. For patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis there were, respectively, higher levels of blood peroxidase, plasmic vitamin A, red cell vitamin E, plasmic SH-groups and blood peroxidase, plasmic vitamins A and E. PMID:9503808

  16. The evidence for natural therapeutics as potential anti-scarring agents in burn-related scarring.

    PubMed

    Mehta, M; Branford, O A; Rolfe, K J

    2016-01-01

    Though survival rate following severe thermal injuries has improved, the incidence and treatment of scarring have not improved at the same speed. This review discusses the formation of scars and in particular the formation of hypertrophic scars. Further, though there is as yet no gold standard treatment for the prevention or treatment of scarring, a brief overview is included. A number of natural therapeutics have shown beneficial effects both in vivo and in vitro with the potential of becoming clinical therapeutics in the future. These natural therapeutics include both plant-based products such as resveratrol, quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate as examples and includes the non-plant-based therapeutic honey. The review also includes potential mechanism of action for the therapeutics, any recorded adverse events and current administration of the therapeutics used. This review discusses a number of potential 'treatments' that may reduce or even prevent scarring particularly hypertrophic scarring, which is associated with thermal injuries without compromising wound repair. PMID:27574685

  17. Relation of magnetocardiographic arrhythmia risk parameters to delayed ventricular conduction in postinfarction ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Petri; Pesola, Katja; Järvinen, Antero; Mäkijärvi, Markku; Katila, Toivo; Toivonen, Lauri

    2002-09-01

    Time-domain late field and intra-QRS fragmentation parameters in magnetocardiography (MCG) identify patients prone to VT after myocardial infarction. This study investigated if they are related to slow ventricular conduction and affected by arrhythmia surgery. Twenty-two patients with old myocardial infarction undergoing map-guided subendocardial resection to treat sustained VT were included. Bipolar electrograms were recorded during operation using an epicardial jacket and endocardial balloon electrode array. The time from the QRS onset to the end of local ventricular excitation in each electrogram was measured during sinus rhythm. Multi-channel MCG was recorded before and after operation and filtered QRS duration (QRSd), root mean square amplitude of the magnetic field strength during the last 40 ms of the QRS complex (RMS40), duration of the low amplitude signal < 300 fT (LAS300), fragmentation index M (M), and fragmentation score S (S) were determined. All patients had one or two VT foci localized and resected. MCG parameters correlated with time to the latest end of ventricular excitation; r = 0.45 for QRSd (P = 0.035), r = 0.64 for M (P = 0.001), and r = 0.73 for S (P < 0.001). The correlations were even better in patients with anterior infarction (e.g., r = 0.87 for QRSd, P < 0.001; r = 0.91 for M, P < 0.001). The operation reduced the abnormalities in MCG parameters and 20 of the 21 patients tested postoperatively became noninducible. MCG parameters indicating postinfarction arrhythmia propensity are related to delayed ventricular conduction. Abolition of the arrhythmia substrate reverses the abnormality of these parameters. PMID:12380770

  18. An idiosyncratic history of burn scars.

    PubMed

    Petro, Jane A

    2015-03-01

    The history of burn scars can best be found in military medical history. The care of wounded soldiers documented in the Illiad reflected the trauma of the weapons of war, arrow, spear, sword, and ax. The introduction of gunpowder in the 14th century, increasingly sophisticated explosives, and in modern times, petroleum-driven vehicles, including airplanes, created a new subset of wounds requiring attention and post-survival scars challenging the quality of survival. This article selects from among a myriad of examples of modern military treatments as they relate to those survivors. Larrey, with Napolean's Grand Army, Sir Harold Gilles during and following World War I, and the Boston area preparation and response to the Cocoanut Grove Fire in 1942 are the principle topics examined. Recent modern interventions, related to the survival of horrific blast and burn injuries, with modern wound care and scar manipulation techniques provide context to the current ability to modify healing and scars. PMID:25922950

  19. Proceedings of the SCAR Conference, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research (SCAR) team analyzed six major topics: (1) aerodynamics, (2) stability and control, (3) propulsion, (4) environmental factor, (5) airframe structures and materials, and (6) design integration.

  20. SCAR-B UWC131A

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-19

    ... SCAR-B Discipline:  Tropospheric Chemistry Field Campaigns Radiation Budget Aerosols ... Droplet Concentration Effective Droplet Radius Liquid Water Content Nitrogen Oxides Ozone (O3) Particle Number Concentration ...

  1. The semiclassical limit of scar intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergini, Eduardo G.

    2015-04-01

    By using a simple statistical model we find the distribution of scar intensities surviving the semiclassical limit. The obtained distribution is verified in a wide energy range of the quantum Bunimovich stadium billiard.

  2. SCAR-A Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-19

    ... (SCAR-A) data include physical and chemical components of the Earth's surface, the atmosphere and the radiation field collected in the eastern part of the United States with an emphasis in air pollution. Discipline:  ...

  3. Do postsurgical interventions optimize ultimate scar cosmesis.

    PubMed

    Viera, M H; Amini, S; Konda, S; Berman, B

    2009-06-01

    Keloids and other scars are different manifestations of the normal wound healing process. If located in visible areas, scars may have a psychological impact that could affect the quality of life of the scar-bearing population. Good preoperatory planning including hiding incisions in natural anatomical landmarks or placing them parallel to relaxed skin tension lines are among the techniques used to improve the cosmesis of scars. Once a prominent or noticeable scar has developed, multiple therapeutic modalities can be applied including surgical excision, although high recurrence rates precludes its use as monotherapy. Several advanced surgical correction techniques including Z-plasty and W-plasty may be useful in repositioning scars. Other modalities that have been reported to improve scar cosmesis include cryosurgery, radiotherapy, lasers, and skin substitute grafts. Adjuvant postsurgical treatment modalities have reduced dramatically the recurrence rates associated with the removal of the scar. In this review of the literature the authors discuss evidence based data related to the abovementioned modalities and other topical and intralesional therapies including occlusion, compression, silicone, corticosteroids, interferons, imiquimod, resiquimod, tacrolimus, 5-fluorouracil, retinoids, as well as the role of several over-the-counter agents such as onion extract, vitamin E and the combination of hydrocortisone, vitamin E and silicone. Finally, they address newer modalities including vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor, transforming growth factor-3, interleukin-10, mannose-6-phosphate, UVA-1, narrowband UVB, intense pulsed light and photodynamic therapy. Ultimately, the decision of choosing the most appropriate postexcisional management treatment should be taken by physicians on a case-by-case basis in order to obtain the best cosmetically acceptable results. PMID:19528906

  4. Frequency of placenta previa in previously scarred and non scarred uterus

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Tayyaba; Waheed, Fatima; Mahmood, Zahid; Saba, Kanwal; Mahmood, Hamis; Bukhari, Mulazim Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of placenta Previa in patients coming to a tertiary care unit with previously scarred and non-scarred uterus. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried on 114 cases who underwent caesarean sections (37 cases out of 645 cases with non scarred uterus and 77 cases from 721 cases with scarred uterus) in the department of obstetrics and gynecology Lady Willingdon Hospital from January 2008– December 2011. Results: Most patients (47.36%) were between 26-30 years age group, presented with gestational age between 36-40 weeks (70.17%), were mostly G2-4, while frequency of placenta Previa in non-scarred uterus was 32.45% (37 cases), and frequency in previously scarred uterus was 67.54% (77 cases). Major degree Previa was found in 88 cases (77.19%). There were 5.70% cases of placenta Previa from non-scarred uteruses and 10.67% cases of placenta Previa (10.67%) from already scarred uteruses. Stratification revealed a higher trend of the morbidity with the increase in number of previous caesarean sections. Conclusion: A significantly higher frequency of placenta Previa was found among patients coming to a tertiary care hospital with previously scarred uterus. PMID:26101491

  5. Development of antimicrobial and scar preventive chitosan hydrogel wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Sadiya; Arora, Abha; Alam, M S; Gupta, Bhuvanesh

    2016-07-11

    Antimicrobial and scar preventive wound dressings were developed by coating a blend of chitosan (CS), polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyvinyl pyrolidone (PVP) on the cotton fabric and subsequent freeze drying. The miscibility of blend systems and functional group interaction were investigated by attenuated total reflectance-infra red spectroscopy. The scanning electron microscopy of the coated fabric revealed porous structure. The porosity of the material was 54-70% and the pore size was in the range of 75-120μm depending on the blend composition. The air permeability diminished as the PVP content increased. The water vapour transmission rate was in the range of 2000-3500g/m(2)day which may offer to be proper material for the wound dressing with moderate exudate absorption. Tetracycline hydrochloride was used as model drug within the hydrogel matrix. The cumulative release of drug was found to be ∼80% of the total loading after ∼48h. The drug loaded dressings showed good antimicrobial nature against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. In vivo wound healing and tissue compatibility studies were carried out over a period of 21 days on full-thickness skin wounds created on male Wistar rats. Fast healing was observed in drug loaded dressing treated wounds with minimum scarring, as compared to the other groups. These results suggest that drug loaded dressing could provide scar preventive wound healing. PMID:27163526

  6. Natakalim improves post-infarction left ventricular remodeling by restoring the coordinated balance between endothelial function and cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong-Min; Zhong, Ming-Li; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Cui, Wen-Yu; Long, Chao-Liang; Wang, Hai

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial dysfunction can lead to congestive heart failure and the activation of endothelial ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels may contribute to endothelial protection. Therefore, the present study was carried out to investigate the hypothesis that natakalim, a novel K(ATP) channel opener, ameliorates post-infarction left ventricular remodeling and failure by correcting endothelial dysfunction. The effects of myocardial infarction were assessed 8 weeks following left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion in male Wistar rats. Depressed blood pressure, cardiac dysfunction, evidence of left ventricular remodeling and congestive heart failure were observed in the rats with myocardial infarction. Treatment with natakalim at daily oral doses of 1, 3 or 9 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks prevented these changes. Natakalim also prevented the progression to cardiac failure, which was demonstrated by the increase in right ventricular weight/body weight (RVW/BW) and relative lung weight, signs of cardiac dysfunction, as well as the overexpression of atrial and brain natriuretic peptide mRNAs. Our results also demonstrated that natakalim enhanced the downregulation of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, attenuated the upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide (NO), inhibited the upregulated endothelin system and corrected the imbalance between prostacyclin and thromboxane A(2). Overall, our findings suggest that natakalim prevents post-infarction hypertrophy and cardiac failure by restoring the coordinated balance between endothelial function and cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25215478

  7. Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Hobbs, P. V.; Kirchoff, V. W. J. H.; Artaxo, P.; Remer, L. A.; Holben, B. N.; King, M. D.; Ward, D. E.; Prins, E. M.; Longo, K. M.; Mattos, L. F.; Nobre, C. A.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Ji, Q.; Thompson, A. M.; Gleason, J. F.; Christopher, S. A.; Tsay, S.-C.

    1998-01-01

    The Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) field project took place in the Brazilian Amazon and cerrado regions in August-September 1995 as a collaboration between Brazilian and American scientists. SCAR-B, a comprehensive experiment to study biomass burning, emphasized measurements of surface biomass, fires, smoke aerosol and trace gases, clouds, and radiation. their climatic effects, and remote sensing from aircraft and satellites. It included aircraft and ground-based in situ measurements of smoke emission factors and the compositions, sizes, and optical properties of the smoke particles; studies of the formation of ozone; the transport and evolution of smoke; and smoke interactions with water vapor and clouds. This overview paper introduces SCAR-B and summarizes some of the main results obtained so far. (1) Fires: measurements of the size distribution of fires, using the 50 m resolution MODIS Airborne Simulator, show that most of the fires are small (e.g. 0.005 square km), but the satellite sensors (e.g., AVHRR and MODIS with I km resolution) can detect fires in Brazil which are responsible for 60-85% of the burned biomass: (2) Aerosol: smoke particles emitted from fires increase their radius by as much as 60%, during their first three days in the atmosphere due to condensation and coagulation, reaching a mass median radius of 0.13-0.17 microns: (3) Radiative forcing: estimates of the globally averaged direct radiative forcing due to smoke worldwide, based on the properties of smoke measured in SCAR-B (-O.l to -0.3 W m(exp -2)), are smaller than previously modeled due to a lower single-scattering albedo (0.8 to 0.9), smaller scattering efficiency (3 square meters g(exp -2) at 550 nm), and low humidification factor; and (4) Effect on clouds: a good relationship was found between cloud condensation nuclei and smoke volume concentrations, thus an increase in the smoke emission is expected to affect cloud properties. In SCAR-B, new techniques were developed

  8. Enhanced in vivo delivery of 5-fluorouracil by ethosomal gels in rabbit ear hypertrophic scar model.

    PubMed

    Wo, Yan; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Kan; Mao, Xiaohui; Su, Weijie; Li, Ke; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Applying Ethosomal Gels (EGs) in transdermal drug delivery systems has evoked considerable interest because of their good water-solubility and biocompatibility. However, there has not been an explicit description of applying EGs as a vehicle for hypertrophic scars treatment. Here, a novel transdermal EGs loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU EGs) was successfully prepared and characterized. The stability assay in vitro revealed that 5-FU EGs stored for a period of 30 days at 4 ± 1 °C had a better size stability than that at 25 ± 1 °C. Furthermore, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, EGs labeled with Rhodamine 6 G penetrated into the deep dermis of the hypertrophic scar within 24 h in the rabbit ear hypertrophic model suggested that the EGs were an optional delivery carrier through scar tissues. In addition, the value of the Scar Elevation Index (SEI) of 5-FU EGs group in the rabbit ear scar model was lower than that of 5-FU Phosphate Buffered Saline gel and Control groups. To conclude, these results suggest that EGs delivery system loaded 5-fluorouracil is a perfect candidate drug for hypertrophic scars therapy in future. PMID:25501333

  9. Enhanced in Vivo Delivery of 5-Fluorouracil by Ethosomal Gels in Rabbit Ear Hypertrophic Scar Model

    PubMed Central

    Wo, Yan; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Kan; Mao, Xiaohui; Su, Weijie; Li, Ke; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Applying Ethosomal Gels (EGs) in transdermal drug delivery systems has evoked considerable interest because of their good water-solubility and biocompatibility. However, there has not been an explicit description of applying EGs as a vehicle for hypertrophic scars treatment. Here, a novel transdermal EGs loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU EGs) was successfully prepared and characterized. The stability assay in vitro revealed that 5-FU EGs stored for a period of 30 days at 4 ± 1 °C had a better size stability than that at 25 ± 1 °C. Furthermore, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, EGs labeled with Rhodamine 6 G penetrated into the deep dermis of the hypertrophic scar within 24 h in the rabbit ear hypertrophic model suggested that the EGs were an optional delivery carrier through scar tissues. In addition, the value of the Scar Elevation Index (SEI) of 5-FU EGs group in the rabbit ear scar model was lower than that of 5-FU Phosphate Buffered Saline gel and Control groups. To conclude, these results suggest that EGs delivery system loaded 5-fluorouracil is a perfect candidate drug for hypertrophic scars therapy in future. PMID:25501333

  10. Remote sensing of smoke, clouds, and radiation using AVIRIS during SCAR experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Remer, Lorraine; Kaufman, Yorman J.

    1995-01-01

    During the past two years, researchers from several institutes joined together to take part in two SCAR experiments. The SCAR-A (Sulfates, Clouds And Radiation - Atlantic) took place in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States in July, 1993. remote sensing data were acquired with the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS), and a RC-10 mapping camera from an ER-2 aircraft at 20 km. In situ measurements of aerosol and cloud microphysical properties were made with a variety of instruments equipped on the University of Washington's C-131A research aircraft. Ground based measurements of aerosol optical depths and particle size distributions were made using a network of sunphotometers. The main purpose of SCAR-A experiment was to study the optical, physical and chemical properties of sulfate aerosols and their interaction with clouds and radiation. Sulfate particles are believed to affect the energy balance of the earth by directly reflecting solar radiation back to space and by increasing the cloud albedo. The SCAR-C (Smoke, Clouds And Radiation - California) took place on the west coast areas during September - October of 1994. Sets of aircraft and ground-based instruments, similar to those used during SCAR-A, were used during SCAR-C. Remote sensing of fires and smoke from AVIRIS and MAS imagers on the ER-2 aircraft was combined with a complete in situ characterization of the aerosol and trace gases from the C-131A aircraft of the University of Washington and the Cesna aircraft from the U.S. Forest Service. The comprehensive data base acquired during SCAR-A and SCAR-C will contribute to a better understanding of the role of clouds and aerosols in global change studies. The data will also be used to develop satellite remote sensing algorithms from MODIS on the Earth Observing System.

  11. Effectiveness of Onion Extract Gel on Surgical Scars in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Chanprapaph, Kumutnart; Tanrattanakorn, Somsak; Wattanakrai, Penpun; Wongkitisophon, Pranee; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2012-01-01

    Background. Onion extracts have been shown in vitro to accelerate wound healing. Results from clinical studies on surgical scars in Caucasians were disappointing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of onion extract gel in improving the cosmetic and symptoms of surgical scars in Asians. Patients/Methods. Twenty Asians who had new Pfannenstiel's cesarean section scars were recruited in this prospective double-blinded, split-scar study. Each side was randomly assigned treatment with onion extract gel or placebo at 7 days after surgery. The product was applied three times daily for 12 weeks. Subjects were evaluated at baseline and 4th and 12th weeks. Scar redness was assessed by calorimeter, scar height and pliability were assessed by blinded investigators, and scar symptoms and overall cosmetic improvement were assessed by subjects. Results. Sixteen subjects completed the study. A statistically significant difference between two sides of scar in terms of scar height and scar symptoms was found. There was no statistically significant difference in scar redness, scar pliability, and overall cosmetic appearance between two sides. Conclusions. The early use of topical 12% onion extract gel on Pfannenstiel's cesarean section scar in Asians resulted in the improvement of scar height and scar symptoms. PMID:22924037

  12. Reflectance confocal microscopy for scarring and non-scarring alopecia real-time assessment.

    PubMed

    Ardigò, Marco; Agozzino, Marina; Franceschini, Chiara; Donadio, Carlo; Abraham, Leonardo Spagnol; Barbieri, Luca; Sperduti, Isabella; Berardesca, Enzo; González, Salvador

    2016-07-01

    Clinical management of alopecia represents one of the major issues in dermatology. Scalp biopsies are not easily accepted because of the high bleeding and sensitive anatomical area. Trichoscopy is routinely used for diagnosis of alopecia, but in several cases lack to provide sufficient information on the status of the disease. Recently, reflectance confocal microscopy demonstrated its usefulness for the evaluation of several inflammatory skin condition and preliminary reports about alopecia have been proposed in the literature. The aim was to identify the confocal features characterizing scarring and non-scarring alopecia. Reflectance confocal microscopy from 86 patients affected by scarring (28 lichen planopilaris and 9 lupus erythematosus) and non-scarring alopecia (30 androgenic alopecia and 19 alopecia areata), were retrospectively, blinded evaluated. Good concordance between different readers on the confocal criteria has been assessed. Statistical significant features, specific for scarring alopecia and non-scarring alopecia have been identified. In this study, data on reflectance confocal microscopy features useful for the differential diagnosis between scarring and non-scarring alopecia have been identified. Further studies focusing on the use of this non-invasive technique in the therapeutic follow-up and distinction of sub-entities of alopecia are still required. PMID:27225248

  13. Improved Stratification of Autonomic Regulation for risk prediction in post-infarction patients with preserved left ventricular function (ISAR-Risk)

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Axel; Barthel, Petra; Schneider, Raphael; Ulm, Kurt; Müller, Alexander; Joeinig, Anke; Stich, Raphael; Kiviniemi, Antti; Hnatkova, Katerina; Huikuri, Heikki; Schömig, Albert; Malik, Marek; Schmidt, Georg

    2009-01-01

    Aims To investigate the combination of heart rate turbulence (HRT) and deceleration capacity (DC) as risk predictors in post-infarction patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) > 30%. Methods and results We enrolled 2343 consecutive survivors of acute myocardial infarction (MI) (<76 years) in sinus rhythm. HRT and DC were obtained from 24 h Holter recordings. Patients with both abnormal HRT (slope ≤ 2.5 ms/RR and onset ≥ 0%) and abnormal DC (≤4.5 ms) were considered suffering from severe autonomic failure (SAF) and prospectively classified as high risk. Primary and secondary endpoints were all-cause, cardiac, and sudden cardiac mortality within the first 5 years of follow-up. During follow-up, 181 patients died; 39 deaths occurred in 120 patients with LVEF ≤ 30%, and 142 in 2223 patients with LVEF>30% (cumulative 5-year mortality rates of 37.9% and 7.8%, respectively). Among patients with LVEF > 30%, SAF identified another high-risk group of 117 patients with 37 deaths (cumulative 5-year mortality rates of 38.6% and 6.1%, respectively). Merging both high-risk groups (i.e. LVEF ≤ 30% and/or SAF) doubled the sensitivity of mortality prediction compared with LVEF ≤ 30% alone (21.1% vs. 42.1%, P < 0.001) while preserving 5-year mortality rate (38.2%). Conclusion In post-MI patients with LVEF>30%, SAF identifies a high-risk group equivalent in size and mortality risk to patients with LVEF ≤ 30%. PMID:19109245

  14. The Efficacy of Medical Stabilization Prior to Myocardial Revascularization in Early Refractory Postinfarction Angina

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Arthur J.; Sanders, John H.; Moran, John H.; Spies, Stewart M.; Lesch, Michael L.; Michaelis, Lawrence L.

    1983-01-01

    The timing of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in patients with persistent, severe myocardial ischemia after an acute myocardial infarction is controversial. Based on the previous disappointing clinical experience with urgent surgery, a period of medical stabilization (mean ten days, range two to 28) prior to surgery was employed in a prospective nonrandomized clinical trial. The frequent use of intravenous nitroglycerin and intra-aortic balloon pumping was important in allowing preoperative clinical stabilization in these patients who were refractory to conventional medical therapy. The combined medical-surgical treatment protocol was associated with no early or late mortality in 20 patients who suffered preoperative myocardial infarction and demonstrated refractory post-infarction angina. Although these patients were considered to be high-risk surgical candidates, the incidence of perioperative myocardial damage in this selected group was comparable with that observed in patients undergoing elective CABG surgery at this institution without recent preoperative myocardial infarction. In order to determine the hemodynamic effectiveness of this selected patient management process, perioperative changes in left ventricular performance were determined by multigated cardiac blood pool imaging. Computer-based analysis of this radionuclide-related data allowed the accurate determination of ejection fraction (EF). Those patients with preoperative subendocardial infarction (N = 12) had no decrease in global EF 24 hours after operation and significant increases in EF seven days and eight months after operation. This pattern is analogous to that observed in patients without preoperative myocardial necrosis undergoing elective CABG surgery at this institution. Those patients with recent preoperative transmural myocardial infarction (N = 8) showed a decrease in EF 24 hours after operation, but recovered to preoperative levels seven days and eight months after

  15. Evaluating evidence for atrophic scarring treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    McGrouther, Duncan; Chakrabarty, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction Atrophic scars cause significant patient morbidity. Whilst there is evidence to guide treatment, there does not appear to be a systematic review to analyse the efficacy of treatment options. Objectives To retrieve all evidence relating to atrophic scar treatment and evaluate using the Clinical Evidence GRADE score in order to allow clinicians to make evidence-based treatment choices. Method Searches were performed in Medline, EMBASE, CINHL and Cochrane to identify all English studies published evaluating treatment of atrophic scars on adults excluding journal letters. Each study was allocated a GRADE score based on type of study, quality, dose response, consistency of results and significance of results. The end score allowed categorisation of evidence into high, moderate, low or very low quality. Results A total of 41 studies were retrieved from searches including randomised controlled trials, observational studies, retrospective analyses and case reports of which 7% were allocated a high-quality score, 10% a moderate score, 7% a low score and 75% a very low score. Treatment modalities included ablative laser therapy, non-ablative laser therapy, autologous fat transfer, dermabrasion, chemical peels, injectables, subcision, tretinoin iontophoresis and combination therapy. Conclusion There is a paucity of good-quality clinical evidence evaluating treatment modalities for atrophic scarring. Evidence supports efficacy of laser, surgery and peel therapy. Further biomolecular research is required to identify targeted treatment options and more randomised controlled trials would make the evidence base for atrophic scar treatment more robust. PMID:25352991

  16. Fraxelated radiofrequency device for acne scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Babar K.; Khokher, Sairah

    2012-09-01

    Acne scars can be improved with various treatments such as topical creams, chemical peels, dermal fillers, microdermabrasion, laser, and radiofrequency devices. Some of these treatments especially lasers and deep chemical peels can have significant side effects such as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation in darker skin types. Fraxelated RF Laser devices have been reported to have lower incidence of side effects in all skin phototypes. Nine patients between ages 18 and 35 of various skin phototypes were selected from a private practice and treated with a RF fraxelated device (E-matrix) for acne scars. Outcomes were measured by physician observation, subjective feedback received by patients, and comparison of before and after photographs. In this small group of patients with various skin phototypes, fraxelated radiofrequency device improved acne scars with minimal side effects and downtime.

  17. Transforming medical imaging: the first SCAR TRIP conference a position paper from the SCAR TRIP subcommittee of the SCAR research and development committee.

    PubMed

    Andriole, Katherine P; Morin, Richard L

    2006-03-01

    The First Society for Computer Applications in Radiology (SCAR) Transforming the Radiological Interpretation Process (TRIP) Conference and Workshop, "Transforming Medical Imaging" was held on January 31-February 1, 2005 in Bethesda, MD. Representatives from all areas of medical and scientific imaging-academia, research, industry, and government agencies-joined together to discuss the future of medical imaging and potential new ways to manage the explosion in numbers, size, and complexity of images generated by today's continually advancing imaging technologies. The two-day conference included plenary, scientific poster, and breakout sessions covering six major research areas related to TRIP. These topic areas included human perception, image processing and computer-aided detection, data visualization, image set navigation and usability, databases and systems integration, and methodology evaluation and performance validation. The plenary presentations provided a general status review of each broad research field to use as a starting point for discussion in the breakout sessions, with emphasis on specific topics requiring further study. The goals for the breakout sessions were to define specific research questions in each topic area, to list the impediments to carrying out research in these fields, to suggest possible solutions and near- and distant-future directions for each general topic, and to report back to the general session. The scientific poster session provided another mechanism for presenting and discussing TRIP-related research. This report summarizes each plenary and breakout session, and describes the group recommendations as to the issues facing the field, major impediments to progress, and the outlook for radiology in the short and long term. The conference helped refine the definition of the SCAR TRIP Initiative and the problems facing radiology with respect to the dramatic growth in medical imaging data, and it underscored a present and future need

  18. Modifications in vertical scar breast reduction.

    PubMed

    Beer, G M; Morgenthaler, W; Spicher, I; Meyer, V E

    2001-06-01

    The use of vertical-scar breast reduction techniques is only slowly increasing, even though they have been advocated by Lassus and Lejour and are requested by patients. Possible reasons why surgeons are reluctant to use these techniques are that they are said to be more difficult to learn, they require considerable experience and intuition, and their applicability is confined to small breasts. Several surgeons have developed modifications, combining vertical-scar breast reduction techniques with details of the familiar inverted-T-scar technique. We present a procedure involving two further modifications of the vertical-scar breast reduction technique: first, a standardised, geometrical preoperative drawing from our superior-pedicle T technique, with the aim of establishing a reproducible method of reduction requiring no particular intuitive touch, and, second, the addition of a periareolar skin resection, to give the breast the desired round shape. Between September 1998 and December 1999 we used this technique in a prospective series of 52 patients. The median resection weight was 450 g. The maximal postoperative follow-up was 15 months. There were no acute postoperative complications necessitating reoperation. The late complication rate was within the expected range for such procedures (seven patients, 13.5%) and included vertical-scar widening, areolar distortion, residual wrinkles due to incomplete shrinkage of the undermined skin in the inferior pole and asymmetry of the breast. This procedure enables us to offer patients with moderate to marked hypertrophy a reproducible versatile vertical breast reduction technique. The technique is easy to teach and easy to learn, especially for those who are familiar with the superior pedicle inverted-T-scar technique. PMID:11355991

  19. Inflammation and cutaneous nervous system involvement in hypertrophic scarring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-hua; Yang, Heng-lian; Xiao, Hu; Wang, Yi-bing; Wang, De-chang; Huo, Ran

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to use a mouse model of hypertrophic scarring by mechanical loading on the dorsum of mice to determine whether the nervous system of the skin and inflammation participates in hypertrophic scarring. Results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that inflammation contributed to the formation of a hypertrophic scar and increased the nerve density in scar tissue.Western blot assay verified that interleukin-13 expression was increased in scar tissue. These findings suggest that inflammation and the cutaneous nervous system play a role in hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:26692869

  20. Comparative analysis of changes of myocardial angiogenesis and energy metabolism in postinfarction and diabetic damage of rat heart.

    PubMed

    Afanasiev, Sergey A; Egorova, Margarita V; Kondratyeva, Dina S; Batalov, Roman E; Popov, Sergey V

    2014-01-01

    Comparative study of changes in myocardial activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and capillary density distribution in the experimental models of diabetic and postinfarction damage of rat heart was performed. Data showed that decrease in LDH and SDH activities was observed in both pathologies which can suggest abnormal processes of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in cardiac mitochondria. Activity of LDH and SDH in combined pathologies was comparative with the corresponding values of these parameters in control group. The authors hypothesize that these differences can be caused by specifics of myocardial vascularization. The results of the study showed that an increase in capillary density was found in all groups of rats with pathologies compared with control group. However, no significant differences in the intensity of angiogenesis processes were found between groups with pathologies. PMID:24689068

  1. Comparing kinematically detachable rock masses and rockfall scar volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrouli, O.; Corominas, J.

    2015-09-01

    In rockfall prone areas the evaluation of the risk due to worst case scenarios requires the establishment of maximum thresholds for the expected rockfall volumes. The magnitude of such instabilities is often related to the properties of the jointed rock mass, with the characteristics of the existing unfavorably dipping joint sets playing a major role. The study- site here is the chute of Forat Negre in Andorra. The size distribution of the missing volumes from the scars was calculated using terrestrial laser scanner point cloud data and reaches up to few thousands of m3. On the other hand, the application of Markland criteria on a Digital Elevation Model of the zone indicated the kinematically detachable rock masses to be up to tens of thousands of m3. As the size of the scar areas does not indicate the occurrence of such events in the past, the effect of the joint persistence as assumed for the two analyses is discussed here. The areas of the exposed joint surfaces belonging to each discontinuity set are obtained and their use as a measure of the relative persistence of each set is proposed. The average and median length of the sets F3 and F5 (sliding planes) are found to be similar to the average and median spacing of the intersecting set F7 (tension crack), suggesting that the F7 set exerts a control over the persistence of the former ones.

  2. The Beneficial Effects of Postinfarct Cytokine Combination Therapy are Sustained During Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Sanganalmath, Santosh K.; Stein, Adam B.; Guo, Yiru; Tiwari, Sumit; Hunt, Greg; Vincent, Robert J.; Huang, Yiming; Rezazadeh, Arash; Ildstad, Suzanne T.; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Bolli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)+Flt-3 ligand (FL) or G-CSF+stem cell factor (SCF) improves left ventricular (LV) function and halts LV remodeling at 35 days after myocardial infarction (MI). In the current study, we investigated whether these beneficial effects are sustained in the long term - an issue of fundamental importance for clinical translation. Mice undergoing a 30-min coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion received vehicle (group I), G-CSF+FL (group II), G-CSF+SCF (group III), or G-CSF alone (group IV) starting 4 h after reperfusion and were euthanized 48 weeks later. LV structure and function were assessed by serial echocardiography before and at 48 h and 4, 8, 16, 32, and 48 wk after MI. During follow-up, mice in group I exhibited worsening of LV function and progressive LV remodeling. Compared with group I, both groups II and III exhibited improved LV EF at 4 wk after MI; however, only in group II was this improvement sustained at 48 wk. Group II was also the only group in which the decrease in infarct wall thickening fraction, the LV dilatation, and the increase in LV mass were attenuated vs. group I. We conclude that the beneficial effect of G-CSF+FL on postinfarction LV dysfunction and remodeling is sustained for at least 11 months, and thus is likely to be permanent. In contrast, the effect of G-CSF+SCF was not sustained beyond the first few weeks, and G-CSF alone is ineffective. To our knowledge, this is the first long-term study of cytokines in postinfarction LV remodeling. The results reveal heretofore unknown differential actions of cytokines and have important translational implications. PMID:19616005

  3. [Autologous Fat Grafting in Scar Revision].

    PubMed

    Yu, Pan-xi; Cai, Jing-long

    2016-04-01

    Regenerative medicine is an emerging discipline. Adipose tissue is a rich source of fat cells and mesenchymal stem cells, and autologous fat grafting has increasingly been applied in plastic surgeries and dermatological treatments. This paper reviews the latest advances in autologous fat grafting in scar revision. PMID:27181904

  4. Will stem cells bring hope to pathological skin scar treatment?

    PubMed

    Li, Qiankun; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-08-01

    Pathological skin scars, such as keloids, aesthetically and psychosocially affect patients. The quest for scar reduction and the increasing recognition of patient satisfaction has led to the continued exploration of scar treatment. Stem cells are a promising source for tissue repair and regeneration. The multi-potency and secretory functions of these cells could offer possible treatments for pathological scars and have been examined in recent studies. Here, we analyze the factors that influence the formation of pathological skin scars, summarize recent research on pathological scar treatment with stem cells and elaborate on the possible mechanisms of this treatment. Additionally, other effects of stem cell treatments are also presented while evaluating potential side effects of stem cell-based pathological scar treatments. Thus, this review may provide meaningful guidance in the clinic for scar treatments with stem cells. PMID:27293205

  5. A nude mouse model of hypertrophic scar shows morphologic and histologic characteristics of human hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Momtazi, Moein; Kwan, Peter; Ding, Jie; Anderson, Colin C; Honardoust, Dariush; Goekjian, Serge; Tredget, Edward E

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HSc) is a fibroproliferative disorder that occurs following deep dermal injury. Lack of a relevant animal model is one barrier toward better understanding its pathophysiology. Our objective is to demonstrate that grafting split-thickness human skin onto nude mice results in survival of engrafted human skin and murine scars that are morphologically, histologically, and immunohistochemically consistent with human HSc. Twenty nude mice were xenografted with split-thickness human skin. Animals were euthanized at 30, 60, 120, and 180 days postoperatively. Eighteen controls were autografted with full-thickness nude mouse skin and euthanized at 30 and 60 days postoperatively. Scar biopsies were harvested at each time point. Blinded scar assessment was performed using a modified Manchester Scar Scale. Histologic analysis included hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, toluidine blue, and picrosirius red staining. Immunohistochemistry included anti-human human leukocyte antigen-ABC, α-smooth muscle actin, decorin, and biglycan staining. Xenografted mice developed red, shiny, elevated scars similar to human HSc and supported by blinded scar assessment. Autograft controls appeared morphologically and histologically similar to normal skin. Xenografts survived up to 180 days and showed increased thickness, loss of hair follicles, adnexal structures and rete pegs, hypercellularity, whorled collagen fibers parallel to the surface, myofibroblasts, decreased decorin and increased biglycan expression, and increased mast cell density. Grafting split-thickness human skin onto nude mice results in persistent scars that show morphologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical consistency with human HSc. Therefore, this model provides a promising technique to study HSc formation and to test novel treatment options. PMID:23126488

  6. The Use of Silicone Adhesives for Scar Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Bleasdale, Benjamin; Finnegan, Simon; Murray, Kathyryn; Kelly, Sean; Percival, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: This article discusses the history and developments of silicone gel sheeting (SGS) scar therapy. Furthermore, we review a breadth of literature to gain an insight into how and why topical silicone gels remain the favored treatment of medical experts in scar management. We also analyze an ever increasing number of alternative therapies claiming to provide enhanced scar reduction performance. Recent Advances: Topical silicone gel treatments seem to remain the first point of clinical recommendation in scar management. SGS has been used in scar therapy for over 30 years, during which its efficacy has been the subject of numerous clinical evaluations. Critical Issues: While the exact mechanisms by which SGS improves hypertrophic scars, keloid development and recovery are yet to be fully agreed upon, its ability to do so remains largely undisputed at present. However, there still is ongoing deliberation over the exact mechanism of action of silicone in improving a scar. At present it is likely that through occlusion of the scar site and hydration of the wound bed, the overactivity of scar-related cells is suppressed, and their activity normalized. Future Direction: The clinical support of topical silicone gel products, relative to all alternative scar therapies, is considered the internationally recommended first-line form of scar management, and favored by consensus among healthcare professionals. However, there still remains the need for further clinical evidence and a better understanding of the mechanism behind the benefit of silicone gel for use in the prevention of abnormal scarring. PMID:26155385

  7. Scar formation and revision after the removal of orthodontic miniscrews

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Dong-Won; Kim, Kyung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Many clinicians expect complete healing after the removal of temporary anchorage devices, but clinical examination may reveal scar-like tissue. This report presents the typical features of scarring detected after the removal of miniscrews, and the clinical outcome of scar revision along with its pathologic features. PMID:26023543

  8. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  9. Combination Therapy in the Management of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Baveja, Sukriti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atrophic acne scars are difficult to treat. The demand for less invasive but highly effective treatment for scars is growing. Objective: To assess the efficacy of combination therapy using subcision, microneedling and 15% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peel in the management of atrophic scars. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with atrophic acne scars were graded using Goodman and Baron Qualitative grading. After subcision, dermaroller and 15% TCA peel were performed alternatively at 2-weeks interval for a total of 6 sessions of each. Grading of acne scar photographs was done pretreatment and 1 month after last procedure. Patients own evaluation of improvement was assessed. Results: Out of 16 patients with Grade 4 scars, 10 (62.5%) patients improved to Grade 2 and 6 (37.5%) patients improved to Grade 3 scars. Out of 22 patients with Grade 3 scars, 5 (22.7%) patients were left with no scars, 2 (9.1%) patients improved to Grade 1and 15 (68.2%) patients improved to Grade 2. All 11 (100%) patients with Grade 2 scars were left with no scars. There was high level of patient satisfaction. Conclusion: This combination has shown good results in treating not only Grade 2 but also severe Grade 4 and 3 scars. PMID:24761094

  10. Biology and principles of scar management and burn reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tredget, Edward E; Levi, Benjamin; Donelan, Matthias B

    2014-08-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is extremely common and is the source of most morbidity related to burns. The biology of hypertrophic healing is complex and poorly understood. Multiple host and injury factors contribute, but protracted healing of partial thickness injury is a common theme. Hypertrophic scarring and heterotopic ossification may share some basic causes involving marrow-derived cells. Several traditional clinical interventions exist to modify hypertrophic scar. All have limited efficacy. Laser interventions for scar modification show promise, but as yet do not provide a definitive solution. Their efficacy is only seen when used as part of a multimodality scar management program. PMID:25085089

  11. Suppressed inflammatory gene expression during human hypertrophic scar compared to normotrophic scar formation.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Lenie J; van der Veer, Willem M; de Jong, Etty H; Gibbs, Susan; Niessen, Frank B

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrophic scar formation is a result of adverse cutaneous wound healing. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic scar formation is still poorly understood. A problem next to the lack of suitable animal models is that often normal skin is compared to hypertrophic scar (HTscar) and not to normotrophic scar (NTscar) tissue. Another drawback is that often only one time period after wounding is studied, while scar formation is a dynamic process over a period of several months. In this study, we compared the expression of genes involved in inflammation, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and also macrophage infiltration in biopsies obtained before and up to 52 weeks after standard surgery in five patients who developed HTscar and six patients who developed NTscar. It was found that HTscar formation coincided with a prolonged decreased expression of inflammatory genes (TNFα, IL-1α, IL-1RN, CCL2, CCL3, CXCL2, CXCR2, C3 and IL-10) and an extended increased expression of ECM-related genes (PLAU, Col3A1, TGFβ3). This coincided with a delayed but prolonged infiltration of macrophages (type 2) in HTscar tissue compared to NTscar tissue. These findings were supported by immunohistochemical localization of proteins coding for select genes named above. Our study emphasizes that human cutaneous wound healing is a dynamic process that is needed to be studied over a period of time rather than a single point of time. Taken together, our results suggest innate immune stimulatory therapies may be a better option for improving scar quality than the currently used anti-inflammatory scar therapies. PMID:25939875

  12. Current options for the treatment of pathological scarring.

    PubMed

    Poetschke, Julian; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2016-05-01

    Scarring is the consequence of surgery, trauma or different skin diseases. Apart from fresh, immature scars,that transform into mature scars over the course of would healing and that do not require further treatment,linear hypertrophic scars, widespread hypertrophic scars, keloids and atrophic scars exist. Symptoms like pruritusand pain, stigmatization as well as functional and aesthetic impairments that are very disturbing for the affected patients can bethe basis for the desire for treatment. Today, a multitude of options for the treatment and prevention of scars exists. Topical agents based on silicone or onion extract, intralesional injections of cristalline glucocorticoids (oftentimes in combinationwith cryotherapy) or 5-Fluorouracil as well as ablative and nonablative laser treatment are used. Current guidelines summarize the multitude of available treatment options and the currently available datafor the treating physicians, allowing them to make clear therapy recommendations for every single scar type. Relieving patients of their discomfort and doing their aesthetic demands justice is thus possible. Apart from scar prevention becoming more and more important, the increased use of modernlaser treatment options constitutes a key point in clinical scar treatment. At the same time the attention is turned to evaluating current therapeutic options with the help of contemporary study designs so as to graduallyimprove the level of evidence in scar treatment. PMID:27119465

  13. Granuloma annulare in herpes zoster scars.

    PubMed

    Ohata, C; Shirabe, H; Takagi, K; Kawatsu, T

    2000-03-01

    A 54-year-old Japanese female developed granuloma annulare twice in herpes zoster scars. Soon after the second event, she developed ulcerative colitis, which was well controlled by sulfonamides and corticosteroid suppository. She had no history of diabetes mellitus. There was no recurrence of granuloma annulare by June of 1999. Granuloma annulare might have contributed to the complications of ulcerative colitis, although this had not been noticed before. PMID:10774142

  14. Caesarean scar ectopic pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Hazel; Heggs, Karen; White, Donna

    2013-01-01

    This case study discusses a recent diagnosis of a rare form of ectopic pregnancy within a Caesarean section scar. Evidence indicates that the prevalence of this form of ectopic pregnancy is escalating due to the increasing number of Caesarean sections performed. As ultrasound plays a major role in diagnosing this rare life-threatening condition, we recommend key points for practitioners to consider for meticulous assessment and accurate diagnosis. PMID:27433207

  15. Scars of symmetries in quantum chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Delande, D.; Gay, J.C.

    1987-10-19

    The hydrogen atom in a magnetic field is a classically chaotic Hamiltonian system. The energy-level fluctuations have been shown recently to obey a random-matrix model. Here we go beyond the statistical analysis by studying the destruction of the low-field dynamical symmetries. We especially establish the existence of scars of symmetries in the chaotic regime. The symmetry properties are no longer associated with one given level, but fractalized onto clusters of levels, generating a long-range order.

  16. [Formation and treatment of pathologic scars--clinical and micromorphologic investigations (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kerl, H; Auböck, L; Bayer, U

    1981-03-01

    The results of treatment with Calmurid and Calmurid-HC in patients with hypertrophic scars and keloids of various causes are reported. Histochemical and ultrastructural investigations were performed in individual cases before and after treatment. The following results were found: 1. In the context of keloid prophylaxis and scar care, application of Calmurid and Calmurid-HC has proved very effective. The results of treating hypertrophic scars with urea preparations are also to be evaluated optimistically. 2. The local treatment with Calmurid or Calmurid-HC generally does not have a substantial influence on cosmetically disturbing keloids. However, the skin becomes smoother, more elastic and more resistant under Calmurid or Calmurid-HC therapy; a reduction in the size of the keloid mass is observed only in individual cases. 3. In short, the results are consistent with those which can be obtained with other external preparations which are specially recommended for treatment of scars and keloids. Success of treatment is especially dependent on the age of the lesion. 4. Disturbances in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen metabolism as well as enzyme defects are the most significant factors in the pathogenesis of pathological scars. The histochemical and electron microscopic studies reveal (of course with the necessary caution in the interpretation) that Calmurid and Calmurid-HC show an effect on distribution of GAG and on the enzyme pattern of the fibroblasts. The preparations may possibly affect the disturbed processes of collagen and GAG synthesis. The reduction of the mast cells in keloids and hypertrophic scars under Calmurid treatment is noteworthy. PMID:7234039

  17. Differential microRNA Expression and Regulation in the Rat Model of Post-Infarction Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueyan; Meng, Heyu; Jiang, Chao; Yang, Sibao; Cui, Fengwen; Yang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a complex end stage of various cardiovascular diseases with a poor prognosis, and the mechanisms for development and progression of heart failure have always been a hot point. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the post transcriptional regulation of heart failure have not been fully elucidated. Current data suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the pathogenesis of heart failure and could serve as a new biomarker, but the precise regulatory mechanisms are still unclear. Methods The differential miRNA profile in a rat model of post-infarction heart failure was determined using high throughout sequencing and analyzed through bioinformatics approaches. The results were validated using qRT-PCR for 8 selected miRNAs. Then the expression patterns of 4 miRNAs were analyzed in different periods after myocardial infarction. Finally, gain- and loss-of-function experiments of rno-miR-122-5p and rno-miR-184 were analyzed in H2O2 treated H9c2 cells. Results In the heart failure sample, 78 miRNAs were significantly upregulated and 28 were downregulated compared to the controls. GO and KEGG pathway analysis further indicated the likely roles of these miRNAs in heart failure. Time-course analysis revealed different expression patterns of 4 miRNAs: rno-miR-122-5p, rno-miR-199a-5p, rno-miR-184 and rno-miR-208a-3p. Additionally, rno-miR-122-5p and rno-miR-184 were proved to promote apoptosis in vitro. Conclusions Differential profile and expression patterns of miRNAs in the rats model of post-infarction heart failure were found, and the pro-apoptotic roles of rno-miR-122-5p and rno-miR-184 were revealed. These findings may provide a novel way that may assist in heart failure diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27504893

  18. Mathematical modeling of chemotaxis and glial scarring around implanted electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silchenko, Alexander N.; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that the implantation of electrodes for deep brain stimulation or microelectrode probes for the recording of neuronal activity is always accompanied by the response of the brain’s immune system leading to the formation of a glial scar around the implantation sites. The implantation of electrodes causes massive release of adenosine-5‧-triphosphate (ATP) and different cytokines into the extracellular space and activates the microglia. The released ATP and the products of its hydrolysis, such as ADP and adenosine, become the main elements mediating chemotactic sensitivity and motility of microglial cells via subsequent activation of P2Y2,12 as well as A3A/A2A adenosine receptors. The size and density of an insulating sheath around the electrode, formed by microglial cells, are important criteria for the optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio during microelectrode recordings or parameters of electrical current delivered to the brain tissue. Here, we study a purinergic signaling pathway underlying the chemotactic motion of microglia towards implanted electrodes as well as the possible impact of an anti-inflammatory coating consisting of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. We present a model describing the formation of a stable aggregate around the electrode due to the joint chemo-attractive action of ATP and ADP and the mixed influence of extracellular adenosine. The bioactive coating is modeled as a source of chemo-repellent located near the electrode surface. The obtained analytical and numerical results allowed us to reveal the dependences of size and spatial location of the insulating sheath on the amount of released ATP and estimate the impact of immune suppressive coating on the scarring process.

  19. Mast cells promote scar remodeling and functional recovery after spinal cord injury via mouse mast cell protease 6.

    PubMed

    Vangansewinkel, Tim; Geurts, Nathalie; Quanten, Kirsten; Nelissen, Sofie; Lemmens, Stefanie; Geboes, Lies; Dooley, Dearbhaile; Vidal, Pia M; Pejler, Gunnar; Hendrix, Sven

    2016-05-01

    An important barrier for axon regeneration and recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is attributed to the scar that is formed at the lesion site. Here, we investigated the effect of mouse mast cell protease (mMCP) 6, a mast cell (MC)-specific tryptase, on scarring and functional recovery after a spinal cord hemisection injury. Functional recovery was significantly impaired in both MC-deficient and mMCP6-knockout (mMCP6(-/-)) mice after SCI compared with wild-type control mice. This decrease in locomotor performance was associated with an increased lesion size and excessive scarring at the injury site. Axon growth-inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and the extracellular matrix components fibronectin, laminin, and collagen IV were significantly up-regulated in MC-deficient and mMCP6(-/-) mice, with an increase in scar volume between 23 and 32%. A degradation assay revealed that mMCP6 directly cleaves fibronectin and collagen IV in vitro In addition, gene expression levels of the scar components fibronectin, aggrecan, and collagen IV were increased up to 6.8-fold in mMCP6(-/-) mice in the subacute phase after injury. These data indicate that endogenous mMCP6 has scar-suppressing properties after SCI via indirect cleavage of axon growth-inhibitory scar components and alteration of the gene expression profile of these factors.-Vangansewinkel, T., Geurts, N., Quanten, K., Nelissen, S., Lemmens, S., Geboes, L., Dooley, D., Vidal, P. M., Pejler, G., Hendrix, S. Mast cells promote scar remodeling and functional recovery after spinal cord injury via mouse mast cell protease 6. PMID:26917739

  20. Omentum-derived stromal cells improve myocardial regeneration in pig post-infarcted heart through a potent paracrine mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    De Siena, Rocco; Balducci, Luigi; Blasi, Antonella; Montanaro, Manuela Gessica; Saldarelli, Marilisa; Saponaro, Vittorio; Martino, Carmela; Logrieco, Gaetano; Soleti, Antonio; Fiobellot, Simona; Madeddu, Paolo; Rossi, Giacomo; Ribatti, Domenico; Crovace, Antonio; Cristini, Silvia; Invernici, Gloria; Parati, Eugenio Agostino; Alessandri, Giulio

    2010-07-01

    Cell-based therapy could be a valid option to treat myocardial infarct (MI). Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADStCs) have demonstrated tissue regenerative potential including cardiomyogenesis. Omentum is an extremely rich source of visceral fat and its accumulation seems to correlate with cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the capacity of human fat Omentum-derived StCs (FOStCs) to affect heart function upon acute infarct in pigs induced by permanent ligation of the anterior interventricular artery (IVA). We demonstrated for the first time that the local injection of 50 x 10{sup 6} of FOStCs ameliorates the functional parameters of post-infarct heart. Most importantly, histology of FOStCs treated hearts demonstrated a substantial improvement of cardiomyogenesis. In culture, FOStCs produced an impressive number and amount of angiogenic factors and cytokines. Moreover, the conditioned medium of FOStCs (FOStCs-CM) stimulates in vitro cardiac endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation and vascular morphogenesis and inhibits monocytes, EC activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Since FOStCs in vivo did not trans-differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells, we conclude that FOStCs efficacy was presumably mediated by a potent paracrine mechanism involving molecules that concomitantly improved angiogenesis, reduced inflammation and prevented cardiomyocytes death. Our results highlight for the first time the important role that human FOStCs may have in cardiac regeneration.

  1. Human relaxin gene expression delivered by bioreducible dendrimer polymer for post-infarct cardiac remodeling in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sook; Choi, Joung-Woo; Oh, Jung-Eun; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Sung Wan

    2016-08-01

    In consensus, myocardial infarction (MI) is defined as irreversible cell death secondary to prolonged ischemia in heart. The aim of our study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of anti-fibrotic human Relaxin-expressing plasmid DNA with hypoxia response element (HRE) 12 copies (HR1) delivered by a dendrimer type PAM-ABP polymer G0 (HR1/G0) after MI on functional, hemodynamic, geometric, and cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling in rats. HR1/G0 demonstrated significantly improved LV systolic function, hemodynamic parameters, and geometry on 1 wk and 4 wks after MI in rats, compared with I/R group. The resolution of regional wall motional abnormalities and the increased blood flow of infarct-related coronary artery supported functional improvements of HR1/G0. Furthermore, HR1/G0 polyplex showed favorable post-infarct cardiac ECM remodeling reflected on the favorable cardiac ECM compositions. Overall, this is the first study, which presented an advanced platform for the gene therapy that reverses adverse cardiac remodeling after MI with a HR1 gene delivered by a bioreducible dendrimer polymer in the cardiac ECM. PMID:27174688

  2. Loss of CEACAM1, a Tumor-Associated Factor, Attenuates Post-infarction Cardiac Remodeling by Inhibiting Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Yanmei; Yan, Yi; Li, Xinzhong; Chen, Guojun; He, Nvqin; Shen, Shuxin; Chen, Gangbin; Zhang, Chuanxi; Liao, Wangjun; Liao, Yulin; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule1 (CEACAM1) is a tumor-associated factor that is known to be involved in apoptosis, but the role of CEACAM1 in cardiovascular disease is unclear. We aims to investigate whether CEACAM1 influences cardiac remodeling in mice with myocardial infarction (MI) and hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte injury. Both serum in patients and myocardial CEACAM1 levels in mice were significantly increased in response to MI, while levels were elevated in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs) exposed to hypoxia. Eight weeks after MI, a lower mortality rate, improved cardiac function, and less cardiac remodeling in CEACAM1 knock-out (KO) mice than in their wild-type (WT) littermates were observed. Moreover, myocardial expression of mitochondrial Bax, cytosolic cytochrome C, and cleaved caspase-3 was significantly lower in CEACAM1 KO mice than in WT mice. In cultured NRCs exposed to hypoxia, recombinant human CEACAM1 (rhCEACAM1) reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulated mitochondrial Bax, increased cytosolic cytochrome C and cleaved caspase-3, and consequently increased apoptosis. RhCEACAM1 also increased the levels of GRP78 and CHOP in NRCs with hypoxia. All of these effects were abolished by silencing CEACAM1. Our study indicates that CEACAM1 exacerbates hypoxic cardiomyocyte injury and post-infarction cardiac remodeling by enhancing cardiomyocyte mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:26911181

  3. Scar Management in the Pediatric and Adolescent Populations.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Totri, Christine R; Donelan, Matthias B; Shumaker, Peter R

    2016-02-01

    For most children and adolescents who have developed symptomatic scars, cosmetic concerns are only a portion of the motivation that drives them and their caregivers to obtain treatment. In addition to the potential for cosmetic disfigurement, scars may be associated with a number of physical comorbidities including hypertrichosis, dyshidrosis, tenderness/pain, pruritus, dysesthesias, and functional impairments such as contractures, all of which may be compounded by psychosocial factors. Although a plethora of options for treating scars exists, specific management guidelines for the pediatric and adolescent populations do not, and evidence must be extrapolated from adult studies. New modalities such as the scar team approach, autologous fat transfer, and ablative fractional laser resurfacing suggest a promising future for children who suffer symptomatically from their scars. In this state-of-the-art review, we summarize cutting-edge scar treatment strategies as they relate to the pediatric and adolescent populations. PMID:26743819

  4. Analysis of state of vehicular scars on Arctic Tundra, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathram, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    Identification on ERTS images of severe vehicular scars in the northern Alaska tundra suggests that, if such scars are of an intensity or have spread to a dimension such that they can be resolved by ERTS sensors (20 meters), they can be identified and their state monitored by the use of ERTS images. Field review of the state of vehicular scars in the Umiat area indicates that all are revegetating at varying rates and are approaching a stable state.

  5. [Scarring linear IgA dermatosis in the adult].

    PubMed

    Kurz, K; Mahrle, G

    1986-10-15

    A 54-year-old woman had a six-months history of a scarring blistering disease with clinical signs of dermatitis herpetiformis and bullous pemphigoid. Direct immunofluorescence examination showed homogeneously linear deposits of IgA along the dermo-epidermal junction. Electron microscopic studies revealed blistering above and beneath the lamina densa. Referring to this new case of a scarring linear IgA disease we discuss some other forms of scarring bullous diseases in adults. PMID:3541412

  6. Repair of acne scars with Dermicol-P35.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin C

    2009-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a prevalent skin condition that can cause disfiguring residual scarring. While the complete removal of acne scars is unlikely, several treatments exist that can improve the appearance of acne scars. Dermal fillers offer a simple, nonsurgical corrective procedure that can provide improved skin texture. Dermicol-P35 (Evolence [Ortho Dermatologics, Skillman, NJ]) is a new, highly purified, ribose cross-linked, porcine collagen-based dermal filler that has demonstrated low immunogenicity and results that persist for at least 12 months. This article presents the aesthetic results of a male patient treated with Dermicol-P35 for severe facial acne scars. PMID:19577176

  7. Interactive visualization for scar transmurality in cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiml, Sabrina; Toth, Daniel; Panayiotou, Maria; Fahn, Bernhard; Karim, Rashed; Behar, Jonathan M.; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S.; Brost, Alexander; Mountney, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Heart failure is a serious disease affecting about 23 million people worldwide. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is used to treat patients suffering from symptomatic heart failure. However, 30% to 50% of patients have limited clinical benefit. One of the main causes is suboptimal placement of the left ventricular lead. Pacing in areas of myocardial scar correlates with poor clinical outcomes. Therefore precise knowledge of the individual patient's scar characteristics is critical for delivering tailored treatments capable of improving response rates. Current research methods for scar assessment either map information to an alternative non-anatomical coordinate system or they use the image coordinate system but lose critical information about scar extent and scar distribution. This paper proposes two interactive methods for visualizing relevant scar information. A 2-D slice based approach with a scar mask overlaid on a 16 segment heart model and a 3-D layered mesh visualization which allows physicians to scroll through layers of scar from endocardium to epicardium. These complementary methods enable physicians to evaluate scar location and transmurality during planning and guidance. Six physicians evaluated the proposed system by identifying target regions for lead placement. With the proposed method more target regions could be identified.

  8. CNS Injury, Glial Scars, and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Michael T.; Silver, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Spinal cord and brain injuries lead to complex cellular and molecular interactions within the central nervous system in an attempt to repair the initial tissue damage. Many studies have illustrated the importance of the glial cell response to injury, and the influences of inflammation and wound healing processes on the overall morbidity and permanent disability that result. The abortive attempts of neuronal regeneration after spinal cord injury are influenced by inflammatory cell activation, reactive astrogliosis and the production of both growth promoting and inhibitory extracellular molecules. Despite the historical perspective that the glial scar was a mechanical barrier to regeneration, inhibitory molecules in the forming scar and methods to overcome them have suggested molecular modification strategies to allow neuronal growth and functional regeneration. Unlike myelin associated inhibitory molecules, which remain at largely static levels before and after central nervous system trauma, inhibitory extracellular matrix molecules are dramatically upregulated during the inflammatory stages after injury providing a window of opportunity for the delivery of candidate therapeutic interventions. While high dose methylprednisolone steroid therapy alone has not proved to be the solution to this difficult clinical problem, other strategies for modulating inflammation and changing the make up of inhibitory molecules in the extracellular matrix are providing robust evidence that rehabilitation after spinal cord and brain injury has the potential to significantly change the outcome for what was once thought to be permanent disability. PMID:17617407

  9. Ligands for opioid and sigma-receptors improve cardiac electrical stability in rat models of post-infarction cardiosclerosis and stress.

    PubMed

    Lishmanov YuB; Maslov, L N; Naryzhnaya, N V; Tam, S W

    1999-01-01

    The effects of the extremely selective mu-opioid receptor agonist, [D-Arg2,Lys4]-dermorphin-(1-4)-amide (DALDA), the mu-opioid receptor agonist morphine, the mu/delta agonist D-Ala2, Leu5, Arg6-enkephalin (dalargin), the kappa-opioid receptor agonist spiradoline, and the sigma1-receptor antagonist DuP 734 on ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) was investigated in an experimental post-infarction cardiosclerosis model and an immobilization stress-induced model in rats. Both models produced a significant decrease in VFT. The postinfarction cardiosclerosis-induced decrease in VFT was significantly reversed by intravenous administration of dalargin (0.1 mg/kg), DALDA (0.1 mg/kg), or morphine HCl (1.5 mg/kg). Pretreatment with naloxone (0.2 mg/kg) completely eliminated the increase in cardiac electrical stability produced by DALDA. Both spiradoline (8 mg/kg, i.p.) and DuP 734 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a significant increase in VFT in rats with post-infarction cardiosclerosis. This effect of spiradoline was blocked by nor-binaltorphimine. The immobilization stress-induced decrease in VFT was significantly reversed by administration of either DALDA, spiradoline or DuP 734. In conclusion, activation of either mu- or kappa1-opioid receptors or blockade of sigma1-receptors reversed the decrease in VFT in both cardiac compromised models. Since DALDA and dalargin essentially do not cross blood brain barriers, their effects on VFT may be mediated through peripheral mu-opioid receptors. PMID:10403501

  10. Influence of the autonomic nervous system on circadian patterns of myocardial ischaemia: comparison of stable angina with the early postinfarction period.

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, B.; Stevenson, R.; Vaishnav, S.; Wilkinson, P.; Ranjadayalan, K.; Timmis, A. D.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the circadian rhythm of myocardial ischaemia in patients with stable angina with that in patients in the early postinfarction period with particular emphasis on the role of the autonomic nervous system. PATIENTS--44 patients with stable angina and ischaemia on treadmill testing (group A) were compared with 131 patients in the early postinfarction period (group B). All had 48 hour ambulatory Holter monitoring. SETTING--Coronary care unit and cardiology department of a district general hospital. DESIGN--Prospective, between group, comparative study. RESULTS--337 ischaemic episodes occurred in 35 patients in group A and 370 ischaemic episodes occurred in 65 patients in group B. 34% of patients in group A had only silent episodes of ischaemia compared with 97% in group B (p < 0.0001). In group A ischaemic episodes showed a circadian rhythm that peaked during the daytime hours (p < 0.0001), but this was not seen in group B. Both the high (0.15-0.40 Hz) and low (0.04-0.15 Hz) frequency spectral components of heart rate variability showed a clear circadian rhythm (p < 0.0001); peak values occurred during the sleeping hours, although this pattern was less pronounced in group B. The ratio of low to high frequency variability (a measure of sympathovagal balance) showed a peak in daytime hours in group A (p < 0.002), but this was not seen in group B. CONCLUSION--In stable angina, myocardial ischaemia peaks during the day and is associated with a similar circadian rhythm of sympathovagal balance. In the early postinfarction period both the ischaemic and sympathovagal rhythms are severely diminished or lost altogether. Circadian changes in sympathovagal tone may explain, at least in part, the circadian rhythm of ambulatory myocardial ischaemia in patients with stable angina. PMID:8198882

  11. Postinfarction Functional Recovery Driven by a Three-Dimensional Engineered Fibrin Patch Composed of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Santiago; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Bagó, Juli R.; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Férnandez, Marco A.; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Perea-Gil, Isaac; Blanco, Jerónimo

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research has been dedicated to restoring myocardial cell slippage and limiting ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We examined the ability of a three-dimensional (3D) engineered fibrin patch filled with human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to induce recovery of cardiac function after MI. The UCBMSCs were modified to coexpress luciferase and fluorescent protein reporters, mixed with fibrin, and applied as an adhesive, viable construct (fibrin-cell patch) over the infarcted myocardium in mice (MI-UCBMSC group). The patch adhered well to the heart. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging demonstrated early proliferation and differentiation of UCBMSCs within the construct in the postinfarct mice in the MI-UCBMSC group. The implanted cells also participated in the formation of new, functional microvasculature that connected the fibrin-cell patch to both the subjacent myocardial tissue and the host circulatory system. As revealed by echocardiography, the left ventricular ejection fraction and fractional shortening at sacrifice were improved in MI-UCBMSC mice and were markedly reduced in mice treated with fibrin alone and untreated postinfarction controls. In conclusion, a 3D engineered fibrin patch composed of UCBMSCs attenuated infarct-derived cardiac dysfunction when transplanted locally over a myocardial wound. Significance Ischemic heart failure (HF) is the end stage of many cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction. The only definitive treatment for HF is cardiac transplant, which is hampered by limited number of heart donors and graft rejection. In recent times, cellular cardiomyoplasty has been expected to repair infarcted myocardium by implantation of different sources of stem or progenitor cells. However, low cell survival and myocardial implantation rates have motivated the emergence of novel approaches with the objective of generating graftable cell-based implants. Here, the potential

  12. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser in Treatment of Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Andrej; Pljakovska, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scars appear as a result of skin damage during the process of the skin healing. There are two types of acne scars, depending on whether there is a loss or accumulation of collagen: atrophic and hypertrophic. In 80-90% it comes to scars with loss of collagen compared to smaller number of hypertrophic scars and keloids. AIM: The aim of the study was to determine efficiency and safety of fractional carbon dioxide laser in the treatment of acne scars. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was carried out in Acibadem Sistina Clinical Hospital, Skopje at the Department of Dermatovenerology, with a total of 40 patients treated with fractional carbon dioxide laser (Lutronic eCO2). The study included patients with residual acne scars of a different type. RESULTS: Comedogenic and papular acne in our material were proportionately presented in 50% of cases, while the other half were the more severe clinical forms of acne - pustular inflammatory acne and nodulocystic acne that leave residual lesions in the form of second, third and fourth grade of scars. CONCLUSION: The experiences of our work confirm the world experiences that the best result with this method is achieved in dotted ice pick or V-shaped acne scars. PMID:27275326

  13. Topical modalities for treatment and prevention of postsurgical hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Foo, Chong Wee; Tristani-Firouzi, Payam

    2011-08-01

    There is no universally accepted treatment regimen and no evidence-based literature to guide management of hypertrophic scars. This article summarizes the existing literature regarding topical treatments such as silicone gel sheeting and ointment, onion extract, vitamin E, pressure garment therapy, massage therapy, and topical imiquimod 5% cream in the management of hypertrophic scars. PMID:21856542

  14. Regenerative healing, scar-free healing and scar formation across the species: current concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Sara; Volk, Susan W; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2014-09-01

    All species have evolved mechanisms of repair to restore tissue function following injury. Skin scarring is an inevitable and permanent endpoint for many postnatal organisms except for non-amniote vertebrates such as amphibians, which are capable of tissue regeneration. Furthermore, mammalian foetuses through mid-gestation are capable of rapid wound repair in the absence of scar formation. Notably, excessive cutaneous scar formation, such as hypertrophic and keloid scars, is a species limited clinical entity as it occurs only in humans, although wounds on the distal limbs of horses are also prone to heal with fibroproliferative pathology known as equine exuberant granulation tissue. Currently, there are no reliable treatment options to eradicate or prevent scarring in humans and vertebrates. The limited number of vertebrate models for either hypertrophic or keloid scarring has been an impediment to mechanistic studies of these diseases and the development of therapies. In this viewpoint essay, we highlight the current concepts of regenerative, scar-free and scar-forming healing compared across a number of species and speculate on areas for future research. Furthermore, in-depth investigative research into the mechanisms of scarless repair may allow for the development of improved animal models and novel targets for scar prevention. As the ability to heal in both a scarless manner and propensity for healing with excessive scar formation is highly species dependent, understanding similarities and differences in healing across species as it relates to the regenerative process may hold the key to improve scarring and guide translational wound-healing studies. PMID:24863070

  15. Sulforaphane effects on postinfarction cardiac remodeling in rats: modulation of redox-sensitive prosurvival and proapoptotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Rafael Oliveira; De Castro, Alexandre Luz; Bonetto, Jéssica Hellen Poletto; Ortiz, Vanessa Duarte; Müller, Dalvana Daneliza; Campos-Carraro, Cristina; Barbosa, Silvia; Neves, Laura Tartari; Xavier, Léder Leal; Schenkel, Paulo Cavalheiro; Singal, Pawan; Khaper, Neelam; da Rosa Araujo, Alex Sander; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated whether sulforaphane (SFN), a compound found in cruciferous vegetables, could attenuate the progression of post-myocardial infarction (MI) cardiac remodeling. Male Wistar rats (350 g) were allocated to four groups: SHAM (n=8), SHAM+SFN (n=7), MI (n=8) and MI+SFN (n=5). On the third day after surgery, cardiac function was assessed and SFN treatment (5 mg/kg/day) was started. At the end of 25 days of treatment, cardiac function was assessed and heart was collected to measure collagen content, oxidative stress and protein kinase. MI and MI+SFN groups presented cardiac dysfunction, without signs of congestion. Sulforaphane reduced fibrosis (2.1-fold) in infarcted rats, which was associated with a slight attenuation in the cardiac remodeling process. Both infarcted groups presented increases in the oxidative markers xanthine oxidase and 4-hydroxinonenal, as well as a parallel increase in the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Moreover, sulforaphane stimulated the cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) (38%). Oxidative markers correlated with ERK 1/2 activation. In the MI+SFN group, up-regulation of ERK 1/2 (34%) and Akt (35%), as well as down-regulation of p38 (52%), was observed. This change in the prosurvival kinase balance in the MI+SFN group was related to a down-regulation of apoptosis pathways (Bax/Bcl-2/caspase-3). Sulforaphane was unable to modulate autophagy. Taken together, sulforaphane increased HO-1, which may generate a redox environment in the cardiac tissue favorable to activation of prosurvival and deactivation of prodeath pathways. In conclusion, this natural compound contributes to attenuation of the fibrotic process, which may contribute to mitigation against the progression of cardiac remodeling postinfarction. PMID:27288935

  16. Old-scar mass and changing surgical perspective: Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Aktimur, Recep; Aktimur, Sude Hatun; Çolak, Elif; Alıcı, Ömer; Demirağ, Mehmet Derya

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic inflammatory disease of an unknown etiology. Skin is involved in 25% of all cases, and 29% of them present as a scar sarcoidosis. Asymptomatic old-scar masses are generally regarded as a foreign body reaction by surgeons and often result in excisional biopsy. We describe a case of a patient who developed sarcoidosis in a 34-year-old appendectomy scar and adjacent inguinal lymph nodes without any local or systemic symptom and radiologic finding. Surgeons should not underestimate the importance of such lesions as a simple condition. Scar sarcoidosis may resolve spontaneously, or the treatment with some topical agents is effective. Furthermore, scar sarcoidosis may be the initial manifestation of systemic sarcoidosis. PMID:25931946

  17. Burn Scar Near the Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) image pair shows 'before and after' views of the area around the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Washington. On June 27, 2000, a fire in the dry sagebrush was sparked by an automobile crash. The flames were fanned by hot summer winds. By the day after the accident, about 100,000 acres had burned, and the fire's spread forced the closure of highways and loss of homes. These images were obtained by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Compare the area just above and to the right of the line of cumulus clouds in the May 15 image with the same area imaged on August 3. The darkened burn scar measures approximately 35 kilometers across. The Columbia River is seen wending its way around Hanford. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/JPL, MISR Science Team

  18. The molecular basis of hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhensen; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are caused by dermal injuries such as trauma and burns to the deep dermis, which are red, raised, itchy and painful. They can cause cosmetic disfigurement or contractures if craniofacial areas or mobile region of the skin are affected. Abnormal wound healing with more extracellular matrix deposition than degradation will result in HTS formation. This review will introduce the physiology of wound healing, dermal HTS formation, treatment and difference with keloids in the skin, and it also review the current advance of molecular basis of HTS including the involvement of cytokines, growth factors, and macrophages via chemokine pathway, to bring insights for future prevention and treatment of HTS. PMID:27574672

  19. Morphological and immunochemical differences between keloid and hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, H. P.; Desmoulière, A.; Diegelmann, R. F.; Cohen, I. K.; Compton, C. C.; Garner, W. L.; Kapanci, Y.; Gabbiani, G.

    1994-01-01

    There are two types of excessive scarring, keloid and hypertrophic scar. Contrary to hypertrophic scars, keloids do not regress with time, are difficult to revise surgically, and do not provoke scar contractures. These two lesions require different therapeutic approaches but are often confused because of an apparent lack of morphological differences. We have investigated the collagen organization and the possible presence of alpha-smooth muscle (SM) actin-expressing myofibroblasts in these conditions. Keloids contain large, thick collagen fibers composed of numerous fibrils closely packed together. In contrast hypertrophic scars exhibit modular structures in which fibroblastic cells, small vessels, and fine, randomly organized collagen fibers are present. We confirm that such nodular structures are always present in hypertrophic scar and rarely in keloid. Furthermore, only nodules of hypertrophic scars contain alpha-SM actin-expressing myofibroblasts. Electron microscopic examination supports the above-mentioned differences in collagen organization and in fibroblastic features and shows the presence of an amorphous extracellular material surrounding fibroblastic cells in keloid. The presence in hypertrophic scar myofibroblasts of alpha-SM actin, the actin isoform typical of vascular SM cells, may represent an important element in the pathogenesis of contraction. Interestingly, when placed in culture fibroblasts from hypertrophic scars and keloid express similar amounts of alpha-SM actin, suggesting that local microenvironmental factors influence in vivo the expression of this protein. Thus several morphological and immunohistochemical differences exist between hypertrophic scar and keloid that are useful for the biological and pathological characterization of the two lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8030742

  20. Hypertrophic scar model in the rabbit ear: a reproducible model for studying scar tissue behavior with new observations on silicone gel sheeting for scar reduction.

    PubMed

    Kloeters, Oliver; Tandara, Andrea; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Hypertrophic scarring poses a clinically relevant problem as it can be cosmetically disfiguring and functionally debilitating. A lack of animal models has hindered an understanding of the pathogenesis and development of new treatment strategies therefore has largely been empiric. Our group has developed a unique hypertrophic scar (HS) model in the rabbit ear. The model has been reproducible, quantifiable, and measurable over a time period of 1 month. We describe the development as well as the reliability and responsiveness of this model to different therapeutic agents, such as TGF-beta blockade, silicone occlusion, and application of collagen-synthesis inhibitors. Moreover, it has given insights into the mechanism of action of silicone sheeting occlusive treatment and ultimately suggests that the epidermis plays a critical role in the development of HS. Additionally, we will present new data supporting the importance of the epidermis and further clarify the mechanism of action of silicone sheeting. When a semi-occlusive polyurethane film was left in place for an additional time period, scar formation was reduced. HSs of this model covered with silicone sheets and five layers of Tegaderm showed a significant scar reduction by 80% compared with wounds with only one layer of Tegaderm. The HS model in the rabbit ear is a highly reliable, responsive, and practical model for studying scar tissue behavior. Furthermore, our data suggest that the degree and the duration of occlusion are most important for reducing scar tissue formation. PMID:17727466

  1. Use of Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale for evaluation of facial scars treated with self-drying silicone gel.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Francesca A; Roccia, Fabio; Fiorini, Paola; Berrone, Sid

    2010-05-01

    In this prospective study, we used the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) to evaluate the outcome of the healing process of posttraumatic and surgical facial scars that were treated with self-drying silicone gel, by both the patient and the observer. In our division, the application of base cream and massage represents the standard management of facial scars after suture removal. In the current study, 15 patients (7 men and 8 women) with facial scars were treated with self-drying silicone gel that was applied without massage, and 15 patients (8 men and 7 women) were treated with base cream and massage. Both groups underwent a clinical evaluation of facial scars by POSAS at the time of suture removal (T0) and after 2 months of treatment (T1). The patient rated scar pain, itch, color, stiffness, thickness, and surface (Patient Scale), and the observer rated scar vascularity, pigmentation, thickness, relief, pliability, and surface area (Observer Scale [OS]). The Patient Scale reported the greatest improvement in the items color, stiffness, and thickness. Itch was the only item that worsened in the group self-drying silicone gel. The OS primarily reported an improvement in the items vascularization, pigmentation, and pliability. The only item in the OS that underwent no change from T0 to T1 was surface area. The POSAS revealed satisfactory healing of posttraumatic and surgical facial scars that were treated with self-drying silicone gel. PMID:20485035

  2. T2-weighted MRI of post-infarct myocardial edema in mice

    PubMed Central

    Beyers, Ronald J.; Smith, R. Scott; Xu, Yaqin; Piras, Bryan A.; Salerno, Michael; Berr, Stuart S.; Meyer, Craig H.; Kramer, Christopher M.; French, Brent A.; Epstein, Frederick H.

    2011-01-01

    T2-weighted, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (T2w CMR) can be used to noninvasively detect and quantify the edematous region that corresponds to the area at risk (AAR) following myocardial infarction (MI). Previously, CMR has been used to examine structure and function in mice, expediting the study of genetic manipulations. To date, CMR has not been applied to imaging of post-MI AAR in mice. We developed a whole-heart, T2w CMR sequence to quantify the AAR in mouse models of ischemia and infarction. The ΔB0 and ΔB1 environment around the mouse heart at 7 T were measured, and a T2-preparation sequence suitable for these conditions was developed. Both in vivo T2w and late gadolinium enhanced CMR were performed in mice after 20-minute coronary occlusions, resulting in measurements of AAR size of 32.5 ± 3.1 (mean ± SEM) % LV mass, and MI size of 50.1 ± 6.4% AAR size. Excellent interobserver agreement and agreement with histology were also found. This T2w imaging method for mice may allow for future investigations of genetic manipulations and novel therapies affecting the AAR and salvaged myocardium following reperfused MI. PMID:21630350

  3. Development of novel SCAR markers for genetic characterization of Lonicera japonica from high GC-RAMP-PCR and DNA cloning.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J L; Li, J; Qiu, Y M; Wei, C L; Yang, L Q; Fu, J J

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers were further developed from high-GC primer RAMP-PCR-amplified fragments from Lonicera japonica DNA by molecular cloning. The four DNA fragments from three high-GC primers (FY-27, FY-28, and FY-29) were successfully cloned into a pGM-T vector. The positive clones were sequenced; their names, sizes, and GenBank numbers were JYHGC1-1, 345 bp, KJ620024; YJHGC2-1, 388 bp, KJ620025; JYHGC7-2, 1036 bp, KJ620026; and JYHGC6-2, 715 bp, KJ620027, respectively. Four novel SCAR markers were developed by designing specific primers, optimizing conditions, and PCR validation. The developed SCAR markers were used for the genetic authentication of L. japonica from its substitutes. This technique provides another means of developing DNA markers for the characterization and authentication of various organisms including medicinal plants and their substitutes. PMID:27173286

  4. [Interactions of peripheral mu-opioid receptors and K(ATP)-channels in regulation of cardiac electrical stability in ischemia, reperfusion, and postinfarction cardiosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Krylatov, A V; Naryzhaia, N V; Solenkova, N V; Lishmanov, A Iu; Bogomaz, S A; Gross, G J; Stefano, J B; Loktiushina, B A

    2002-07-01

    It has been shown that mu-opioid receptor stimulation by intravenous administration of the selective mu receptor agonist DALDA in a dose of 0.1 mg/kg prevented ischemic and reperfusion arrhythmias in rats subjected to coronary artery occlusion (10 min) and reperfusion (10 min), and also increased the ventricular fibrillation threshold in rats with postinfarction cardiac fibrosis. These effects were abolished by pre-treatment with the selective mu receptor antagonist CTAP in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg or by prior injection of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone methiodide (2 mg/kg) which does not penetrate the blood-braib barrier. Both antagonists by themselves had no effect on the incidence of occlusion or reperfusion-induced arrhythmias or on the ventricular fibrillation threshold. Pre-treatment with ATP-sensitive K+ channel (KATP channel) blocker glibenclamide in a dose of 0.3 mg/kg completely abolished the antiarrhythmic effect of DALDA. We believe that DALDA prevents occurrence of electrical instability during ischemia and reperfusion and increases the ventricular fibrillation threshold in rats with postinfarction cardiac fibrosis via stimulation of peripheral mu-opioid receptor which appear to be coupled to the KATP channel. PMID:12238351

  5. Elevated HDL is a risk factor for recurrent coronary events in a subgroup of non-diabetic postinfarction patients with hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, James P; Zareba, Wojciech; Moss, Arthur J; Rainwater, David L; Sparks, Charles E

    2006-07-01

    Recent studies demonstrate important roles for inflammation in development of atherosclerosis with current attention focusing on interactions of inflammation with traditional lipoprotein risk factors. Since the nature of such relationships is largely unknown, we sought to investigate interactions of inflammation with hyperlipidemia in generating cardiovascular risk in a way that would allow recognition of such interactions whether anticipated or not. Thus, we searched for subgroups at high risk for recurrent coronary events in 767 non-diabetic postinfarction patients using an exploratory three-dimensional graphical screening technique with previously established factor analysis-derived inflammatory and lipoprotein-related factors. Results indicated a high-risk patient subgroup defined by factor interaction that was best characterized clinically by high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and total cholesterol. Kaplan-Meier and Cox multivariate analysis confirmed high-risk. Additionally, within-subgroup risk related to metabolic, inflammatory, and thrombogenic blood markers was assessed using Cox analysis with results showing only elevated HDL as a significant and independent predictor of risk with hazard ratio, 2.24 (95% CI; 1.12, 4.49; p = 0.023). We conclude that in non-diabetic postinfarction patients, elevated HDL is predictive of risk of recurrent coronary events within a subgroup of patients characterized by simultaneous elevations in serum CRP and total cholesterol. PMID:16242700

  6. The Structural Basis of Functional Improvement in Response to Human Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Hearts with Post-Infarct LV Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Ye, Lei; Zhong, Jia; Li, Xin; Yan, Chen; Chandler, Margaret P.; Calvin, Steve; Xiao, Feng; Negia, Mesfin; Low, Walter C.; Zhang, Jianyi; Yu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Cellular therapy for myocardial repair has been one of the most intensely investigated interventional strategies for acute myocardium infarction. Although the therapeutic potential of stem cells has been demonstrated in various studies, the underlying mechanisms for such improvement are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the long-term effects of stem cell therapy on both myocardial fiber organization and regional contractile function using a rat model of post-infarct remodeling. Human non-hematopoietic umbilical cord blood stem cells (nh-UCBSCs) were administered via tail vein to rats 2 days after infarct surgery. Animals were maintained without immunosuppressive therapy. In vivo and ex vivo MR imaging was performed on infarct hearts ten months after cell transplantation. Compared to the age-matched rats exposed to the identical surgery, both global and regional cardiac function of the nh-UCBSC-treated hearts, such as ejection fraction, ventricular strain and torsion, were significantly improved. More importantly, the treated hearts exhibited preserved fiber orientation and water diffusivities that were similar to those in sham-operated control hearts. These data provide the first evidence that nh-UCBSC treatment may prevent/delay untoward structural remodeling in post-infarct hearts, which supports the improved LV function observed in vivo in the absence of immunosuppression, suggesting a beneficial paracrine effect that occurred with the cellular therapy. PMID:24332083

  7. Wave-Function Scarring Effects in Open Stadium Shaped Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akis, Richard; Ferry, David

    1997-03-01

    We have found that the low field magneto-conductance of open, stadium shaped quantum dots is periodic, indicating that only a few, regular orbits dominate the transport, despite the fact that this structure is classically chaotic. Our results, which agree with experiment, are obtained by a fully quantum mechanical treatment. Evidence for the regular orbits is seen in heavily scarred wave-functions. Some scars recur periodically, in correspondence to peaks in the power spectrum. Crucial in exciting particular orbits, are the quantized modes in the leads, which cause the electrons to enter the dot in collimated and angled beams. These orbits can be quite long in comparison to the device size. Additional information, including downloadable copies of related papers, can be obtained from our web site: http://www.eas.asu.edu/ ~ nano/nano.html .

  8. Astrocyte scar formation aids central nervous system axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark A; Burda, Joshua E; Ren, Yilong; Ao, Yan; O'Shea, Timothy M; Kawaguchi, Riki; Coppola, Giovanni; Khakh, Baljit S; Deming, Timothy J; Sofroniew, Michael V

    2016-04-14

    Transected axons fail to regrow in the mature central nervous system. Astrocytic scars are widely regarded as causal in this failure. Here, using three genetically targeted loss-of-function manipulations in adult mice, we show that preventing astrocyte scar formation, attenuating scar-forming astrocytes, or ablating chronic astrocytic scars all failed to result in spontaneous regrowth of transected corticospinal, sensory or serotonergic axons through severe spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions. By contrast, sustained local delivery via hydrogel depots of required axon-specific growth factors not present in SCI lesions, plus growth-activating priming injuries, stimulated robust, laminin-dependent sensory axon regrowth past scar-forming astrocytes and inhibitory molecules in SCI lesions. Preventing astrocytic scar formation significantly reduced this stimulated axon regrowth. RNA sequencing revealed that astrocytes and non-astrocyte cells in SCI lesions express multiple axon-growth-supporting molecules. Our findings show that contrary to the prevailing dogma, astrocyte scar formation aids rather than prevents central nervous system axon regeneration. PMID:27027288

  9. Current concepts related to hypertrophic scarring in burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ryan S; Borovikova, Anna A; King, Kassandra; Banyard, Derek A; Lalezari, Shadi; Toranto, Jason D; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z; Wirth, Garrett A; Evans, Gregory R D; Widgerow, Alan D

    2016-05-01

    Scarring following burn injury and its accompanying aesthetic and functional sequelae still pose major challenges. Hypertrophic scarring (HTS) can greatly impact patients' quality of life related to appearance, pain, pruritus and even loss of function of the injured body region. The identification of molecular events occurring in the evolution of the burn scar has increased our knowledge; however, this information has not yet translated into effective treatment modalities. Although many of the pathophysiologic pathways that bring about exaggerated scarring have been identified, certain nuances in burn scar formation are starting to be recognized. These include the effects of neurogenic inflammation, mechanotransduction, and the unique interactions of burn wound fluid with fat tissue in the deeper dermal layers, all of which may influence scarring outcome. Tension on the healing scar, pruritus, and pain all induce signaling pathways that ultimately result in increased collagen formation and myofibroblast phenotypic changes. Exposure of the fat domes in the deep dermis is associated with increased HTS, possibly on the basis of altered interaction of adipose-derived stem cells and the deep burn exudate. These pathophysiologic patterns related to stem cell-cytokine interactions, mechanotransduction, and neurogenic inflammation can provide new avenues of exploration for possible therapeutic interventions. PMID:27027596

  10. Development of new renal scars: a collaborative study.

    PubMed Central

    Smellie, J M; Ransley, P G; Normand, I C; Prescod, N; Edwards, D

    1985-01-01

    In a study of the factors surrounding the development of renal scars clinical data and serial radiographs were analysed in 74 infants and children (66 girls and eight boys) without duplex kidney or obstruction. The development of new scars was seen radiologically in 87 kidneys (74 previously normal and 13 previously scarred). New scarring was extensive in 16 kidneys. Thirty four children were aged 5 or over when scarring occurred. Urinary infection occurred in all the children. Diagnosis and effective treatment were delayed in 45 of them; 58 suffered further urinary infections between the baseline intravenous urogram and the first showing new scarring. Vesicoureteric reflux was seen in 67 of the children. Investigation and treatment varied widely, and few children received long term prophylaxis. Social problems interfered with the management of 22 children. Early diagnosis, prompt effective treatment, investigation, and long term supervision of children with urinary infection are essential if renal scarring is to be reduced; those over the age of 5 are still vulnerable. PMID:3924325

  11. Modeling fibrosis using fibroblasts isolated from scarred rat vocal folds.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yo; Kishimoto, Ayami Ohno; Ye, Shuyun; Kendziorski, Christina; Welham, Nathan V

    2016-07-01

    Following injury, pathologically activated vocal fold fibroblasts (VFFs) can engage in disordered extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, leading to VF fibrosis and impaired voice function. Given the importance of scar VFFs to phenotypically appropriate in vitro modeling of VF fibrosis, we pursued detailed characterization of scar VFFs obtained from surgically injured rat VF mucosae, compared with those obtained from experimentally naïve, age-matched tissue. Scar VFFs initially exhibited a myofibroblast phenotype characterized by increased proliferation, increased Col1a1 transcription and collagen, type I synthesis, increased Acta2 transcription and α-smooth muscle actin synthesis, and enhanced contractile function. These features were most distinct at passage 1 (P1); we observed a coalescence of the scar and naïve VFF phenotypes at later passages. An empirical Bayes statistical analysis of the P1 cell transcriptome identified 421 genes that were differentially expressed by scar, compared with naïve, VFFs. These genes were primarily associated with the wound response, ECM regulation, and cell proliferation. Follow-up comparison of P1 scar VFFs and their in vivo tissue source showed substantial transcriptomic differences. Finally, P1 scar VFFs responded to treatment with hepatocyte growth factor and transforming growth factor-β3, two biologics with reported therapeutic value. Despite the practical limitations inherent to working with early passage cells, this experimental model is easily implemented in any suitably equipped laboratory and has the potential to improve the applicability of preclinical VF fibrosis research. PMID:27111284

  12. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Wang, Su-Juan; Chen, Jian-Yu; Xin, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a complication of wound healing and has a high recurrence rate which can lead to significant abnormity in aesthetics and functions. To date, no ideal treatment method has been established. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism of hypertrophic scarring has not been clearly defined. Although a large amount of scientific research has been reported on the use of medicinal plants as a natural source of treatment for hypertrophic scarring, it is currently scattered across a wide range of publications. Therefore, a systematic summary and knowledge for future prospects are necessary to facilitate further medicinal plant research for their potential use as antihypertrophic scar agents. A bibliographic investigation was accomplished by focusing on medicinal plants which have been scientifically tested in vitro and/or in vivo and proved as potential agents for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Although the chemical components and mechanisms of action of medicinal plants with antihypertrophic scarring potential have been investigated, many others remain unknown. More investigations and clinical trials are necessary to make use of these medical plants reasonably and phytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach against hypertrophic scars. PMID:25861351

  13. Activated keratinocytes in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed Central

    Machesney, M.; Tidman, N.; Waseem, A.; Kirby, L.; Leigh, I.

    1998-01-01

    The etiology of hypertrophic scarring, a pathological end point of wound healing, is unknown. The scars most commonly occur when epithelialization has been delayed during, for example, the healing of deep dermal burn wounds. Hypertrophic scars are conventionally described as a dermal pathology in which the epidermis has only a passive role. In this study, the expression of keratin intermediate filament proteins and filaggrin has been investigated in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars and site-matched controls from the same patients. Hypertrophic scar epidermis was found to express the hyperproliferative keratins K6 and K16 in interfollicular epidermis in association with K17 and precocious expression of filaggrin. K16 mRNA was localized by in situ hybridization using a highly specific cRNA probe. In contrast to the immunohistochemical location of K16 protein, the K16 mRNA was found to be expressed in the basal cell layer of normal skin. In hypertrophic scars the mRNA distribution corroborated the abnormal K16 protein distribution. These results suggest the keratinocytes in hypertrophic scar epidermis have entered an alternative differentiation pathway and are expressing an activated phenotype. Activated keratinocytes are a feature of the early stages of wound healing producing growth factors that influence fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and the inflammatory response. We propose that cellular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic scarring are more complex than isolated dermal phenomena. The persistence of activated keratinocytes in hypertrophic scar epidermis implicates abnormal epidermal-mesenchymal interactions. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:9588880

  14. Microneedling Therapy in Atrophic Facial Scars: An Objective Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran

    2009-01-01

    Background: Atrophic facial scars are always a challenge to treat, especially the ones that are deep-seated and/or involve much of the face. Microneedling or dermaroller therapy is a new addition to the treatment armamentarium for such scars that offers a simple and reportedly effective management of these scars. Aims: The aim of the present study was to perform an objective evaluation of the efficacy of dermaroller treatment in atrophic facial scars of varying etiology. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven patients of atrophic facial scarring were offered multiple sittings of microneedling (dermaroller) treatment and their scars were evaluated and graded clinically and by serial photography at the start as well as at two months after the conclusion of the treatment protocol. Any change in the grading of scars after the end of treatment and follow-up period was noted down. The patients were also asked to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment received on a 1-10 point scale. The efficacy of dermaroller treatment was thus assessed both subjectively by the patients as well as objectively by a single observer. Results: Overall 36 out of the total of 37 patients completed the treatment schedule and were evaluated for its efficacy. Out of these 36 patients, 34 achieved a reduction in the severity of their scarring by one or two grades. More than 80% of patients assessed their treatment as ‘excellent’ on a 10-point scale. No significant adverse effects were noted in any patient. Conclusions: Microneedling therapy seems to be a simple and effective treatment option for the management of atrophic facial scars. PMID:20300368

  15. External rhinoplasty for the Arabian nose: a columellar scar analysis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate columellar scar problems after external rhinoplasty in the Arabian population, and to analyze the technical factors that help prevent such problems and maximize the scar cosmesis. The investigation was conducted in university and private practice settings of the author in Alexandria, Egypt. A total of 600 Arab patients who underwent external rhinoplasty were included in the study. All the patients underwent surgery using the external rhinoplasty approach, in which bilateral alar marginal incisions were connected by an inverted V-shaped transcolumellar incision. At completion of the procedure, a two-layer closure of the columellar incision was performed. At a minimum of 1 year postoperatively, the columellar scar was evaluated subjectively by means of a patient questionnaire, and objectively by clinical examination and comparison of the close-up pre- and postoperative basal view photographs. Objectively, anything less than a barely visible, leveled, thin, linear scar was considered unsatisfactory. Subjectively, 95.5% of the patients rated the scar as unnoticeable, 3% as noticeable but acceptable, and 1.5% as unacceptable. Objectively, the scar was unsatisfactory in 7% of the cases. This was because of scar widening with or without depression (5%), hyperpigmentation (1.5%), and columellar rim notching (0.5%). The use of a deep 6/0 polydioxanon (PDS) suture significantly decreased the incidence of scar widening (p < 0.005).The columellar incision can be used safely in the Arab population regardless of their thick, dark, and oily skin. Technical factors that contributed to the favorable outcome of the columellar scar included proper planning of location and design of the incision used, precise execution, meticulous multilayered closure, and good postoperative care. PMID:15666046

  16. [Differential approach to the use of drug ultraphonophoresis for scars].

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, M Iu; Zenger, V G; Iusova, Zh Iu

    2002-01-01

    A differential approach to administration of drug ultraphonophoresis (gel contractubex, collitin, elastolitin) in scarry deformations is proposed. The analysis of 82 treatment outcomes has shown that early after trauma (on day 6-12) it is more beneficial to use ultraphonophoresis (UPP) of heparin-containing compounds improving blood rheology, e.g. lidase. This prevents development of pathological scars. Later, when the scar tissues has already formed, more effective is UPP of enzyme medicines with fibrinolytic properties (collitin, elastolitin). Differentiated choice of UPP in scar therapy reduces the time of rehabilitation considerably. PMID:12132225

  17. Detecting Moorland Wildfire Scars and their Persistence in the Landscape using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in the Peak District National Park, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millin-chalabi, G. R.; McMorrow, J.; Agnew, C.

    2012-12-01

    The overall aim of this research is to assess the ability of SAR to detect moorland wildfire scars and their persistence in the landscape using the Peak District National Park (PDNP) in the UK as a case study. Spatially-robust data to monitor wildfire scar size and severity in UK moorlands is currently rare. Fires can burn deep into peat soils and contribute to the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and may also affect the water quality of nearby streams. Information on fire extent would be useful for conservation organisations such as Moors For The Future who are trying to preserve the delicate peatland environment. Knowing the size and location of fire scars would help the Fire and Rescue Service to plan future response to moorland fires. Fire scar boundaries can be mapped in the field using Global Positioning Systems (GPS), however this is labour intensive. Indeed in the PDNP wildfire scar mapping is conducted by park rangers which provides essential ground truth data for assessing against the SAR data. Therefore this particular area provides a unique opportunity for testing an alternative SAR technique for monitoring wildfire scars in the moorland landscape. Previous research shows that SAR has been successfully applied for wildfire scar detection in other types of environments such as boreal (Bourgeau-Chavez et al, 1997) and the tropics (Huang and Siegert, 2004). This research presents some of the first results of the project which tests the capability of ERS 2; ASAR (C-band) and PALSAR (L-band) data to detect several wildfire scars from 2003 - 2008 of various spatial scales and fire severity. Some of the key areas of interest the paper will explore are at Bleaklow and the Kinder plateau. The Bleaklow peat fire of 18th April 2003 was larger (7km2) and more severe than at Kinder, which burned between 26-29th May 2008 and covered an area of 10 ha. All the wildfire scars were GPS, mapped just after the fire event. Archival time-series SAR imagery was

  18. Analysis of hypertrophic and normal scar gene expression with cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tsou, R; Cole, J K; Nathens, A B; Isik, F F; Heimbach, D M; Engrav, L H; Gibran, N S

    2000-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one form of abnormal wound healing. Previous studies have suggested that hypertrophic scar formation results from altered gene expression of extracellular matrix molecules. A broadscale evaluation of gene expression in hypertrophic scars has not been reported. To better understand abnormalities in hypertrophic scar gene expression, we compared messenger RNA expression in hypertrophic scars, normal scars, and uninjured skin with the use of complementary (c)DNA microarrays. Total RNA was extracted from freshly excised human hypertrophic scars, normal scars, or uninjured skin and reverse transcribed into cDNA with the incorporation of [33P] deoxycytidine triphosphate. The resulting radioactive cDNA probes were hybridized onto cDNA microarrays of 4000 genes. Hybridization signals were normalized and analyzed. In the comparison of tissue samples, mean intensities were calculated for each gene within each group (hypertrophic scars, normal scars, and uninjured skin). Ratios of the mean intensities of hypertrophic scars to normal scars, hypertrophic scars to uninjured skin, and normal scars to uninjured skin were generated. A ratio that was greater than 1 indicated upregulation of any particular gene and a ratio that was less than 1 indicated downregulation of any particular gene. Our data indicated that 142 genes were overexpressed and 50 genes were underexpressed in normal scars compared with uninjured skin, 107 genes were overexpressed and 71 were underexpressed in hypertrophic scars compared with uninjured skin, and 44 genes were overexpressed and 124 were underexpressed in hypertrophic scars compared with normal scars. Our analysis of collagen, growth factor, and metalloproteinase gene expression confirmed that our molecular data were consistent with published biochemical and clinical observations of normal scars and hypertrophic scars. cDNA microarray analysis provides a powerful tool for the investigation of differential gene expression in

  19. Model of unidirectional block formation leading to reentrant ventricular tachycardia in the infarct border zone of postinfarction canine hearts

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Edward J.; Coromilas, James; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Cervantes, Daniel O.; Wit, Andrew L.; Peters, Nicholas S.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Garan, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background When the infarct border zone is stimulated prematurely, a unidirectional block line (UBL) can form and lead to double-loop (figure-of-eight) reentrant ventricular tachycardia (VT) with a central isthmus. The isthmus is composed of an entrance, center, and exit. It was hypothesized that for certain stimulus site locations and coupling intervals, the UBL would coincide with the isthmus entrance boundary, where infarct border zone thickness changes from thin-to-thick in the travel direction of the premature stimulus wavefront. Method A quantitative model was developed to describe how thin-to-thick changes in the border zone result in critically convex wavefront curvature leading to conduction block, which is dependent upon coupling interval. The model was tested in 12 retrospectively analyzed postinfarction canine experiments. Electrical activation was mapped for premature stimulation and for the first reentrant VT cycle. The relationship of functional conduction block forming during premature stimulation to functional block during reentrant VT was quantified. Results For an appropriately placed stimulus, in accord with model predictions: (1) The UBL and reentrant VT isthmus lateral boundaries overlapped (error: 4.8±5.7 mm). (2) The UBL leading edge coincided with the distal isthmus where the center-entrance boundary would be expected to occur. (3) The mean coupling interval was 164.6±11.0 ms during premature stimulation and 190.7±20.4 ms during the first reentrant VT cycle, in accord with model calculations, which resulted in critically convex wavefront curvature with functional conduction block, respectively, at the location of the isthmus entrance boundary and at the lateral isthmus edges. Discussion Reentrant VT onset following premature stimulation can be explained by the presence of critically convex wavefront curvature and unidirectional block at the isthmus entrance boundary when the premature stimulation interval is sufficiently short. The

  20. MISR Views a Fire-Scarred Landscape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This MISR image pair shows 'before and after' views of the area around the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Washington. On June 27, 2000, a fire in the dry sagebrush was sparked by an automobile crash. The flames were fanned by hot summer winds. By the day after the accident, about 100,000 acres had burned, and the fire's spread forced the closure of highways and loss of homes.

    These images, from Terra orbits 2176 and 3341, were obtained by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. Compare the area just above and to the right of the line of cumulus clouds in the May 15 image with the same area imaged on August 3. The darkened burn scar measures approximately 35 kilometers across. The Columbia River is seen wending its way around the area, and the Snake River branches off to the right.

    According to Idaho's National Interagency Fire Center, the US has been experiencing the worst fire season since 1996.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  1. Scarring, stem cells, scaffolds and skin repair.

    PubMed

    Markeson, Daniel; Pleat, Jonathon M; Sharpe, Justin R; Harris, Adrian L; Seifalian, Alexander M; Watt, Suzanne M

    2015-06-01

    The treatment of full thickness skin loss, which can be extensive in the case of large burns, continues to represent a challenging clinical entity. This is due to an on-going inability to produce a suitable tissue engineered substrate that can satisfactorily replicate the epidermal and dermal in vivo niches to fulfil both aesthetic and functional demands. The current gold standard treatment of autologous skin grafting is inadequate because of poor textural durability, scarring and associated contracture, and because of a paucity of donor sites in larger burns. Tissue engineering has seen exponential growth in recent years with a number of 'off-the-shelf' dermal and epidermal substitutes now available. Each has its own limitations. In this review, we examine normal wound repair in relation to stem/progenitor cells that are intimately involved in this process within the dermal niche. Endothelial precursors, in particular, are examined closely and their phenotype, morphology and enrichment from multiple sources are described in an attempt to provide some clarity regarding the controversy surrounding their classification and role in vasculogenesis. We also review the role of the next generation of cellularized scaffolds and smart biomaterials that attempt to improve the revascularisation of artificial grafts, the rate of wound healing and the final cosmetic and functional outcome. PMID:24668923

  2. Extensive Burn Scars in Russia's Amur Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Vast areas of southeastern Russia have been scorched by fires over the last few weeks. All across Siberia fires have been raging, and this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 15, 2002, shows extensive, dark burn scars along with actively burning fires (red dots) on the north side of the Amur River, which separates Russia (north) and China (south). The southern Amur region is largely devoted to farming and other agriculture, and these fires may have been set intentionally to prepare the land for the growing season. Fire is often used to clear land of unwanted vegetation, and to return the nutrients stored in vegetation back to the soil. However, fires that are too frequent or severe can devastate the soil, eventually making it unsuitable for farming or grazing. Fires can also escape control and spread into protected areas. In this image, fires are mostly concentrated in a lowland area within the drainage basin of the Zeya River, which drains from the frozen lake at the top of the image. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  3. Efficacy of fractional CO2 laser in treatment of atrophic scar of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Banihashemi, Mahnaz; Nahidi, Yalda; Maleki, Masoud; Esmaily, Habibollah; Moghimi, Hamid Reza

    2016-05-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an endemic disease in Iran. Unfortunately, it can lead to unsightly atrophic scars with limited treatment options. Fractional CO2 laser is accepted for treatment of atrophic acne scars and recently has been used to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis, so we planned to use fractional CO2 laser on leishmaniasis scar. We conducted this study on 60 leishmaniasis scars on the face of 40 patients. The lesions were treated by a fractional CO2 laser with beam size of 120 μm, with energy of 50-90 mJ, and 50-100 spots/cm(2) density with two passes in three monthly sessions. Evaluation was done in the first and second months after the first treatment and 3 and 6 months after the last treatment. Digital photography was performed at each visit. Assessment of improvement rate by patient and physician was rated separately as follows: no improvement (0 %), mild (<25 %), moderate (25-50 %), good (51-75 %), and excellent (76-100 %). Based on patients' opinion, in the first and second follow-up, 48.3 and 90 % of them reported moderate to excellent healing, respectively (p < 0.001). In 3 and 6 months follow-up after the end of the experiment, most of the patients (88.3 and 95 %, respectively) reported moderate to excellent healing of scars. Based on two observers' opinion, healing in the first follow-up in most of the patients (65 %) was mild to moderate and 33 % were reported as having no healing. In the second follow-up, only 5 % of the patients were reported with no healing and 60 % were reported as having moderate healing (p < 0.001). In 3 and 6 months follow-up, most of the patients (95 and 96.6 %) were reported as having moderate to excellent healing (p = <0.001). Our results underlined the high efficacy of fractional CO2 laser for leishmaniasis scar. No significant adverse effects were noted. PMID:26984344

  4. Caesarean section scar ectopic pregnancy following postcoital contraception.

    PubMed

    Fabunmi, Laura; Perks, Nigel

    2002-07-01

    This is believed to be the first reported case of an ectopic pregnancy following failed progestogen-only emergency contraception. The ectopic pregnancy was at the site of a previous caesarean section scar and was managed conservatively. PMID:16259837

  5. Effects of scars on crystalline shell pressure stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Duanduan; Sknepnek, Rastko; Bowick, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Thomson problem is the prototypical example of a crystal on a sphere. For high number of particles in the ground state of the Thomson problem one finds scars - freely-terminating grain boundary arrays of dislocations. Here we analyze how scars affect the mechanical stability of a spherical crystalline shell, like a viral capsid, under external hydrostatic pressure. We use elastic continuum theory to model the shell. Its energy contains both stretching and bending energies. Furthermore, using Monte Carlo simulations, we compare how shells with and without scars deform under external pressure in a quasi-static process. We find that presence of scars always lowers the critical pressure at which the shell collapses. We acknowledge support from Soft Matter Program, Syracuse University.

  6. 15. Newfound Gap parking area with construction scar looking W. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Newfound Gap parking area with construction scar looking W. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Newfound Gap Road, Between Gatlinburg, TN & Cherokee, NC, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  7. Semiclassical calculation of scars for a smooth potential

    SciTech Connect

    Provost, D.; Baranger, M. )

    1993-08-02

    Bogomolny's formula for energy-smoothed scars is applied to a nonspecific, nonscalable Hamiltonian, a two-dimensional anharmonic oscillator. The semiclassical theory reproduces well the exact quantal results over a large spatial and energy range.

  8. Anatomopathological findings in scars: comparative study between different specimens.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Andrada Despina; Bedereag, Ştefan Iulian; NiŢescu, Cristian; Florescu, Ioan Petre

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the remarkable progress science and medicine have experienced, many facts concerning healing processes and pathological scars are still unknown or incompletely explained. This paper is part of a larger study (research for a PhD thesis) concerning new approaches in the prevention and treatment of pathological post-burn scars. We present and analyze the cases of some patients who developed abnormal scars in order to understand and point out the characteristics, that different types of pathological scars have in common and how we can differentiate them. Knowing what issue to address is the key to any successful therapy. Thus, the information we obtained will help us in applying more appropriate and efficient methods of treatment and in our further research: comparing the efficiency of newer therapies to that of older ones. PMID:25826518

  9. Laser treatment of acne, psoriasis, leukoderma, and scars.

    PubMed

    Railan, Divya; Alster, Tina S

    2008-12-01

    Lasers frequently are used by dermatologists for their multiple aesthetic applications, but they also can be used to treat a variety of medical dermatology conditions. Conditions such as acne vulgaris, psoriasis, and vitiligo can all be successfully treated with laser, thereby providing the patient with additional therapeutic options. Lasers have also been used for years to improve the appearance of scars. The newer fractionated lasers have been especially effective in enhancing the clinical outcomes of scar revision. PMID:19150300

  10. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: interrater reliability and concurrent validity.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    Research into the pathophysiology and treatment of hypertrophic scar (HSc) remains limited by the heterogeneity of scar and the imprecision with which its severity is measured. The objective of this study was to test the interrater reliability and concurrent validity of the Cutometer measurement of elasticity, the Mexameter measurement of erythema and pigmentation, and total thickness measure of the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar, and HSc. Three independent investigators evaluated 128 sites (severe HSc, moderate or mild HSc, donor site, and normal skin) on 32 burn survivors using all of the above measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient, which was used to measure interrater reliability, reflects the inherent amount of error in the measure and is considered acceptable when it is >0.75. Interrater reliability of the totals of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS fell below the acceptable limit ( congruent with0.50). The individual subscales of the mVSS fell well below the acceptable level (< or =0.3). The Cutometer reading of elasticity provided acceptable reliability (>0.89) for each study site with the exception of severe scar. Mexameter and DermaScan C reliability measurements were acceptable for all sites (>0.82). Concurrent validity correlations with the mVSS were significant except for the comparison of the mVSS pliability subscale and the Cutometer maximum deformation measure comparison in severe scar. In conclusion, the Mexameter and DermaScan C measurements of scar color and thickness of all sites, as well as the Cutometer measurement of elasticity in all but the most severe scars shows high interrater reliability. Their significant concurrent validity with the mVSS confirms that these tools are measuring the same traits as the mVSS, and in a more objective way. PMID:18388576

  11. Perennial plate tectonics with lasting mantle lithosphere scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, P.; Pysklywec, R. N.; Stephenson, R.

    2015-12-01

    Although the conventional theory of plate tectonics can explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries, it cannot adequately explain the processes involved in deformation and seismicity within plate interiors. Here, we consider that the pre-existing deformation or "scarring" within the mantle lithosphere may have a very long lived presence that could incorporate deformation of the plate interior and plate boundary. Mantle lithosphere scars from continent-continent collisions could generate virtual plate boundaries that remain over long timescales, producing "perennial" plate tectonics. Local geophysical studies can map the crustal environment well, and global whole mantle tomography models are rapidly improving, yet high-resolution images of the mantle lithosphere are often not available in regions where scarring may be present. Where mantle lithosphere heterogeneities have been observed (usually interpreted simply as subduction scars), the same attention has not been afforded to them as, for example, re-activation of faults within the Earth's crust. In idealized numerical simulations, we compare how relic scarring at varying depths in the lithosphere affects patterns of deformation. High-resolution thermal-mechanical numerical experiments explore continental lithospheric deformation featuring a weakened crust and mantle lithosphere scars. Our models show that deep lithospheric scars can control the tectonic evolution of a region over shallow geological features, indicating the importance of mantle lithosphere heterogeneities. The Altyn Tagh Fault (ATF) in central China is an example of an ancient continental collision zone that undergoes periodic deformation during times of regional compression. We suggest that the ATF may be a locale where a long-lasting mantle lithosphere scar can control the subsequent crustal evolution and deformation, with ancient plate boundaries having a "perennial" plate tectonic presence.

  12. Frequent PIK3CA mutations in radial scars.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Katie L; Ang, Daphne; Warrick, Andrea; Beadling, Carol; Corless, Christopher L; Troxell, Megan L

    2013-12-01

    Radial scars are breast lesions of uncertain pathogenesis that are associated with a 2-fold increased risk of breast cancer compared with that in controls. Activating point mutations in PIK3CA are found in 25% to 30% of invasive breast cancers; however, they have not previously been investigated in radial scars. We sought to evaluate radial scars for known activating point mutations commonly seen in invasive breast cancer. Sixteen surgical cases containing 22 radial scars were identified from pathology archives. Lesional tissue was macrodissected from unstained paraffin sections; genomic DNA was then extracted and screened for a panel of known hotspot mutations using polymerase chain reaction and mass spectroscopy analysis. Of the 22 radial scars, 14 (63.6%) had PIK3CA mutations (10 with H1047R mutations, 2 G1049R mutations, 1 E542K, 1 E545K). The remaining 8 lesions were wild type for all of the screened genes. Of the radial scars without epithelial atypia, 9/16 (56.3%) had PIK3CA mutations; furthermore, 5/6 (83.3%) radial scars with atypia had mutations detected. In this study, the frequency of PIK3CA mutations was notably higher than the 25% to 30% mutation frequency of invasive breast cancer. This finding raises interesting questions as to the role of PIK3CA mutations in breast cancer development. Additional larger studies are indicated to confirm and extend these observations in understanding the pathogenesis of radial scars and their relationship to breast cancer. PMID:24193002

  13. Suppression of scarring in peripheral nerve implants by drug elution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FitzGerald, James J.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Medical implants made of non-biological materials provoke a chronic inflammatory response, resulting in the deposition of a collagenous scar tissue (ST) layer on their surface, that gradually thickens over time. This is a critical problem for neural interfaces. Scar build-up on electrodes results in a progressive decline in signal level because the scar tissue gradually separates axons away from the recording contacts. In regenerative sieves and microchannel electrodes, progressive scar deposition will constrict and may eventually choke off the sieve hole or channel lumen. Interface designs need to address this issue if they are to be fit for long term use. This study examines a novel method of inhibiting the formation and thickening of the fibrous scar. Approach. Research to date has mainly focused on methods of preventing stimulation of the foreign body response by implant surface modification. In this paper a pharmacological approach using drug elution to suppress chronic inflammation is introduced. Microchannel implants made of silicone doped with the steroid drug dexamethasone were implanted in the rat sciatic nerve for periods of up to a year. Tissue from within the microchannels was compared to that from control devices that did not release any drug. Main results. In the drug eluting implants the scar layer was significantly thinner at all timepoints, and unlike the controls it did not continue to thicken after 6 months. Control implants supported axon regeneration well initially, but axon counts fell rapidly at later timepoints as scar thickened. Axon counts in drug eluting devices were initially much lower, but increased rather than declined and by one year were significantly higher than in controls. Significance. Drug elution offers a potential long term solution to the problem of performance degradation due to scarring around neural implants.

  14. The Importance of Mast Cells in Dermal Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Wilgus, Traci A.; Wulff, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Mast cells are resident inflammatory cells present in high numbers in the skin. They are one of the first cell types to respond to damage and they do so by quickly releasing a variety of preformed mediators that are stored within mast cell granules. Mast cells are not only active early on, where they help induce inflammation, but they also stimulate the proliferation of several important cell types and influence the production and remodeling of collagen. Recent Advances: Recent studies have highlighted the importance of mast cells in determining the amount of scar tissue that forms as a result of the repair process. Mast cells are found in low numbers and in a less activated state in scarless wounds, whereas high numbers of activated mast cells are associated with scarring and fibrosis. Furthermore, animals that lack mast cells or have been treated with degranulation inhibitors or drugs that block the activity of mast cell proteases have been shown to heal with reduced scar tissue. Critical Issues: Despite evidence suggesting that mast cells regulate scar tissue development, the entire range of mast cell activities during wound repair and scar formation has not been completely characterized. In addition, the potential therapeutic benefits of targeting mast cells clinically have yet to be fully explored. Future Directions: More studies are needed to determine whether inhibiting mast cell activation and blocking the function of mast cell mediators are viable options to prevent or reduce the appearance of scars. PMID:24757590

  15. Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars: Update and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chenyu; Murphy, George F.; Akaishi, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Summary: The development of cutaneous pathological scars, namely, hypertrophic scars (HSs) and keloids, involves complex pathways, and the exact mechanisms by which they are initiated, evolved, and regulated remain to be fully elucidated. The generally held concepts that keloids and HSs represent “aberrant wound healing” or that they are “characterized by hyalinized collagen bundles” have done little to promote their accurate clinicopathological classification or to stimulate research into the specific causes of these scars and effective preventative therapies. To overcome this barrier, we review here the most recent findings regarding the pathology and pathogenesis of keloids and HSs. The aberrations of HSs and keloids in terms of the inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling phases of the wound healing process are described. In particular, the significant roles that the extracellular matrix and the epidermal and dermal layers of skin play in scar pathogenesis are examined. Finally, the current hypotheses of pathological scar etiology that should be tested by basic and clinical investigators are detailed. Therapies that have been found to be effective are described, including several that evolved directly from the aforementioned etiology hypotheses. A better understanding of pathological scar etiology and manifestations will improve the clinical and histopathological classification and treatment of these important lesions. PMID:25289219

  16. Management of keloids and hypertrophic scars: current and emerging options

    PubMed Central

    Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2013-01-01

    In the context of growing aesthetic awareness, a rising number of patients feel disappointed with their scars and are frequently seeking help for functional and aesthetic improvement. However, excessive scarring following surgery or trauma remains difficult to improve despite a plethora of advocated treatment strategies as frequently observed in daily clinical routine. It is thus still preferable to prevent scarring by minimizing risk factors as much as possible. Hence, it remains crucial for the physician to be aware of basic knowledge of healing mechanisms and skin anatomy, as well as an appreciation of suture material and wound closure techniques to minimize the risk of postoperative scarring. Next to existing, well known prophylactic and therapeutic strategies for the improvement of excessive scarring, this article discusses emerging techniques such as intralesional cryotherapy, intralesional 5-fluorouracil, interferon, and bleomycin. Some of them have been successfully tested in well-designed trials and already have extended or may extend the current spectrum of excessive scar treatment in the near future. Innovative options such as imiquimod 5% cream, photodynamic therapy, or botulinum toxin A may also be of certain importance; however, the data currently available is too contradictory for definite recommendations. PMID:23637546

  17. Does the placement of an Amplatzer septal occluder device confer benefit in patients with a post-infarction ventricular septal defect?

    PubMed

    Dawson, Alan G; Williams, Stuart G; Cole, Daisy

    2014-12-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'Is the placement of an Amplatzer septal occluder device across a post-infarction ventricular septal defect a suitable alternative for patients not eligible for surgical repair?' Altogether, 31 papers were found using the reported search, of which 17 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that the insertion of an Amplatzer occluder device in patients with a post-infarction ventricular septal defect (VSD) not amenable to surgical repair can offer benefit in selected patients. Patients with cardiogenic shock frequently have an unfavourable outcome and closure should be considered cautiously. From the literature available, patients have a better outcome if the intervention is delayed by 2 weeks or more possibly due to the maturation of the VSD and recovery of myocardial function. In certain situations, device closure may be complicated by device dislocation or embolization, residual shunting or a tortuous course not amenable to device implantation. In such settings, surgical repair is the only option. In patients who proceed straight to surgical repair with no attempt at percutaneous closure, the overall mortality lies in the region of 43% and similar to percutaneous closure, there is an association observed between those operated within 7 days of the VSD occurrence and those greater than this time. Patients presenting in cardiogenic shock experienced an increased risk of death and if the timing of myocardial infarction to VSD closure could be delayed by 3 weeks, there was a statistically significant reduction in operative mortality. Percutaneous closure of a post-infarction VSD may avoid the requirement for surgical closure. However, in some cases, it provides time to

  18. Scar prevention by laser-assisted scar healing (LASH) using thermal post-conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossé, Alban; Iarmarcovai, Gwen; Capon, Alexandre; Cornil, Alain; Mordon, Serge

    2009-02-01

    An 810-nm diode laser system was developed to accelerate and improve the healing process in surgical scars. Using thermal post-conditioning, the laser system provides a localised moderate heating whose maximum temperature is controlled to prevent tissue damage and stimulate the heat shock proteins (HSP) synthesis. The 810-nm wavelength allows a deep penetration of the light into the dermis, without damaging the epidermis. The time along which surgical incision is treated (continuous wave) must therefore be selected carefully with respect to the temperature precision achieved within the heated volume. A top-hat profile is preferred to a Gaussian profile in order to ensure the skin surface temperature is homogenised, as is the temperature of the heated volume. The spot shape will depend on the medical indication. The treatment should be made safe and controlled by means of a safety strip containing an RFID chip which will transmit the various operating settings to the laser device. A clinical trial aims at evaluating the 810 nm-diode laser in surgical incisions, with only one laser treatment immediately after skin closure, of patients with Fitzpatrick skin types I to IV. Surgical incisions were divided into two fields, with only portions randomly selected receiving laser treatment. At the final scar analysis (12 months) of the pilot study, the treated portion scored significantly better for both surgeon (P = 0.046) and patients (P = 0.025). Further studies may be warranted to better understand the cellular mechanisms leading to Laser-Assisted Skin Healing (LASH).

  19. Scar-Saving Flap during Serial Excision by Borrowing from the Opposite Side

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji Yeon; Song, Won Keun

    2008-01-01

    Background Congenital melanocytic nevi may have various shapes according to the anatomic location. Therefore, it is desirable to apply proper surgical designs to the diverse forms considering the characteristics of the sites as well as the shape and size. Objective The purpose of this article is to introduce a new scar-saving flap design for semicircular defects after removing congenital melanocytic nevi without excising additional normal skin. Methods In most cases to excise semicircular nevi, normal skin should be excised to prevent dog ear, resulting in the long length of the scar. So we use a new scar-saving flap design by borrowing a partial length from the opposite side. Results We used this new technique for 4 cases of large semicircular skin defects. In all cases, this method had some advantages from this perspective: (1) it does not require excision of normal adjacent skin to convert a semicircular defect into a crescent shape or to remove dog-ears (2) the final suture line is not much longer than the diameter of the original defect and (3) it makes the removal of a much larger volume possible in one procedure rather than using the classic serial excision technique, which consists of a central elliptical excision within the confines of the nevus. In this way the frequency of procedures and discomfort to the patient can be reduced. Conclusion We think that a scar-saving flap design by borrowing a partial length from the opposite side can be a good strategy for a semicircular skin defect. PMID:27303174

  20. Cesarean Scar Pregnancy Managed with Conservative Treatment.

    PubMed

    Boza, Aysen; Boza, Barıs; Api, Murat

    2016-09-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) is a rare, but life-threatening type of ectopic pregnancy. An exact and early diagnosis of CSP is very important for prognosis. The aim of the present study was to describe 4 women with CSP and discuss their clinical presentations, diagnoses, and various management options along with the published literature. Four women with a suspicion of CSP or cervical pregnancy were referred to our hospital between August 2013 and January 2014. All the patients were counseled about medical management options. After the treatment, serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-hCG) levels were followed weekly until they reached <5 mIU/mL. All the patients were diagnosed at the first trimester, with the average gestational age of 6.4±0.9 weeks. Treatment was systemic methotrexate (MTX) treatment in 3 of the 4 women, requiring no further intervention. The remaining 1 woman was treated with an intragestational administration of MTX. The mean time passed until ß-hCG reached <5 mIU/mL was 10.2±2.9 (range, 8-14) weeks, and the mean time passed until the gestational sac resolved was 21.5±3.5 (range, 18-25) weeks. Based on this limited number of case-series experience, it seems that CSP should be treated conservatively even if there are visible fetal cardiac activity, fetal poles, large gestational sacs, and high initial ß-hCG levels. Although the complete remission of the lesion takes a relatively long time, medical management via a noninvasive approach and follow-up should be tried as the first choice of therapy. PMID:27582596

  1. Cesarean Scar Pregnancy Managed with Conservative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Boza, Aysen; Boza, Barıs; Api, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) is a rare, but life-threatening type of ectopic pregnancy. An exact and early diagnosis of CSP is very important for prognosis. The aim of the present study was to describe 4 women with CSP and discuss their clinical presentations, diagnoses, and various management options along with the published literature. Four women with a suspicion of CSP or cervical pregnancy were referred to our hospital between August 2013 and January 2014. All the patients were counseled about medical management options. After the treatment, serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-hCG) levels were followed weekly until they reached <5 mIU/mL. All the patients were diagnosed at the first trimester, with the average gestational age of 6.4±0.9 weeks. Treatment was systemic methotrexate (MTX) treatment in 3 of the 4 women, requiring no further intervention. The remaining 1 woman was treated with an intragestational administration of MTX. The mean time passed until ß-hCG reached <5 mIU/mL was 10.2±2.9 (range, 8–14) weeks, and the mean time passed until the gestational sac resolved was 21.5±3.5 (range, 18–25) weeks. Based on this limited number of case-series experience, it seems that CSP should be treated conservatively even if there are visible fetal cardiac activity, fetal poles, large gestational sacs, and high initial ß-hCG levels. Although the complete remission of the lesion takes a relatively long time, medical management via a noninvasive approach and follow-up should be tried as the first choice of therapy. PMID:27582596

  2. Effects of Noscarna™ on hypertrophic scarring in the rabbit ear model: histopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Won; Ku, Sae Kwang; Cho, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Hiep, Tran Tuan; Han, Sang Duk; Kim, Bo Gyun; Kang, Min Kyung; Do, Eui Seon; Jun, Joon Ho; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Sohn, Young Taek; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of silicone-based gel on the healing of hypertrophic scars in the rabbit ear model. After 4-week application of silicone-based gel containing allantoin, dexpanthenol and heparin (Noscarna™) to scars in a rabbit ear model of hypertrophic scarring, significant improvements in hypertrophic scar healing and a great loss of skin pigment were observed compared to the non-treated control, base or silicone control-treated scars. Furthermore, histological analysis of Noscarna™-treated scars revealed a significant reduction in scar elevation index (SEI), anterior skin and epithelial thicknesses, inflammatory cells, vessels, collagen disorganization and fibroblasts compared to all control hypertrophic scars. Furthermore, Noscarna™ showed more favorable effects on hypertrophic scars than a commercial product, Contractubex®. Therefore, these results clearly demonstrated that the newly developed silicone-based gel, Noscarna™, could be a promising formulation as an effective therapeutic agent for hypertrophic scars. PMID:23212642

  3. Comparison of quality of facial scars after single low-level laser therapy and combined low-level with high-level (PDL 595 nm) laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Vranova, Jana; Remlova, Eva; Jelinkova, Helena; Rosina, Jozef; Dostalova, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of our study was to compare the quality of resulting facials scar 12 weeks after single and combined laser therapy. Forty-one children from age 1.5 to 5 years with facial scars after injury participated in the study. Thirty-one underwent laser therapy, 14 were treated using single low-level laser therapy (670 nm, fluence 3-5 J/cm(-2) ), and 17 underwent combined high-level laser therapy with non-ablative pulsed dye laser (PDL; 595 nm, spot size 7 mm, delay 0.45 ms or 1.5 ms, fluence 9-11 J/cm(-2) , cryogen spray/delay 20/30 ms) and low-level laser therapy. The control group consisted of 10 untreated children. Before treatment and at week 4, 8, and, 12 the scars were evaluated using the POSAS questionnaire. A statistically significant improvement in scars (between ratings before treatment and 4 weeks after therapy, before treatment and 8 weeks after therapy and before treatment and 12 weeks after therapy) was observed in all parameters in both treatment groups (p < 0.0001). For the HLLT+LLLT group the most significant enhancement in the quality of scars was found for all items and at all evaluations, except pigmentation and pliability. There was no improvement observed in quality of facial scars in the control group. PMID:26031491

  4. Effect of laser infrared therapy on several rheological indices of blood and on the homeostasis of patients with post-infarction cardiosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volov, N. A.; Kudinova, M. A.; Fedulaeva, A. I.; Fedulaev, Yu. N.; Gordeev, I. G.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made on 38 patients affected by exertion angina pectoris of the I-III functional classes. The patients survived a Q-associated myocardial infarction not earlier than 1 year ago. The patients were treated according to a 10-session course of laser infrared therapy. The dynamics of several hemorheological indices (such as blood viscosity, the hematocrit of venous blood, fibrinogen, fibronectine, thrombocyte aggregation, antithrombin III, and the activated partial thrombplastin time) was estimated prior to the treatment, 5 - 7 days after the beginning of laser therapy, and 30 days after the beginning of laser therapy treatment. It was found that laser therapy was capable of producing a significant decrease in the blood viscosity, fibrinogen level, and in the aggregation of thrombocytes. Moreover, laser infrared therapy carried out on patients affected by post-infarction cardiosclerosis and by stable exertion stenocardia of the I-III functional classes produced a reliable normalization of hemorheological indices of the blood.

  5. Scar prevention and remodeling: a review of the medical, surgical, topical and light treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Leonard Y; El Tal, Abdel Kader; Stiff, Mark A; Fakhouri, Tarek M

    2014-08-01

    Cosmetic, functional, and structural sequelae of scarring are innumerable, and measures exist to optimize and ultimately minimize these sequelae. To evaluate the innumerable methods available to decrease the cosmetic, functional, and structural repercussions of scarring, pubMed search of the English literature with key words scar, scar revision, scar prevention, scar treatment, scar remodeling, cicatrix, cicatrix treatment, and cicatrix remodeling was done. Original articles and reviews were examined and included. Seventy-nine manuscripts were reviewed. Techniques, comparisons, and results were reviewed and tabulated. Overall, though topical modalities are easier to use and are usually more attractive to the patient, the surgical approaches still prove to be superior and more reliable. However, advances in topical medications for scar modification are on the rise and a change towards medical treatment of scars may emerge as the next best approach. Comparison studies of the innumerable specific modalities for scar revision and prevention are impossible. Standardization of techniques is lacking. Scarring, the body's natural response to a wound, can create many adverse effects. At this point, the practice of sound, surgical fundamentals still trump the most advanced preventative methods and revision techniques. Advances in medical approaches are available, however, to assist the scarring process, which even the most advanced surgical fundamentals will ultimately lead to. Whether through newer topical therapies, light treatment, or classical surgical intervention, our treatment armamentarium of scars has expanded and will allow us to maximize scar prevention and to minimize scar morbidity. PMID:24697346

  6. 31P NMR 2D Mapping of Creatine Kinase Forward Flux Rate in Hearts with Postinfarction Left Ventricular Remodeling in Response to Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ling; Cui, Weina; Zhang, Pengyuan; Jang, Albert; Zhu, Wuqiang; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing a fast 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D-CSI) method, this study examined the heterogeneity of creatine kinase (CK) forward flux rate of hearts with postinfarction left ventricular (LV) remodeling. Immunosuppressed Yorkshire pigs were assigned to 4 groups: 1) A sham-operated normal group (SHAM, n = 6); 2) A 60 minutes distal left anterior descending coronary artery ligation and reperfusion (MI, n = 6); 3) Open patch group; ligation injury plus open fibrin patch over the site of injury (Patch, n = 6); and 4) Cell group, hiPSCs-cardiomyocytes, -endothelial cells, and -smooth muscle cells (2 million, each) were injected into the injured myocardium pass through a fibrin patch (Cell+Patch, n = 5). At 4 weeks, the creatine phosphate (PCr)/ATP ratio, CK forward flux rate (Flux PCr→ATP), and k constant of CK forward flux rate (kPCr→ATP) were severely decreased at border zone myocardium (BZ) adjacent to MI. Cell treatment results in significantly increase of PCr/ATP ratio and improve the value of kPCr→ATP and Flux PCr→ATP in BZ myocardium. Moreover, the BZ myocardial CK total activity and protein expression of CK mitochondria isozyme and CK myocardial isozyme were significantly reduced, but recovered in response to cell treatment. Thus, cell therapy results in improvement of BZ bioenergetic abnormality in hearts with postinfarction LV remodeling, which is accompanied by significantly improvements in BZ CK activity and CK isozyme expression. The fast 2D 31P MR CSI mapping can reliably measure the heterogeneity of bioenergetics in hearts with post infarction LV remodeling. PMID:27606901

  7. Activation of peripheral delta opioid receptors eliminates cardiac electrical instability in a rat model of post-infarction cardiosclerosis via mitochondrial ATP-dependent K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Lishmanov, Yu B; Solenkova, N V; Gross, G J; Stefano, G B; Tam, S W

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the selective delta-1 (delta(1)) opioid receptor agonist, DPDPE, and the selective delta(2) opioid receptor agonist, DSLET, have been studied on the ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) in rats with an experimental post-infarction cardiosclerosis (CS). It has been found that CS induced a significant decrease in VFT. This CS-induced decrease in VFT was significantly reversed by intravenous administration of DPDPE (0.1 mg/kg) 10 min before VFT measurement. On the contrary, intravenous injection of DSLET (0.5 mg/kg) exacerbated the CS-induced cardiac electrical instability. Pretreatment with the selective delta opioid receptor antagonist, ICI 174,864 (0.5 mg/kg), completely abolished the changes in VFT produced by both DPDPE and DSLET. Previous administration of a nonselective peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide (5 mg/kg) also completely reversed the antifibrillatory action of DPDPE. Naloxone methiodide and ICI 174,864 alone had no effect on VFT. Pretreatment with the nonselective K(ATP) channel blocker, glibenclamide (0.3 mg/kg), or with the mitochondrial selective K(ATP) channel blocker, 5-hydroxydecanoic acid (5-HD, 5 mg/kg), completely abolished the DPDPE-induced increase in cardiac electrical stability. Glibenclamide and 5-HD alone had no effect on VFT. These results demonstrate that the delta opioid receptor plays an important role in the regulation of electrical stability in rats with post-infarction cardiosclerosis. We propose that peripheral delta(1) opioid receptor stimulation reverses CS-induced electrical instability via mitochondrial K(ATP) channels. On the contrary, delta(2) opioid receptor stimulation may exacerbate the CS-induced decrease in VFT. Further studies are necessary to determine the delta opioid receptor subtype which mediates the antifibrillatory effect of DPDPE and pro-fibrillatory effect of DSLET. PMID:12798419

  8. Surgery for postinfarction ventricular tachycardia in the pre-implantable cardioverter defibrillator era: early and long term outcomes in 100 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, J; Campbell, R; McComb, J; Furniss, S; Doig, J; Hilton, C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To report outcome following surgery for postinfarction ventricular tachycardia undertaken in patients before the use of implantable defibrillators.
DESIGN—A retrospective review, with uniform patient selection criteria and surgical and mapping strategy throughout. Complete follow up. Long term death notification by OPCS (Office of Population Censuses and Statistics) registration.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre for arrhythmia management.
PATIENTS—100 consecutive postinfarction patients who underwent map guided endocardial resection at this hospital in the period 1981-91 for drug refractory ventricular tachyarrhythmias.
RESULTS—Emergency surgery was required for intractable arrhythmias in 28 patients, and 32 had surgery within eight weeks of infarction ("early"). Surgery comprised endocardial resections in all, aneurysmectomy in 57, cryoablations in 26, and antiarrhythmic ventriculotomies in 11. Twenty five patients died < 30 days after surgery, 21 of cardiac failure. This high mortality reflects the type of patients included in the series. Only 12 received antiarrhythmic drugs after surgery. Perioperative mortality was related to preoperative left ventricular function and the context of surgery. Mortality rates for elective surgery more than eight weeks after infarction, early surgery, emergency surgery, and early emergency surgery were 18%, 31%, 46%, and 50%, respectively. Actuarial survival rates at one, three, five, and 10 years after surgery were 66%, 62%, 57%, and 35%.
CONCLUSIONS—Surgery offers arrhythmia abolition at a risk proportional to the patient's preoperative risk of death from ventricular arrhythmias. The long term follow up results suggest a continuing role for surgery in selected patients even in the era of catheter ablation and implantable defibrillators.


Keywords: arrhythmias; myocardial infarction; surgical management PMID:10409528

  9. Drought and Burn Scars in Southeastern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    More than 2 million acres were consumed by hundreds of fires between December 2002 and February 2003 in southeastern Australia's national parks, forests, foothills and city suburbs. These images were acquired on February 14, 2002 (left) and February 17, 2003 (right) by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite. The year 2002 was one of Australia's hottest and driest on record, and the acreage burnt during the summer 2002-2003 fire season in Victoria, the Australian Capital Territory and southern New South Wales, is the largest since 1938-1939, when more than 3 million acres were scorched.

    The extent of the burnt area and the dry conditions as of February 2003 are indicated by these contrasting false-color views. Both image panels display data from the near-infrared, red and blue spectral bands of MISR's downward-viewing (nadir) camera, as red, green and blue, respectively. This display technique causes healthy vegetation to appear red and burnt areas to show as dark brown. The data displayed from the two dates were processed identically to preserve relative brightness variations. Vegetation changes related to the dry conditions (not related to the brown burn scars) are also indicated in the February 2003 panel, where many previously red areas exhibit instead the pale yellow-brown of the underlying soils and geology. Significant reduction in the surface area of several large and important water bodies are also apparent. The diminished extent of Lake Hume (along the left-hand edge) in the later date provides a good example.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbits 14999 and 16858. The panels cover an area of about 208 kilometers x 286 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 118 to

  10. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    PubMed Central

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Hee Choi, Seong; Bless, Diane M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method Twenty four 4-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to one of four experimental groups: Chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100 ng basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), chronic vocal fold scar treated with saline (sham treatment), and unscarred untreated control. Following tissue harvest, histological and immunohistochemical data were collected to confirm extracellular matrix alteration in the chronic scar group, and acoustic, aerodynamic and high speed digital imaging data were collected using an excised larynx setup in all groups. Phonation threshold pressure (Pth), glottal resistance (Rg), glottal efficiency (Eg), vibratory amplitude and vibratory area were employed as dependent variables. Results Chronically scarred vocal folds were characterized by elevated collagen I and III and reduced hyaluronic acid abundance. Phonation was achieved and data were collected from all control and bFGF treated larynges, however phonation was not achieved with 3 of 6 chronically scarred and 1 of 6 saline treated larynges. Compared to control, the chronic scar group was characterized by elevated Pth, reduced Eg, and intra-larynx vibratory amplitude and area asymmetry. The bFGF group was characterized by Pth below control group levels, Eg comparable to control, and vocal fold vibratory amplitude and area symmetry comparable to control. The sham group was characterized by Pth comparable to control, Eg superior to control, and vocal fold vibratory amplitude and area symmetry comparable to control. Conclusions The excised larynx model reported here demonstrated robust deterioration across phonatory indices under the scar condition and sensitivity to treatment induced change under the bFGF condition. The improvement observed under the sham condition may reflect

  11. Hypertrophic scars and keloids in surgery: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Song, Colin

    2014-09-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids remain a challenge in surgery. We appreciate that our understanding of the process at cellular and molecular level, profound as it is, when it comes to the clinical evidence much is left to be desired. Although the bench to bedside conundrum remains, the science of translational research calls for an even higher level of cooperation between the scientist and the clinician for the impetus to succeed.The clinicians alerted us to the possible theories in the pathogenesis of keloid formation, inter alia, the ischemia theory, mast cell theory, immune theory, transforming growth factor β interaction, mechanical theory, and the melanocyte stimulating hormone theory. All of the above presupposed a stimulus that would result in an uncontrolled upregulation of collagen and extracellular matrix expression in the pathogenesis of the keloid. This bedside to bench initiative, as in true science, realized more ponderables than possibilities.By the same token, research into the epidermal-mesenchymal signaling, molecular biology, genomics, and stem cell research holds much promise in the bench top arena. To assess efficacy, many scar assessment scores exist in the literature. The clinical measurement of scar maturity can aid in determining end points for therapeutics. Tissue oxygen tension and color assessment of scars by standardized photography proved to be useful.In surgery, the use of dermal substitutes holds some promise as we surmise that quality scars that arise from dermal elements, molecular and enzyme behavior, and balance. Although a systematic review shows some benefit for earlier closure and healing of wounds, no such review exists at this point in time for the use of dermal substitutes in scars.Adipose-derived stem cell, as it pertains to scars, will hopefully realize the potential of skin regeneration rather than by repair in which we are familiar with as well as the undesirable scarring as a result of healing through the inflammatory

  12. Computational Representations of Myocardial Infarct Scars and Implications for Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Adam J.; Bishop, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Image-based computational modeling is becoming an increasingly used clinical tool to provide insight into the mechanisms of reentrant arrhythmias. In the context of ischemic heart disease, faithful representation of the electrophysiological properties of the infarct region within models is essential, due to the scars known for arrhythmic properties. Here, we review the different computational representations of the infarcted region, summarizing the experimental measurements upon which they are based. We then focus on the two most common representations of the scar core (complete insulator or electrically passive tissue) and perform simulations of electrical propagation around idealized infarct geometries. Our simulations highlight significant differences in action potential duration and focal effective refractory period (ERP) around the scar, driven by differences in electrotonic loading, depending on the choice of scar representation. Finally, a novel mechanism for arrhythmia induction, following a focal ectopic beat, is demonstrated, which relies on localized gradients in ERP directly caused by the electrotonic sink effects of the neighboring passive scar. PMID:27486348

  13. Multimodal management of atrophic acne scarring in the aging face.

    PubMed

    O'Daniel, T Gerald

    2011-12-01

    Atrophic facial acne scarring is a widely prevalent condition that can have a negative impact on a patient's quality of life. The appearance of these scars is often worsened by the normal effects of aging. A number of options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, ablative or nonablative laser resurfacing, dermal fillers, and surgical techniques such as subcision or punch excision. Depending on the type and extent of scarring, a multimodal approach is generally necessary to provide satisfactory results. Resurfacing techniques correct surface irregularities, long-lasting dermal fillers address the volume loss resulting from acne, and sub-superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) face-lift procedures counter the soft tissue laxity and ptosis associated with aging. This article briefly reviews the evolution of individual approaches to treating atrophic acne scarring, followed by case examples illustrating results that can be achieved using a multimodal approach. Representative cases from patients in their 30s, 40s, and 50s are presented. In the author's clinical practice, multimodal approaches incorporating fractionated laser, injectable poly-L: -lactic acid, and sub-SMAS face-lift procedures have achieved optimal aesthetic outcomes, high patient satisfaction, and durability of aesthetic effect over time. PMID:21491169

  14. Closure of supporting cell scar formations requires dynamic actin mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hordichok, Andrew J; Steyger, Peter S

    2007-10-01

    In many vertebrate inner ear sensory epithelia, dying sensory hair cells are extruded, and the apices of surrounding supporting cells converge to re-seal the epithelial barrier between the electrochemically-distinct endolymph and perilymph. These cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Dynamic microtubular mechanisms have been proposed for hair cell extrusion; while contractile actomyosin-based mechanisms are required for cellular extrusion and closure in epithelial monolayers. The hypothesis that cytoskeletal mechanisms are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation was tested using bullfrog saccules incubated with gentamicin (6h), and allowed to recover (18h). Explants were then fixed, labeled for actin and cytokeratins, and viewed with confocal microscopy. To block dynamic cytoskeletal processes, disruption agents for microtubules (colchicine, paclitaxel) myosin (Y-27632, ML-9) or actin (cytochalasin D, latrunculin A) were added during treatment and recovery. Microtubule disruption agents had no effect on hair cell extrusion or supporting cell scar formation. Myosin disruption agents appeared to slow down scar formation but not hair cell extrusion. Actin disruption agents blocked scar formation, and largely prevented hair cell extrusion. These data suggest that actin-based cytoskeletal processes are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation in bullfrog saccules. PMID:17716843

  15. Regulation of scar formation by vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Wilgus, Traci A.; Ferreira, Ahalia M.; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; Bergdall, Valerie K.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) is known for its effects on endothelial cells and as a positive mediator of angiogenesis. VEGF is thought to promote the repair of cutaneous wounds due to its pro-angiogenic properties, but its ability to regulate other aspects of wound repair, such as the generation of scar tissue has not been well studied. We examined the role of VEGF in scar tissue production utilizing models of scarless and fibrotic repair. Scarless fetal wounds had lower levels of VEGF and were less vascular than fibrotic fetal wounds, and the scarless phenotype could be converted to a scar-forming phenotype by adding exogenous VEGF. Similarly, neutralization of VEGF reduced vascularity and decreased scar formation in adult wounds. These results show that VEGF levels have a strong influence on scar tissue formation. Our data suggest that VEGF may not simply function as a mediator of wound angiogenesis, but instead may play a more diverse role in the wound repair process. PMID:18427552

  16. Sarcoidosis presenting as non-scarring non-scalp alopecia.

    PubMed

    Dan, Luke; Relic, John

    2016-08-01

    In this article we describe a 39-year-old man who presented with non-scarring non-scalp alopecia of his limbs as the initial presentation of sarcoidosis. Alopecia is a rare cutaneous manifestation of sarcoidosis. A literature review has found only one other example of sarcoidosis presenting as non-scarring non-scalp alopecia in an area other than the scalp in a patient who was otherwise asymptomatic. Several reported cases have described scarring alopecia of the scalp, which is the area of skin most commonly affected by sarcoidosis. There has been one documented case of sarcoidosis manifesting as total body non-scarring alopecia in a patient who had systemic symptoms of sarcoidosis. Other cases have presented rare cutaneous manifestations of sarcoidosis but in all these cases several other organ systems have been involved, and the patient has had systemic symptoms on presentation or the cutaneous presentation did not include non-scalp non-scarring alopecia. PMID:25823524

  17. Scar tissue orientation in unsutured and sutured corneal wound healing.

    PubMed Central

    Melles, G R; Binder, P S; Beekhuis, W H; Wijdh, R H; Moore, M N; Anderson, J A; SundarRaj, N

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--This study aimed to evaluate stromal wound healing morphology in short term unsutured compared with sutured corneal wounds, to define regional variation in healing within radial keratotomy wounds. METHODS--Stromal scar tissue orientation (fibroblast and collagen fibre orientation) was analysed in unsutured and adjacent sutured keratotomy wounds in monkeys, 2 to 9 weeks after surgery, using light and transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS--At 2 to 4 weeks, scar tissue orientation was transverse to the wound edge in unsutured wounds, but sagittal in sutured wounds. At 5 to 9 weeks, a reorientation of scar tissue sagittal to the wound was seen in the unsutured wounds, proceeding from the posterior to anterior wound regions. In sutured wounds, a scar tissue reorientation transverse to the wound was seen, proceeding from the anterior wound region in a posterior direction. CONCLUSIONS--Within the same cornea, sutured and unsutured wounds showed opposite patterns of healing. Sutured wounds initially healed more slowly, but obtained pseudolamellar continuity over time. In contrast, healing of unsutured wounds was characterised by an early approximation towards lamellar repair that was followed by an ineffective reorganisation of the scar. This latter pattern of healing, that may be associated with a variable weakening of the wound, may relate to the clinical findings of unpredictability and/or progression of refractive effect following radial keratotomy. Images PMID:7547789

  18. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Uterine Scar Niche before and after Laparoscopic Surgical Repair: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, Olivier; Bergeron, Tessa; Beaudry, Ariane; Demers, Suzanne; Roberge, Stéphanie; Bujold, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Context Uterine scar defects or scar niche are relatively common after cesarean delivery. An association has been observed between the severity of scar defect, also known as isthmocele, some gynecologic symptoms, and the risk of uterine scar dehiscence at the next delivery. It has been suggested that surgical repair of scar defect could improve the gynecological symptoms, but it remains unclear whether such surgery mends the uterine scar itself. Case Report We report the case of a woman with uterine scar defect in whom laparoscopic repair significantly improved the gynecological symptoms without affecting the uterine scar, evaluated by hysterosonography. Conclusion This case highlights the significant dearth of knowledge surrounding the diagnosis, consequences, and benefits of surgical repair of uterine scar defect after cesarean. PMID:25452883

  19. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Uterine Scar Niche before and after Laparoscopic Surgical Repair: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Olivier; Bergeron, Tessa; Beaudry, Ariane; Demers, Suzanne; Roberge, Stéphanie; Bujold, Emmanuel

    2014-11-01

    Context Uterine scar defects or scar niche are relatively common after cesarean delivery. An association has been observed between the severity of scar defect, also known as isthmocele, some gynecologic symptoms, and the risk of uterine scar dehiscence at the next delivery. It has been suggested that surgical repair of scar defect could improve the gynecological symptoms, but it remains unclear whether such surgery mends the uterine scar itself. Case Report We report the case of a woman with uterine scar defect in whom laparoscopic repair significantly improved the gynecological symptoms without affecting the uterine scar, evaluated by hysterosonography. Conclusion This case highlights the significant dearth of knowledge surrounding the diagnosis, consequences, and benefits of surgical repair of uterine scar defect after cesarean. PMID:25452883

  20. A multidisciplinary approach to scars: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Zanier, Emiliano; Bordoni, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to carry out a narrative review regarding the approach to scars through complementary and alternative medicine focusing on osteopathy, naturopathy, and other minor methods and traditional rehabilitative medicines, such as physiotherapy and manual therapies. We analyzed the existing literature regarding the possible influences of techniques relaxing the diaphragm – both manual and psychophysical relaxing techniques – and the consequent local response to events leading to scar tissue healing. The objective of the study is to become a useful instrument of knowledge for those manual therapists and professionals who deal with patients affected by discontinuity of the skin surface due to trauma or surgery. This article also intends to stimulate research in order to find and propose new methods of scar treatment, taking into consideration the information gained so far from other complementary and alternative disciplines. PMID:26316774

  1. Verapamil inhibits scar formation after peripheral nerve repair in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Han, A-chao; Deng, Jing-xiu; Huang, Qi-shun; Zheng, Huai-yuan; Zhou, Pan; Liu, Zhi-wei; Chen, Zhen-bing

    2016-01-01

    The calcium channel blocker, verapamil, has been shown to reduce scar formation by inhibiting fibroblast adhesion and proliferation in vitro. It was not clear whether topical application of verapamil after surgical repair of the nerve in vivo could inhibit the formation of excessive scar tissue. In this study, the right sciatic nerve of adult Sprague-Dawley rats was transected and sutured with No. 10-0 suture. The stoma was wrapped with gelfoam soaked with verapamil solution for 4 weeks. Compared with the control group (stoma wrapped with gelfoam soaked with physiological saline), the verapamil application inhibited the secretion of extracellular matrix from fibroblasts in vivo, suppressed type I and III collagen secretion and increased the total number of axons and the number of myelinated axons. These findings suggest that verapamil could reduce the formation of scar tissue and promote axon growth after peripheral nerve repair. PMID:27127494

  2. A multidisciplinary approach to scars: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Zanier, Emiliano; Bordoni, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to carry out a narrative review regarding the approach to scars through complementary and alternative medicine focusing on osteopathy, naturopathy, and other minor methods and traditional rehabilitative medicines, such as physiotherapy and manual therapies. We analyzed the existing literature regarding the possible influences of techniques relaxing the diaphragm - both manual and psychophysical relaxing techniques - and the consequent local response to events leading to scar tissue healing. The objective of the study is to become a useful instrument of knowledge for those manual therapists and professionals who deal with patients affected by discontinuity of the skin surface due to trauma or surgery. This article also intends to stimulate research in order to find and propose new methods of scar treatment, taking into consideration the information gained so far from other complementary and alternative disciplines. PMID:26316774

  3. Differential expression of cyclooxygenases in hypertrophic scar and keloid tissues.

    PubMed

    Rossiello, Luigi; D'Andrea, Francesco; Grella, Roberto; Signoriello, Giuseppe; Abbondanza, Ciro; De Rosa, Caterina; Prudente, Mariaevelina; Morlando, Marianna; Rossiello, Raffaele

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HS) and keloid (KL) are two forms of an abnormal cutaneous scarring process, mainly characterized by excessive extracellular matrix deposition and fibroblast proliferation. Despite the increased understanding of the molecular and cellular events leading to HS and KL, the pathogenesis of these lesions remains poorly understood. A pivotal role in the formation of abnormal scars has been ascribed to transforming growth factor-beta, whose activity appears to be mediated through a link with pathways acting via cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2). To date, there is no report on the in vivo expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in human HS and KL tissues. Therefore, using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, we investigated 36 cases of KL, 32 cases of HS, and 25 cases of normal skin in order to define the localization and distribution of COX-1 and COX-2 in the tissues of these scar lesions and the overlying epidermis. The results mainly show the following: (a) a significant overexpression of COX-1 in HS tissues and the overlying epidermis as compared with normal skin and KL tissues and (b) a significant overexpression of COX-2 in KL tissue and the overlying epidermis in contrast to normal skin and HS tissues. Our data support the hypothesis that both COXs are involved in the pathogenesis of scar lesions in different ways and, particularly, COX-1 in the formation of HS and COX-2 in the formation of KL. In addition, the overexpression of COX-1 and COX-2 in the epidermis overlying HS and KL tissues, respectively, underlines the importance of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in the pathogenesis of scar lesions. PMID:19769727

  4. Scar Functions, Barriers for Chemical Reactivity, and Vibrational Basis Sets.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, F; Vergini, E; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2016-07-14

    The performance of a recently proposed method to efficiently calculate scar functions is analyzed in problems of chemical interest. An application to the computation of wave functions associated with barriers relevant for the LiNC ⇄ LiCN isomerization reaction is presented as an illustration. These scar functions also constitute excellent elements for basis sets suitable for quantum calculation of vibrational energy levels. To illustrate their efficiency, a calculation of the LiNC/LiCN eigenfunctions is also presented. PMID:26905100

  5. Liposuction-Assisted Short-Scar Brachioplasty: Technical Highlights.

    PubMed

    Hill, Sean; Small, Kevin H; Pezeshk, Ronnie A; Rohrich, Rod J

    2016-09-01

    Upper arm contouring is based on the location and amount of excess skin and fat. The short-scar brachioplasty addresses minimal to moderate skin laxity and lipodystrophy in the proximal arm in patients with appropriate skin tone and quality. This article highlights technical refinements of the senior author's (R.J.R.) approach to short-scar medial liposuction-assisted brachioplasty to maximize results and minimize incision length. To highlight this simple and safe approach with high patient/surgeon satisfaction, the authors discuss the following in this Video Plus article: patient examination, preoperative assessment, surgical pearls, and postoperative outcomes. PMID:27556619

  6. Recontouring, resurfacing, and scar revision in skin cancer reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Michael J; Perro, Christopher A

    2009-08-01

    Residual disfigurement is a common problem for patients who have undergone skin cancer reconstruction. Restoring form and function in these patients is an artistic and technical endeavor. The efficacy of surgical scar revision, dermabrasion, chemical peels, and laser resurfacing is predicated upon the skin's innate ability to regenerate over time in response to mechanical, chemical, and thermal or ablative stresses. The patient and surgeon should be accepting of a process that is often gradual and may proceed in stages. Achieving proficiency with the secondary procedures for improving scars and local flaps may allow the motivated surgeon to mold an initially passable surgical result into an excellent one. PMID:19698924

  7. Mineral analysis in experimental corneal scars. An EDAX study

    SciTech Connect

    Bonafonte, S.; Fernandez del Cotero, J.N.; Aguirre Vila-Coro, A.

    1988-01-01

    Central penetrating excisional wounds were made in the corneas of 12 rabbits and 10 trout. The scar tissue and the surrounding cornea were compared using a new method for assessing inorganic elements in the cornea: the scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of x-ray (EDAX). Semiquantitative determination of inorganic elements within the range of atomic numbers 9-93 in the periodic system was performed, comparing the relative concentration of those elements in the scar tissue to the surrounding cornea. Results showed that calcium was the only element higher in the healing wound than in the surrounding cornea.

  8. SCARS operations final report for the NORESS and ARCESS arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, S.J.

    1992-05-01

    This SCARS (System Control and Receiving Station) Operations Final Report for the Norwegian Experimental Seismic System (NORESS) and Arctic Experimental Seismic System (ARCESS) Arrays is a history of the operations of these projects. It is intended for those who were directly involved in the NORESS and ARCESS projects, as well as for those who are involved in similar projects. Included is a description of the locations and configuration of each array, the function and performance of the field systems, and a summation of the wide range of tasks performed at SCARS.

  9. Scar-free cutaneous wound healing in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Hanna M; Gilbert, Emily A B; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous wounds heal with two possible outcomes: scarification or near-perfect integumentary restoration. Whereas scar formation has been intensively investigated, less is known about the tissue-level events characterising wounds that spontaneously heal scar-free, particularly in non-foetal amniotes. Here, a spatiotemporal investigation of scar-free cutaneous wound healing following full-thickness excisional biopsies to the tail and body of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) is provided. All injuries healed without scarring. Cutaneous repair involves the development of a cell-rich aggregate within the wound bed, similar to scarring wounds. Unlike scar formation, scar-free healing involves a more rapid closure of the wound epithelium, and a delay in blood vessel development and collagen deposition within the wound bed. It was found that, while granulation tissue of scarring wounds is hypervascular, scar-free wound healing conspicuously does not involve a period of exuberant blood vessel formation. In addition, during scar-free wound healing the newly formed blood vessels are typically perivascular cell-supported. Immunohistochemistry revealed widespread expression of both the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor A and the anti-angiogenic factor thrombospondin-1 within the healing wound. It was found that scar-free wound healing is an intrinsic property of leopard gecko integument, and involves a modulation of the cutaneous scar repair program. This proportional revascularisation is an important factor in scar-free wound healing. PMID:26360824

  10. CARDIOVASCULAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN DELIVERING AND EVALUATING THE EFFICACY OF HEPATOCYTE GROWTH FACTOR GENE IN CHRONIC INFARCT SCAR

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Maythem; Saloner, David; Do, Loi; Wilson, Mark; Martin, Alastair

    2012-01-01

    Background In open-chest model of acute infarct, epicardial delivery of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene improved LV function. This study was designed to test 1) the efficacy of HGF gene in infarct scar delivered under MR guidance and 2) the potential of multiple MR sequences in assessing the effects of pCK-HGF (treatment) and pCK-LacZ (control) genes on myocardial structure and function. Methods and Materials Swine (6 per group) were subjected to myocardial infarct, under X-ray fluoroscopy, developed LV remodelling at 5weeks. Multiple clinical MR imaging sequences were performed before delivery of gene (at 5 weeks after infarction) and 5 weeks after delivery of gene. Under MR-guidance, the active endovascular catheter was introduced into LV to transendocardially deliver 3.96×1011 viral copies of pCK-HGF or pCK-LacZ in the border and core of the infarct scar. Histological evaluation of the infarct scar was performed 5 weeks after delivery of gene. Results At 5weeks after infarction, there was no significant difference in measured cardiovascular MR parameters between the groups. PCK-HGF gene caused significant improvement in the following parameters (P<0.05 for these parameters): 3D strain (radial, circumferential, and longitudinal) , perfusion (maximum upslope, peak signal intensity, and time to peak) compared with control pCK-LacZ at 5 weeks after delivery of the genes. The ejection fraction was higher in pCK-HGF treated (43±1%) than pCK-LacZ control (37±1%, P<0.05). These changes are associated with a decrease in infarct scar size (11.3±2.0% in pCK-LacZ control and 6.7±1.3%, in pCK-HGF treated, P<0.01) and transmurality in 4 out of 5 infarct scar segments (P<0.05) on DE-MR imaging. Microscopic study confirmed the increase in capillary (P<0.05), and arteriole (P<0.05) density of infarct scar in pCK-HGF treated compared with pCK-LacZ control animals. Conclusions HGF gene delivered under MR-guidance into infarct scar ameliorated global function, 3D strain

  11. Bioerosion by chemosynthetic biological communities on Holocene submarine slide scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, C. K.; Ussler, W.; Greene, H. G.; Barry, J.; Keaten, R.

    2005-02-01

    Geomorphic, stratigraphic, and faunal observations of submarine slide scars that occur along the flanks of Monterey Canyon in 2.0 2.5 km water depths were made to identify the processes that continue to alter the surface of a submarine landslide scar after the initial slope failure. Deep-sea chemosynthetic biological communities and small caves are common on the sediment-free surfaces of the slide scars, especially along the headwall. The chemosynthetic organisms observed on slide scars in Monterey Canyon undergo a faunal succession based in part on their ability to maintain their access to the redox boundaries in the sediment on which they depend on as an energy source. By burrowing into the seafloor, these organisms are able to follow the retreating redox boundaries as geochemical re-equilibration occurs on the sole of the slide. As these organisms dig into the seafloor on the footwall, they often generate small caves and weaken the remaining seafloor. While chemosynthetic biological communities are typically used as indicators of fluid flow, these communities may be supported by methane and hydrogen sulfide that are diffusing out of the fresh seafloor exposed at the sole of the slide by the slope failure event. If so, these chemosynthetic biological communities may simply mark sites of recent seafloor exhumation, and are not reliable fluid seepage indicators.

  12. Biologicals and Fetal Cell Therapy for Wound and Scar Management

    PubMed Central

    Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Ramelet, Albert-Adrien; Raffoul, Wassim; de Buys Roessingh, Anthony; Scaletta, Corinne; Pioletti, Dominique; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2011-01-01

    Few biopharmaceutical preparations developed from biologicals are available for tissue regeneration and scar management. When developing biological treatments with cellular therapy, selection of cell types and establishment of consistent cell banks are crucial steps in whole-cell bioprocessing. Various cell types have been used in treatment of wounds to reduce scar to date including autolog and allogenic skin cells, platelets, placenta, and amniotic extracts. Experience with fetal cells show that they may provide an interesting cell choice due to facility of outscaling and known properties for wound healing without scar. Differential gene profiling has helped to point to potential indicators of repair which include cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, cytokines, growth factors, and development. Safety has been evidenced in Phase I and II clinical fetal cell use for burn and wound treatments with different cell delivery systems. We present herein that fetal cells present technical and therapeutic advantages compared to other cell types for effective cell-based therapy for wound and scar management. PMID:22363853

  13. Ectopic Pregnancy in caesarean section scar: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Rajarshi; Solanki, Narayan; Kakadiya, Ketan; Bansal, Ashank; Joshi, Manisha; Nawale, Ajita

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of ectopic pregnancy occurring in the scar of a previous caesarean section, diagnosed by ultrasonography and confirmed by 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging of pelvis. We present the clinical details and imaging findings, followed by discussion of the etiology, pathogenesis, and imaging of this condition. PMID:26649124

  14. [Nonablative fractional lasers: Acne scars and other indications].

    PubMed

    Degitz, K

    2015-10-01

    Nonablative photothermolysis has become an established technique in laser dermatology. It is mainly used for restructuring dermal connective tissue in order to treat, for example, acne scars or solar elastosis. It is also applied to the treatment of melasma and other benign cutaneous pigment disorders. This article discusses various indications in light of published observations and with regard to practical considerations. PMID:26253115

  15. 4. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF DAM, WITH SCARS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF DAM, WITH SCARS FROM EARTH MOVING TO CONSTRUCT DAM IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING NORTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Five Point Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 12 miles Northwest of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  16. 8. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH MOVING TO CONSTRUCT DAM, LOOKING NORTH - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, East Timothy Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 8.4 miles North of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  17. 9. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH MOVING TO CONSTRUCT DAM, LOOKING EAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, East Timothy Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 8.4 miles North of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  18. Histologic features of alopecias: part II: scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Bernárdez, C; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Requena, L

    2015-05-01

    The diagnosis of disorders of the hair and scalp can generally be made on clinical grounds, but clinical signs are not always diagnostic and in some cases more invasive techniques, such as a biopsy, may be necessary. This 2-part article is a detailed review of the histologic features of the main types of alopecia based on the traditional classification of these disorders into 2 major groups: scarring and nonscarring alopecias. Scarring alopecias are disorders in which the hair follicle is replaced by fibrous scar tissue, a process that leads to permanent hair loss. In nonscarring alopecias, the follicles are preserved and hair growth can resume when the cause of the problem is eliminated. In the second part of this review, we describe the histologic features of the main forms of scarring alopecia. Since a close clinical-pathological correlation is essential for making a correct histopathologic diagnosis of alopecia, we also include a brief description of the clinical features of the principal forms of this disorder. PMID:25439143

  19. Hysteroscopy and suction evacuation of cesarean scar pregnancies: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Fylstra, Donald L

    2014-03-01

    Implantation of a pregnancy into the scar of a prior cesarean is an uncommon type of ectopic pregnancy. The incidence of cesarean scar pregnancy is thought to be one in 1800-2216 pregnancies. The increase in the incidence of cesarean scar pregnancy is thought to be a consequence of the increasing rates of cesarean delivery. The natural history of cesarean scar pregnancy is unknown. However, if such a pregnancy is allowed to continue, uterine scar rupture with hemorrhage and possible hysterectomy seem likely. Two early diagnosed cesarean scar pregnancies were treated with hysteroscopy and suction curettage removal. One required intramuscular methotrexate to resolve a persistent cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy. It would seem reasonable that simple suction evacuation would frequently leave chorionic villi imbedded within the cesarean scar, as the pregnancy is not within the endometrial cavity. PMID:24320609

  20. Chromatic analysis of burn scar based on ANN by using photoelectrical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Baikun; Qi, Hongzhi; Ming, Dong; Zhang, Mingjian; Wang, Qifang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a novel method for the chromatic analysis of burn scar is proposed. The aim of the algorithm is to evaluate the curative effect and set up the treatment plan pertinently, because the scar color is an impersonal parameter reflects the degree of scar hypertrophy. The method is based on artificial neural network (ANN) by using photoelectrical technique, and composed of three main parts: firstly capture the digital color images of the burn scar using CCD camera, then change the RGB color data of the burn scar into that of HSB color space and emend it using ANN, lastly judge the degree of burn scar hypertrophy by chromatic analysis using ANN again. The experimental results were good conformed to the degrees of scar hypertrophy given by clinical evaluations. It suggests that the chromatic analysis technique of the burn scar is valuable for further study and apply to the clinical engineering.

  1. Sequential treatment with intradermal incision (intracision) and 2,940-nm Er:YAG laser for chicken pox scars.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ju; Kim, Young Koo; Choi, Sun Young; Park, Kui Young; Seo, Seong Jun

    2014-01-01

    Boxcar scars, such as chicken pox scars, are round to oval depressions with sharply defined vertical edges. Subcision is a simple and safe procedure for treatment of atrophic and depressed scars, but boxcar scars are generally not eliminated by subcision. Intradermal incision technique (intracision) can treat chicken pox scars by untethering fibrotic strands, raising collagen synthesis, and having additional intradermal blood pocket formation. We have found that chicken pox scars further improve when intracision is followed by laser skin resurfacing. PMID:24502307

  2. The evolution of laser surgery for acne and other scarring processes.

    PubMed

    Morton, Laurel M

    2014-12-01

    The treatment of acne scars is an important part of a laser specialist's practice. For the last 20 years, the technology available for this application has progressed from nonablative to ablative and eventually to fractional lasers that are effective for a range of scar types. Although patients with mild to severe acne scarring have long been good laser candidates, we are beginning to understand the use of lasers for severe traumatic scars which can be disfiguring and functionally limiting in nature. PMID:25830249

  3. Blockade of Mast Cell Activation Reduces Cutaneous Scar Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ranzer, Matthew J.; Wilgus, Traci A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  4. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  5. Molecular mechanisms of scar-sourced axon growth inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ohtake, Yosuke; Li, Shuxin

    2014-01-01

    Astrogliosis is a defense response of the CNS to minimize primary damage and to repair injured tissues, but it ultimately generates harmful effects by upregulating inhibitory molecules to suppress neuronal elongation and forming potent barriers to axon regeneration. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are highly expressed by reactive scars and are potent contributors to the non-permissive environment in mature CNS. Surmounting strong inhibition by CSPG-rich scar is an important therapeutic goal for achieving functional recovery after CNS injuries. Currently, enzymatic digestion of CSPGs with locally applied chondroitinase ABC is the main in vivo approach to overcome scar inhibition, but several disadvantages may prevent using this bacterial enzyme as a therapeutic option for patients. A better understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying CSPG function may facilitate development of new effective therapies to overcome scar-mediated inhibition. Previous studies support that CSPGs act by non-specifically hindering the binding of matrix molecules to their cell surface receptors through steric interactions, but two members of the leukocyte common antigen related (LAR) phosphatase subfamily, protein tyrosine phosphatase σ and LAR, are functional receptors that bind CSPGs with high affinity and mediate CSPG inhibition. CSPGs may also act by binding two receptors for myelin-associated growth inhibitors, Nogo receptors 1 and 3. Thus, CSPGs inhibit axon growth through multiple mechanisms, making them especially potent and difficult therapeutic targets. Identification of CSPG receptors is not only important for understanding the scar-mediated growth suppression, but also for developing novel and selective therapies to promote axon sprouting and/or regeneration after CNS injuries. PMID:25192646

  6. Disfiguring burn scars and adolescent self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Robert, R; Meyer, W; Bishop, S; Rosenberg, L; Murphy, L; Blakeney, P

    1999-11-01

    Although children with burn scars are reported to have positive self-concepts, social and sexual maturation can be expected to stimulate anxiety, depression and diminished self-esteem in adolescents with disfiguring scars. This study examines complex self-regard of adolescents with burn scars. The following were hypothesized: (1) adolescents with disfiguring burn scars would view themselves as less competent than unburned normative samples; (2) subjects' perceived competence would be incongruent with the importance ascribed to the domains of physical appearance and athletic competence and (3) depression/anxiety would correlate negatively with perceived competence. Subjects were 14 adolescents: 6 male and 8 female, 13-20 years old, at least 2 years post-burn injury (TBSA = 39% +/- 23%). All had scars in at least 2 of the following areas: head/face, neck, chest, hands, genitals. Each subject was administered the Harter Self Perception Profile, a standardized measure of self-competence and value in 8 domains plus a general competence measure. The subjects were also assessed for anxiety/depression by the Child Behavioral Checklist. Overall, adolescents in this sample exhibited a similar or higher degree of self-worth as compared to their peers. However, the athletic competence and physical appearance sub-domains of self-worth for the burn survivors were significantly lower as compared to the normative group. Half of the participants rated the importance of physical appearance to be higher than their level of personal competence in this area, making for distressing emotions. Mood was similar to the normative group and mood correlated significantly with self-worth. PMID:10563682

  7. Evaluation of eddy-current procedures for measuring wear scars in preheat steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.D.

    1985-04-01

    Tests show that flat wear scar procedures will provide more accurate measurements of the depth of wear scars in steam generator tubes if they are supplemented by two new techniques. Used together, these methods can detect as little as 5% increase in scar depth.

  8. [Keloid scars (part I): Clinical presentation, epidemiology, histology and pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Philandrianos, C; Kerfant, N; Jaloux, C; Martinet, L; Bertrand, B; Casanova, D

    2016-04-01

    Keloid scars are a dysregulated response to cutaneous wound healing and are characterized by excessive deposition of collagen. Clinical and histological aspects are typical but they are often confused with hypertrophic scars. Principal pathogenesis is abnormal regulation of the collagen equilibrium because of TGFβ. In this first part, clinical characteristics, physiopathology and histology of keloid scars are explained. PMID:26545809

  9. Histology of the thick scar on the female, red Duroc pig: Final similarities to human hypertrophic scar

    PubMed Central

    Harunari, Nobuyuki; Zhu, Kathy Q.; Armendariz, Rebecca T.; Deubner, Heike; Muangman, Pornprom; Carrougher, Gretchen J.; Isik, F. Frank; Gibran, Nicole S.; Engrav, Loren H.

    2010-01-01

    The etiology and treatment of hypertrophic scar remain puzzles even after decades of research. A significant reason is the lack of an accepted animal model of the process. The female, red Duroc pig model was described long ago. Since the skin of the pig is similar to that of humans, we are attempting to validate this model and found it to be encouraging. In this project we quantified myofibroblasts, mast cells and collagen nodules in the thick scar of the Duroc pig and compared these to the values for human hypertrophic scar. We found the results to be quite similar and so further validated the model. In addition, we observed that soon after wounding an inflammatory cell layer forms. The thickness of the inflammatory layer approaches the thickness of the skin removed as if the remaining dermis “knows” how much dermis is gone. In deep wounds this inflammatory layer thickens and this thickness is predictive of the thickness of the ultimate scar. PMID:16905264

  10. AN EFFICIENT METHOD FOR ACCURATELY DETERMINING WEAR VOLUMES OF SLIDERS WITH NON-FLAT WEAR SCARS AND COMPOUND CURVATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Truhan, Jr., John J

    2006-01-01

    Point contact is often used in unidirectional pin-on-disk and reciprocating pin-on-flat sliding friction and wear tests. The slider tip could have either a spherical shape or compound curvatures (such as an ellipsoidal shape), and the worn tip usually is not flat but has unknown curvatures. Current methods for determining the wear volumes of sliders suffer from one or more limitations. For example, the gravimetric method is not able to detect small amounts of wear, and the two-dimensional wear scar size measurement is valid only for flat wear scars. More rigorous methods can be very time consuming, such as the 3D surface profiling method that involves obtaining tedious multiple surface profiles and analyzing a large set of data. In this study, a new 'single-trace' analysis is introduced to efficiently evaluate the wear volumes of non-flat worn sliders. This method requires only the measurement of the wear scar size and one trace of profiling to obtain the curvature on the wear cap. The wear volume calculation only involves closed-form algebraic equations. This single-trace method has demonstrated much higher accuracy and fewer limitations than the gravimetric method and 2D method, and has shown good agreement with the 3D method while saving significant surface profiling and data analysis time.