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Sample records for postoperative analgesic effect

  1. Effectiveness of preoperative analgesics on postoperative dental pain: a study.

    PubMed Central

    Zacharias, M.; Hunter, K. M.; Baker, A. B.

    1996-01-01

    Patients undergoing extractions of third molar teeth under general anesthesia were given a placebo, diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) 100 mg, or methadone (an opiate) 10 mg 60 to 90 min prior to surgery, and their pain scores and postoperative medication requirements were measured for 3 days. All patients received local anesthetic blocks and analgesic drugs during the perioperative period. There were no significant differences between the three groups in the pain scores and medication requirements during the period of study. It was concluded that preoperative use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates may not offer a preemptive analgesic effect in patients who have had adequate analgesia during the surgery. Continued use of analgesic drugs during the postoperative period is perhaps more useful for this purpose. There appears to be a higher incidence of vomiting following opiates (methadone), precluding its clinical use in day-care patients. PMID:10323113

  2. Analgesic effect of intramuscular and oral nalbuphine in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Beaver, W T; Feise, G A; Robb, D

    1981-02-01

    In a double-blind study using patients' subjective reports as indices of analgesia, the relative analgesic potency of intramuscular and oral nalbuphine was determined in 104 postoperative patients. Effects of single doses of 3 and 9 mg of intramuscular nalbuphine were compared with those of 15- and 45-mg oral doses of nalbuphine by means of a parallel study design (26 patients per treatment group). When both intensity and duration of analgesia are considered (i.e., total analgesic effect), oral nalbuphine is 1/4 to 1/5 as potent as intramuscular nalbuphine. In terms of peak effect, however, oral nalbuphine is only 1/10 as potent. The oral/parenteral potency ratio for total effect is close to those obtained by Houde et al. in studies of morphine (1/6), metopon (1/5), hydromorphone (1/5), and oxymorphone (1/6) and suggests that oral nalbuphine undergoes substantial biotransformation on first pass through gut mucosa and liver. Since intramuscular nalbuphine is approximately equipotent to morphine, it should be feasible to equal the analgesia induced by the usual intramuscular doses of morphine with reasonable oral doses of nalbuphine. Although nalbuphine is a mixed agonist/antagonist analgesic, no psychotomimetic reactions were observed. PMID:7006884

  3. Etodolac: analgesic effects in musculoskeletal and postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Pena, M

    1990-01-01

    Numerous clinical trials have shown etodolac to be an effective analgesic. The purpose of the present report is to review results of 14 studies that demonstrate the effectiveness of etodolac in a variety of painful conditions. Presented are the results of four postsurgical pain studies, one study of acute gouty arthritis and nine studies of acute musculoskeletal disorders: acute low back pain, acute painful shoulder, tendinitis and bursitis, and acute sports injuries. A single oral dose of etodolac (25, 50, 100, 200, or 400 mg) was compared with aspirin (650 mg) or a combination of acetaminophen (600 mg) plus codeine (60 mg) for the relief of pain up to 12 h following oral, urogenital or orthopedic surgery. In multiple dose studies of acute gouty arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions, etodolac 200 or 300 mg twice a day (b.i.d.) or 200 mg three times a day (t.i.d.) was compared with naproxen 500 mg b.i.d. or t.i.d., diclofenac 50 mg b.i.d. or t.i.d., and piroxicam 20 or 40 mg once a day (o.d.) administered over 5 to 14 days. The efficacy of etodolac was at least equal and in some ways superior to aspirin and acetaminophen plus codeine in the relief of postsurgical pain. In studies of acute gouty arthritis, significant improvement from baseline were seen for all efficacy parameters evaluated for both the etodolac- and naproxen-treated patients. All the present studies of musculoskeletal conditions have shown etodolac to be effective and comparable in analgesic efficacy to naproxen, diclofenac or piroxicam. In summary, etodolac therapy for pain following surgery, in acute gouty arthritis and in acute musculoskeletal conditions resulted in analgesia comparable to that provided by several well-established analgesic or anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:2150571

  4. The Influence of Genotype Polymorphism on Morphine Analgesic Effect for Postoperative Pain in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Geum; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Keun Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Background Although opioids are the most commonly used medications to control postoperative pain in children, the analgesic effects could have a large inter-individual variability according to genotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the analgesic effect of morphine for postoperative pain in children. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 88 healthy children undergoing tonsillectomy, who received morphine during the operation. The postoperative pain score, frequency of rescue analgesics, and side effects of morphine were assessed in the post-anesthesia care unit. The children were genotyped for OPRM1 A118G, ABCB1 C3435T, and COMT Val158Met. Results Children with at least one G allele for OPRM1 (AG/GG) had higher postoperative pain scores compared with those with the AA genotype at the time of discharge from the post-anesthesia care unit (P = 0.025). Other recovery profiles were not significantly different between the two groups. There was no significant relationship between genotypes and postoperative pain scores in analysis of ABCB1 and COMT polymorphisms. Conclusions Genetic polymorphism at OPRM1 A118G, but not at ABCB1 C3435T and COMT Val158Met, influences the analgesic effect of morphine for immediate acute postoperative pain in children. PMID:26839669

  5. A Clinical Experimental Model to Evaluate Analgesic Effect of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Acute Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Francisco Elano Carvalho; Mello, Irene Lopes; Pimenta, Fernando Heladio de Oliveira Medeiros; Costa, Debora Maia; Wong, Deysi Viviana Tenazoa; Fernandes, Claudia Regina; Lima Junior, Roberto César; Gomes, Josenília M. Alves

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the viability of a clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) and its analgesic effects. It is a prospective study with twenty (20) patients randomly divided into two groups: control group and RIPC group. The opioid analgesics consumption in the postoperative period, the presence of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia, the scores of postoperative pain by visual analog scale, and the plasma levels interleukins (IL-6) were evaluated. The tourniquet applying after spinal anesthetic block was safe, producing no pain for all patients in the tourniquet group. The total dose of morphine consumption in 24 hours was significantly lower in RIPC group than in the control group (p = 0.0156). The intensity analysis of rest pain, pain during coughing and pain in deep breathing, showed that visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in RIPC group compared to the control group: p = 0.0087, 0.0119, and 0.0015, respectively. There were no differences between groups in the analysis of presence or absence of mechanical hyperalgesia (p = 0.0704) and in the serum levels of IL-6 dosage over time (p < 0.0001). This clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning promoted satisfactory analgesia in patients undergoing conventional cholecystectomy, without changing serum levels of IL-6. PMID:27446611

  6. A Clinical Experimental Model to Evaluate Analgesic Effect of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Acute Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Francisco Elano Carvalho; Mello, Irene Lopes; Pimenta, Fernando Heladio de Oliveira Medeiros; Costa, Debora Maia; Wong, Deysi Viviana Tenazoa; Fernandes, Claudia Regina; Lima Junior, Roberto César; Gomes, Josenília M Alves

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the viability of a clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) and its analgesic effects. It is a prospective study with twenty (20) patients randomly divided into two groups: control group and RIPC group. The opioid analgesics consumption in the postoperative period, the presence of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia, the scores of postoperative pain by visual analog scale, and the plasma levels interleukins (IL-6) were evaluated. The tourniquet applying after spinal anesthetic block was safe, producing no pain for all patients in the tourniquet group. The total dose of morphine consumption in 24 hours was significantly lower in RIPC group than in the control group (p = 0.0156). The intensity analysis of rest pain, pain during coughing and pain in deep breathing, showed that visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in RIPC group compared to the control group: p = 0.0087, 0.0119, and 0.0015, respectively. There were no differences between groups in the analysis of presence or absence of mechanical hyperalgesia (p = 0.0704) and in the serum levels of IL-6 dosage over time (p < 0.0001). This clinical model of remote ischemic preconditioning promoted satisfactory analgesia in patients undergoing conventional cholecystectomy, without changing serum levels of IL-6. PMID:27446611

  7. CGRP 4218T/C polymorphism correlated with postoperative analgesic effect of fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yusheng; Zhao, Mingqiang; Xu, Fenghe; Liu, Chuansheng; Yin, Yanwei; Yu, Junmin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Our study aimed at evaluating the association between α-calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) 4218T/C polymorphism and the patient-controlled analgesic (PCA) effect of fentanyl on Chinese Han population. Methods: 98 patients were involved in the experiment, but only 92 patients completed the experiment. 0.1 mg/kg fentanyl was given to the patients through intravenous injection ten minutes before the ending of surgery. The patients achieved PCA by controlling the fentanyl infusion pump and a single dose was 1 mg. The CGRP 4218T/C polymorphism was genotyped with polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. The fentanyl consumption within the 72 hours after the surgery was recorded and the pain was assessed with numeric rating scale (NRS) method. Results: The patients were divided into three groups of wild homozygote (T/T), heterozygote (T/C), and mutant homozygote (C/C). At the 6th hour and the 12th hour after the surgery, the fentanyl consumption for PCA of the T/C group was significantly higher than the T/T group (P<0.05). Meanwhile, the fentanyl consumption of the C/C group was much higher than the T/T group (P<0.05) at the 12th hour and the 24th hour. Besides, the fentanyl consumption of the C/C group was more than the T/C group (P<0.05) at the 24th hour. The differences in NRS scores, Ramsey scores, and postoperative adverse reactions between each group at all time points were not statistically significant. Conclusions: CGRP 4218T/C polymorphism may be associated with the postoperative fentanyl consumption for analgesia. PMID:26191294

  8. Effect of body mass index on operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Shohab, Durre; Ayub, Ramsha; Alam, Muhammad Umar; Butt, Amna; Sheikh, Sanam; Assad, Salman; Akhter, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of body mass index (BMI) on operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) by comparing three BMI groups. Material and methods This is a retrospective analysis of 129 patients who underwent PCNL from January 2010 to August 2013. All the patients underwent PCNL by a standard technique. The patients were divided into three groups: patients having a BMI ≤24 kg/m2 were included in the normal group, those having a BMI of 24.1–30.0 kg/m2 were included in the overweight group, and those having a BMI >30 kg/m2 were included in the obese group. Three groups were compared for operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement. Results A total of 129 patients including 44 females and 85 males were included with a mean age of 45.00±1.44 years. The mean age in the normal group was 43.29±1.69 years, 47.08±1.29 years in the overweight group, and 43.61±1.25 years in the obese group. The mean stone size in the normal group was 25.46±8.92 mm, 28.01±8.40 mm in the overweight group, and 26.84±7.41 mm in the obese group. Our results showed no statistically significant difference with respect to mean operative time, mean hospital stay, and stone clearance in the normal, obese, and overweight patients undergoing PCNL. Postoperative complications and analgesia requirement were also similar in all the three groups. Conclusion There was no effect of BMI on operative time, hospital stay, stone clearance, postoperative complications, and postoperative analgesic requirement in patients undergoing PCNL. PCNL is a safe and effective procedure for the removal of renal stones in obese patients. PMID:26623145

  9. Registered Nurses' Knowledge about Adverse Effects of Analgesics when Treating Postoperative Pain in Patients with Dementia.

    PubMed

    Rantala, Maija; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Kvist, Tarja; Kankkunen, Päivi

    2015-08-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) play a pivotal role in treating pain and preventing and recognizing the adverse effects (AEs) of analgesics in patients with dementia. The purpose of this study was to determine RNs' knowledge of potentially clinically relevant AEs of analgesics. A descriptive, cross-sectional study design was used. In all, 267 RNs treating orthopedic patients, including patients with dementia, in 7 university hospitals and 10 central hospitals in Finland, completed a questionnaire. Analgesics were defined according to the Anatomic Therapeutic Classification as strong opioids, weak opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics (NSAIDs), and paracetamol. Definitions of AEs were based on the literature. Logistic regression analysis was applied to analyze which variables predicted nurses' knowledge. The RNs had a clear understanding of the AEs of paracetamol and strong opioids. However, the AEs of NSAIDs, especially renal and cardiovascular AEs, were less well known. The median percentage of correct answers was 87% when asked about strong opioids, 73% for weak opioids, and 60% for NSAIDs. Younger RNs had better knowledge of opioid-related AEs (odds ratio [OR] per 1-year increase, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94-1.00) and weak opioids (OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93-0.99). This study provides evidence of a deficiency in RNs' knowledge, especially regarding the adverse renal and cardiovascular effects of NSAIDs. Such lack of knowledge indicates that hospitals may need to update the knowledge of older RNs, especially those who treat vulnerable patients with dementia. PMID:26047589

  10. Postoperative catecholamine response to onychectomy in isoflurane-anesthetized cats. Effects of analgesics.

    PubMed

    Benson, G J; Wheaton, L G; Thurmon, J C; Tranquilli, W J; Olson, W A; Davis, C A

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-four healthy adult cats were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. Six cats (group 1) served as controls; onychectomy of the forefeet was performed in the other three groups. Saline was administered intravenously to group 1, and morphine, xylazine, and salicylate were administered to groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Mixed venous blood samples were drawn for catecholamine analysis before induction of anesthesia, after recovery from anesthesia, and 30 minutes and 60 minutes after administration of the analgesic agent. Plasma catecholamine concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Isoflurane anesthesia alone induced a transient increase in epinephrine concentration. Norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations increased significantly after onychectomy. Morphine and xylazine significantly decreased postoperative norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations; salicylate did not. PMID:1853554

  11. Preoperative education and use of analgesic before onset of pain routinely for post-thoracotomy pain control can reduce pain effect and total amount of analgesics administered postoperatively.

    PubMed

    Kol, Emine; Alpar, Sule Ecevit; Erdoğan, Abdullah

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficiency of preoperative pain management education and the role of analgesics administration before the onset of pain postoperatively. The study was a prospective, randomized, and single-blind clinical trial, which was conducted January 1, 2008 through October 1, 2008 in the Thoracic Surgery Unit of Akdeniz University Hospital. A total of 70 patients who underwent thoracotomy (35 in the control group and 35 in the study group) were included in the study. Of the patients, 70% (n = 49) were male and 30% (n = 21) were female. Mean age was 51 ± 10 years (range = 25-65). The same analgesia method was used for all patients; the same surgical team performed each operation. Methods, including preemptive analgesia and placement of pleural or thoracic catheter for using analgesics, that were likely to affect pain level, were not used. The same analgesia medication was used for both patient groups. But the study group, additionally, was educated on how to deal with pain preoperatively and on the pharmacological methods to be used after surgery. An intramuscular diclofenac Na 75 mg was administered to the study group regardless of whether or not they reported pain in the first two postoperative hours. The control group did not receive preoperative education, and analgesics were not administered to them unless they reported pain in the postoperative period. The routine analgesics protocol was as follows: diclofenac Na 75 mg (once a day) intramuscular administered upon the complaint of pain following extubation in the postoperative period and 20 mg mepederin intravenously (maximum dose, 100 mg/day), in addition, when the patient expressed pain. Pain severity was assessed during the second, fourth, eighth, 16th, 24th, and 48th hours, and marked using the Verbal Category Scale and the Behavioral Pain Assessment Scale. Additionally, the total dose of daily analgesics was calculated. The demographic characteristics showed a

  12. Comparative study of postoperative analgesic effect of intraperitoneal instillation of dexmedetomidine with bupivacaine and bupivacaine alone after laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Vrinda P; Parmar, Vandana; Badheka, Jigisha; Nanavati, Dharam S; Taur, Pradip; Rajyaguru, Ajay M

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: This prospective double-blinded study was designed with the aim of comparing the analgesic effect of intraperitoneal instillation of dexmedetomidine with bupivacaine with that with bupivacaine alone in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgeries. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 100 patients of either sex undergoing elective laparoscopic surgery were randomly divided into two groups containing 50 patients in each group. Group B received intraperitoneal instillation with 50 mL of bupivacaine 0.25% (125 mg) and groups B + D received 50 mL of bupivacaine 0.25% (125 mg) + 1 μg/kg of dexmedetomidine. Pain was assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS) at 0.5 h, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, and 24 h after the surgery. The requirement of rescue analgesics were recorded. RESULT: Duration of analgesia was longer in group B+D (14.5 hr) compared to group B (13.06 hr). The requirement of rescue analgesic in 24 hours was less in group B+D (1.76) compared to group B (2.56) which were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The mean number of total rescue analgesia given in 24 h was less in group B+D was 1.76 whereas in group B was 2.56 that were statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Intraperitoneal instillation of dexmedetomidine with bupivacaine prolongs the duration of postoperative analgesia as compared to that with bupivacaine alone. And also there is less number of rescue analgesics that are required postoperatively when dexmedetomidine is supplemented as an adjuvant to bupivacaine. PMID:27279399

  13. The Postoperative Analgesic Effect of Morphine and Paracetamol in the Patients Undergoing Laparotomy, Using PCA Method

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoubi, Siamak; Pourfallah, Reza; Barikani, Ameneh; Kayalha, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Objective: postoperative pain increases the activity of the sympathetic system, causes hypermetabolic conditions, retains salt and water, increases glucose, fatty acid lactate and oxygen consumption, weakens the immunity system which delays wound healing. Our object was comparison of the analgesic effect of morphine and paracetamol in the patients undergoing laparotomy, using PCA method. Method: Seventy patients who had undergone laparotomy were studied using double blind randomized clinical trial (35 patients received morphine and 35 paracetamol) in the Shahid Rajaee Center and Velayat Hospital (Qazvin, Iran). People using opioids, painkillers and sedatives regularly and in large doses and patients with a history of lung or liver problems did not participate in this project. The parameters of the severity of pain and nausea (VAS), hemodynamic changes (BP and HR), pruritus, arterial oxygen desaturation and patient satisfaction (VAS) of both groups were measured by a third party (trained colleague). The data was analyzed using SPSS 16 statistical software then descriptive results were extracted and ultimately the groups were compared using the following statistical tests: student’s T-test, chi 2 and Fisher’s exact test (P<0.05). Findings: The mean age of the participants was 45±12.5 years. Women constituted 24.3% of the patients and men 75.7%. The average pain severity for morphine and paracetamol groups (VAS) was 5.3±2.2and 6.37±1.7 after2 hours and reached 1.91±1.3 and 2.49±1.3 after 8 hours (after the operation) respectively. There was a significant difference between the groups after 2 and 4 hours in terms of pain severity (after 2 hours P=0.007 and after 4 hours P=0.047). However there was no significant difference between the average pain severity of the studied groups (after 6 hours P=0.4 and 8 hours P=0.08). After 8 hours, the average nausea severity was the minimum in both groups being 1.71±1.6 and 1.43±1.1 in morphine and paracetamol groups

  14. Analgesic effect of acetaminophen, phenyltoloxamine and their combination in postoperative oral surgery pain.

    PubMed

    Forbes, J A; Barkaszi, B A; Ragland, R N; Hankle, J J

    1984-01-01

    In this factorial study, 148 outpatients with pain after oral surgery were randomly assigned, on a double-blind basis, a single oral dose of acetaminophen 650 mg, phenyltoloxamine 60 mg, a combination of acetaminophen 650 mg with phenyltoloxamine 60 mg, or placebo. Using a self-rating record, subjects rated their pain and its relief hourly for 6 hours after medication. Measures of total and peak analgesia were derived from these subjective reports. The acetaminophen effect was significant for every measure of total and peak analgesia. The phenyltoloxamine effect was not significant for any measure of analgesia. Although efficacy was lower for the acetaminophen-phenyltoloxamine combination than for acetaminophen alone, for every variable, the contrast for interaction was not statistically significant. The results of this study differ from those of previous studies in patients with headache and musculoskeletal pain. All adverse effects were transitory and consistent with the known pharmacologic profiles of the study medications or the backup analgesic. PMID:6483639

  15. Analgesic oral efficacy of tramadol hydrochloride in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A; Olson, N Z; Zighelboim, I; DeCastro, A; Minn, F L

    1992-06-01

    Tramadol hydrochloride is a synthetic opiate agonist with a plasma elimination half-life of 5 to 6 hours and peak plasma levels at about 1 1/2 hours. It derives its activity from attachment to the mu-receptor and blockage of norepinephrine reuptake. The purpose of this single-dose, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to determine the analgesic effectiveness of an oral administration of two dose levels of tramadol hydrochloride (75 or 150 mg) compared with the combination of 650 mg acetaminophen plus 100 mg propoxyphene napsylate in 161 patients with severe postoperative pain after cesarean section. Analgesia was assessed over a 6-hour period. Treatments were compared on the basis of standard scales for pain intensity and relief and a number of derived variables based on these data. A global rating of the study medication was also used to compare treatments. The three active treatments were effective analgesics, statistically superior to placebo for many hourly and summary measures. A dose response was seen between the two tramadol doses, with the 150 mg dose providing significantly greater analgesia over the lower dose. The 75 mg dose of tramadol was generally more effective than the acetaminophen-propoxyphene combination after hour 2, and significantly so for some hourly time points, as well as for the global rating of the medication. The 150 mg dose of tramadol was significantly more effective than the acetaminophen-propoxyphene combination from hour 2 through hour 6 for the sum of pain intensity differences and total pain relief scores, as well as for the global rating of the medication. Tramadol hydrochloride at both dose levels is an effective analgesic agent and at 150 mg is statistically superior to the acetaminophen-propoxyphene combination. No serious adverse effects were observed; however, dizziness was more frequently reported with 150 mg tramadol. PMID:1351804

  16. Preemptive Analgesic Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on Postoperative Pain: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Eidy, Mohammad; Fazel, Mohammad Reza; Janzamini, Monir; Haji Rezaei, Mostafa; Moravveji, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological analgesic method used to control different types of pain. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of preoperative TENS on post inguinal hernia repair pain. Patients and Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed on 66 male patients with unilateral inguinal hernias who were admitted to the Shahid Beheshti hospital in Kashan, Iran, from April to October 2014. Participants were selected using a convenience sampling method and were assigned to intervention (n = 33) and control (n = 33) groups using permuted-block randomization. Patients in the intervention group were treated with TENS 1 hour before surgery, while the placebo was administered to patients in the control group. All of the patients underwent inguinal hernia repair by the Lichtenstein method, and pain intensity was evaluated at 2, 4, 6, and 12 hours after surgery using a visual analogue scale. Additionally, the amounts of analgesic administered by pump were calculated and compared between the two groups. Results The mean estimated postoperative pain intensity was 6.21 ± 1.63 in the intervention group and 5.45 ± 1.82 in the control group (P = 0.08). In the intervention group pain intensity at 2 and 4 hours after surgery were 3.54 ± 1.48 and 5.12 ± 1.41 (P < 0.001), respectively. In the control group these values were 4.0±1.5 and 4.76 ± 1.39 (P = 0.04), respectively. No significant differences were observed in mean pain intensities at 6 and 12 hours. Conclusions TENS can reduce postoperative pain in the early hours after inguinal hernia repair surgery. PMID:27275401

  17. Comparison of Conorphone, A Mixed Agonist-Antagonist Analgesic, to Codeine for Postoperative Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Raymond A.; Wirdezk, Peggy R.; Butler, Donald P.; Fox, Philip C.

    1984-01-01

    The analgesic efficacy of two doses of conorphone (20 and 40 mg), a mixed agonist-antagonist analgesic, were compared to two doses of codeine for postoperative pain in the oral surgery model. Each subject received 2 of the 4 possible treatment at two separate sessions in an incomplete block, single crossover design. Both doses of conorphone and the 60 mg dose of codeine were superior to 30 mg of codeine for the various indices of analgesic activity. The 40 mg dose of conorphone resulted in a high incidence of side effects (25/30 subjects) such as drowsiness, dizziness, nausea and vomiting. The low dose of conorphone resulted in side effects similar to 60 mg of codeine with the exception of a greater incidence of drowsiness. These data suggest that while 40 mg of conorphone may not be well tolerated clinically, 20 mg of conorphone may be an alternative to 60 mg of codeine for postoperative pain. PMID:6597688

  18. Combined parecoxib and I.V. paracetamol provides additional analgesic effect with better postoperative satisfaction in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elseify, Zeinab Ahmed; El-Khattab, Salwa Omar; Khattab, Ahmed Metwally; Atta, Eman Mohammed; Ajjoub, Layal Fares

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adequacy of postoperative analgesia is one of the most important factors that determine early hospital discharge and patients’ ability to resume their normal activities postoperatively. The optimal non-opioid analgesic technique for postoperative pain management would reduce pain and enhance patient satisfaction, and it also facilitates earlier mobilization and rehabilitation by reducing pain-related complications after surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of intravenous paracetamol and parecoxib when used alone, or in combination. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) physical status I and II adult patients who were scheduled for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction were included in this study. Patients were allocated into three groups: group I patients received 1g intravenous paracetamol after induction and another 1 g 4 h later, group II received 40 mg parecoxib after induction, while group III received combination of both drugs (paracetamol 1 g and parecoxib 40 mg). Pain during rest and mobility was assessed in the immediate postoperative period, 2 h and 8 h successively using visual analog scale (VAS). Patient satisfaction was rated according to satisfaction score. Results: Total morphine requirements were lower in group III patients (6.9±2.7 mg) in comparison to group I patients (12.6±3.6 mg) or group II patients (9.8±2.8 mg). The least VAS scores were recorded during knee movement (3.8±1.1) in group III patients compared to group I (6.0±1.8) and group II patients (4.8±1.9). Eight hours postoperatively, group III patients were more satisfied regarding the postoperative pain management. Conclusion: Combination of intravenous paracetamol and parecoxib provided better analgesia and higher patient satisfaction than each drug when used separately. PMID:21655016

  19. Single dose oral analgesics for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J; Wiffen, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Background Thirty-five Cochrane Reviews of randomised trials testing the analgesic efficacy of individual drug interventions in acute postoperative pain have been published. This overview brings together the results of all those reviews and assesses the reliability of available data. Objectives To summarise data from all Cochrane Reviews that have assessed the effects of pharmaceutical interventions for acute pain in adults with at least moderate pain following surgery, who have been given a single dose of oral analgesic taken alone. Methods We identified systematic reviews in The Cochrane Library through a simple search strategy. All reviews were overseen by a single Review Group, had a standard title, and had as their primary outcome numbers of participants with at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours compared with placebo. For individual reviews we extracted the number needed to treat (NNT) for this outcome for each drug/dose combination, and also the percentage of participants achieving at least 50% maximum pain relief, the mean of mean or median time to remedication, the percentage of participants remedicating by 6, 8, 12, or 24 hours, and results for participants experiencing at least one adverse event. Main results The overview included 35 separate Cochrane Reviews with 38 analyses of single dose oral analgesics tested in acute postoperative pain models, with results from about 45,000 participants studied in approximately 350 individual studies. The individual reviews included only high-quality trials of standardised design and outcome reporting. The reviews used standardised methods and reporting for both efficacy and harm. Event rates with placebo were consistent in larger data sets. No statistical comparison was undertaken. There were reviews but no trial data were available for acemetacin, meloxicam, nabumetone, nefopam, sulindac, tenoxicam, and tiaprofenic acid. Inadequate amounts of data were available for dexibuprofen, dextropropoxyphene 130

  20. The effects of 2 μg and 4 μg doses of dexmedetomidine in combination with intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine on spinal anesthesia and its postoperative analgesic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Yektaş, Abdulkadir; Belli, Enver

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the postoperative analgesic characteristics and side effects of two different doses of intrathecal dexmedetomidine in combination with hyperbaric bupivacaine, and to evaluate the effects of these combinations on spinal anesthesia. METHODS: After obtaining approval from the local ethics committee, 60 male patients who were undergoing inguinal surgery and were classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class I were included in the study. The present study was conducted in 2003 in a military hospital with a capacity of 100 beds. The patients were randomly assigned to three groups of 20 patients: group 1, 0.5 mL saline added to 3 mL (15 mg) hyperbaric bupivacaine; and groups 2 and 3, 2 μg dexme-detomidine and 4 μg dexmedetomidine added to 3 mL (15 mg) hyperbaric bupivacaine, respectively. Medications were administered by intrathecal injection in a total volume of 3.5 mL. The postoperative analgesic characteristics, effects on spinal anesthesia and side effects were recorded. RESULTS: Demographic characteristics were similar among the groups. The mean (± SD) time to onset of pain was 220.75±112.7 min in group 1, 371.5±223.5 min in group 2 and 1042.50±366.78 min in group 3. Time to first pain sensation in group 3 was significantly longer than that in groups 1 and 2 (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Two different doses of dexmedetomidine, an α2-adrenoceptor agonist with analgesic effects, resulted in an increased duration of analgesia and efficacy, decreased postoperative analgesic use and was associated with no notable adverse effects. PMID:24527467

  1. Postoperative pain relief with pentazocine and acetaminophen: comparison with other analgesic combinations and placebo.

    PubMed

    Petti, A

    1985-01-01

    A single-blind, parallel-group study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an analgesic combining 650 mg of acetaminophen and 25 mg of pentazocine in 129 patients with moderate postoperative pain. Comparisons were made with a combination containing acetaminophen (300 mg) and codeine (30 mg), a combination containing acetaminophen (650 mg) and propoxyphene napsylate (100 mg), and a placebo. A nurse observer queried patients at regular intervals over a six-hour period concerning the intensity of pain and the degree of pain relief. The scores obtained were used in the calculation of standard measures of analgesic efficacy. Acetaminophen/pentazocine proved to be significantly superior to placebo and equivalent to the other active analgesic combinations. No side effects were reported with acetaminophen/pentazocine, acetaminophen/propoxyphene napsylate, or placebo. One mild side effect was questionably associated with acetaminophen/codeine. This study demonstrates that the combination of acetaminophen and pentazocine is as safe and effective in controlling postoperative pain of moderate severity as other commonly used analgesics. PMID:2870808

  2. Factors influencing the postoperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats by Canadian veterinarians.

    PubMed Central

    Dohoo, S E; Dohoo, I R

    1996-01-01

    Four hundred and seventeen Canadian veterinarians were surveyed to determine their postoperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats following 6 categories of surgeries, and their opinion toward pain perception and perceived complications associated with the postoperative use of potent opioid analgesics. Three hundred and seventeen (76%) returned the questionnaire. An analgesic user was defined as a veterinarian who administers analgesics to at least 50% of dogs or 50% of cats following abdominal surgery, excluding ovariohysterectomy. The veterinarians responding exhibited a bimodal distribution of analgesic use, with 49.5% being defined as analgesic users. These veterinarians tended to use analgesics in 100% of animals following abdominal surgery. Veterinarians defined as analgesic nonusers rarely used postoperative analgesics following any abdominal surgery. Pain perception was defined as the average of pain rankings (on a scale of 1 to 10) following abdominal surgery, or the value for dogs or cats if the veterinarian worked with only 1 of the 2 species. Maximum concern about the risks associated with the postoperative use of potent opioid agonists was defined as the highest ranking assigned to any of the 7 risks evaluated in either dogs or cats. Logistic regression analysis identified the pain perception score and the maximum concern regarding the use of potent opioid agonists in the postoperative period as the 2 factors that distinguished analgesic users from analgesic nonusers. This model correctly classified 68% of veterinarians as analgesic users or nonusers. Linear regression analysis identified gender and the presence of an animal health technologist in the practice as the 2 factors that influenced pain perception by veterinarians. Linear regression analysis identified working with an animal health technologist, graduation within the past 10 years, and attendance at continuing education as factors that influenced maximum concern about the postoperative use

  3. The efficacy of peritubal analgesic infiltration in postoperative pain following percutaneous nephrolithotomy – A prospective randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Lojanapiwat, Bannakij; Chureemas, Tanarit; Kittirattarakarn, Pruit

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To study the efficacy of peritubal infiltration in postoperative pain following percutaneous nephrolithotomy in general PCNL patients and PCNL patients with supracostal renal access. Patients and Methods: A total of 105 PCNL patients were randomized into two groups, 53 patients receiving peritubal analgesic infiltration (study group) and 52 patients as the control group. Of these patients, supracostal access was performed in 22 patients of study group and 23 patients of control group. The study group received peritubal injection with 10mL of bupivacain. Postoperative pain as the primary outcome was assessed by using visual analogue scale at 1, 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours postoperatively. The secondary outcomes were the total postoperative morphine usage in 24 hours and time of the first analgesic demand. Results: The average VAS pain at 1 and 4 hours after the operation in the study group were significant lower in the control group (P≤0.001 and 0.026). Doses of morphine usage for controlling postoperative pain and the first analgesic demand were significantly lower and longer in study group. Among patients submitted to supracostal access, the average VAS pain at 1 hour after operation in the study group was lower (P=0.018). Doses of morphine usage for controlling postoperative pain also was lower in the study group (P=0.012). Conclusion: The peritubal local anesthetic infiltration is effective in alleviating immediate postoperative pain after percutaneous nephrolithotomy even with supracostal access. PMID:26689520

  4. Efficacy of Tramadol as a Sole Analgesic for Postoperative Pain in Male and Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, A Marissa; Kennedy, Lucy H; Na, Jane J; Nemzek-Hamlin, Jean A

    2015-01-01

    Tramadol is a centrally acting weak μ opioid agonist that has few of the adverse side effects common to other opioids. Little work has been done to establish an effective analgesic dose of tramadol specific for surgical laparotomy and visceral manipulation in mice. We used general appearance parameters to score positive indicators of pain including posture, coat condition, activity, breathing, and interactions with other mice, activity events (that is, the number of times each mouse stretched up in a 3-min period) used as an indicator of decreased pain, von Frey fibers, and plasma levels of corticosterone to determine whether tramadol at 20, 40, or 80 mg/kg prevented postoperative pain in male and female C57BL/6 mice. A ventral midline laparotomy with typhlectomy was used as a model of postoperative pain. In male mice, none of the markers differed between groups that received tramadol (regardless of dose) and the saline-treated controls. However, general appearance scores and plasma corticosterone levels were lower in female mice that received 80 mg/kg tramadol compared with saline. In summary, for severe postoperative pain after laparotomy and aseptic typhlectomy, tramadol was ineffective in male C57BL/6 mice at all doses tested. Although 80 mg/kg ameliorated postoperative pain in female C57BL/6 mice, this dose is very close to the threshold reported to cause toxic side effects, such as tremors and seizures. Therefore, we do not recommend the use of tramadol as a sole analgesic in this mouse model of postoperative pain. PMID:26224442

  5. Efficacy of Analgesic Treatments to Manage Children's Postoperative Pain After Laparoscopic Appendectomy: Retrospective Medical Record Review.

    PubMed

    Manworren, Renee C B; McElligott, Connor D; Deraska, Peter V; Santanelli, James; Blair, Sherry; Ruscher, Kimberly A; Weiss, Richard; Rader, Christine; Finck, Christine; Bourque, Michael; Campbell, Brendan

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of the effectiveness of multimodal analgesic treatments to manage children's postoperative pain during hospital stays is limited. Our retrospective chart review of a convenience sample of 200 pediatric surgical patients' pain experiences during the first 24 hours after laparoscopic appendectomy demonstrates the benefits of a multimodal analgesic approach. We found that pediatric patients who received perioperative IV ketorolac in addition to opioids reported statistically significantly lower mean pain intensity (n = 134, mean [M] = 2.9, standard deviation [SD] = 1.7) during the first 24 hours after surgery when compared with the pain intensity of patients who did not receive perioperative IV ketorolac (n = 66, M = 3.7, SD = 1.7, t = 3.14, P = .002). Patients who received perioperative IV ketorolac (M = 0.94, SD = 0.71) also received significantly fewer morphine equivalents of postoperative opioids during the first 24 hours after surgery than those who did not (M = 1.21, SD = 0.78, t = 2.41, P = .02). We will use data from these patients to introduce the potential for a personalized medicine approach to postoperative pain. PMID:26924376

  6. Postoperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats by Canadian veterinarians.

    PubMed Central

    Dohoo, S E; Dohoo, I R

    1996-01-01

    Four hundred and seventeen Canadian veterinarians were surveyed to determine their postoperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats following 6 surgical procedures, and to determine their opinions toward pain perception and perceived complications associated with the postoperative use of potent opioid analgesics. Three hundred and seventeen (76%) returned the questionnaire. The percentage of animals receiving analgesics postoperatively ranged from 84% of dogs and 70% of cats following orthopedic surgery to 10% of dogs and 9% of cats following castration. In general, with the exception of orthopedic surgery, roughly equal percentages of dogs and cats received postoperative analgesics. Opioids were used almost exclusively to provide postoperative analgesia, with butorphanol the most commonly administered drug to both dogs and cats. Analgesics were usually administered either once or twice postoperatively. With regard to the administration of potent opioid agonists, the 3 major concerns included respiratory depression, bradycardia, and sedation in dogs, and excitement, respiratory depression, and bradycardia in cats. Seventy-seven percent of veterinarians considered their knowledge of issues related to the recognition and control of postoperative pain to be inadequate. Experience in practice is currently the major source of knowledge, with undergraduate veterinary school and research articles in journals ranked as the least important sources. Lectures or seminars delivered at the regional level were the preferred format for continuing education. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8877040

  7. Postoperative continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine has comparable analgesic effects and fewer complications as compared to traditional patient-controlled analgesia with sufentanil in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Tang, Jun; Jin, Li; Li, Wei-Yan; Zhang, Li-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the postoperative analgesic effects of continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine with traditional patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with sufentanil after non-cardiac thoracotomy. Methods: One hundred and twenty adult patients undergoing open thoracotomy were recruited into this assessor-blinded, randomized study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive analgesia through a wound catheter placed below the fascia and connected to a 2 ml/h ropivacaine 0.5% (RWI group) or sufentanil PCA (SPCA group). Analgesia continued for 48 h. Visual analogue scores (VAS) at rest and movement, Ramsay scores and adverse effects were recorded at 2, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after surgery. Three months after discharge, patient’s satisfaction, residual pain and surgical wound complications were assessed. Results: General characteristics of patients were comparable between two groups. There were no statistical differences in the VAS scores and postoperative pethidine consumption between two groups (P > 0.05). However, when compared with SPCA group, the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness and respiratory depression, ICU stay and hospital expenditure reduced significantly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Patients’ satisfaction with pain management was also improved markedly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Continuous wound infusion with ropivacaine is effective for postoperative analgesia and has comparable effects to traditional PCA with sufentanil. Furthermore, this therapy may also reduce the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness, respiratory depression and decrease the ICU stay and hospital expenditure. PMID:26131121

  8. The incidence of postoperative pain and analgesic usage in children.

    PubMed

    Acs, G; Drazner, E

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the incidence of post-restorative dental pain and analgesic usage in children. A questionnaire completed by parents was employed. The mean age of the patients was 8.1 years; and all patients were in the six- to thirteen-year-old range. Pain following routine restorative procedures was reported by 31.5 percent of the patients. Additionally, 52.9 percent of these patients required analgesic relief. PMID:1537941

  9. Auditing Analgesic Use in Post-operative Setting in a Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bathini, Prapthi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Managing postoperative pain efficiently is one important therapeutic challenge in the hospitals. Combination use of analgesics is in vogue, where in drugs from the opioid and non-opioid group are given synergistically. The aim of this study is to audit the use of different analgesics on the first postoperative day. Effort has been made to look into the drug or drug combinations used and other factors associated with their use. Materials and Methods: Retrospective, cross sectional observational study was conducted over a period of 11 months in a tertiary care teaching hospital at Hyderabad with approval from institutional ethics committee. Medical records of 649 patients on the first postoperative day were analysed for analgesics by various indicators. Results: Average number of drugs per encounter was 4.23. Percentage of patients prescribed drugs from national essential drug list/WHO was 81.94%. Most common analgesic (monotherapy) prescribed was tramadol followed by diclofenac and the most common combination drugs prescribed were tramadol+Paracetamol. The most common route of administration was intravenous. All the drugs except piroxicam, were in the lower limit of the recommended daily dose. Conclusion: The present study gives an idea of the overall pattern of analgesic drug use in postoperative patients. The drug combinations used, the most common single use drug can be made out. The health professionals can be encouraged to prescribe by generic name and from the National List of Essential Medicines NLEMs. PMID:26023565

  10. Comparison of the postoperative analgesic effects of paracetamol-codeine phosphate and naproxen sodium-codeine phosphate for lumbar disk surgery.

    PubMed

    Polat, Reyhan; Peker, Kevser; Gülöksüz, Çiğdem Topçu; Ergil, Julide; Akkaya, Taylan

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compared the efficacy of paracetamol-codeine phosphate and naproxen sodium-codeine phosphate on postoperative pain and tramadol consumption during the first 24 hours after a lumbar disk surgery. After Ethics Committee approval and informed consent had been obtained, 64 patients were allocated into three groups. Patients received oral paracetamol-codeine (300 mg + 30 mg; Group P), naproxen sodium-codeine (550 mg + 30 mg; Group N), or placebo tablets (Group C) 30 minutes prior to induction of anesthesia. Patient-controlled analgesia was supplied postoperatively using tramadol. Pain intensity, tramadol consumption, and side effects were recorded every 1 hour, 2 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after surgery. Whole study period pain intensity (visual analogue scale scores) was lower in Group P (p = 0.007) and Group N (p = 0.001), compared with Group C, however, there was no statistically significant difference between Group P and Group N regarding pain intensity (p > 0.05). Tramadol consumption was lower in Group P and Group N, compared with Group C (p < 0.001), and in turn the lowest incidence of tramadol consumption was detected in Group P compared with Group N (p < 0.001) and Group C (p < 0.001). Side effects were similar between the groups. Preemptive administration of paracetamol-codeine and naproxen sodium-codeine combination significantly reduced tramadol consumption and provided more effective analgesia compared with placebo. The paracetamol-codeine combination was superior to naproxen sodium-codeine with regard to tramadol consumption. PMID:26362959

  11. Electroacupuncture Reduces Postoperative Pain and Analgesic Consumption in Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgery: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tongyu; Xu, Jianjun; Ma, Wen; Zhou, Jia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on postoperative pain management in patients undergoing thoracic surgery. A randomized study was conducted. Ninety-two thoracic surgical patients were randomly divided into an EA group and a sham group. Postoperative intravenous analgesia was applied with a half dose of the conventional drug concentration in both groups. In the EA group, EA treatment was administered for three consecutive days after the surgery with 6 sessions of 30 min each. Compared with the sham group, patients in the EA group had a lower visual analogue scale (VAS) score at 2, 24, 48, and 72 hours and consumed less analgesic after surgery. The incidence of opioid-related adverse effects of nausea was lower in the EA group. The time to first flatus and defecation was also shorter in the EA group. Furthermore, the plasma β-endorphin (β-EP) level was higher by radioimmunoassay and the plasma 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) level was lower in the EA group by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay during the first 72 hr after thoracic surgery. Therefore, EA is suitable as an adjunct treatment for postoperative pain management after thoracic surgery. PMID:27073400

  12. Comparison of carprofen and pethidine as postoperative analgesics in the cat.

    PubMed

    Balmer, T V; Irvine, D; Jones, R S; Roberts, M J; Slingsby, L; Taylor, P M; Waterman, A E; Waters, C

    1998-04-01

    The postoperative analgesia and sedation in cats given carprofen (4.0 mg/kg bodyweight by subcutaneous injection preoperatively) was compared to that in cats given pethidine (3.3 mg/kg bodyweight by intramuscular injection postoperatively) in a controlled, randomised, blinded, multicentre clinical trial. Further dosing with the particular analgesic was allowed if a cat was exhibiting unacceptable pain. In total, 57 carprofen cases and 59 pethidine cases were evaluated. Significantly fewer cats in the carprofen group required additional doses of analgesic, and mean pain scores were significantly lower from four hours after ovariohysterectomy, and at 18 to 24 hours after castration, compared to the pethidine group. In conclusion, carprofen provided as good a level of postoperative analgesia as pethidine, but of a longer duration (at least 24 hours) and was well tolerated. It thus provides an option for 'pre-emptive analgesia' in cats about to undergo surgery. PMID:9577756

  13. Analgesic Effects of Paracetamol and Morphine After Elective Laparotomy Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Alimian, Mahzad; Pournajafian, Alireza; Kholdebarin, Alireza; Ghodraty, Mohammadreza; Rokhtabnak, Faranak; Yazdkhasti, Payman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Opioids have been traditionally used for postoperative pain control, but they have some unpleasant side effects such as respiratory depression or nausea. Some other analgesic drugs like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are also being used for pain management due to their fewer side effects. Objectives: The aim of our study was to compare the analgesic effects of paracetamol, an intravenous non-opioid analgesic and morphine infusion after elective laparotomy surgeries. Patients and Methods: This randomized clinical study was performed on 157 ASA (American Society of Anesthesiology) I-II patients, who were scheduled for elective laparotomy. These patients were managed by general anesthesia with TIVA technique in both groups and 150 patients were analyzed. Paracetamol (4 g/24 hours) in group 1 and morphine (20 mg/24 hours) in group 2 were administered by infusion pump after surgery. Postoperative pain evaluation was performed by visual analog scale (VAS) during several hours postoperatively. Meperidine was administered for patients complaining of pain with VAS > 3 and repeated if essential. Total doses of infused analgesics, were recorded following the surgery and compared. Analysis was performed on the basis of VAS findings and meperidine consumption. Results: There were no differences in demographic data between two groups. Significant difference in pain score was found between the two groups, in the first eight hours following operation (P value = 0.00), but not after 12 hours (P = 0.14) .The total dose of rescue drug (meperidine) and number of doses injected showed a meaningful difference between the two groups (P = 0.00). Also nausea, vomiting and itching showed a significant difference between the two groups and patients in morphine group, experienced higher levels of them. Conclusions: Paracetamol is not enough for postoperative pain relief in the first eight hour postoperatively, but it can reduce postoperative opioid need and is

  14. Acute postoperative pain predicts chronic pain and long-term analgesic requirements after breast surgery for cancer.

    PubMed

    Fassoulaki, A; Melemeni, A; Staikou, C; Triga, A; Sarantopoulos, C

    2008-01-01

    Postoperative pain and analgesic requirements may be associated with chronic pain. The aim of the study was to investigate this association. We studied 98 patients who had cancer breast surgery and served as controls in four previous studies, receiving placebo. We compared the pain and analgesic requirements 0-9 h and 1-6 days postoperatively: a) between patients with chronic pain 3 months postoperatively versus patients without and b) between those patients who consumed analgesics at home versus those who did not. Patients with chronic pain had experienced higher intensity pain at rest the first 9 postoperative hours (VAS-rest p = 0.033). Patients requiring analgesics at home had consumed postoperatively more opioids (p = 0.005) and more paracetamol (p = 0.037). These patients had experienced pain of higher intensity the first 9 postoperative hours (VAS-rest p = 0.022, VAS-movement p = 0.009) as well as during the six postoperative days (VAS-rest p = 0.013, VAS-movement p = 0.001). Higher intensities of acute postoperative pain are associated with chronic pain development. Higher analgesic needs and higher acute postoperatively pain intensity are associated with long-term analgesic consumption. PMID:19235522

  15. The Efficacy and Clinical Safety of Various Analgesic Combinations for Post-Operative Pain after Third Molar Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Au, Alvin Ho Yeung; Choi, Siu Wai; Cheung, Chi Wai; Leung, Yiu Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To run a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials aiming to answer the clinical question “which analgesic combination and dosage is potentially the most effective and safe for acute post-operative pain control after third molar surgery?”. Materials and Methods A systematic search of computer databases and journals was performed. The search and the evaluations of articles were performed by 2 independent reviewers in 3 rounds. Randomized clinical trials related to analgesic combinations for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery that matched the selection criteria were evaluated to enter in the final review. Results Fourteen studies with 3521 subjects, with 10 groups (17 dosages) of analgesic combinations were included in the final review. The analgesic efficacy were presented by the objective pain measurements including sum of pain intensity at 6 hours (SPID6) and total pain relief at 6 hours (TOTPAR6). The SPID6 scores and TOTPAR6 scores of the reported analgesic combinations were ranged from 1.46 to 6.44 and 3.24 – 10.3, respectively. Ibuprofen 400mg with oxycodone HCL 5mg had superior efficacy (SPID6: 6.44, TOTPAR6: 9.31). Nausea was the most common adverse effect, with prevalence ranging from 0-55%. Ibuprofen 200mg with caffeine 100mg or 200mg had a reasonable analgesic effect with fewer side effects. Conclusion This systematic review and meta-analysis may help clinicians in their choices of prescribing an analgesic combination for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery. It was found in this systematic review Ibuprofen 400mg combined with oxycodone HCL 5mg has superior analgesic efficacy when compared to the other analgesic combinations included in this study. PMID:26053953

  16. Postoperative morphine requirements, nausea and vomiting following anaesthesia for tonsillectomy. Comparison of intravenous morphine and non-opioid analgesic techniques.

    PubMed

    Mather, S J; Peutrell, J M

    1995-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to be as effective as opioid analgesia following tonsillectomy in children. Opioids are still frequently used but tonsillectomy is associated with a high incidence of vomiting. This study has attempted to assess postoperative analgesic consumption and nausea and vomiting after general anaesthesia for tonsillectomy using either paracetamol premedication, paracetamol plus a NSAID or intravenous morphine to provide postoperative analgesia. Some children required a rescue dose of morphine in the recovery room, including some who had received intravenous morphine at induction. Least supplementary morphine was required by those who had received paracetamol plus ketorolac. Postoperative nausea and vomiting was significantly less in the two groups which were not given intraoperative morphine. The number of vomiting incidents was also much less. We conclude that the preoperative administration of paracetamol alone provides satisfactory analgesia in many children but that supplementary analgesia is still required for some. PMID:7489439

  17. Analgesic efficacy of controlled-release oxycodone in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, A; Olson, N Z; Colon, A; Rivera, J; Kaiko, R F; Fitzmartin, R D; Reder, R F; Goldenheim, P D

    1996-07-01

    The efficacy and safety of graded doses (10, 20, and 30 mg) of controlled-release (CR) oxycodone was compared with that of immediate-release (IR) oxycodone (15 mg), immediate-release oxycodone 10 mg in combination with acetaminophen 650 mg (APAP), and placebo in a single-dose, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group study. The participants, 182 inpatients experiencing moderate to severe pain after abdominal or gynecologic surgery, provided hourly ratings of pain intensity and relief for 12 hours after administration. All active treatments were significantly superior to placebo for many hourly measurements and for the sum of pain intensity differences (SPID) and total pain relief (TOTPAR). A dose response was found among the three levels of CR oxycodone for pain relief and peak pain intensity difference (PID), with the 20- and 30-mg doses being significantly better than the 10-mg dose. For all active treatments, peak PID and peak pain relief occurred approximately 2 to 4 hours after administration. The median time to onset of relief was 32 minutes for oxycodone plus APAP, 41 minutes for IR oxycodone, and 46 minutes for CR oxycodone 30 mg. Duration of pain relief showed that the 10-, 20-, and 30-mg doses of CR oxycodone had durations of action of 10 to 12 hours compared with IR oxycodone and oxycodone plus APAP (both approximately 7 hours). Typical adverse events, particularly somnolence, occurred in all active treatment groups. Treatment with CR oxycodone was safe and effective in this study, and its characteristics will be beneficial in the treatment of pain. PMID:8844441

  18. Carprofen as an analgesic for postoperative pain in cats: dose titration and assessment of efficacy in comparison to pethidine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Lascelles, B D; Cripps, P; Mirchandani, S; Waterman, A E

    1995-12-01

    The aim of this study was to titrate the optimal dose of carprofen for single dose usage, for alleviating postoperative pain, under a double-blind and randomised protocol, using both negative and positive controls. Renal tolerance was assessed by screening plasma urea and creatinine. Pre- and postoperative assessment of pain and sedation was made using a dynamic and interactive visual analogue scoring system in 60 cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy. The cats were randomly assigned to one of six groups: (1) carprofen at 1.0 mg/kg subcutaneously (sc); (2) carprofen at 2.0 mg/kg sc; (3) carprofen at 4.0 mg/kg sc; (4) pethidine at 5.0 mg/kg intramuscularly (im), (5) pethidine at 10.0 mg/kg im: and (6) no analgesics (injection of saline). All injections were given postoperatively on tracheal extubation and administered in a double-blind manner. Assessments were made up to 20 hours post extubation. Prior to induction and at 20 hours post extubation, blood samples were taken for laboratory analysis of the urea and creatinine content to check for any adverse effect on renal function. Cats given pethidine did not appear more sedated than the groups receiving carprofen or saline. Cats receiving carprofen were in less pain postoperatively overall, with 4.0 mg/kg being the most effective dose rate (significantly better than the other doses of carprofen at four and eight hours post extubation). The highest dose of pethidine provided significantly better analgesia than the highest dose of carprofen up to two hours post extubation, but from two to 20 hours post extubation carprofen at 4.0 mg/kg provided significantly better analgesia than the pethidine. None of the analgesic regimens appeared to affect renal function adversely, as measured by urea and creatinine levels. PMID:8926722

  19. Post-operative dental pain and analgesic efficacy. Part II. Analgesic usage and efficacy after dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Seymour, R A; Blair, G S; Wyatt, F A

    1983-12-01

    The analgesics taken by patients after oral and periodontal surgery were noted over a three day observation period. Analgesic consumption matched closely the pain experience. The efficacy of self-prescribed analgesics was extrapolated from the pain scores obtained in the first 12 hours after surgery, and overall, the apparent efficacy appears poor. However, those patients who reported taking aspirin recorded significantly less pain than those who took either paracetamol or combination analgesics. Analgesic efficacy was not related to dose, although a significant correlation was noted between the number of paracetamol tablets taken and pain severity. PMID:6580916

  20. Epigenetic regulation of spinal cord gene expression contributes to enhanced postoperative pain and analgesic tolerance subsequent to continuous opioid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liang, De-Yong; Shi, Xiao-You; Sun, Yuan; Clark, J David

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioids have become the mainstay for treatment of moderate to severe pain and are commonly used to treat surgical pain. While opioid administration has been shown to cause opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance, interactions between opioid administration and surgery with respect to these problematic adaptations have scarcely been addressed. Accumulating evidence suggests opioids and nociceptive signaling may converge on epigenetic mechanisms in spinal cord to enhance or prolong neuroplastic changes. Epigenetic regulation of Bdnf (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and Pdyn (prodynorphin) genes may be involved. Results Four days of ascending doses of morphine treatment caused opioid-induced hyperalgesia and reduced opioid analgesic efficacy in mice. Both opioid-induced hyperalgesia and the reduced opioid analgesic efficacy were enhanced in mice that received hindpaw incisions. The expression of Bdnf and Pdyn (qPCR) was increased after morphine treatment and incision. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the Pdyn and Bdnf promoters were more strongly associated with acetylated H3K9 after morphine plus incision than in the morphine or incision alone groups. Selective tropomyosin-related kinase B (ANA-12) and κ-opioid receptor (nor-binaltorphimine) antagonists were administered intrathecally, both reduced hyperalgesia one or three days after surgery. Administration of ANA-12 or nor-binaltorphimine attenuated the decreased morphine analgesic efficacy on day 1, but only nor-binaltorphimine was effective on day 3 after incision in opioid-exposed group. Coadministration of histone acetyltransferase inhibitor anacardic acid daily with morphine blocked the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and attenuated incision-enhanced hyperalgesia in morphine-treated mice. Anacardic acid had similar effects on analgesic tolerance, showing the involvement of histone acetylation in the interactions detected. Conclusions Spinal epigenetic changes

  1. The efficacy of nonopioid analgesics for postoperative dental pain: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, N.; Grad, H. A.; Haas, D. A.; Aronson, K. J.; Jokovic, A.; Locker, D.

    1997-01-01

    The evidence for the efficacy of nonopioid analgesics in the dental pain model was examined by conducting a meta-analysis. Studies were obtained by searching the literature from August 1996 back to 1975 using the terms pain, analgesics, and dentistry. This led to the review of 294 articles, of which 33 studies met the inclusion criteria. Pain scale results were transformed into a common percent scale and converted to N-weighted means with differences in efficacy considered significant using a 95% confidence interval. Collectively, therapeutic doses of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) commonly used in dentistry were significantly more efficacious than the combination of acetaminophen (600 or 650 mg) with codeine (60 mg). Similarly, specific doses of each of diflunisal, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, and ketorolac were significantly more efficacious than the commonly used acetaminophen-codeine combination. These quantitative results show that particular NSAIDs may be more efficacious than the acetaminophen-codeine combination for relief of postoperative dental pain. PMID:9481955

  2. The analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block on postoperative pain and morphine consumption in varicocelectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ömür, Dilek; Oğuzalp, Hüseyin; Kiraz, Hasan A.; Ekin, Serpil; Alan, Cabir; Ersay, Ahmet R.; Hancı, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the analgesic effect of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block administered before varicocele surgery. Methods: This study was completed at the Faculty of Medicine, Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Çanakkale, Turkey, between January 2011 and April 2013. In a prospective, double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical study, 40 male patients scheduled for elective varicocele operations were randomized to group T (treatment group) or group C (controls). After receiving general anesthesia, group T received a TAP block using 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine on the operation side, whereas group C received a control block using 20 mL 0.9% Sodium chloride. During the first 24 hours after surgery, the patient pain was evaluated using the visual analogue scale (VAS) at rest and while coughing. Postoperative patient controlled analgesia morphine consumption, VAS scores, and side effects were recorded. Results: Of 34 patients, Group T (n=18) had significantly lower VAS pain scores than Group C (n=16) both at rest and while coughing. The total morphine consumed was lower (7.7 ± 4.0) versus 21.6 ± 12.4 mg, p<0.001) in the 24 hours after surgery. Conclusion: As part of a multimodal analgesic regime after varicocelectomy surgery, morphine consumption and VAS pain scores were significantly lower among those receiving 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine administered for a TAP block than among controls. PMID:27279511

  3. [Study of analgesic efficacy of propacetamol in the postoperative period using a double blind placebo controlled method].

    PubMed

    Nikoda, V V; Maiachkin, R B

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency and safety of postoperative use of propacetamol was estimated in 30 patients by means of double blind placebo controlled method. The first group consisted of 15 patients to whom propacetamol was introduced intravenously in single dose of 2 g along with patient controlled anesthesia with promedol. Placebo in combination with patient control anesthesia were used in 15 patients from the 2nd group. Intravenous introducing of propacetamol in dose of 2 g in 15 minutes provides relief of pain intensity in postoperative period. So it permits to consider propacetamol as basic non-opioid analgesic. In early postoperative period combination of propacetamol and opioid analgesic (promedol) reduces demands in the latter by 44%. PMID:12462772

  4. Side effects of commonly prescribed analgesic medications.

    PubMed

    Carter, Gregory T; Duong, Vicky; Ho, Stanley; Ngo, Kathryn C; Greer, Christopher L; Weeks, Douglas L

    2014-05-01

    Analgesics, including opioids, steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin, acetaminophen, antiepileptics, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, are medications commonly used to treat many forms of pain. However, all of these agents may have significant adverse side effects. Adverse effects may occasionally be inseparable from desired effects. Side effects are often dose dependent and time dependent. It is critical that the prescribing practitioner and the dispensing pharmacist provide a thorough, understandable review of the potential side effects to all patients before these drugs are administered. Proper monitoring and follow-up during therapy are crucial. PMID:24787343

  5. Correlation of ADRB1 rs1801253 Polymorphism with Analgesic Effect of Fentanyl After Cancer Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Tian, Yanli; Zhao, Chunlei; Sui, Zhifu; Liu, Chang; Wang, Congmin; Yang, Rongya

    2015-01-01

    Background Our study aimed to explore the association between β1-adrenoceptor (ADRB1) rs1801253 polymorphism and analgesic effect of fentanyl after cancer surgeries in Chinese Han populations. Material/Methods Postoperative fentanyl consumption of 120 patients for analgesia was recorded. Genotype distributions were detected by allele specific amplification-polymerase chain reaction (ASA-PCR) method. Postoperative pain was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) method. Differences in postoperative VAS score and postoperative fentanyl consumption for analgesia in different genotype groups were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Preoperative cold pressor-induced pain test was also performed to test the analgesic effect of fentanyl. Results Frequencies of Gly/Gly, Gly/Arg, Arg/Arg genotypes were 45.0%, 38.3%, and 16.7%, respectively, and passed the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) test. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) and the heart rate (HR) had no significant differences at different times. After surgery, the VAS score and fentanyl consumption in Arg/Arg group were significantly higher than in other groups at the postoperative 2nd hour, but the differences were not obvious at the 4th hour, 24th hour, and the 48th hour. The results suggest that the Arg/Arg homozygote increased susceptibility to postoperative pain. The preoperative cold pressor-induced pain test suggested that individuals with Arg/Arg genotype showed worse analgesic effect of fentanyl compared to other genotypes. Conclusions In Chinese Han populations, ADRB1 rs1801253 polymorphism might be associated with the analgesic effect of fentanyl after cancer surgery. PMID:26694722

  6. [Cryotherapy as analgesic technique in direct, postoperative treatment following elective joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, S; le Blond, R; Köhler, V; Cordis, R; Gill, C; Kleihues, H; Schlüter, S; Noack, W

    1997-01-01

    The application of crushed ice or hydrogenated silicate, a micro-crystalline substitute has been used as a method to treat posttraumatic and postoperative irritations of the locomotor system for a long time. Closed systems using pumps can be viewed as further development as they enable continuous, water-free cooling of operating areas. The analgetic effect of postoperative cold therapy was evaluated in a prospective clinical trial, including 312 patients after total knee or hip arthroplasty. Conventional cold packs, consisting of microcrystalline silicate were compared to a continuous applicable closed system. Continuous cryotherapy resulted in a depression of skin temperature to 12 degrees C, whereas intermittent cooling only caused a mean temperature decrease of 1 degree C. Clinically continuous cold application leads to a more than 50% decrease of analgetic demands in both, systemic and regional application (p < 0.001). This observation was found in a significant correlation with patient's pain sensation as well as primary range of motion. Intermittent cryotherapy was found to be ineffective in postoperative pain relieve in hip- and adequate in knee arthroplasty patients. We could not report an influence on postoperative blood loss, as discussed in previous reports. PMID:9199073

  7. Post-operative intravenous patient-controlled analgesic efficacy of morphine with ketorolac versus nefopam after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery: a randomized non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji-Uk; Cheon, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Yoon-Mi; Ri, Hyun-Su; Baik, Seong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    Background Nefopam is a non-opioid non-steroidal centrally acting analgesic. This study was conducted to assess the analgesic efficacy of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) using nefopam alone, compared with a combination of morphine and ketorolac, after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. Methods Sixty patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery received IV-PCA. Group A (n = 30) received IV-PCA with a combination of morphine 60 mg and ketorolac 180 mg, while group B (n = 30) received nefopam 200 mg (basal rate 1 ml/h, bolus 1 ml, and lockout time 15 min for both). The primary outcome evaluated was analgesic efficacy using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Other evaluated outcomes included the incidence rate of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), patient satisfaction of pain control, percentage of patients requiring additional opioids, and incidence rate of postoperative adverse effects. Results Group B was not inferior to group A in relation to the VAS in the post-anesthesia care unit, and at 12, 24, and 48 h after surgery (mean difference [95% confidence interval], 0.50 [–0.43 to 1.43], -0.30 [-1.25 to 0.65], -0.05 [-0.65 to 0.55], and 0.10 [-0.55 to 0.75], respectively). The incidence rate of nausea was lower in group B than in group A at 12 and 24 h after surgery (P = 0.004 and P = 0.017, respectively). There were no significant differences in the other outcomes between groups. Conclusions IV-PCA using nefopam alone has a non-inferior analgesic efficacy and produces a lower incidence of PONV in comparison with IV-PCA using a combination of morphine and ketorolac after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. PMID:27066208

  8. A 12-hour evaluation of the analgesic efficacy of diflunisal, aspirin, and placebo in postoperative dental pain.

    PubMed

    Forbes, J A; Calderazzo, J P; Bowser, M W; Foor, V M; Shackleford, R W; Beaver, W T

    1982-01-01

    Two-hundred and one outpatients with postoperative pain following oral surgery were randomly assigned, on a double-blind basis, a single oral dose of diflunisal (250, 500, or 1000 mg), aspirin (650 mg), or placebo. Using a self-rating record, the subjects rated their pain and its relief hourly for 12 hours after medication. Measures of peak and total analgesia were derived from the patients' subjective reports. Diflunisal 250 and 1000 mg were significantly superior to aspirin for every measure of total and peak analgesia; the 500-mg diflunisal dose was significantly superior to aspirin for measures of total analgesia only. All doses of diflunisal were significantly superior to aspirin and placebo at each hour from hour 3 through hour 12. Approximately 60 per cent of the patients treated with diflunisal completed the 12-hour observation period without the need for additional analgesic therapy. Adverse effects were mild and transitory and occurred in less than 10 per cent of the patients. PMID:7068938

  9. The analgesic efficacy of etoricoxib compared with oxycodone/acetaminophen in an acute postoperative pain model: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Chang, David J; Desjardins, Paul J; King, Thomas R; Erb, Tara; Geba, Gregory P

    2004-09-01

    Our objective in this study was to compare the analgesic effects of etoricoxib and oxycodone/acetaminophen in a postoperative dental pain model. Patients experiencing moderate to severe pain after extraction of two or more third molars were randomized to single doses of etoricoxib 120 mg (n = 100), oxycodone/acetaminophen 10/650 mg (n = 100), or placebo (n = 25). The primary end-point was total pain relief over 6 h. Other end-points included patient global assessment of response to therapy; onset, peak, and duration of effect; and rescue opioid analgesic use. Active treatments were statistically significantly superior to placebo for all efficacy measures. Total pain relief over 6 h for etoricoxib was significantly more than for oxycodone/acetaminophen (P < 0.001). Patient global assessment of response to therapy at 6 and 24 h was superior for etoricoxib. Both drugs achieved rapid onset, although the time was faster for oxycodone/acetaminophen by 5 min. The peak effect was similar for both drugs. Compared with oxycodone/acetaminophen patients, etoricoxib patients experienced a longer analgesic duration, had a smaller percentage requiring rescue opioids during 6 and 24 h, and required less rescue analgesia during 6 and 24 h. Oxycodone/acetaminophen treatment resulted in more frequent adverse events (AEs), drug-related AEs, nausea, and vomiting compared with etoricoxib treatment. In conclusion, etoricoxib 120 mg provided superior overall efficacy compared with oxycodone/acetaminophen 10/650 mg and was associated with significantly fewer AEs. PMID:15333415

  10. Combination analgesic efficacy: individual patient data meta-analysis of single-dose oral tramadol plus acetaminophen in acute postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jayne E; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2002-02-01

    The primary aims of this study were to assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of single-dose oral tramadol plus acetaminophen in acute postoperative pain and to use meta-analysis to demonstrate the efficacy of the combination drug compared with its components. Individual patient data from seven randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trials of tramadol plus acetaminophen were supplied for analysis by the R.W. Johnson Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Raritan, New Jersey, USA. All trials used identical methods and assessed single-dose oral tramadol (75 mg or 112.5 mg) plus acetaminophen (650 mg or 975 mg) in adult patients with moderate or severe postoperative pain. Summed pain intensity and pain relief data over six and eight hours and global evaluations of treatment effect after eight hours were extracted. Number-needed-to-treat (NNT) for one patient to obtain at least 50% pain relief was calculated. NNTs derived from pain relief data were compared with those derived from pain intensity data and global evaluations. Information on adverse effects was collected. Combination analgesics (tramadol plus acetaminophen) had significantly lower (better) NNTs than the components alone, and comparable efficacy to ibuprofen 400 mg. This could be shown for dental but not postsurgical pain, because more patients were available for the former. Adverse effects were similar for the combination drugs and the opioid component alone. Common adverse effects were dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, and headache. In sum, this meta-analysis demonstrated analgesic superiority of the combination drug over its components, without additional toxicity. PMID:11844632

  11. WITHDRAWN The analgesic effect of paracetamol when added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Celik, M; Saricaoglu, F; Canbay, O; Dal, D; Uzumcigil, A; Leblebicioglu, G; Aypar, U

    2011-10-21

    Ahead of Print article withdrawn by publisher AIM: Intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) is frequently used in patients who will undergo upper extremity surgical operations for its ease of use, rapid effectiveness and short hospitalization period. Different drug combinations have been used to overcome some systemic adverse effects and to increase the postoperative analgesic effectiveness. In our study, we evaluated the effects of paracetamol (Perfalgan) when added to lidocaine for IVRA, looking specifically at tourniquet pain and postoperative pain. METHODS: Ninety patients undergoing elective hand surgery with IVRA were randomly assigned to three groups to receive either IV saline and C-IVRA with 0.5% lidocaine 3 mg/kg (control group, N=30), IV saline and IVRA with 0.5% lidocaine and 20 mL paracetamol (10 mg/cc) (P-IVRA group, N=30) or IV paracetamol and IVRA with 0.5% lidocaine (L-IV group, N=30). The following were measured: 1) sensory and motor block onset and recovery time, 2) tourniquet pain after tourniquet application and at 10, 20 and 30 min after tourniquet deflation, 3) the visual analog scale (VAS) scores of tourniquet pain at 30 min and 1, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h postoperatively, 4) the time to first analgesic requirement, 5) total analgesic consumption in 24 h and 6) side effects. RESULTS: Sensory and motor block onset and recovery times were similar in both groups. VAS scores of tourniquet pain were lower in group P-IRVA at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 24 h, postoperatively (P<0.01). Anesthesia quality, as determined by the anesthesiologist and surgeon, was similar in both groups. The time to the first postoperative analgesic request was 67.83±57.48 min in group C-IRVA and 93±80.79 min in group P-IRVA (P<0.05). Paracetamol consumption was significantly less in group P-IRVA (1.60± 1 [tablets]) when compared with group C-IRVA (2.45±0.9; P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Perfalgan as an adjunct to lidocaine improves postoperative analgesia in IVRA without adverse effects. PMID

  12. Analgesic effect of Persian Gulf Conus textile venom

    PubMed Central

    Tabaraki, Nasim; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar; Moradi, Ali Mashinchian; Vosughi, Gholamhossein; Mostafavi, Pargol Ghavam

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Cone snails are estimated to consist of up to 700 species. The venom of these snails has yielded a rich source of novel peptides. This study was aimed to study the analgesic effect of Persian Gulf Conus textile and its comparison with morphine in mouse model. Materials and Methods: Samples were collected in Larak Island. The venom ducts were Isolated and kept on ice then homogenized. The mixture centrifuged at 10000 × g for 20 min. Supernatant was considered as extracted venom. The protein profile of venom determined using 15% sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Venom was administered intraperitoneally (IP) to evaluate the LD50 in Swiss albino mice. Different concentrations of Conus textile venom were injected intrathecally to mice to evaluate their analgesic effect in comparison to morphine. Injection was carried out between the L5 and L6 vertebrae. Differences between groups in the first and second phase were tested with Two-Way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: SDS-PAGE indicated 12 bands ranged between 6 and 180 KDa. Finally, ten ng of Conus crude venom showed the best analgesic activity in formalin test. No death observed up to 100 mg/kg. Analgesic activity of crude venom was more significant (P<0.05) in acute pain than inflammatory pain. The analgesic effect of 10 ng Conus venom was the same as morphine for reduction of inflammatory pain (P=0.27). Conclusion: The venom of Persian Gulf Conus textile contains an analgesic component for reliving of acute pain which can lead to find an analgesic drug. PMID:25729549

  13. Single-patient data meta-analysis of 3453 postoperative patients: oral tramadol versus placebo, codeine and combination analgesics.

    PubMed

    Moore, R A; McQuay, H J

    1997-02-01

    The analgesic effectiveness and safety of oral tramadol were compared with standard analgesics using a meta-analysis of individual patient data from randomised controlled trials in patients with moderate or severe pain after surgery or dental extraction. Calculation of %maxTOTPAR from individual patient data, and the use of > 50%maxTOTPAR defined clinically acceptable pain relief. Number-needed-to-treat (NNT) for one patient to have > 50%maxTOTPAR compared with placebo was used to examine the effectiveness of different single oral doses of tramadol and comparator drugs. Eighteen randomised, double-blind, parallel-group single-dose trials with 3453 patients using categorical pain relief scales allowed the calculation of %maxTOTPAR. The use of > 50%maxTOTPAR was a sensitive measure to discriminate between analgesics. Tramadol and comparator drugs gave significantly more analgesia than placebo. In postsurgical pain tramadol 50, 100 and 150 mg had NNTs for > 50%maxTOTPAR of 7.1 (95% confidence intervals 4.6-18), 4.8 (3.4-8.2) and 2.4 (2.0-3.1), comparable with aspirin 650 mg plus codeine 60 mg (NNT 3.6 (2.5-6.3)) and acetaminophen 650 mg plus propoxyphene 100 mg (NNT 4.0 (3.0-5.7)). With the same dose of drug postsurgical patients had more pain relief than those having dental surgery. Tramadol showed a dose-response for analgesia in both postsurgical and dental pain patients. With the same dose of drug postsurgical pain patients had fewer adverse events than those having dental surgery. Adverse events (headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, somnolence) with tramadol 50 mg and 100 mg had a similar incidence to comparator drugs. There was a dose response with tramadol, tending towards higher incidences at higher doses. Single-patient meta-analysis using more than half pain relief provides a sensitive description of the analgesic properties of a drug, and NNT calculations allow comparisons to be made with standard analgesics. Absolute ranking of analgesic performance

  14. Analgesic effectiveness of the narcotic agonist-antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Raymond W.

    1979-01-01

    1 Two fundamentally different types of narcotic-antogonists have been found to be very effective analgesics with relatively low dependence-producing potentials. 2 These two drug classes can be distinguished as being either morphine-like or nalorphine-like on the basis of their subjective and objective effects after single doses and on chronic administration, and by the character of their abstinence syndromes on abrupt withdrawal or on precipitation by other antagonists. 3 To explain differences in side effects associated with their analgesic actions, the existence of three types of receptors has been postulated: a μ receptor which is believed to be associated with euphoria and other typical morphine-like effects and a kappa (χ) and a sigma (σ) receptor which are believed to be associated with the sedative and psychotomimetic effects, respectively, of the nalorphine-like drugs. 4 The antagonist-analgesics of the morphine-type have the characteristics of being agonists of low intrinsic activity but with high affinity for the μ receptor. Representative analgesics of this type are profadol, propiram and buprenorphine. 5 The antagonist-analgesics of the nalorphine-type are drugs which are believed to have varying degrees of affinity and intrinsic activity at all three receptors, but characteristically seem to act merely as competitive antagonists with no intrinsic activity at the μ receptor. Representative analgesics of this type are pentazocine, nalbuphine and butorphanol. 6 There are considerable differences among the individual drugs of each type in terms of their analgesic and narcotic-antagonistic potencies. However, clear differences in analgesic efficacy among any of the antagonist-analgesics remain to be proved. All give evidence of being capable of relieving pain in nondependent patients in situations in which doses of morphine (or its surrogates) usually used would be effective. 7 The major advantages of the partial agonists of the morphine-type over the

  15. Perioperative local infiltration anesthesia with ropivacaine has no effect on postoperative pain after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hofstad, Janne Kristin; Winther, Siri B; Rian, Torbjørn; Foss, Olav A; Husby, Otto S; Wik, Tina S

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — The local infiltration analgesia (LIA) technique has been widely used to reduce opioid requirements and to improve postoperative mobilization following total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, the evidence for the efficacy of LIA in THA is not yet clear. We determined whether single-shot LIA in addition to a multimodal analgesic regimen would reduce acute postoperative pain and opioid requirements after THA. Patients and methods — 116 patients undergoing primary THA under spinal anesthesia were included in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. All patients received oral opioid-sparing multimodal analgesia: etoricoxib, acetaminophen, and glucocorticoid. The patients were randomized to receive either 150 mL ropivacaine (2 mg/mL) and 0.5 mL epinephrine (1 mg/mL) or 150 mL 0.9% saline. Rescue analgesic consisted of morphine and oxycodone as needed. The primary endpoint was pain during mobilization in the recovery unit. Secondary endpoints were pain during mobilization on the day after surgery and total postoperative opioid requirements on the first postoperative day. Results — The levels of pain during mobilization—both in the recovery unit and on the day after surgery—and consumption of opioids on the first postoperative day were similar in the 2 groups. Interpretation — LIA did not provide any extra analgesic effect after THA over and above that from the multimodal analgesic regimen used in this study. PMID:25997827

  16. Effects of Postoperative Pain Management on Immune Function After Laparoscopic Resection of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Nam Kyu; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Hur, Hyuk; Lee, Jinae; Noh, Hyun-young; Lee, Jong Ho; Koo, Bon-Neyo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There has been a rising interest in the possible association between perioperative opioid use and postoperative outcomes in cancer patients. Continuous surgical wound infiltration with local anesthetics is a nonopioid analgesic technique that can be used as a postoperative pain management alternative to opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA). The aim of this study was to compare the effects of an opioid-based analgesic regimen versus a local anesthetic wound infiltration-based analgesic regimen on immune modulation and short-term cancer recurrence or metastasis in patients undergoing laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer. Sixty patients undergoing laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to either the opioid group or the ON-Q group. For postoperative analgesia during the first 48 hours, the opioid group (n = 30) received fentanyl via IV PCA, whereas the ON-Q group (n = 30) received continuous wound infiltration of 0.5% ropivacaine with an ON-Q pump and tramadol via IV PCA. Pethidine for the opioid group and ketorolac or propacetamol for the ON-Q group were used as rescue analgesics. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. The primary outcome was postoperative immune function assessed by natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) and interleukin-2. Secondary outcomes were postoperative complications, cancer recurrence, or metastasis within 1 year after surgery, and postoperative inflammatory responses measured by white blood cell count, neutrophil percentage, and C-reactive protein. Immune function and inflammatory responses were measured before surgery and 24 and 48 hours after surgery. Fifty-nine patients completed the study. In the circumstance of similar pain control efficacy between the opioid group and the ON-Q group, postoperative NKCC and interleukin-2 levels did not differ between the 2 groups. The incidence of postoperative complications and recurrence

  17. Postoperative dental pain--a comparative study of anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, W. I.; Kendrick, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    Intravenous dexamethasone and diclofenac were evaluated in a double blind randomised trial, relative to an opioid (pentazocine) and placebo (saline), in 160 patients undergoing extraction of impacted lower third molar teeth. Test drugs were administered intravenously before surgery to provide postoperative analgesia. Following the operation, pain was assessed using a 10 cm visual analogue scale. Patients who received diclofenac reported significantly less pain than others 30 minutes after surgery (p less than 0.05). Pain scores on the day following surgery were also significantly lower in the diclofenac group compared to the opioid and placebo groups (p less than 0.05) but not less than those who received dexamethasone--possibly indicating a long term advantage of the anti-inflammatory drugs. Vomiting was a problem in the opioid group. PMID:1853495

  18. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Daphne retusa Hemsl.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaojia; Jin, Huizi; Xu, Wenzheng; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xiaohua; Yan, Shikai; Chen, Ming; Li, Jianqiang; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2008-10-30

    Daphne retusa Hemsl. belongs to the genus Daphne, a member of Thymelaeaceae family. The barks and stems of Daphne retusa are used as a folkloric medicine 'Zhu Shi Ma' in Western China because of its effects of detumescence and acesodyne. In this paper, we investigate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the 75% ethanol extract of the stems and barks of Daphne retusa and different fractions partitioned with petroleum ether, methylene chloride, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, respectively. The anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated using xylene-induced ear oedema in mice and carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats, while the acetic acid-induced writhing test and hot-plate test as models for evaluating the centrally and peripherally analgesic activity. The results showed the plant has significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects (P<0.05-0.01). Meanwhile, the result of the acute toxicity test at which the MTD was above 5g/kg indicates that the plant extract is relatively safe in, and/or non-toxic to, mice. The findings of these experimental animal studies indicate that the Daphne retusa ethanol extract possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties, and thus provide pharmacological support to folkloric, ethnomedical uses of 'Zhu shima' in the treatment and/of management of anti-inflammatory and painful conditions in China. PMID:18692124

  19. Effect of Intravenous Patient Controlled Ketamine Analgesiaon Postoperative Pain in Opium Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Dahi-Taleghani, Mastane; Fazli, Benjamin; Ghasemi, Mahshid; Vosoughian, Maryam; Dabbagh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acutepostoperative pain is among the worst experience that patient scan undergo, and many analgesics have been used to suppress it; especially in chronic opium abusers. Ketamine is an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist analgesic, having both anesthetic and analgesic properties, which are not affected to the same extent in chronic opium abusers. Objectives: In this study, we assessed the analgesic effects of ketamine added to morphine as a patient-controlled analgesia method for acute pain management, compared with a placebo, inchronic maleopium abusers. Patients and Methods: After institutional review board approval for ethical considerations, a randomized double-blinded placebo controlled clinical trial was conducted. A total of 140 male patients aged 18-65 years, undergoing orthopedic surgery, were entered into the study after matching inclusion and exclusion criteria. All patients received the same anesthesia method; while the first group received ketamine (1mg/mL) and morphine (0.5 mg/mL) as a patient-controlled analgesia (70 patients), the second group received morphine (0.5 mg/mL) plus normal saline (70 patients). P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The ketamine and morphine group of patients experienced less postoperative pain and required less postoperative rescue analgesia. However, the unwanted postoperative side effects were nearly the same; although increased levels of postoperative nausea and vomiting were observed in the ketamine and morphine group Conclusions: This study demonstrated improved analgesic effects after using intravenous patient controlled analgesia with ketamine on postoperative pain in opium abusers. PMID:24701419

  20. Perioperative analgesic effects of intravenous paracetamol: Preemptive versus preventive analgesia in elective cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hossam Ibrahim Eldesuky Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cesarean section (CS) is the one of the most common surgical procedure in women. There is preoperative stress effect before the delivery of the baby as (intubation and skin incision). There is acute postoperative pain, which may be progressed to chronic pain. All these perioperative stress effects need for various approach of treatment, which including systemic and neuraxial analgesia. The different analgesia modalities may affect and impair early interaction between mother and infant. Preemptive intravenous (I.V.) paracetamol (before induction) may reduce stress response before the delivery of the baby, intraoperative opioids and postoperative pain. Objectives: The aim of this study to compare between the administration of I.V. paracetamol as: Preemptive analgesia (preoperative) and preventive analgesia (at the end of surgery) as regards of hemodynamic, pain control, duration of analgesia, cumulative doses of intraoperative opioids and their related side-effects and to compare between two different protocols of postoperative analgesia and their cumulative doses. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients undergoing elective CS were randomly enrolled in this study and divided into two groups of 30 patients each. Group I: i.V. paracetamol 1 g (100 ml) was given 30 min before induction of anesthesia. Group II: i.V. paracetamol 1 g (100 ml) was given 30 min before the end of surgery. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and peripheral oxygen saturation were recorded. Postoperative pain was assessed by visual analog score. Postoperative pethidine was given by two different protocols: group I: 0.5 mg/kg was divided into 0.25 mg/kg intramuscular and 0.25 mg/kg I.V. Group II was given pethidine 0.5 mg/kg I.V. Doses of intraoperative fentanyl, postoperative pethidine, duration of paracetamol analgesic time, time to next analgesia, and side-effects of opioid were noted and compared. Result: Preemptive group had hemodynamic stability

  1. Analgesic effects of NB001 on mouse models of arthralgia.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhen; Wang, Dong-sheng; Wang, Xin-shang; Tian, Jiao; Han, Jing; Guo, Yan-yan; Feng, Bin; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Ming-gao; Liu, Shui-bing

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated the critical roles of calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1) in the central nervous system in chronic pain. In the present study, we examined the analgesic effects of NB001, a selective inhibitor of AC1, on animal models of ankle joint arthritis and knee joint arthritis induced by complete Freund's adjuvant injection. NB001 treatment had no effect on joint edema, stiffness, and joint destruction. Furthermore, the treatment failed to attenuate the disease progression of arthritis. However, NB001 treatment (3 mg/kg) significantly weakened joint pain-related behavior in the mouse models of ankle joint arthritis and knee joint arthritis. Results indicated that NB001 exhibited an analgesic effect on the animal models of arthritis but was not caused by anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:26452469

  2. Analgesic effects of melatonin on post-herpetic neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yun-Kun; Ding, Ji-Fei; Liu, Jin; Yang, Yong-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the analgesic effects of melatonin on post-herpetic neuralgia and its possible mechanism. Methods: A total of 48 PHN Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups randomly: Normal, PHN, PHN+MT and naloxone, 4P-PDOT or L-arginine+120 mg/kg MT (C). Heat pain latency was determined after MT injection for 20 min, 40 min, 80 min and 120 min respectively. The expression levels of δ receptor and MT2 receptor in different tissues of rats were detected by RT-PCR method. NO content was determined. Results: Heat pain latency in PHN rats were lower than that of control group (P<0.05), MT could increase the heat pain latency with dose-dependent, while naloxone, 4P-PDOT and L-arginine could reverse the analgesic effect of MT (P<0.05). The expression levels of δ receptor and MT2 receptor in spinal cord, hypothalamus and hippocampus in PHN+MT (120 mg/kg, i. p.) group were significantly higher than that of PHN group (P<0.05). The NO levels in the brain and spinal cord tissues in PHN group were higher than that of PHN+MT (120 mg/kg) group (P<0.05). Conclusions: MT had significant analgesic effects in the treatment of PHN, and its mechanism was closely related with δopioid receptor, NO and MT2 receptor. PMID:26131073

  3. Impairment of aspirin antiplatelet effects by non-opioid analgesic medication

    PubMed Central

    Polzin, Amin; Hohlfeld, Thomas; Kelm, Malte; Zeus, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin is the mainstay in prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases. Impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects are associated with enhanced incidence of cardiovascular events. Comedication with non-opioid analgesic drugs has been described to interfere with aspirin, resulting in impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects. Additionally, non-opioid analgesic medication has been shown to enhance the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Pain is very frequent and many patients rely on analgesic drugs to control pain. Therefore effective analgesic options without increased risk of cardiovascular events are desirable. This review focuses on commonly used non-opioid analgesics, interactions with aspirin medication and impact on cardiovascular risk. PMID:26225198

  4. Chlorhexidine gel and less difficult surgeries might reduce post-operative pain, controlling for dry socket, infection and analgesic consumption: a split-mouth controlled randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Haraji, A; Rakhshan, V

    2015-03-01

    Reports on post-surgical pain are a few, controversial and flawed (by statistics and analgesic consumption). Besides, it is not known if chlorhexidine can reduce post-extraction pain adjusting for its effect on prevention of infection and dry socket (DS). We assessed these. A total of 90 impacted mandibular third molars of 45 patients were extracted. Intra-alveolar 0·2% chlorhexidine gel was applied in a split-mouth randomised design to one-half of the sockets. None of the included patients took antibiotics or analgesics afterwards. In the first and third post-operative days, DS formation and pain levels were recorded. Predictive roles of the risk factors were analysed using fixed-effects (classic) and multilevel (mixed-model) multiple linear regressions (α = 0·05, β≤0·1). In the first day, pain levels were 5·56 ± 1·53 and 4·78 ± 1·43 (out of 10), respectively. These reduced to 3·22 ± 1·41 and 2·16 ± 1·40. Pain was more intense on the control sides [both P values = 0·000 (paired t-test)]. Chlorhexidine had a significant pain-alleviating effect (P = 0·0001), excluding its effect on DS and infection. More difficult surgeries (P = 0·0201) and dry sockets were more painful (P = 0·0000). Age had a marginally significant negative role (P = 0·0994). Gender and smoking had no significant impact [P ≥ 0·7 (regression)]. The pattern of pain reduction differed between dry sockets and healthy sockets [P = 0·0102 (anova)]. Chlorhexidine can reduce pain, regardless of its infection-/DS-preventive effects. Simpler surgeries and sockets not affected by alveolar osteitis are less painful. Smoking and gender less likely affect pain. The role of age was not conclusive and needs future studies. PMID:25251411

  5. The analgesic effect of crossing the arms.

    PubMed

    Gallace, A; Torta, D M E; Moseley, G L; Iannetti, G D

    2011-06-01

    The ability to determine precisely the location of sensory stimuli is fundamental to how we interact with the world; indeed, to our survival. Crossing the hands over the body midline impairs this ability to localize tactile stimuli. We hypothesized that crossing the arms would modulate the intensity of pain evoked by noxious stimulation of the hand. In two separate experiments, we show (1) that the intensity of both laser-evoked painful sensations and electrically-evoked nonpainful sensations were decreased when the arms were crossed over the midline, and (2) that these effects were associated with changes in the multimodal cortical processing of somatosensory information. Critically, there was no change in the somatosensory-specific cortical processing of somatosensory information. Besides studies showing relief of phantom limb pain using mirrors, this is the first evidence that impeding the processes by which the brain localises a noxious stimulus can reduce pain, and that this effect reflects modulation of multimodal neural activities. By showing that the neural mechanisms by which pain emerges from nociception represent a possible target for analgesia, we raise the possibility of novel approaches to the treatment of painful clinical conditions. Crossing the arms over the midline impairs multimodal processing of somatosensory stimuli and induces significant analgesia to noxious hand stimulation. PMID:21440992

  6. Foot massage: effectiveness on postoperative pain in breast surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Ucuzal, Meral; Kanan, Nevin

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of foot massage on pain after breast surgery, and provide guidance for nurses in nonpharmacologic interventions for pain relief. This was a quasiexperimental study with a total of 70 patients who had undergone breast surgery (35 in the experimental group and 35 in the control group). Patients in the control group received only analgesic treatment, whereas those in the experimental group received foot massage in addition to analgesic treatment. Patients received the first dose of analgesics during surgery. As soon as patients came from the operating room, they were evaluated for pain severity. Patients whose pain severity scored ≥4 according to the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were accepted into the study. In the experimental group, pain and vital signs (arterial blood pressure, pulse, and respiration) were evaluated before foot massage at the time patients complained about pain (time 0) and then 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after foot massage. In the control group, pain and vital signs were also evaluated when the patients complained about pain (time 0) and again at 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes, in sync with the times when foot massage was completed in the experimental group. A patient information form was used to collect descriptive characteristics data of the patients, and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire was used to determine pain severity. Data were analyzed for frequencies, mean, standard deviation, chi-square, Student t, Pillai trace, and Bonferroni test. The results of the statistical analyses showed that patients in the experimental group experienced significantly less pain (p ≤ .001). Especially notable, patients in the experimental group showed a decrease in all vital signs 5 minutes after foot massage, but patients in the control group showed increases in vital signs except for heart rate at 5 minutes. The data obtained showed that foot massage in breast surgery patients was

  7. A Study on Pre-Emptive Analgesic Effect of Intravenous Paracetamol in Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgeries (FESSs): A Randomized, Double-Blinded Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Koteswara, Chethan M.; D., Sheetal

    2014-01-01

    Background: Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (FESS) is associated with significant post-operative pain. Intravenous (iv) paracetamol provides pain relief in most patients who have undergone FESS. In some studies, it was found to be inadequate. It has been observed from previous studies conducted on patients undergoing other surgeries like abdominal surgeries that the analgesic efficacy of iv paracetamol improves when used Pre-emptively. There are no studies done previously on use of iv paracetamol Pre-emptively in FESS. Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the post-operative analgesic effects of Pre-emptive intravenous (iv) paracetamol in FESS. Materials and Methods: Following institutional ethics committee approval, thirty nine American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) physical status I-II patients were assigned in a randomized manner into two groups: Group I received iv paracetamol 1g, in 100mL, 15 minutes before induction and Group II received iv paracetamol 1g, in 100 mL, at the end of the surgery. The time to first analgesic use and the total analgesic consumed in 24 hours was recorded. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain scores were obtained from all patients at 0, 30 minutes, 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after the end of the Surgery. Results: Time to first analgesic requirement was significantly longer in Group I compared to Group II (p = 0.0329). Rescue analgesic consumption and post-operative VAS pain scores recorded were significantly lower in Group I compared to Group II (p < 0.05) until 24 after surgery. Conclusion: Pre-emptive iv paracetamol in comparison to intra-operative paracetamol, provided effective and reliable post-operative analgesia after FESS. PMID:24596738

  8. Comparison of the analgesic effects of robenacoxib, buprenorphine and their combination in cats after ovariohysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Staffieri, F; Centonze, P; Gigante, G; De Pietro, L; Crovace, A

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the postoperative analgesic effects of robenacoxib and buprenorphine alone or in combination, in cats after ovariohysterectomy. Thirty healthy cats were randomly assigned to receive buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg, n=10; GB), robenacoxib (2mg/kg, n=10; GR) or their combination at the same dosages (n=10; GBR) SC. After 30 min cats were sedated with an IM administration of medetomidine (0.02 mg/kg) and ketamine (5mg/kg). General anaesthesia was induced with propofol and after intubation was maintained with isoflurane. Before premedication and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24h after extubation, pain and sedation were assessed using a simple descriptive pain scale, ranging from 0 (no pain/no sedation) to 4 (intense pain/ deep sedation). If the pain score was ≥ 3, rescue analgesia was provided using buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg) administered IM. Pain score was higher in GB at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8h compared to baseline and compared to GBR at the same study times. Moreover, the pain score was also higher in GB compared to GR at 2, 3, 4 and 6h. Pain score was similar at all study times between GR and GBR. Sedation at 1 and 2h was higher than baseline values in all groups. Cats in GB received rescue analgesia more often than cats assigned to GR or GBR. Robenacoxib was an effective analgesic drug in cats up to 24h after ovariohysterectomy. The addition of buprenorphine did not provide any additional analgesic effects compared to robenacoxib alone. PMID:23434263

  9. Comparison of side effects between buprenorphine and meloxicam used postoperatively in Dutch belted rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Cooper, Coreen S; Metcalf-Pate, Kelly A; Barat, Christopher E; Cook, Judith A; Scorpio, Diana G

    2009-05-01

    One of the challenges facing veterinarians and investigators who use rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as a surgical model in biomedical research is choosing an appropriate and efficacious postoperative analgesic without systemic complications and side effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gastrointestinal side effects associated with the postoperative use of buprenorphine in Dutch Belted rabbits. We also evaluated the analgesic meloxicam as an alternative to opioid administration during the postoperative period. Rabbits were assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups during the postoperative period after routine ovariohysterectomy: buprenorphine (n = 10), meloxicam (n = 10), and incisional infiltration with bupivicaine (no treatment control; n = 10). Feed intake, fecal production, weight loss, urine output, and other physiologic parameters were monitored and behavior and pain assessments were performed for 7 d after surgery and compared with baseline values collected before surgery. All rabbits showed decreased pellet consumption, fecal production, and weight on day 1 after surgery. This effect was severe in some rabbits that received bupivicaine; therefore treatment of this entire group with metoclopramide, fluids, and hay was instituted to reverse gut stasis. No significant difference in feed consumption and fecal production was present between the buprenorphine- and meloxicam-treated groups. On the basis of these results, meloxicam appears to be a suitable alternative or adjunct to buprenorphine for alleviating postoperative pain with minimal risk of anorexia and gastrointestinal ileus. PMID:19476717

  10. Effect of submucosal application of tramadol on postoperative pain after third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Gönül, Onur; Satılmış, Tülin; Bayram, Ferit; Göçmen, Gökhan; Sipahi, Aysegül; Göker, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of submucosal application of tramadol, for acute postoperative facial pain, following the extraction of impacted third molar teeth. This prospective, double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled study included 60 ASA I-II patients undergoing impacted third molar surgery under local anaesthesia. Following the surgical procedure, patients were randomly divided into two groups; group T (1 mg/kg tramadol) and group S (2-mL saline). Treatments were applied submucosally after surgery. Pain after extraction was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS) 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h postoperatively. The time at which the first analgesic drug was taken, the total analgesic dose used, and adverse tissue reactions were also evaluated. In group T, postoperative VAS scores were significantly lower compared to that in group S (p < 0.05). This study demonstrated that post-operative submucosal application of tramadol is an effective method for reducing acute post-operative facial pain after impacted third molar surgery. PMID:26467984

  11. Analgesic effect of high intensity laser therapy in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Stiglić-Rogoznica, Nives; Stamenković, Doris; Frlan-Vrgoc, Ljubinka; Avancini-Dobrović, Viviana; Vrbanić, Tea Schnurrer-Luke

    2011-09-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (KOA), the most common type of osteoarthritis (OA), is associated with pain and inflammation of the joint capsule, impaired muscular stabilization, reduced range of motion and functional disability. High-intensity laser therapy (HILT) involves higher-intensity laser radiation and causes minor and slow light absorption by chromophores. Light stimulation of the deep structures, due to high intensity laser therapy, activates cell metabolism through photochemical effect. The transmissions of pain stimulus are slowed down and result in a quick achievement of pain relief. The aim of our research was to investigate the prompt analgesic effect of HILT on patients with KOA. Knee radiographs were performed on all patients and consequently graded using the Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale (K/L). A group of 96 patients (75 female, 21 male, mean age 59.2) with K/L 2 and 3 were submitted to HILT therapy. Pain intensity was evaluated with visual analogue scale (VAS) before and after the treatment. HILT consisted in one daily application, over a period of ten days, using protocol wavelength, frequency and duration. The results showed statistically significant decrease in VAS after the treatment (p < 0.001). Considering these results, HILT enables prompt analgesic effects in KOA treatment. Therefore HILT is a reliable option in KOA physical therapy. PMID:22220431

  12. Analgesic effect of butorphanol and levomethadone in detomidine sedated horses.

    PubMed

    Schatzman, U; Armbruster, S; Stucki, F; Busato, A; Kohler, I

    2001-08-01

    The analgesic potency of butorphanol 25 microg/kg bodyweight (BW) and levomethadone 100 microg/kg BW, administered together with detomidine 10 microg/kg BW, was measured in twelve Warmblood horses in a randomized, blinded cross-over study. Detomidine with saline 10 ml 0.9% was used as placebo. The nociceptive threshold was determined using a constant current and a pneumatic pressure model for somatic pair Detomidine alone and in combination with butorphanol or levomethadone caused a significant temporary increase (P < 0.05) of the nociceptive threshold with a maximum effect within 15 min and a return to baseline levels within 90 min. Butorphanol and levomethadone increased the nociceptive threshold and prolonged the duration of anti-nociception significantly from 15 to 75 min (P < 0.05) after drug administration compared with detomidine alone to both test methods. No significant difference between butorphanol and levomethadone was registered. It is concluded that the addition of butorphanol or levomethadone to detomidine increases the nociceptive threshold to somatic pain and prolongs the analgesic effect of detomidine in the horse. PMID:11554491

  13. Effects of Postoperative Pain Management on Immune Function After Laparoscopic Resection of Colorectal Cancer: A Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Nam Kyu; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Hur, Hyuk; Lee, Jinae; Noh, Hyun-Young; Lee, Jong Ho; Koo, Bon-Neyo

    2016-05-01

    There has been a rising interest in the possible association between perioperative opioid use and postoperative outcomes in cancer patients. Continuous surgical wound infiltration with local anesthetics is a nonopioid analgesic technique that can be used as a postoperative pain management alternative to opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA). The aim of this study was to compare the effects of an opioid-based analgesic regimen versus a local anesthetic wound infiltration-based analgesic regimen on immune modulation and short-term cancer recurrence or metastasis in patients undergoing laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer.Sixty patients undergoing laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to either the opioid group or the ON-Q group. For postoperative analgesia during the first 48 hours, the opioid group (n = 30) received fentanyl via IV PCA, whereas the ON-Q group (n = 30) received continuous wound infiltration of 0.5% ropivacaine with an ON-Q pump and tramadol via IV PCA. Pethidine for the opioid group and ketorolac or propacetamol for the ON-Q group were used as rescue analgesics. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. The primary outcome was postoperative immune function assessed by natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) and interleukin-2. Secondary outcomes were postoperative complications, cancer recurrence, or metastasis within 1 year after surgery, and postoperative inflammatory responses measured by white blood cell count, neutrophil percentage, and C-reactive protein. Immune function and inflammatory responses were measured before surgery and 24 and 48 hours after surgery.Fifty-nine patients completed the study. In the circumstance of similar pain control efficacy between the opioid group and the ON-Q group, postoperative NKCC and interleukin-2 levels did not differ between the 2 groups. The incidence of postoperative complications and recurrence or

  14. Analgesic Opioid Dose Is an Important Indicator of Postoperative Ileus Following Radical Cystectomy with Ileal Conduit: Experience in the Robotic Surgery Era

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Kyo Chul; Yoon, Young Eun; Chung, Byung Ha; Hong, Sung Joon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Postoperative ileus (POI) is common following bowel resection for radical cystectomy with ileal conduit (RCIC). We investigated perioperative factors associated with prolonged POI following RCIC, with specific focus on opioid-based analgesic dosage. Materials and Methods From March 2007 to January 2013, 78 open RCICs and 26 robot-assisted RCICs performed for bladder carcinoma were identified with adjustment for age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists grade, and body mass index (BMI). Perioperative records including operative time, intraoperative fluid excess, estimated blood loss, lymph node yield, and opioid analgesic dose were obtained to assess their associations with time to passage of flatus, tolerable oral diet, and length of hospital stay (LOS). Prior to general anaesthesia, patients received epidural patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) consisted of fentanyl with its dose adjusted for BMI. Postoperatively, single intravenous injections of tramadol were applied according to patient desire. Results Multivariate analyses revealed cumulative dosages of both PCA fentanyl and tramadol injections as independent predictors of POI. According to surgical modality, linear regression analyses revealed cumulative dosages of PCA fentanyl and tramadol injections to be positively associated with time to first passage of flatus, tolerable diet, and LOS in the open RCIC group. In the robot-assisted RCIC group, only tramadol dose was associated with time to flatus and tolerable diet. Compared to open RCIC, robot-assisted RCIC yielded shorter days to diet and LOS; however, it failed to shorten days to first flatus. Conclusion Reducing opioid-based analgesics shortens the duration of POI. The utilization of the robotic system may confer additional benefit. PMID:25048497

  15. The effects of Western music on postoperative pain in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Good, M; Chin, C C

    1998-02-01

    Music is a method nurses can use to help relieve pain, however little is known about its effectiveness across cultures. In this study, Western music was tested for its effectiveness in reducing postoperative pain in 38 Taiwanese patients, and its acceptability was explored. A pretest and post-test experimental design was used with visual analogue scales to measure sensation and distress of pain. Before surgery, subjects were randomly assigned to receive tape recorded music or the usual care. Those who were assigned to the music group chose among 5 types of sedative music. On postoperative Day 1 and Day 2, the effectiveness of the tape-recorded music was investigated during 15 minutes of rest in bed. Patients were interviewed on Day 3 to determine their liking for the music, its calming effects, and the helpfulness of the music. Repeated measures analysis of variance showed a significant interaction between time and group in the distress of pain on Day 1, but not on Day 2, and in pain sensation on Day 2, but not Day 1. Subjects from Taiwan were similar to subjects in a previous study in the United States in their liking for the music, and in reports of the helpfulness of the music for pain sensation and distress, but fewer Taiwanese found the music calming, and they had different choices: more chose harp music and fewer chose jazz than subjects in the U.S. study, and some would prefer Buddhist hymns or popular songs heard in Taiwan. Findings support the use of culturally acceptable music in addition to analgesic medication for the sensation and distress of postoperative pain. PMID:9542366

  16. Vasorelaxant effect of the analgesic clonixin on rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Morales, M A; Silva, A; Brito, G; Bustamante, S; Ponce, H; Paeile, C

    1995-03-01

    1. A novel vasorelaxant effect of clonixinate of L-lysine (Clx), analgesic and anti-inflammatory, was studied in rat aortic rings. 2. Clx completely relaxed aortic rings contracted by KCl 70 mM and together with its analog flunixin exhibited lesser potency but equal efficacy than verapamil. In comparison, indomethacin, which is a more potent cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor relaxed only about 40% of the maximal contraction of aortic rings. 3. Furthermore, Clx antagonized Ca2+ dependent aortic contraction and BAY K-8644 induced aortic contraction suggesting its calcium antagonist character. 4. From these results it can be concluded that the hypotensive effect seen in rats in vivo after Clx i.v. injection arises because of vasodilatory effect of Clx and gives further support to the proposal that the pharmacological mechanism of action of Clx should be calcium antagonism. PMID:7590098

  17. Postoperative Pain and Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia-Related Adverse Effects in Young and Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jae Chul; Lee, Jinae; Kim, So Yeon; Choi, Sumin; Han, Dong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this retrospective analysis of 10,575 patients who used fentanyl-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) after surgery, we evaluated difference between young and elderly patients on their characteristic of adverse effects. We reviewed the data collected from the patients who were provided IV-PCA for pain control following elective surgery under either general or spinal anesthesia between September 2010 and March 2014. Postoperative pain, incidence of PCA-related adverse effects, and risk factors for the need of rescue analgesics and antiemetics for postoperative 48 hours were analyzed. Pain intensity (numerical rating scale [NRS]) at postoperative 6 to 12 hours (4.68 vs 4.58, P < 0.01) and incidence of nausea or vomiting (23.8% vs 20.6%, P < 0.001) were higher in young patients, while incidence of PCA discontinuation (9.9% vs 11.5%, P < 0.01) and sedation (0.1% vs 0.7%, P < 0.001) was higher in elderly patients. Despite larger fentanyl dose used, a greater proportion of young patients required rescue analgesics (53.8% vs 47.9%, P < 0.001) while addition of ketorolac was effective in reducing postoperative pain. Despite lower incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), a larger proportion of elderly patients required rescue antiemetics (10.1% vs 12.2%, P < 0.001) while addition of ramosetron was effective in reducing PONV. In conclusion, when fentanyl-based IV-PCA is used for postoperative pain control, a larger proportion of young patients may require rescue analgesics while elderly patients may require more rescue antiemetics. The addition of ketorolac or ramosetron to the PCA of young and elderly patients can be effective to prevent rescue analgesics or antiemetics use. PMID:26559296

  18. Effect of Music Therapy on Postoperative Pain Management in Gynecological Patients: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sin, Wai Man; Chow, Ka Ming

    2015-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may have a negative impact on the physiological and psychological well-being of patients. Pharmacological methods are currently used to relieve such pain in gynecological patients; however, inadequate pain control is still reported, and the use of nonpharmacological pain-relieving methods is increasingly being advocated, one of which is music therapy. The purpose of this literature review was to identify, summarize, and critically appraise current evidence on music therapy and postoperative pain management among gynecological patients. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, and Allied and Complementary Medicine was conducted using the search terms music, gynecological, pain, surgery, operative, and post-operative to identify relevant articles in English from 1995 to the present. All identified articles were assessed independently for inclusion into review. A total of 7 articles were included after removal of duplicates and exclusion of irrelevant studies. All the included studies assessed the effects of music therapy on postoperative pain intensity, and three of them measured pain-related physiological symptoms. The findings indicated that music therapy, in general, was effective in reducing pain intensity, fatigue, anxiety, and analgesic consumption in gynecological patients during the postoperative period. It is recommended as an adjunct to pharmacological pain-relieving methods in reducing postoperative pain. Future researches on music therapy to identify the most effective application and evaluate its effect by qualitative study are recommended. PMID:26697822

  19. An in vitro investigation of the effect of some analgesics on human enamel.

    PubMed

    McNally, L M; Barbour, M E; O'Sullivan, D J; Jagger, D C

    2006-07-01

    The sale of over-the-counter pain relief medication has increased dramatically in recent years, and typically amounts to several hundred thousands of pounds per year in the UK. Many soluble analgesic preparations contain citric acid, and it has been suggested that these formulations may cause dental erosion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of some over-the-counter analgesics on tooth surface loss from human enamel. Six commonly available analgesics were chosen for this study and the effect of immersing unerupted human enamel was examined using non-contact optical profilometry. Two of the six analgesics investigated caused no detectable erosion (Boots soluble aspirin and Anadin Extra). Three caused statistically significant enamel erosion, but this was very slight and is thought to be clinically insignificant (Alka Seltzer, Panadol and Solpadeine). Only one analgesic caused possible potentially clinical significant enamel erosion. Further studies are needed to determine whether Aspro causes clinically significant enamel erosion. PMID:16774512

  20. The analgesic effect of clonidine as an adjuvant in dorsal penile nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Anouar, Jarraya; Mohamed, Smaoui; Sofiene, Abidi; Jawhar, Zouari; Sahar, Elleuch; Kamel, Kolsi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB) is a commonly performed regional anesthetic technique for male circumcision. The aim of this study was to assess the analgesic effect of the adjunction of clonidine to bupivacaine 0.5% in this block. Methods It was a prospective randomized double-blind clinical trial including 40 ASA1 boys aged from 1 to 4 years undergoing elective circumcision. Dorsal penile nerve block was performed under general Anesthesia. Patients were randomized in two groups: Group 1 (G1): received 0.1 ml/Kg of bupivacaine 0.5% with 1µg/kg of clonidine in each side. Group 2 (G2): received 0.1 ml/kg of bupivacaine 0.5% with placebo in each side. The failure of the DNPB was defined by the increase of heart rate by more than 25% comparing to baseline and in his case an intravenous injection of 20 µg/kg of alfentanyl was given. Post-operative pain was assessed by CHEOPS score. Results A total of 40 patients were enrolled. Demographic parameters were similar in both groups. We noted no case of DNPB failure in this study. The supply for additional analgesia was seen in 12 patients in group 2 versus 3 cases in group 1. CHEOPS (Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale) was significantly lower in group 1 from 2nd post operative hour until the 24th hour. Conclusion Clonidine can be used in dorsal penile nerve block to improve and to prolong its analgesic effects after male circumcision. PMID:27347302

  1. Effects of Dexmedetomidine on Serum Interleukin-6, Hemodynamic Stability, and Postoperative Pain Relief in Elderly Patients under Spinal Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Yun, So Hui; Park, Jong Cook; Kim, Sang Rim; Choi, Yun Suk

    2016-02-01

    The beneficial effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX) have not been extensively investigated in elderly patients receiving spinal anesthesia. This study evaluated the effects of intravenous DEX infusion on stress and hemodynamic response, as well as on postoperative analgesia in elderly patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We randomly allocated 45 adult patients to 3 patient groups (n=15 each): uni-saline group patients underwent unilateral TKA with saline administration, uni-DEX group patients underwent unilateral TKA with DEX administration, and bilateral-DEX group patients underwent bilateral TKA with DEX administration. Serum interleukin︲6 (IL-6) levels were significantly lower in the bilateral-DEX group than in the uni-saline group 6 and 24h postoperatively, and were negatively correlated with total DEX dosage 24h postoperatively. Bradycardia occurred more frequently in the uni-DEX and bilateral-DEX groups than in the uni-saline group. The total dose of required supplementary analgesics was significantly higher in the uni-saline group than in the uni-DEX and bilateral-DEX groups 6h postoperatively. The results indicate that perioperative intravenous DEX administration decreases postoperative serum IL︲6 levels in patients undergoing bilateral TKA, and has a postoperative analgesic effect in patients undergoing unilateral or bilateral TKA. PMID:26899608

  2. Sound can enhance the analgesic effect of virtual reality

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology may serve as an effective non-pharmacological analgesic to aid pain management. During VR distraction, the individual is immersed in a game presented through a head-mounted display (HMD). The technological level of the HMD can vary, as can the use of different input devices and the inclusion of sound. While more technologically advanced designs may lead to more effective pain management the specific roles of individual components within such systems are not yet fully understood. Here, the role of supplementary auditory information was explored owing to its particular ecological relevance. Healthy adult participants took part in a series of cold-pressor trials submerging their hand in cold water for as long as possible. Individual pain tolerances were measured according to the time (in seconds) before the participant withdrew their hand. The concurrent use of a VR game and the inclusion of sound was varied systematically within participants. In keeping with previous literature, the use of a VR game increased pain tolerance across conditions. Highest pain tolerance was recorded when participants were simultaneously exposed to both the VR game and supplementary sound. The simultaneous inclusion of sound may therefore play an important role when designing VR to manage pain. PMID:27069646

  3. Sound can enhance the analgesic effect of virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah; Coxon, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology may serve as an effective non-pharmacological analgesic to aid pain management. During VR distraction, the individual is immersed in a game presented through a head-mounted display (HMD). The technological level of the HMD can vary, as can the use of different input devices and the inclusion of sound. While more technologically advanced designs may lead to more effective pain management the specific roles of individual components within such systems are not yet fully understood. Here, the role of supplementary auditory information was explored owing to its particular ecological relevance. Healthy adult participants took part in a series of cold-pressor trials submerging their hand in cold water for as long as possible. Individual pain tolerances were measured according to the time (in seconds) before the participant withdrew their hand. The concurrent use of a VR game and the inclusion of sound was varied systematically within participants. In keeping with previous literature, the use of a VR game increased pain tolerance across conditions. Highest pain tolerance was recorded when participants were simultaneously exposed to both the VR game and supplementary sound. The simultaneous inclusion of sound may therefore play an important role when designing VR to manage pain. PMID:27069646

  4. Effect of preemptive ketamine administration on postoperative visceral pain after gynecological laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong-Qi; Jia, Dong-Lin

    2016-08-01

    The pain following gynecological laparoscopic surgery is less intense than that following open surgery; however, patients often experience visceral pain after the former surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of preemptive ketamine on visceral pain in patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopic surgery. Ninety patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopic surgery were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Group 1 received placebo. Group 2 was intravenously injected with preincisional saline and local infiltration with 20 mL ropivacaine (4 mg/mL) at the end of surgery. Group 3 was intravenously injected with preincisional ketamine (0.3 mg/kg) and local infiltration with 20 mL ropivacaine (4 mg/mL) at the end of surgery. A standard anesthetic was used for all patients, and meperidine was used for postoperative analgesia. The visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for incisional and visceral pain at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h, cumulative analgesic consumption and time until first analgesic medication request, and adverse effects were recorded postoperatively. The VAS scores of visceral pain in group 3 were significantly lower than those in group 2 and group 1 at 2 h and 6 h postoperatively (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). At 2 h and 6 h, the VAS scores of incisional pain did not differ significantly between groups 2 and 3, but they were significantly lower than those in group 1 (P<0.01). Groups 1 and 2 did not show any differences in visceral pain scores at 2 h and 6 h postoperatively. Moreover, the three groups showed no statistically significant differences in visceral and incisional pain scores at 12 h and 24 h postoperatively. The consumption of analgesics was significantly greater in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3, and the time to first request for analgesics was significantly longer in groups 2 and 3 than in group 1, with no statistically significant difference between groups 2 and 3. However, the three groups showed no significant difference

  5. Comparison of the effects of buprenorphine, oxymorphone hydrochloride, and ketoprofen for postoperative analgesia after onychectomy or onychectomy and sterilization in cats.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, Stephanie; Brown, Nancy O; Shofer, Frances S

    2002-01-01

    In this prospective, randomized, blinded study, 68 clinically healthy cats that had onychectomy (n = 20), onychectomy and castration (n = 20), or onychectomy and ovariohysterectomy (n = 28) were randomly assigned to one of four postoperative analgesic treatment groups: buprenorphine (0.01 mg/kg body weight, intramuscularly [IM]), oxymorphone hydrochloride (0.05 mg/kg body weight, IM), ketoprofen (2 mg/kg body weight, IM), and placebo (physiological saline). Sedation scores, visual analog pain scores, cumulative pain scores, serum cortisol concentration, and appetite were used to assess postoperative analgesic effect. Buprenorphine demonstrated the highest efficacy with the lowest cumulative pain scores and serum cortisol levels. PMID:12428880

  6. Role of flupirtine as a preemptive analgesic in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ghanshyam; Behera, Shailaja Shankar; Das, Saurabh Kumar; Jain, Gaurav; Choupoo, Sujali; Raj, Janak

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Postsurgical pain is the leading complaint after laparoscopic cholecystectomy that may delay the postoperative recovery and hence we undertook a prospective randomized trial to analyze the role of flupirtine as a preemptive analgesic for postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing above surgery. Material and Methods: A total of 66 cases were randomly assigned to two groups to receive capsule flupirtine (200 mg) or capsule vitamin B complex administered orally, 2 h before the laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery. Time to first analgesic requirement, assessment of postoperative pain in terms of visual analog score, and analgesic requirement postoperatively were measured as a primary outcome. Results: Time to first analgesic requirement was significantly prolonged in the flupirtine group as compared with the placebo group. There was significant pain reduction in early postoperative period (up to 4 h), but no changes occurred thereafter. Total analgesic requirement (including rescue analgesia) and side-effects were comparable between the groups except for higher sedation in flupirtine group. Conclusions: Flupirtine is effective as a preemptive analgesic in providing adequate pain relief during the immediate postoperative period after laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery. However, continuation of drug therapy postoperatively could possibly delineate its optimal analgesic profile more profoundly. PMID:25948895

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Preemptive Analgesic Effect of Injected Intramuscular Diclofenac and Ketorolac after Third Molar Surgery- A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mony, Deepthi; Kulkarni, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Analgesia pre-emptively administered effect-ively aid in management of pain. Pre-emptive analgesia is anti-nociceptive treatment which prevents altered central sensitization of afferent inputs. Aim To compare and evaluate the pre-emptive analgesic efficacy of preoperatively administered ketorolac and diclofenac for controlling postoperative pain after third molar surgery. Materials and Methods A total of 50 patients with symmetrically impacted third molars were divided into two groups, 30mg intramuscular injection of ketorolac and 75 mg diclofenac sodium were used in the respective groups. The visual analogue scale was used to assess post operative pain for three days and the patients were also evaluated for the number of rescue analgesia. Results The data was statistically evaluated with paired t- test. The maximum time taken for pain perception for Group A Ketoralac was 5.48 hrs and Group B Diclofenac sodium was 4.9 hrs and p=0.235 which was not significant. The mean number of tablets taken by the patients in the first three post operative days was 3.24 in Group A i.e., Ketorolac and 4.04 in Group B i.e., Diclofenac sodium. The values were compared using the paired t test. The p value = 0.004, which was significant. Conclusion Ketoralac showed better pre-emptive analgesic effect for post-operative pain management after third molar extraction. The immediate post-operative pain free period provided by both ketorolac and diclofenac by intramuscular route was same. PMID:27504398

  8. Evaluation of analgesic effect of local administration of morphine after iliac crest bone graft harvesting: A double blind study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Devinder; Gombar, K K; Bhatia, Nidhi; Gombar, Satinder; Garg, Sudhir

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: Pain is a complex process influenced by both physiological and psychological factors. In spite of an armamentarium of analgesic drugs and techniques available to combat post-operative pain, appropriate selection, and effective management for relief of post-operative pain still poses unique challenges. The discovery of peripheral opioid receptors has led to growing interest in the use of locally applied opioids (intra-articular, intra-pleural, intra-peritoneal, and perineural) for managing acute pain. As bone graft harvesting is associated with significant post-operative pain and there is a paucity of literature on the use of peripheral opioids at the iliac crest bone harvesting site, the present study was planned to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of local administration of morphine after iliac crest bone graft harvesting. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients, 20-50 years of age scheduled to undergo elective surgery for delayed and non-union fracture both bone leg with bone grafting under general anaesthesia (GA) were randomly assigned to one of the four groups of 15 patients each: group 1: 2.5 ml normal saline (NS) +2.5 ml NS infiltrated into the harvest site at 2 sites + 1 ml NS intramuscularly (i/m); Group 2: 2.5 ml NS + 2.5 ml NS infiltrated into the harvest site at 2 sites + 5 mg morphine in 1 ml i/m.; Group 3: 2.5 mg (2.5 ml) morphine + 2.5 mg (2.5 ml) morphine infiltrated into the harvest site at 2 sites + 1 ml NS i/m; Group 4: 0.5 mg naloxone (2.5 ml) +5 mg (2.5 ml) morphine infiltrated into the harvest site at 2 sites + 1 ml NS i/m. Pain from the bone graft site and operative site was assessed for 24 h post-operatively. Results: The patients who had received morphine infiltration (Group 3) had significantly less pain scores at the graft site at 4, 6, and 10 post-operative hours. They also had significantly less morphine consumption and overall better pain relief as compared to the other groups. Conclusions: Morphine

  9. Test-dependent relationship of the antidepressant and analgesic effects of amitriptyline.

    PubMed

    Casas, J; Gibert-Rahola, J; Chover, A J; Micó, J A

    1995-11-01

    Antidepressants have been found to be of value in the treatment of pain of various etiologies. Nevertheless, the data are conflicting as it is often difficult to distinguish between the analgesic and antidepressant action. The analgesic effect of acutely administered amitriptyline at doses of 2.5, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg was investigated in four nociceptive tests involving physical (hot plate and tail flick tests), or noxious chemical stimuli (acetic acid and formalin tests). Relationships were established between the analgesic actions and the antidepressant effect of acutely administered amitriptyline at doses of 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg in the forced swimming test. The results demonstrated a relationship between the antidepressant effect and the analgesic action in the tail flick test, but not in the hot plate, acetic acid and formalin tests. Thus, the type of noxious stimulus may be a determining factor in the relationship between these two pharmacological actions. PMID:8786671

  10. Analgesic Effect of Clonidine Added to Bupivacaine in Spinal Anesthesia for Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lak, Marzieh; Yousefi, Asghar; Karimi-Sari, Hamidreza; Saghafinia, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several researchers have suggested that addition of local anesthetics to spinal anesthesia increases the duration of post-operative analgesia. Objectives: This study sought to assess the effect of addition of clonidine to bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia on analgesia after cruciate ligament repair. Patients and Methods: This double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 50 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class I or II patients who were candidates for cruciate ligament repair. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups; one group received 15 mg of bupivacaine (group B) and the other 15 mg of bupivacaine plus clonidine (75 µg, group BC). The two groups were compared in terms of post-operative analgesia and related factors using the SPSS software version 20. Results: All patients were males with a mean age of 24.9 years in group B, and 25.2 years in group BC (P > 0.05). In group BC, time lapse to request analgesics was 160 minutes longer and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) at this time was 0.3 units less than group B. The time to regression of sensory block by two dermatomes was seven minutes longer, VAS in the recovery room was 1 unit less and Bromage scale in the recovery room and ward was 0.6 and 0.9 units more, respectively in the BC group. Hypotension and ephedrine usage was 36% more in the BC group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Clonidine plus bupivacaine can increase the duration of motor and sensory block in arthroscopic cruciate ligament repair under spinal anesthesia. However, due to significant hemodynamic changes, further studies are required to determine a safer dose. PMID:26290855

  11. Evaluation of analgesic effects of intrathecal clonidine along with bupivacaine in cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nikhil; Bogra, Jaishri; Chaudhary, Ajay K.

    2011-01-01

    Aims and Context: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the analgesic and adverse effects of intrathecal clonidine with hyperbaric bupivacaine in spinal anesthesia. Settings and Design: Randomized single blind trial. Methods: 210 ASA I-II pregnant females undergoing emergency cesarean section were randomized in a single-blind fashion to one of the three groups. In group I (n=70) patients received 12.5 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine intrathecally. In group II (n=70) patients received intrathecal mixture of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (8 mg) and clonidine 50 μg. In group III (n=70), patients received 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (10 mg) intrathecally along with 50 μg of clonidine. Statistical Analysis Used: Groups were compared using one-way ANOVA with the Bonferroni multiple comparison post hoc test. The proportion of adverse events was compared using the chi-square test (χ2 =57.2410). Results: On adding 50 μg clonidine, we were able to reduce intrathecal dose of bupivacaine for cesarean section to 8 mg. Patients receiving intrathecal clonidine along with bupivacaine had significantly long lasting analgesia with lower bupivacaine dose [246.21±5.15 min. (group II) vs 146.0±4.55 min (group I), P=0.021; 95% confidence interval: 238.01-257.40, group II and 134.99-157.0 group I]. Conclusions: Addition of intrathecal clonidine causes some sedation in the postoperative period, but it provides adequate analgesia and motor paralysis at lower dose of bupivacaine. It also significantly prolongs postoperative pain relief. PMID:21655013

  12. Diclofenac is more effective for post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing lower abdominal gynecological surgeries: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Anirban; Biswas, Jhuma; Mukhopadhyay, Purnava; Sanyal, Poushali; Dasgupta, Shyamal; Das, Shyamashis

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to compare the efficacy of injectable diclofenac intramuscularly (IM), injection paracetamol intravenously (IV), or a combination of both to provide post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing lower abdominal gynecological surgeries. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 female patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II), aged 20-50 years, scheduled for elective total abdominal hysterectomy with or without bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were randomized to receive 75 mg diclofenac IM 8 hourly (Group D) or 1 g paracetamol IV 8 hourly (Group P) or a combination of both 8 hourly (Group PD) for 24 h post-operative period from the start of surgery. The primary outcome measured was the requirement of rescue analgesic (tramadol), the secondary outcomes measured included visual analog score (VAS) for pain, time until first rescue analgesic administration, patient satisfaction score and any side effects. Results: The requirement of rescue analgesic was significantly lower in Groups D and PD compared to Group P. Mean (standard deviation) tramadol requirement during 24 h was 56.67 (62.60) mg, 20.00 (40.68) mg and 20.00 (40.68) mg in the Groups P, D and PD respectively. Less number of patients in Groups D and PD (20% in both the groups) required rescue analgesic compared to Group P (50%). The VAS showed a significant decrease in Groups D and PD compared to Group P between 4 and 12 h post-operatively. However, Group PD showed no significant difference when compared to Group D alone. Conclusion: Injection diclofenac IM is more effective than paracetamol IV in terms of rescue analgesic requirement, but the combination of diclofenac IM and paracetamol IV provides no added advantage over diclofenac IM alone. PMID:25886225

  13. The effect of intraarticular levobupivacaine and bupivacaine injection on the postoperative pain management in total knee artroplastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Nurcan; Taspinar, Vildan; Karasu, Derya; Tezcan, Aysu; Dikmen, Bayazit; Gogus, Nermin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with considerable postoperative pain. We compared the effects of intraoperative intraarticular levobupivacaine and bupivacaine on postoperative analgesia and analgesic consumption after total knee arthroplasty. Methods: Sixty ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) physical status II-III, 18-75 years old patients scheduled for unilateral TKA were included in this study. For the operative procedure combined spinal epidural anesthesia was given by injecting 15mg levobupivacaine in subarachnoid space at L3-4/L4-5 in sitting position for all patients. In Group L 20ml levobupivacaine(0.5%), in Group B 20ml bupivacaine (0.5%) was injected intraarticularly 10 minutes before opening of the tourniquet at the end of the surgery. For all patients postoperative analgesia was provided with PCEA (levobupivacaine+fentanyl) and oral 1gr paracetamol four times a day. Patients’ intraoperative-postoperative hemodynamical data, postoperative sensorial-motor block characteristics, side effects, PCEA demand ratios and bolus volumes, total analgesic consumption, VAS values, first mobilization time, hospitalization time were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS version 13.00 software. Results: There was no intergroup difference in demographic data, hemodynamical data, PCEA demand ratios, total analgesic consumption, first mobilization time, hospitalization time and VAS values at 0,2,72 hour. Postoperative lower VAS values were determined at 4,8,12,24 hours in Group B and at 48th hour in Group L(p<0.05). Conclusions: Intraarticular local anesthetic administration in addition to PCEA for post operative pain relief provides good analgesia after TKA surgery. PMID:25674125

  14. Analgesic use - prevalence, biomonitoring and endocrine and reproductive effects.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, David M; Mazaud-Guittot, Séverine; Gaudriault, Pierre; Lesné, Laurianne; Serrano, Tania; Main, Katharina M; Jégou, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Paracetamol and NSAIDs, in particular acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and ibuprofen, are among the most used and environmentally released pharmaceutical drugs. The differences in international trends in the sale and consumption of mild analgesics reflect differences in marketing, governmental policies, habits, accessibility, disease patterns and the age distribution of each population. Biomonitoring indicates ubiquitous and high human exposure to paracetamol and to salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of acetylsalicylic acid. Furthermore, evidence suggests that analgesics can have endocrine disruptive properties capable of altering animal and human reproductive function from fetal life to adulthood in both sexes. Medical and public awareness about these health concerns should be increased, particularly among pregnant women. PMID:27150289

  15. The Effect of Intravenous Paracetamol on Postoperative Pain after Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shimia, Mohammad; Abedini, Naghi

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A randomized, double-blinded controlled trial. Purpose Postoperative pain relief especially using analgesic drugs with minimal side effects has considerable clinical importance. This study aimed to examine the effect of intravenous paracetamol on pain relief after lumbar discectomy as a major surgery. Overview of Literature Patients undergoing lumbar discectomy experience a high degree of lumbar pain. Some authors emphasize the use of intravenous paracetamol to improve postoperative pain and increase patients' satisfaction following this surgery. Methods Fifty-two patients scheduled for lumbar discectomy were randomly allocated into two groups: a group that received intravenous paracetamol (1 g/100 mL normal saline) within the last 20 minutes of surgery as the case group (n=24) and a group that received sodium chloride 0.9% 100 mL as the control group (n=28). Postoperative pain was assessed at 1, 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours after surgery by a visual analogue scale (VAS). The dosage of the administered opioid (morphine), as well as drug-related side effects within the first 24 hours after surgery were also recorded. Results The mean VAS score was significantly lower in the paracetamol group than the controls for all of the assessed time points. Although the dose of the administered morphine was numerically lower in the paracetamol group, this difference was not statistically significant (5.53±4.49 mL vs. 7.85±4.17 mL). Conclusions Intravenous paracetamol as a non-opioid analgesic can relieve postoperative pain in patients undergoing lumbar discectomy; however, its use alone may not represent the best regimen for reducing the needed dose of opioids after operation. PMID:25187855

  16. Effect of preoperative flupirtine on postoperative morphine sparing in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, D; Ahuja, V; Dass, C; Gombar, S; Huria, A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Flupirtine is a unique non-opioid, centrally acting analgesic with muscle relaxant properties. So far no study has evaluated, use of preoperative flupirtine on postoperative morphine sparing effect in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH). Materials and Methods: We performed a prospective, controlled, and randomized study in 50 female patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I–II, aged between 30 and 60 years scheduled for TAH under general anesthesia (GA). Patients were randomized to receive either single dose flupirtine 100 mg or placebo 1 h prior to surgery. A standard anesthetic and analgesic protocol was followed in both the groups. Postoperatively, a titrated loading dose of intravenous morphine 0.1 mg/kg was followed with patient-controlled analgesia with morphine (bolus of 0.01 mg/kg with a lockout time of 7 min). The primary outcome was cumulative morphine consumption at 48 h postoperatively. Secondary outcomes included hemodynamics, visual analog scale (VAS) at rest, VAS on cough, and any adverse effects. Results: All enrolled 50 patients completed the follow-up. The cumulative mean morphine consumption (standard deviation [SD]) at 48 h (40.4 [6.0] vs. 47 [6.6] mg, P = 0.001) was reduced in-group flupirtine as compared with placebo. The cumulative mean VAS at rest (SD) (3 [0.7] vs. 3.7 [0.7], P = 0.001) and on cough (3 [0.9] vs. 3.8 [0.5], P = 0.002) were reduced in-group flupirtine as compared with placebo at 48 h postoperatively. Conclusion: Preoperative use of flupirtine exhibited morphine sparing effect in patients following TAH under GA at 48 h. PMID:26955312

  17. Analgesic Effects of 1st Generation Anti-histamines in Mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mebae; Shima, Kazuhiro; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Sakurada, Shinobu; Sugawara, Shunji; Fujita, Takuo; Tadano, Takeshi; Watanabe, Makoto; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Endo, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Pain is sensed, transmitted, and modified by a variety of mediators and receptors. Histamine is a well-known mediator of pain. In addition to their anti-histaminic effects, the classical, or 1st generation, anti-histamines (1st AHs) possess, to various degrees, anti-muscarinic, anti-serotonergic, anti-adrenergic, and other pharmacologic effects. Although there have been attempts to use 1st AHs as analgesics and/or analgesic adjuvants, the advent of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) discouraged such trials. We previously reported that in patients with temporomandibular disorders, osteoporosis, and/or osteoarthritis, the analgesic effects of certain 1st AHs (chlorpheniramine and diphenhydramine) are superior to those of the NSAIDs flurbiprofen and indomethacin. Here, we compared analgesic effects among 1st AHs and NSAIDs against responses shown by mice to intraperitoneally injected 0.7% acetic acid. Since 1st AHs are water soluble, we selected water-soluble NSAIDs. For direct comparison, drugs were intravenously injected 30 min before the above tests. Histamine-H1-receptor-deficient (H1R-KO) mice were used for evaluating H1-receptor-independent effects. The tested 1st AHs (especially cyproheptadine) displayed or tended to display analgesic effects comparable to those of NSAIDs in normal and H1R-KO mice. Our data suggest that the anti-serotonergic and/or anti-adrenergic effects of 1st AHs make important contributions to their analgesic effects. Moreover, combination of a 1st AH with an NSAID (cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor) produced remarkably potent analgesic effects. We propose that a 1st AH, by itself or in combination with a cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor, should undergo testing to evaluate its usefulness in analgesia. PMID:27040636

  18. Effects of Ropivacaine on Postoperative Pain and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farsad; Zamani, Somayyeh; Etezadi, Farhad; Shariat Moharari, Reza; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative analgesic effects of ropivacaine have been demonstrated in various surgical procedures; however, its beneficial effect on postoperative pain relief and ability to breathe out air in urological surgeries, particularly in local interventions such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), has remained uncertain. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of ropivacaine on postoperative pain severity and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in patients undergoing PCNL procedure. Patients and Methods: This randomized double-blinded clinical trial was performed on 55 consecutive adult patients aged 15 to 60 years who underwent Tubeless PCNL surgery. The patients were randomly assigned to instill 30 mL of ropivacaine 0.2% or 30 mL of isotonic saline with the same protocol. The parameters of visual analogue scale (VAS) (for assessment of pain severity) and PEF (for assessment of ability to breathe out air) were measured 4 and 6 hours after completing the procedure. Moreover, the amounts of opioids or analgesics administered within 6 hours after the operation were recorded. Results: We found no difference in the mean pain severity score between the case and control groups 4 hours (P = 0.332) and 6 hours (P = 0.830) after the operation. The mean PEF at baseline was similar in case and control groups (P = 0.738). Moreover, no difference was revealed in PEF index 4 hours (P = 0.398) and 6 hours (P = 0.335) after PCNL between the groups. The mean VAS scores 4 hours after the operation slightly decreased 2 hours later (P < 0.001) in the both groups. Moreover, in the both groups, a sudden decrease in PEF index was observed within 4 hours after the operation and increased with a mild gradient for the next 2 hours. No difference was found in the amount of postoperative analgesic used in the both groups. Conclusions: Instillation of ropivacaine 0.2% (30 mL) within tubeless PCNL surgery does not have a significant effect on postoperative pain relief

  19. Differential Effectiveness of Clinically-Relevant Analgesics in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Alexandra L.; Lymn, Kerry A.; Wallace, Georgia L.; Howarth, Gordon S.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis is characterized by pain and a pro-inflammatory tissue response. Rat models are frequently used in mucositis disease investigations yet little is known about the presence of pain in these animals, the ability of analgesics to ameliorate the condition, or the effect that analgesic administration may have on study outcomes. This study investigated different classes of analgesics with the aim of determining their analgesic effects and impact on research outcomes of interest in a rat model of mucositis. Female DA rats were allocated to 8 groups to include saline and chemotherapy controls (n = 8). Analgesics included opioid derivatives (buprenorphine; 0.05mg/kg and tramadol 12.5mg/kg) and NSAID (carprofen; 15mg/kg) in combination with either saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU; 150mg/kg). Research outcome measures included daily clinical parameters, pain score and gut histology. Myeloperoxidase assay was performed to determine gut inflammation. At the dosages employed, all agents had an analgesic effect based on behavioural pain scores. Jejunal myeloperoxidase activity was significantly reduced by buprenorphine and tramadol in comparison to 5-FU control animals (53%, p = 0.0004 and 58%, p = 0.0001). Carprofen had no ameliorating effect on myeloperoxidase levels. None of the agents reduced the histological damage caused by 5-FU administration although tramadol tended to increase villus length even when administered to healthy animals. These data provide evidence that carprofen offers potential as an analgesic in this animal model due to its pain-relieving efficacy and minimal effect on measured parameters. This study also supports further investigation into the mechanism and utility of opioid agents in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. PMID:27463799

  20. Nociceptive Transmission to Rat Primary Somatosensory Cortex – Comparison of Sedative and Analgesic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Granmo, Marcus; Jensen, Tanja; Schouenborg, Jens

    2013-01-01

    CO2-laser C-fibre evoked cortical potentials (LCEPs) is a potentially useful animal model for studies of pain mechanisms. A potential confounding factor when assessing analgesic effects of systemically administered drugs using LCEP is sedation. This study aims to clarify: 1) the relation between level of anaesthesia and magnitude of LCEP, 2) the effects of a sedative and an analgesic on LCEP and dominant EEG frequency 3) the effects of a sedative and analgesic on LCEP when dominant EEG frequency is kept stable. LCEP and EEG were recorded in isoflurane/nitrous-oxide anaesthetized rats. Increasing isoflurane level gradually reduced LCEPs and lowered dominant EEG frequencies. Systemic midazolam (10 μmol/kg) profoundly reduced LCEP (19% of control) and lowered dominant EEG frequency. Similarly, morphine 1 and 3 mg/kg reduced LCEP (39%, 12% of control, respectively) and decreased EEG frequency. When keeping the dominant EEG frequency stable, midazolam caused no significant change of LCEP. Under these premises, morphine at 3 mg/kg, but not 1 mg/kg, caused a significant LCEP reduction (26% of control). In conclusion, the present data indicate that the sedative effects should be accounted for when assessing the analgesic effects of drug. Furthermore, it is suggested that LCEP, given that changes in EEG induced by sedation are compensated for, can provide information about the analgesic properties of systemically administrated drugs. PMID:23320109

  1. Effects of analgesics and antidepressants on TREK-2 and TRESK currents.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun; Kim, Eun-Jin; Han, Jaehee; Han, Jongwoo; Kang, Dawon

    2016-07-01

    TWIK-related K(+) channel-2 (TREK-2) and TWIK-related spinal cord K(+) (TRESK) channel are members of two-pore domain K(+) channel family. They are well expressed and help to set the resting membrane potential in sensory neurons. Modulation of TREK-2 and TRESK channels are involved in the pathogenesis of pain, and specifi c activators of TREK-2 and TRESK may be benefi cial for the treatment of pain symptoms. However, the effect of commonly used analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels are not known. Here, we investigated the effect of analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels. The effects of analgesics were examined in HEK cells transfected with TREK-2 or TRESK. Amitriptyline, citalopram, escitalopram, and fluoxetine significantly inhibited TREK-2 and TRESK currents in HEK cells (p<0.05, n=10). Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, nabumetone, and bupropion inhibited TRESK, but had no effect on TREK-2. These results show that all analgesics tested in this study inhibit TRESK activity. Further study is needed to identify the mechanisms by which the analgesics modulate TREK-2 and TRESK differently. PMID:27382354

  2. Effects of analgesics and antidepressants on TREK-2 and TRESK currents

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun; Kim, Eun-Jin; Han, Jaehee; Han, Jongwoo

    2016-01-01

    TWIK-related K+ channel-2 (TREK-2) and TWIK-related spinal cord K+ (TRESK) channel are members of two-pore domain K+ channel family. They are well expressed and help to set the resting membrane potential in sensory neurons. Modulation of TREK-2 and TRESK channels are involved in the pathogenesis of pain, and specifi c activators of TREK-2 and TRESK may be benefi cial for the treatment of pain symptoms. However, the effect of commonly used analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels are not known. Here, we investigated the effect of analgesics on TREK-2 and TRESK channels. The effects of analgesics were examined in HEK cells transfected with TREK-2 or TRESK. Amitriptyline, citalopram, escitalopram, and fluoxetine significantly inhibited TREK-2 and TRESK currents in HEK cells (p<0.05, n=10). Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, nabumetone, and bupropion inhibited TRESK, but had no effect on TREK-2. These results show that all analgesics tested in this study inhibit TRESK activity. Further study is needed to identify the mechanisms by which the analgesics modulate TREK-2 and TRESK differently. PMID:27382354

  3. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects of Ixora coccinea.

    PubMed

    Ali Adnan, Md Syed; Al-Amin, Md Mamun; Nasir Uddin, Mir Muhammad; Shohel, M; Bhattacharjee, Rajib; Hannan, J M A; Das, Biplab Kumar

    2014-01-27

    Abstract Background: The present study was carried out to explore the potential of the ethanol extract of Ixora coccinea L. (IC) leaves as analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic agents using the hot-plate, acetic acid-induced writhing, carrageenan-induced paw edema and brewer's yeast-induced pyrexia tests in rodents. Methods: The extract was prepared by soaking the dried powdered leaves of IC in ethanol for 2 days. The filtrate thus obtained by filtration and evaporation was considered as a stock solution and was used in all experimental models. Results: Oral administration of IC (250 and 500 mg/kg) significantly (p<0.05) increased the reaction time in the hot-plate test. Ixora coccinea (250 and 500 mg/kg) produced 56.14% and 63.16% inhibition (p<0.05) in acetic acid-induced writhing. It also (250 and 500 mg/kg) produced significant (p<0.05) inhibition of paw edema pronounced at 6 h after carrageenan injection. Intraperitoneal administration of IC (250 and 500 mg/kg) lowered the body temperature in brewer's yeast-induced hyperthermia. Conclusions: Based on the findings, it may be concluded that the IC leaves possessed analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic activities. Phytochemical constituents of IC leaves such as flavonoids, tannins, and triterpenes in ethanol extract could be correlated with its observed biological activities. PMID:24468614

  4. Effect of drugs modulating serotonergic system on the analgesic action of paracetamol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Karandikar, Yogita S.; Belsare, Peeyush; Panditrao, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The underlying mechanisms for the analgesic action of paracetamol (PCT) are still under considerable debate. It has been recently proposed that PCT may act by modulating the Serotonin system. This study was conducted to verify the influence of Serotonin modulating drugs (buspirone, ondansetron, and fluoxetine) on the analgesic effect of PCT. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult albino mice were assigned to five groups: Normal saline, PCT, fluoxetine selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) + PCT, buspirone (5-HT1A Agonist) + PCT, and ondansetron (5HT3 antagonist) + PCT. Hot-plate and formalin test were used to determine pain threshold, tests being conducted 60 min after the last treatment. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance followed by Dunnet's test. Results: Coadministration of buspirone with PCT attenuated the antinociceptive activity of PCT (P < 0.001), whereas fluoxetine + PCT increased pain threshold in the hot-plate and formalin test (P = 0.0046). Analgesic effect of PCT was not affected by ondansetron in formalin models. It attenuated analgesic action of PCT in hot-plate test (P = 0.0137). Conclusion: The results suggest that 5-HT1 receptors could also be responsible for the analgesic effect of PCT. Also, higher analgesia is produced by co-administration of SSRI (fluoxetine) + PCT. PMID:27298498

  5. Postoperative ventilatory and circulatory effects of heating after aortocoronary bypass surgery. Postoperative external heat supply.

    PubMed

    Joachimsson, P O; Nyström, S O; Tydén, H

    1987-08-01

    The effects of postoperative external heat supply on shivering, oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, ventilatory requirements and haemodynamic variables were studied postoperatively after aortocoronary bypass surgery in 24 men with stable angina pectoris. After hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) at 25 degrees C, the patients were rewarmed to a nasopharyngeal temperature of at least 38 degrees C, resulting in a rectal temperature of about 34 degrees C before termination of CPB. Twelve patients, forming the control group, were given no other external heat supply. In another group (n = 12), the "radiant heat supply group", additional external heat was provided postoperatively, the main source of which was a thermal ceiling supplemented with heated, humidified respiratory gases. In this latter group the postoperative rewarming was accomplished earlier and was converted into a mainly passive process. Shivering, oxygen uptake, CO2 production and ventilation volumes were significantly reduced compared with the control group. Cardiac index and stroke index were higher and systemic oxygen extraction was lower in the radiant heat supply group. Postoperative hypertension and vasoconstriction were greatly decreased, suggesting that residual hypothermia is an important cause of the postoperative vasoconstriction. PMID:3115049

  6. Preoperative low-dose ketamine has no preemptive analgesic effect in opioid-naïve patients undergoing colon surgery when nitrous oxide is used - a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Nistal-Nuño, Beatriz; Freire-Vila, Enrique; Castro-Seoane, Francisco; Camba-Rodriguez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background: The analgesic properties of ketamine are associated with its non-competitive antagonism of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor; these receptors exhibit an excitatory function on pain transmission and this binding seems to inhibit or reverse the central sensitization of pain. In the literature, the value of this anesthetic for preemptive analgesia in the control of postoperative pain is uncertain. The objective of this study was to ascertain whether preoperative low-dose ketamine reduces postoperative pain and morphine consumption in adults undergoing colon surgery. Methods: In a double-blind, randomized trial, 48 patients were studied. Patients in the ketamine group received 0.5 mg/kg intravenous ketamine before surgical incision, while the control group received normal saline. The postoperative analgesia was achieved with a continuous infusion of morphine at 0.015 mg∙kgˉ¹∙hˉ¹ with the possibility of 0.02 mg/kg bolus every 10 min. Pain was assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), morphine consumption, and hemodynamic parameters at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 hours postoperatively. We quantified times to rescue analgesic (Paracetamol), adverse effects and patient satisfaction. Results: No significant differences were observed in VAS scores between groups (P>0.05), except at 4 hours postoperatively (P=0.040). There were no differences in cumulative consumption of morphine at any time point (P>0.05). We found no significant differences in incremental postoperative doses of morphine consumption in bolus, except at 12 h (P =0.013) and 24 h (P =0.002). The time to first required rescue analgesia was 70 ± 15.491 min in the ketamine group and 44 ± 19.494 min in the control (P>0.05). There were no differences in hemodynamic parameters or patient satisfaction (P>0.05). Conclusions: Preoperative low-dose-ketamine did not show a preemptive analgesic effect or efficacy as an adjuvant for decreasing opioid requirements for postoperative pain in

  7. Analgesic effect of caffeine and clomipramine: a possible interaction between adenosine and serotonin systems.

    PubMed

    Bach-Rojecky, Lidija

    2003-03-01

    The goals of this study were to determine whether the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine exerts an analgesic effect and to investigate the time-dependent influence of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor clomipramine on the action of caffeine. Results suggest a possible interaction between serotonin and adenosine systems, which may contribute to the analgesic action of drugs. Therefore, the hot-plate and formalin tests were employed in order to measure the response to painful thermic and chemical stimuli. Results have shown that caffeine (1.67, 16.7 and 67 mg kg(-1), i.p.) exerts a direct dose-dependent analgesic action. When caffeine (1.67 and 16.7 mg kg(-1)) was combined with clomipramine (3 mg kg(-1) i.p.), an enhanced analgesic effect was obtained. However, the same combinations were ineffective in a subacute model. In this model, clomipramine was administered for 14 days and the respective dose of caffeine was added on the last day. Therefore, it can be concluded that the serotonin system interacts with the analgesic action of caffeine and that a long-term use of clomipramine probably triggers subsensitivity of adenosine receptors. PMID:14769250

  8. Effect of Oral Pregabalin as Preemptive Analgesic in Patients Undergoing Lower Limb Orthopedic Surgeries under Spinal Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Bon; Nelamangala, Kiran; Krishnamurthy, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Conquering postoperative pain which has significant impact on the surgery outcome can be challenging for the clinicians. Pregabalin is a GABA analogue used for various neuropathic pain syndromes. Very few studies are there with the use of pregabalin as a preemptive analgesic for orthopedic surgeries. Aim To compare pregabalin 150 mg with placebo for postoperative pain control in patients undergoing elective lower limb orthopedic surgeries under spinal anaesthesia and to assess any side effects. Materials and Methods A randomized double blinded prospective study was undertaken. Ninety patients with ASA physical status I, II, aged between 18–50 years were enrolled in the study. One hour prior to spinal anaesthesia Group C - received colour matched empty capsules, Group P – received 150mg of oral pregabalin. Spinal anaesthesia was administered in sitting position in L3-L4 space with Inj. Bupivacaine heavy (0.5%) at a dose of 0.3mg/kg body weight with 20 mg being the maximum dose using 25 gauge spinal needle. Rescue analgesia was provided with using Inj. Diclofenac 1.5 mg/kg intramuscular. Results Time for rescue analgesia (VAS score >3) was significantly increased in Group P than in Group C. The total dose of diclofenac required in the 24 hour postoperative period was significantly lower in Group P than in Group C. The sedation scores and patient satisfaction scores were also more in Group P than in Group C. Conclusion Preemptive pregabalin in an oral dose of 150 mg offers good postoperative analgesia in lower limb orthopedic surgeries under spinal anaesthesia.

  9. Effect of Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Infusion on Postoperative Bowel Movements in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin Sun; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Lee, Ki-Young; An, Ji Yeong; Bai, Sun Joon; Cho, Ju Yeon; Yoo, Young Chul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sympathetic hyperactivation is one of the causes of postoperative ileus, which occurs frequently after abdominal surgery and adversely influences the patient's prognosis. We aimed to investigate whether dexmedetomidine (DEX) could attenuate postoperative ileus in patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy. Ninety-two patients were randomized to the control (n = 46) or DEX group (n = 46). DEX was administered at a loading dose of 0.5 μg/kg for 10 minutes, followed by an infusion rate of 0.4 μg/kg/h from insufflation of the pneumoperitoneum to the end of surgery. The primary goal was to compare postoperative bowel movements by evaluating the time to first flatus. The balance of the autonomic nervous system, duration of postoperative hospital stay, and pain scores were assessed. The time to first flatus was shorter in the DEX group compared with the control group (67.2 ± 16.8 hours vs 79.9 ± 15.9 hours, P < 0.001). The low-frequency/high-frequency power ratio during pneumoperitoneum increased in the control group, compared with baseline values and the DEX group. The length of postoperative hospital stay was shorter in the DEX group compared with the control group (5.4 ± 0.7 days vs 5.8 ± 1.1 days, P = 0.04). Patients in the DEX group had lower pain scores and required fewer analgesics at 1 hour postoperatively. DEX facilitated bowel movements and reduced the length of hospital stay in patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy. This may be attributed to the sympatholytic and opioid-sparing effects of DEX.

  10. The Effect of Nefopam on Postoperative Fentanyl Consumption: A Randomized, Double-blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jee Youn; Lee, Shin Young; Lee, Mi Kyung; Kim, Jung Eun; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, So Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Nefopam is a non-opioid, non-steroidal, centrally acting analgesic drug. The concomitant use of opioids and nefopam is believed to have many advantages over the administration of opioids alone for postoperative pain management. We conducted a randomized, double-blind study to determine the fentanyl-sparing effect of co-administration of nefopam with fentanyl for postoperative pain management via patient controlled analgesia (PCA). Methods Ninety female patients who underwent laparoscopic total hysterectomy under general anesthesia were randomized into 3 groups, Group A, fentanyl 1,000 µg; Group B, fentanyl 500 µg + nefopam 200 mg; and Group C, fentanyl 500 µg + nefopam 400 mg, in a total volume of 100 ml PCA to be administered over the first 48 h postoperatively without basal infusion. The primary outcome was total fentanyl consumption during 48 h; secondary outcomes included pain scores and incidence of side effects. Results Eighty-one patients were included in the analysis. The overall fentanyl-sparing effects of PCA with concomitant administration of nefopam during the first 48 h postoperatively were 54.5% in Group B and 48.9% group C. Fentanyl use was not significantly different between Groups B and C despite the difference in the nefopam dose. There were no differences among the three groups in terms of PCA-related side effects, although the overall sedation score of Group B was significantly lower than that of Group A. Conclusions The concomitant administration of nefopam with fentanyl for postoperative pain management may allow reduction of fentanyl dose, thereby reducing the risk of opioid-related adverse effects. PMID:27103966

  11. Analgesic effects of maxillary and inferior alveolar nerve blocks in cats undergoing dental extractions.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Joana; Chebroux, Alexandre; Martinez-Taboada, Fernando; Leece, Elizabeth A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effects of maxillary and/or inferior alveolar nerve blocks with lidocaine and bupivacaine in cats undergoing dental extractions. Twenty-nine cats were enrolled. Using an adapted composite pain scale, cats were pain scored before the dental procedure and 30 mins, and 1, 2 and 4 h after isoflurane disconnection. Cats were sedated with buprenorphine (20 µg/kg), medetomidine (10 µg/kg) and acepromazine (20 µg/kg) intramuscularly. Anaesthesia was induced using alfaxalone (1-2 mg/kg) intravenously and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Each cat was randomly assigned to receive maxillary and/or inferior alveolar nerve blocks or no nerve blocks prior to dental extractions. Each nerve block was performed using lidocaine (0.25 mg/kg) and bupivacaine (0.25 mg/kg). Heart rate, systolic arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate, end tidal carbon dioxide and isoflurane vaporiser settings were recorded 5 mins before and after the dental extractions, and the difference calculated. Group mean differences (mean ± SD) for heart rate (-9.7 ± 10.6 vs 7.6 ± 9.5 beats/min [nerve block vs control group, respectively], P <0.0001), systolic arterial blood pressure (-10.33 ± 18.44 vs 5.21 ± 15.23 mmHg, P = 0.02) and vaporiser settings (-0.2 ± 0.2 vs 0.1 ± 0.4, P = 0.023) were significantly different between groups. The control group had higher postoperative pain scores (median [interquartile range]) at 2 h (3 [1.75-4.00] vs 1 [0-2], P = 0.008) and 4 h (4 [2-6] vs 2 [1-2], P = 0.006) after the dental extractions. Maxillary and inferior alveolar nerve blocks with lidocaine and bupivacaine administered prior to dental extractions resulted in a reduction in heart rate and blood pressure while allowing for a reduction in isoflurane. Cats receiving nerve blocks had lower postoperative pain scores than the group without nerve blocks. PMID:24820999

  12. The effect of oral tizanidine on postoperative pain relief after elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Talakoub, Reihanak; Abbasi, Saeed; Maghami, Elham; Zavareh, Sayyed Morteza Heidari Tabaei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cholecystectomy is considered as the most important and relatively common postoperative pain control often begins in recovery room by using systemic narcotics that may have some side effects. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of premedication with oral tizanidine on pain relief after elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: In this double-blinded clinical trial, 70 adults of American Society of Anesthesiologist physiologic state 1 and 2 scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia were studied and randomly divided in two study and control groups. Ninety minutes before the induction of anesthesia, patients received either 4 mg tizanidine (study group) orally in 50cc or the same volume of plain water as a placebo (control group). Then, the vital signs, pain intensity, duration of stay in recovery, and the analgesic consumption were measured and then compared in both groups during 24 h postoperatively. Results: There was no significant difference in patient characteristics, with respect to age, weight, gender, and duration of anesthesia and surgery between the groups (P > 0.05). The pain intensity, need for analgesic drugs (34.57 ± 8.88 mg vs. 101.86 ± 5.08 mg), and the duration of stay in recovery room (67.43 ± 1.59 min vs. 79.57 ± 5.48 min) were significantly lower in tizanidine group than that of the control group. Conclusion: Oral administration of 4 mg tizanidine before laparoscopic cholecystectomy reduces postoperative pain, opioid consumption, and consequence of the duration of stay in recovery room without any complication. PMID:26962521

  13. Analgesic effect of interferon-alpha via mu opioid receptor in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jiang, C L; Son, L X; Lu, C L; You, Z D; Wang, Y X; Sun, L Y; Cui, R Y; Liu, X Y

    2000-03-01

    Using the tail-flick induced by electro-stimulation as a pain marker, it was found that pain threshold (PT) was significantly increased after injecting interferon-alpha (IFN alpha) into the lateral ventricle of rats. This effect was dosage-dependent and abolished by monoclonal antibody (McAb) to IFN alpha. Naloxone could inhibit the analgesic effect of IFN alpha, suggesting that the analgesic effect of IFN alpha be related to the opioid receptors. Beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA), the mu specific receptor antagonist could completely block the analgesic effect of IFN alpha. The selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist, ICI174,864 and the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-BNI both failed to prevent the analgesic effect of IFN alpha. IFN alpha could significantly inhibit the production of the cAMP stimulated by forskolin in SK-N-SH cells expressing the mu-opioid receptor, not in NG108-15 cells expressing the delta-opioid receptor uniformly. The results obtained provide further evidence for opioid activity of IFN alpha and suggest that this effect is mediated by central opioid receptors of the mu subtype. The evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that multiple actions of cytokines, such as immunoregulatory and neuroregulatory effects, might be mediated by distinct domains of cytokines interacting with different receptors. PMID:10676852

  14. Effect of Premedication with Indomethacin and Ibuprofen on Postoperative Endodontic Pain: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Yazdi, Kamal; Mahabadi, Amir Mohammad; Modaresi, Seyed Jalil; Hamzeheil, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Post-endodontic pain is one of the main problems for both patients and dentists. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of premedication with indomethacin and ibuprofen for management of postoperative endodontic pain. Methods and Materials: In this clinical trial, mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis were endodontically treated in 66 patients. The medicines were prepared similarly in the form of capsules containing 400 mg ibuprofen (group A), 25 mg indomethacin (group B) and placebo (group C). The patients were given one capsule 1 h before the start of treatment. Patients recorded their pain measured by a visual analogue scale (VAS) at medication time, during treatment and 8, 12 and 24 h after treatment. The data were analyzed using the chi-square, repeated measures ANOVA, paired t-test, Tamhane and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Ibuprofen and indomethacin significantly reduced the postoperative pain in comparison with placebo during treatment and 8 h after treatment; however, there were no significant differences between them 12 and 24 h after treatment. Conclusion: Premedication with ibuprofen and indomethacin can effectively control short term post-operative pain; the lower incidence of side effects and greater analgesic power of ibuprofen make it a superior choice. PMID:26843879

  15. Effects of On-Demand Versus Fixed-Interval Schedules in the Treatment of Chronic Pain With Analgesic Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berntzen, Dagfinn; Gotestam, K. Gunnar

    1987-01-01

    Compared the effects of fixed-interval and on-demand administration of analgesic medications in chronic pain patients. A fixed-interval analgesic schedule was found more effective than an on-demand schedule in reducing subjective pain and elevating mood. No differences were found between the two conditions on measures of physical activity.…

  16. Analgesic effect and tolerance of Voltaren and Ketogan in acute renal or ureteric colic.

    PubMed

    Sommer, P; Kromann-Andersen, B; Lendorf, A; Lyngdorf, P; Møller, P

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-six patients with renal or ureteric colic were entered into a randomised, prospective, double-blind investigation of the analgesic efficacy and tolerance of Voltaren versus Ketogan, both administered intramuscularly. There were no significant differences regarding pain-relief but side effects were fewer in patients treated with Voltaren. PMID:2645969

  17. Comparison of the analgesic effect of patient-controlled oxycodone and fentanyl for pain management in patients undergoing colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyeo-Woon; Kang, Hyeon-Wook; Park, Chan-Hye; Choi, Byung-Hyun; Bang, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Soo-Han; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Byung-Moon; Noh, Gyu-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist and is generally indicated for the relief of moderate to severe pain. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of patient-controlled oxycodone and fentanyl for postoperative pain in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. Patients scheduled to undergo elective colorectal surgery (n=82) were allocated to receive oxycodone (n=41, concentration of 1 mg/mL) or fentanyl (n=41, concentration of 15 μg/mL) for postoperative pain management. After the operation, pain using a numerical rating scale (NRS), delivery to demand ratio, infused dose of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), side effects, and sedation levels were evaluated. Median (25%-75%) cumulative PCA dose of oxycodone group at 48 hours (66.9, 58.4-83.7 mL) was significantly less than that of fentanyl group (80.0, 63.4-103.3 mL, P=.037). Six hours after surgery, the mean (SD) NRS scores of the oxycodone and fentanyl groups were 6.2 (2.4) and 6.8 (1.9), respectively (P=.216). The mean equianalgesic potency ratio of oxycodone to fentanyl was 55:1. The groups did not differ in postoperative nausea, vomiting, and level of sedation. Patient-controlled oxycodone provides similar effects for pain relief compared to patient-controlled fentanyl in spite of less cumulative PCA dose. Based on these results, oxycodone can be a useful alternative to fentanyl for PCA in patients after colorectal surgery. PMID:27128496

  18. The toxic effect of opioid analgesics on human sperm motility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Yan-Juan; Lu, Pei-Hua; Wang, Li-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Hai

    2013-04-01

    Opioid analgesics are the most common therapeutic analgesic for acute pain. In this study, the toxicological and pharmacological features of a group of opioid analgesics were characterized by the motility of human sperm. Aliquots of sperm were incubated with various concentrations of opioid analgesics in vitro. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to assess sperm motility at 15 minutes, 2 hours, and 4 hours after drug addition to the medium. Butorphanol and dezocine showed marked reduction of motility after incubation with sperm for 15 minutes. Butorphanol was more effective than dezocine in immobilizing sperm. Other opioids studied, such as fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil, showed only partial inhibitory activity. Based on the data reported herein, we have found that butorphanol and dezocine exert a sperm-immobilizing effect. However, fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil exhibit only partial inhibition of sperm motility. Given the increasing use of opioids and their potential effect on sperm motility, these findings are greatly relevant to male reproductive health. PMID:22931048

  19. Effect of adding 8 milligrams ondansetron to lidocaine for Bier's block on post-operative pain

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, Azim; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Adineh-Mehr, Leili

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ondansetron has analgesic properties. The aim of the present study was to assess the analgesic effect of 8 mg ondansetron when added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA). Materials and Methods: Ninety patients undergoing hand surgery were randomly allocated to the three groups to receive 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine diluted with saline to a total dose of 40 mL (Group L, n = 30) or 8 mg ondansetron plus 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine diluted with saline to a total dose of 40 mL (group LO, n = 30) or 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine diluted with saline to a total dose of 40 mL plus 8 mg ondansetron intravenously (Group IO, n = 30). Tourniquet pain and analgesic use were recorded before and after the tourniquet application. Results: The sensory and motor block onset times were significantly shorter in Group LO compared with Group L and Group IO (4.2 ± 1.7 vs. 5.2 ± 0.8 and 5.1 ± 1.2 respectively, P < 0.05; 4.5 ± 1.4 vs. 5.8 ± 1.5 and 5.7 ± 1.4 respectively, P < 0.05). The sensory and motor block recovery times were significantly longer in Group LO compared with Group L and Group IO (6.1 ± 1.1 vs. 4.1 ± 1.3 and 4.5 ± 0.9 respectively, P < 0.05; 6.7 ± 1.4 vs. 4.4 ± 0.9 and 4.7 ± 0.7 respectively, P < 0.05). Post-operative VAS scores were significantly less in Group LO compared with Group L and Group IO till 24 h after tourniquet deflation (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The addition of 8 mg ondansetron to lidocaine for IVRA reduced intraoperative and post-operative analgesic use till 24 h. PMID:24516852

  20. Analgesic Effects of Oligonol, Acupuncture and Quantum Light Therapy on Chronic Nonbacterial Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Akdere, Hakan; Oztekin, Ilhan; Arda, Ersan; Aktoz, Tevfik; Turan, Fatma Nesrin; Burgazli, Kamil Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic Nonbacterial Prostatitis (CNBP) is a condition that frequently causes long-term pain and a significant decrease in the quality of life. Objectives: The present study aimed to examine the analgesic effects of oligonol, acupuncture, quantum light therapy and their combinations on estrogen-induced CNBP in rats. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted in Edirne, Turkey, using a simple randomized allocation. A total of 90 adult male Wistar rats were randomized into 9 groups of 10 rats each: Group I, control; Group II, CNBP, Group III, oligonol only, Group IV, acupuncture only; Group V, quantum only; Group VI, oligonol + quantum; Group VII, acupuncture + oligonol; Group VIII, quantum + acupuncture; Group IX, acupuncture + quantum + oligonol. Oligonol treatment was given at a dose of 60 mg/day for 6 weeks. Conceptual vessels (CV) 3 and 4, and bilaterally urinary bladder (Bl) 32 and 34 points were targeted with 1-hour acupuncture stimulation. The quantum light therapy was applied in 5-minute sessions for 6 weeks (3-times/a week). For pain measurements, mechanical pressure was applied to a point 2 cm distal to the root of the tail to elicit pain and consequent parameters (peak force, latency time of response and total length of measurement) were assessed. Results: Analgesic effects were observed with all treatment regimens; however, the most prominent median analgesic effect was shown in the quantum light therapy in combination with acupuncture for estrogen-induced CNBP (PF1 = 663.9, PF2 = 403.4) (P = 0.012). Furthermore, we observed that monotherapy with quantum light showed a better analgesic efficacy as compared to oligonol and acupuncture monotherapies (PF1 = 1044.6, PF2 = 661.2) (P = 0.018, P = 0.008, P = 0.018; respectively). Conclusions: All treatment modalities showed a significant analgesic effect on CNBP in rats, being most prominent with the quantum light therapy. PMID:26023344

  1. Prescription trajectories and effect of total hip arthroplasty on the use of analgesics, hypnotics, antidepressants, and anxiolytics: results from a population of total hip arthroplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Blågestad, Tone; Nordhus, Inger H; Grønli, Janne; Engesæter, Lars B; Ruths, Sabine; Ranhoff, Anette H; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Pallesen, Ståle

    2016-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been shown to reduce pain and improve function. In addition, it is suggested that THA improves sleep and alleviates symptoms of anxiety and depression. Patients with chronic pain are frequent users of analgesic and psychotropic drugs and thereby risk adverse drug events. The impact of THA on such drug use has not been thoroughly investigated. Based on merged data from the Norwegian Prescription Database and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, this study sought to investigate redeemed medications in a complete population (N = 39,688) undergoing THA in 2005 to 2011. User rates and redeemed drug volume of analgesics (nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, and nonopioids) and psychotropics (hypnotics, anxiolytics, and antidepressants) were calculated for 4 quarters before and 4 quarters after surgery. We analysed preoperative prescription trends (Q1 vs Q4), postoperative prescription (Q4 vs Q5), and long-term effect of surgery (Q4 vs Q8). Before surgery, use of all drug groups increased from Q1 to Q4. Use of opioids, nonopioids, and hypnotics dramatically increased from Q4 to Q5. Long-term (Q4 vs Q8) surgery reduced prescriptions of analgesics, hypnotics, and anxiolytics, but not antidepressants. Overall, the present results extend the positive effects of THA to include reduced reliance on medication to alleviate symptoms. PMID:26588693

  2. Effect of Karamardādi Yoga versus diclofenac sodium in post-operative pain management: A randomized comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hegana, Rahul; Toshikhane, Hemant Devaraj; Toshikhane, Sangeeta; Amin, Hetal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Post-operative pain is Nociceptive i.e., anticipated unavoidable physiological pain which is caused due to tissue trauma. Drugs such as NSAIDs (Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs) and Opioids are used for post-operative pain management but are associated with their own drawbacks. Karamardādi Yoga has been in use in Ayurvedic practice for analgesia. It is known to relieve pain and can be used to supplement anaesthesia and also get rid of adverse effect of modern analgesic drugs. Aims and Objective: To study the comparative effect of Karamardādi Yoga and Diclofenac sodium in post-operative pain management. Materials and Methods: Randomized clinical trial with Group A (Control Group: Tab Diclofenac sodium 50 mg as a single dose) and Group B (Trial Group: Cap Karamardādi Yoga 500 mg as a single dose). Those who had undergone haemorrhoidectomy operation under local anaesthesia were selected as per inclusion criteria. Vitals, desirable effect and undesirable effect, total surgical time, requirement of 1st dose of analgesic, requirement of rescue analgesic and pain determined by VAS (Visual Analog Scale) were the assessment criteria and were observed and recorded. Results: Karamardādi Yoga does not show any undesirable or serious ill effects and altered values of vitals as per statistical analysis. As per VAS scale, pain felt by Trial group was earlier than control group. Conclusions: Karamardādi Yoga has analgesic property but its analgesic property and pain threshold capacity is lesser than those of Diclofenac sodium. PMID:27621519

  3. The influence of divalent cations on the analgesic effect of opioid and non-opioid drugs.

    PubMed

    Assi, A A

    2001-06-01

    It is generally accepted that divalent cations are involved in the nociceptive pathway. The effect of systemic co-administration of magnesium sulfate and calcium channel blockers (nifedipine, verapamil) on the analgesic effect of opioid (mixed mu/kappa: butorphanol) and non-opioid drugs (paracetamol) was investigated. Albino mice and rats were used as experimental animals. Magnesium sulfate and calcium channel blockers were given i.p., 30 min before the administration of butorphanol tartrate and paracetamol. Analgesia was measured using "hot-plate" ( 52.5( composite function)C), "tail-flick" (radiant heat source), "writhing" (acetic acid, 1%, i.p.) and "tail-clip" tests. The pain threshold was evaluated before and after the administration (i.p.) of the different agents. The effect of the combined administration of different agents on behavior, blood pressure and heart rate, was also determined. Nifedipine (5 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and verapamil (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) potentiated the analgesic effect of butorphanol tartrate (0.25-2 mg kg(-1), i.p.) in all tests (synergism) and enhanced analgesic effect of paracetamol (50-125 mg kg(-1), i.p.), only in acetic acid writhing and tail-clip tests. Magensium sulfate (2.5 mg kg(-1), i.p.) potentiated the analgesic effect of butorphanol, but not that of paracetamol. Co-administration of nifedipine and verapamil with either of butorphanol (0.25-2 mg kg(-1)) or paracetamol (50-125 mg kg(-1), i.p.) produced no significant effects on motor coordination, motor performance, locomotor activity, long-term memory or on the blood pressure and heart rate of experimental animals. Co-administration of magnesium sulfate, however, significantly induced sedation, inhibition of locomotor activity, motor performance and coordination, as well as impairing of long-term memory, as compared with butorphanol and paracetamol, administered alone. We conclude that the systemic co-administration of calcium channel blockers potentiated the analgesic effect of

  4. Nitric oxide is involved in ibuprofen preemptive analgesic effect in the plantar incisional model of postsurgical pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sherin S T; Hamza, May; Bahr, Mohamed H; Masoud, Somaia I

    2016-02-12

    Control of postoperative pain is far from satisfactory. Yet, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) remain an important choice. The production of nitric oxide (NO), which plays an important role in the development and maintenance of inflammatory hyperalgesia, is inhibited by NSAIDs. Monoamines also play a key role in the modulation of nociception. The aim of the present work is to study the involvement of NO and monoamines in the antinociceptive mechanism of ibuprofen in postsurgical pain in mice. Surgical incision resulted in mechanical allodynia and increased spinal NO levels. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor l-NAME (50mg/kg), administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), 30min before the incision decreased the development of postsurgical mechanical allodynia and reduced spinal NO levels. Ibuprofen (100 and 300mg/kg, i.p.), administered 30min before the incision, dose-dependently decreased both spinal NO levels and the development of mechanical allodynia. Administration of ibuprofen (100mg/kg i.p.), 20min following surgery, did not significantly reduce spinal NO level and resulted in a smaller antiallodynic effect. l-Arginine (600mg/kg i.p.), administered 20min before ibuprofen administration, restored both spinal NO level and mechanical allodynia in ibuprofen-treated mice. The selective alpha-2 adrenoceptor blocker yohimbine (4mg/kg i.p.), administered 30min before ibuprofen, also blocked ibuprofen effect on both mechanical allodynia and spinal NO level. These results suggest that inhibition of NO synthesis is involved in the analgesic activity of ibuprofen in post-surgical pain. Alpha-2 adrenoceptors are also involved in the analgesic activity of ibuprofen and NO may be involved in this mechanism. PMID:26718443

  5. Reduction of postoperative pain and swelling by ultrasound treatment: a placebo effect.

    PubMed

    Hashish, I; Hai, H K; Harvey, W; Feinmann, C; Harris, M

    1988-06-01

    Ultrasound (US) therapy is used to reduce pain and inflammation and to accelerate healing after soft tissue injury. However, there is little objective evidence of its effectiveness and the mechanisms which may cause these effects are unknown. In a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial we examined the contribution of placebo and massage effects in ultrasound therapy following bilateral surgical extraction of lower third molars. Four to 6 h after surgery the patients (25 per group) received either no therapy, US (0.1 W/cm2), 'mock' US with massage, 'mock' US without massage, or 'self-massage' with a dummy applicator. Facial swelling, trismus, serum C-reactive protein, serum cortisol, pain and anxiety were measured 24 h postoperatively. The results showed that the beneficial analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of US therapy were placebo-mediated, with maximum effect in the placebo ('mock' US) group without circular massaging with the applicator). Self-massage by the patient produced no significant effect. This placebo action was independent of changes in serum cortisol or patient anxiety state. US therapy can significantly reduce postoperative morbidity, but by placebo-mediated mechanisms which are unrelated to the US itself. PMID:3419838

  6. Intravenous acetaminophen (paracetamol): comparable analgesic efficacy, but better local safety than its prodrug, propacetamol, for postoperative pain after third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Moller, Philip Lange; Juhl, Gitte Irene; Payen-Champenois, Catherine; Skoglund, Lasse Ansgar

    2005-07-01

    We compared an acetaminophen (paracetamol) 1 g (n = 51) formulation for infusion with propacetamol 2 g (n = 51) and placebo (n = 50) in a randomized, controlled, double-blind, parallel group trial in patients with moderate-to-severe pain after third molar surgery. Treatment efficacy was assessed in house for 6 h after starting the 15-min infusion. Significant effects versus placebo (P < 0.01) were obtained with both active treatments on pain relief, pain intensity difference on a 100-mm visual analog scale, and on a categorical scale (except for propacetamol at 6 h). No significant differences were noted between active groups except at 1 h. Six-hour weighted sums of primary assessments showed significantly better efficacy than placebo (P < 0.0001) and no difference between active treatments. Median stopwatch time to onset of pain relief for active treatment was 6-8 min after infusion start. Active treatments showed comparable efficacy with a significantly longer duration of analgesia and better patients' global evaluation compared with placebo. The incidence of patients reporting local pain at the infusion site was significantly less frequent after IV acetaminophen or placebo (0%) in comparison with propacetamol (49%). In conclusion, acetaminophen 1 g and propacetamol 2 g were superior to placebo regarding analgesic efficacy, with a more frequent incidence of local pain at the infusion site for propacetamol. PMID:15976212

  7. Effects of low dose dexmedetomidine infusion on haemodynamic stress response, sedation and post-operative analgesia requirement in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Gourishankar Reddy; Upadhyay, Mahendra R; Swadia, VN

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Dexmedetomidine is a α2 agonist with sedative, sympatholytic and analgesic properties and hence, it can be a very useful adjuvant in anaesthesia as stress response buster, sedative and analgesic. We aimed primarily to evaluate the effects of low dose dexmedetomidine infusion on haemodynamic response to critical incidences such as laryngoscopy, endotracheal intubation, creation of pneumoperitoneum and extubation in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The secondary aims were to observe the effects on extubation time, sedation levels, post-operative analgesia requirements and occurrence of adverse effects. Methods: Sixty patients of American Society of Anaesthesiologists(ASA) physical grades I and II undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated into three groups of 20 patients each. Group NS patients received normal saline, Group Dex 0.2 and Group Dex 0.4 patients received dexmedetomidine infusion at 0.2 mcg/kg/h and 0.4 mcg/kg/h respectively, starting 15 min before induction and continued till end of surgery. Parameters noted were pulse rate, mean arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, post-operative sedation and analgesia requirements. SPSS 15.0 version software was used for statistical analysis. ANOVA test for continuous variables, post-hoc test for intergroup comparison, and Chi-square test for discrete values were applied. Results: In Group NS significant haemodynamic stress response was seen following laryngoscopy, tracheal intubation, creation of pneumoperitoneum and extubation. In dexmedetomidine groups, the haemodynamic response was significantly attenuated. The results, however, were statistically better in Dex 0.4 group compared with Dex 0.2 group. Post-operative 24 hour analgesic requirements were much less in dexmedetomidine groups. No significant side effects were noted. Conclusion: Low dose dexmedetomidine infusion in the dose of 0.4 mcg/kg/h effectively attenuates haemodynamic stress response during

  8. Can repeated exposure to morphine change the spinal analgesic effects of lidocaine in rats?*

    PubMed Central

    Dabbagh, Ali; Moghadam, Shervin Farkhondehkish; Rajaei, Samira; Mansouri, Zahra; Manaheji, Homa Shardi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic opium exposure leads to altered response to opioid compounds. The aim of this study was to assess the behavioral effects of opium tolerance on the analgesic effects of intrathecal lidocaine in rats. METHODS: Twenty-four adult male Sprague Dawley rats with intrathecal (IT) catheters were divided into 3 groups of 8. The first group was morphine tolerant and received IT lidocaine (ML). Rats in the second group were not morphine tolerant and received IT lidocaine (L), while the third group consisted of not morphine tolerant rats that received IT placebo. Tail flick test was done and maximal possible antinociceptive effects (MPAE) were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS: While percent of MPAE significantly increased in the L group, it had a significant reduction in the ML group (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: After intrathecal lidocaine administration, a hyperalgesic response was seen in morphine tolerant rats and an analgesic response was seen in the lidocaine group. PMID:22973332

  9. The Analgesic and Antineuroinflammatory Effect of Baicalein in Cancer-Induced Bone Pain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shan; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhi-Fu; Mao-Ying, Qi-Liang; Mi, Wen-Li; Jiang, Jian-Wei; Wu, Gen-Cheng; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) is a severe type of chronic pain. It is imperative to explore safe and effective analgesic drugs for CIBP treatment. Baicalein (BE), isolated from the traditional Chinese herbal medicine Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi (or Huang Qin), has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. In this study, we examined the effect of BE on CIBP and the mechanism of this effect. Intrathecal and oral administration of BE at different doses could alleviate the mechanical allodynia in CIBP rats. Intrathecal 100 μg BE could inhibit the production of IL-6 and TNF-α in the spinal cord of CIBP rats. Moreover, intrathecal 100 μg BE could effectively inhibit the activation of p-p38 and p-JNK MAPK signals in CIBP rats. The analgesic effect of BE may be associated with the inhibition of the expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and through the activation of p-p38 and p-JNK MAPK signals in the spinal cord. These findings suggest that BE is a promising novel analgesic agent for CIBP. PMID:26649065

  10. The Analgesic and Antineuroinflammatory Effect of Baicalein in Cancer-Induced Bone Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shan; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhi-Fu; Mao-Ying, Qi-Liang; Mi, Wen-Li; Jiang, Jian-Wei; Wu, Gen-Cheng; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) is a severe type of chronic pain. It is imperative to explore safe and effective analgesic drugs for CIBP treatment. Baicalein (BE), isolated from the traditional Chinese herbal medicine Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi (or Huang Qin), has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. In this study, we examined the effect of BE on CIBP and the mechanism of this effect. Intrathecal and oral administration of BE at different doses could alleviate the mechanical allodynia in CIBP rats. Intrathecal 100 μg BE could inhibit the production of IL-6 and TNF-α in the spinal cord of CIBP rats. Moreover, intrathecal 100 μg BE could effectively inhibit the activation of p-p38 and p-JNK MAPK signals in CIBP rats. The analgesic effect of BE may be associated with the inhibition of the expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and through the activation of p-p38 and p-JNK MAPK signals in the spinal cord. These findings suggest that BE is a promising novel analgesic agent for CIBP. PMID:26649065

  11. Post-operative epidural analgesia: effects on lung volumes.

    PubMed

    Wahba, W M; Don, H F; Craig, D B

    1975-07-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the role of post-operative pain in reducing Functional Residual Capacity (FRC) and Vital Capacity (VC). The efficacy of post-operative epidural analgesia in reversing these changes was measured in eight subjects after upper abdominal operations. With pain, FRC and VC were 78 per cent and 37 per cent of control respectively. Following epidural analgesia, the values were 84 per cent and 55 per cent. These figures indicate the pain component in the post-operative reduction of these two lung capacities. This partial restoration may be of value in the prevention of post-operative pulmonary complications by avoiding closure of small airways during tidal breathing and by increasing the effectiveness of deep breathing and coughing in the removal of secretions and the reversal of atelectasis. PMID:1095163

  12. The unsolved case of "bone-impairing analgesics": the endocrine effects of opioids on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Pergolizzi, Joseph; Raffa, Robert B; Mattia, Consalvo

    2015-01-01

    The current literature describes the possible risks for bone fracture in chronic analgesics users. There are three main hypotheses that could explain the increased risk of fracture associated with central analgesics, such as opioids: 1) the increased risk of falls caused by central nervous system effects, including sedation and dizziness; 2) reduced bone mass density caused by the direct opioid effect on osteoblasts; and 3) chronic opioid-induced hypogonadism. The impact of opioids varies by sex and among the type of opioid used (less, for example, for tapentadol and buprenorphine). Opioid-associated androgen deficiency is correlated with an increased risk of osteoporosis; thus, despite that standards have not been established for monitoring and treating opioid-induced hypogonadism or hypoadrenalism, all patients chronically taking opioids (particularly at doses ≥100 mg morphine daily) should be monitored for the early detection of hormonal impairment and low bone mass density. PMID:25848298

  13. Sedative and Analgesic Effects of Entonox Gas Compared with Midazolam and Fentanyl in Synchronized Cardioversion.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Kambiz; Forouzan, Arash; Saghari, Sina; Feli, Maryam; Sattari, Ali Reza; Asgari Darian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the Entonox gas could cause adequate analgesic and sedative effects in patients who need cardioversion. In this randomized not blinded clinical trial, the sedative and analgesic effects of midazolam and fentanyl were compared with Entonox. Eligible patients who need synchronized cardioversion because of dysrhythmia were randomly divided into two groups. The first group received intravenous midazolam and fentanyl; the second group received Entonox through a blower-dependent mask. Onset and end of sedation, sedation level, and pain score were recorded. There were nonsignificant differences between the two groups (22 patients in each group) regarding age, gender, weight, sedation level, and frequency and level of shock. The pain score recorded in the first group was 5.05 ± 1.32, and 3.9 ± 0.7 in the second group (P = 0.002). Furthermore, sedation duration and time to full recovery consciousness were shorter in the second group (P < 0.001). In the first group, seven patients needed additional doses to induce and maintain sedation. In addition, as a result of apnoea, four patients required airway support. None of them occurred in the second group. Entonox is a suitable medication in rapid cardioversion, as it has minimal side effects and adequate analgesic and sedative effects. PMID:26576298

  14. Phytochemical, analgesic, antibacterial, and cytotoxic effects of Alpinia nigra (Gaertn.) Burtt leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Abu Ahmed, A M; Sharmen, Farjana; Mannan, Adnan; Rahman, Md Atiar

    2015-10-01

    This research evaluated the phytochemical contents as well as the analgesic, cytotoxic, and antimicrobial effects of the methanolic extract of Alpinia nigra leaf. Phytochemical analysis was carried out using established methods. The analgesic effects of the extract were measured with the formalin test and tail immersion test. The antibacterial activity of the extract was evaluated using the disc diffusion technique. Cytotoxicity was assessed with the brine shrimp lethality bioassay. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance using statistical software (SPSS, Version 19.0). The qualitative phytochemical screening of A. nigra leaf extract showed the presence of medicinally active secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, glycosides, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, steroids, tannins, anthraquinone glycosides, and saponins. The extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg revealed a prevailed central nociception increasing the reaction time in response to thermal stimulation. The extract also showed a response to chemical nociceptors, causing pain inhibition in the late phase. The leaf extract (2 mg/disc) showed mild antibacterial activity compared to tetracycline (50 μg/disc). In the brine shrimp lethality bioassay, the LC50 (lethal concentration 50) value of the extract was found to be 57.12 μg/mL, implying a promising cytotoxic effect. The results evidenced the moderate analgesic and antibacterial effects with pronounced cytotoxic capability. PMID:26587396

  15. Phytochemical, analgesic, antibacterial, and cytotoxic effects of Alpinia nigra (Gaertn.) Burtt leaf extract

    PubMed Central

    Abu Ahmed, A.M.; Sharmen, Farjana; Mannan, Adnan; Rahman, Md Atiar

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluated the phytochemical contents as well as the analgesic, cytotoxic, and antimicrobial effects of the methanolic extract of Alpinia nigra leaf. Phytochemical analysis was carried out using established methods. The analgesic effects of the extract were measured with the formalin test and tail immersion test. The antibacterial activity of the extract was evaluated using the disc diffusion technique. Cytotoxicity was assessed with the brine shrimp lethality bioassay. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance using statistical software (SPSS, Version 19.0). The qualitative phytochemical screening of A. nigra leaf extract showed the presence of medicinally active secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, glycosides, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, steroids, tannins, anthraquinone glycosides, and saponins. The extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg revealed a prevailed central nociception increasing the reaction time in response to thermal stimulation. The extract also showed a response to chemical nociceptors, causing pain inhibition in the late phase. The leaf extract (2 mg/disc) showed mild antibacterial activity compared to tetracycline (50 μg/disc). In the brine shrimp lethality bioassay, the LC50 (lethal concentration 50) value of the extract was found to be 57.12 μg/mL, implying a promising cytotoxic effect. The results evidenced the moderate analgesic and antibacterial effects with pronounced cytotoxic capability. PMID:26587396

  16. A new therapeutic option for postoperative pain management with oxycodone HCI injection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fentanyl is the most commonly used opioid analgesic in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) in Korea. IV oxycodone was approved for postoperative IV PCA by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety of Korea in 2013. The approved dosage regimen for postoperative pain relief with IV oxycodone is IV bolus loading of 2 mg followed by PCA composed of demand boluses of 1 mg and no background infusion with an oxycodone concentration of 1 mg/ml. However, a simulation study indicated that the minimum effective analgesic concentration (MEAC, as indicated by relief of pain by administering rescue analgesics) of oxycodone was reached most quickly with a higher loading dose of 0.1 mg/kg and IV PCA with background infusion. Oxycodone is a therapeutic option as an analgesic for postoperative pain management. It is necessary to reduce the analgesic dose of oxycodone in elderly patients because metabolic clearance decreases with age. PMID:27274364

  17. A new therapeutic option for postoperative pain management with oxycodone HCI injection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung Moon

    2016-06-01

    Fentanyl is the most commonly used opioid analgesic in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) in Korea. IV oxycodone was approved for postoperative IV PCA by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety of Korea in 2013. The approved dosage regimen for postoperative pain relief with IV oxycodone is IV bolus loading of 2 mg followed by PCA composed of demand boluses of 1 mg and no background infusion with an oxycodone concentration of 1 mg/ml. However, a simulation study indicated that the minimum effective analgesic concentration (MEAC, as indicated by relief of pain by administering rescue analgesics) of oxycodone was reached most quickly with a higher loading dose of 0.1 mg/kg and IV PCA with background infusion. Oxycodone is a therapeutic option as an analgesic for postoperative pain management. It is necessary to reduce the analgesic dose of oxycodone in elderly patients because metabolic clearance decreases with age. PMID:27274364

  18. Analgesic effects of adenylyl cyclase inhibitor NB001 on bone cancer pain in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen-bo; Yang, Qi; Guo, Yan-yan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Dong-sheng; Cheng, Qiang; Li, Xiao-ming; Tang, Jun; Zhao, Jian-ning; Liu, Gang; Zhuo, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer pain, especially the one caused by metastasis in bones, is a severe type of pain. Pain becomes chronic unless its causes and consequences are resolved. With improvements in cancer detection and survival among patients, pain has been considered as a great challenge because traditional therapies are partially effective in terms of providing relief. Cancer pain mechanisms are more poorly understood than neuropathic and inflammatory pain states. Chronic inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain are influenced by NB001, an adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1)-specific inhibitor with analgesic effects. In this study, the analgesic effects of NB001 on cancer pain were evaluated. Results Pain was induced by injecting osteolytic murine sarcoma cell NCTC 2472 into the intramedullary cavity of the femur of mice. The mice injected with sarcoma cells for four weeks exhibited significant spontaneous pain behavior and mechanical allodynia. The continuous systemic application of NB001 (30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, twice daily for three days) markedly decreased the number of spontaneous lifting but increased the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold. NB001 decreased the concentrations of cAMP and the levels of GluN2A, GluN2B, p-GluA1 (831), and p-GluA1 (845) in the anterior cingulate cortex, and inhibited the frequency of presynaptic neurotransmitter release in the anterior cingulate cortex of the mouse models. Conclusions NB001 may serve as a novel analgesic to treat bone cancer pain. Its analgesic effect is at least partially due to the inhibition of AC1 in anterior cingulate cortex. PMID:27612915

  19. Effect of transcranial laser infrared irradiation of the mouse brain on analgesic defense-reflex reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geinits, A. V.; Avrutskii, M. Y.; Guseinov, T. Y.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation of reflectory analgesic reactions was made on the brain of white mice when it was exposed to transcranial laser radiation with the wavelength of 0.89 micrometers and the energy density of 3.12 J cm-2. These reactions were evaluated with the aid of `tail flick' and `hot plate' tests. It was found that antinociceptive reactions did not change during the experiment. However, laser radiation might produce a protective antistress effect.

  20. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oils of Eucalyptus.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jeane; Abebe, Worku; Sousa, S M; Duarte, V G; Machado, M I L; Matos, F J A

    2003-12-01

    Many species of the genus Eucalyptus from the Myrtaceae family are used in Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of various medical conditions such as cold, flue, fever, and bronchial infections. In the current investigation, we evaluated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oil extracts from three species of Eucalyptus employing various standard experimental test models. Using acetic acid-induced writhes in mice and hot plate thermal stimulation in rats, it was shown that the essential oils of Eucalyptus citriodora (EC), Eucalyptus tereticornis (ET), and Eucalyptus globulus (EG) induced analgesic effects in both models, suggesting peripheral and central actions. In addition, essential oil extracts from the three Eucalyptus species produced anti-inflammatory effects, as demonstrated by inhibition of rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, neutrophil migration into rat peritoneal cavities induced by carrageenan, and vascular permeability induced by carrageenan and histamine. However, no consistent results were observed for some of the parameters evaluated, both in terms of activities and dose-response relationships, reflecting the complex nature of the oil extracts and/or the assay systems used. Taken together, the data suggest that essential oil extracts of EC, ET, and EG possess central and peripheral analgesic effects as well as neutrophil-dependent and independent anti-inflammatory activities. These initial observations provide support for the reported use of the eucalyptus plant in Brazilian folk medicine. Further investigation is warranted for possible development of new classes of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs from components of the essential oils of the Eucalyptus species. PMID:14611892

  1. The Analgesic Effect of Nefopam with Fentanyl at the End of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hwan; Kim, Jae Hong

    2013-01-01

    Background Nefopam is a centrally acting analgesic that is used to control pain. The aim of this study was to find an appropriate dose of nefopam that demonstrates an analgesic effect when administered in continuous infusion with fentanyl at the end of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods Ninety patients scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly assigned to receive analgesia with fentanyl alone (50 µg, Group 1, n = 30), or with fentanyl in combination with nefopam 20 mg (Group 2, n = 30) or in combination with nefopam 40 mg (Group 3, n = 30) at the end of surgery. Pain and side effects were evaluated at 10 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, 6 hours, and 12 hours after arrival in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). Results Pain was statistically significantly lower in Groups 2 and 3 than in Group 1 at 10 minutes, 2 hours, and 6 hours after arrival in the PACU. Nausea was statistically significantly lower in Group 2 than in Groups 1 and 3 at 10 minutes after arrival in the PACU. Shivering was statistically significantly lower in Groups 2 and 3 than in Group 1 at 10 minutes after arrival in the PACU. Conclusions Nefopam is a drug that can be safely used as an analgesic after surgery, and its side effects can be reduced when fentanyl 50 µg is injected with nefopam 20 mg. PMID:24156002

  2. Analgesic Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Analgesics are agents which selectively relieve pain by acting in the CNS and peripheral pain mediators without changing consciousness. Analgesics may be narcotic or non-narcotic. The study of pain in animals raises ethical, philosophical, and technical problems. Both peripheral and central pain models are included to make the test more evident for the analgesic property of the plant. This chapter highlights methods such as hot plate and formalin and acetic acid-induced pain models to check the analgesic activity of medicinal plants. PMID:26939272

  3. Effects of Adjuvant Analgesics on Cerebral Ischemia-Induced Mechanical Allodynia.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Wataru; Harada, Shinichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain (CPSP), a potential sequela of stroke, is classified as neuropathic pain. Although we recently established a CPSP-like model in mice, the effects of adjuvant analgesics as therapeutic drugs for neuropathic pain in this model are unknown. Hence, the aim of the present study was to assess the usefulness of our model by evaluating the effects of adjuvant analgesics used for treating neuropathic pain in this mouse model of CPSP. Male ddY mice were subjected to 30 min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). The development of hind paw mechanical allodynia was measured after BCAO using the von Frey test. The mechanical allodynia was significantly increased on day 3 after BCAO compared with that during the pre-BCAO assessment. BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia was significantly decreased by intraperitoneal injections of imipramine (a tricyclic antidepressant), mexiletine (an antiarrhythmic), gabapentin (an antiepileptic), or a subcutaneous injection of morphine (an opioid receptor agonist) compared with that following vehicle treatment in BCAO-mice. By contrast, milnacipran (a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor), paroxetine (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), carbamazepine (antiepileptic), and indomethacin (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) did not affect the BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia. Our results show that BCAO in mice may be useful as an animal model of CPSP. In addition, BCAO-induced mechanical allodynia may be suppressed by some adjuvant analgesics used to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:27150152

  4. The Preventive Effect of Dexmedetomidine Against Postoperative Intra-abdominal Adhesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kuru, Serdar; Bozkirli, Osman Bahadir; Barlas, Aziz Mutlu; Duymus, Mehmet Esat; Senes, Mehmet; Yumusak, Nihat; Yilmaz, Cevdet; Kismet, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the possible preventive effects of dexmedetomidine on postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective and potent α2 adrenergic agonist with sedative, analgesic, anxiolytic, sympatholytic, hemodynamic, and diuretic properties. In recent years, investigations have shown that dexmedetomidine possesses secondary antioxidant and also anti-inflammatory effects. Thirty Wistar albino male rats were randomized and divided into 3 groups of 10 animals each: group 1, sham-operated; group 2, cecal abrasion + peritoneal dissection; group 3, cecal abrasion + peritoneal dissection followed by daily intravenous injection of 10 μg/kg dexmedetomidine for 10 days. The animals were killed on postoperative day 21. Blood and cecal samples were taken for biochemical and histopathologic evaluation. In this study, biochemical and pathologic parameters were significantly better in the cecal abrasion + peritoneal dissection + dexmedetomidine group when compared with the cecal abrasion + peritoneal dissection group. Tissue malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase, total sulfhydryl, and catalase were found to be significantly different between the cecal abrasion/peritoneal dissection + dexmedetomidine and the cecal abrasion/peritoneal dissection groups. Plasma malondialdehyde and total sulfhydryl values were also statistically different between these groups (P < 0.05). Statistical analyses of mean pathologic scores showed that the histopathologic damage in the cecal abrasion/peritoneal dissection + dexmedetomidine group was significantly less than the damage in the control group (P < 0.05 for all pathologic parameters). The results of this study show that dexmedetomidine had a significant preventive effect on postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. We concluded that these effects might be due to antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:25594644

  5. Effect of submucosal and intramuscular dexamethasone on postoperative sequelae after third molar surgery: comparative study.

    PubMed

    Majid, Omer Waleed; Mahmood, Waseem Khalid

    2011-12-01

    We compared the effects of dexamethasone sodium phosphate given submucosally and intramuscularly on postoperative complications after removal of impacted lower third molars in a preliminary randomised prospective clinical trial. Thirty patients, each of whom required removal of a single impacted mandibular third molar under local anaesthesia, were randomly allocated to one of 3 groups of 10 each. The 2 experimental groups were given dexamethasone 4 mg submucosally or intramuscularly, and the control group had no steroid. Facial swelling and maximal interincisal distance were measured by an independent examiner at baseline (preoperatively), and at 1, 3, and 7 days postoperatively. Pain was measured by counting the number of rescue analgesic tablets taken, and from the patients' response to a visual analogue scale (VAS). The mean age of the 16 men and 14 women was 27 years (range 20-48). Both dexamethasone groups showed significant reductions in swelling (p<0.001) and in pain (p<0.05) compared with the control group at all intervals. Submucosal dexamethasone resulted in significantly less trismus than controls on day 1 postoperatively (p=0.04), but there were no significant differences among the groups at the other times. The effects of the two routes of dexamethasone were comparable for all variables. There were no cases of alveolar osteitis or wound infection. Dexamethasone 4 mg given submucosally is an effective way of minimising swelling, trismus, and pain after removal of impacted lower third molars, and is comparable with the intramuscular route. It offers a simple, safe, painless, non-invasive, and cost-effective treatment in moderate and severe cases. PMID:21035237

  6. Effect of Intravenous Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) on Hemodynamic Parameters Following Endotracheal Tube Intubation and Postoperative Pain in Caesarian Section Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Ghasem; Molkizadeh, Amirmasoud; Amini, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Background: Use of analgesics, especially opioids, before delivery during cesarean section for preventing hemodynamic changes after endotracheal intubation and postoperative analgesia is limited due to their adverse effects on the neonate. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intravenous acetaminophen (paracetamol) in blunting hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation and postoperative pain in parturient undergoing cesarean section by general anesthesia. Patients and Methods: Eighty parturients undergoing cesarean section by general anesthesia were randomly divided to receive either 15 mg/kg intravenous paracetamol (n = 40) or normal saline (n = 40) fifteen minutes before endotracheal intubation. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and pulse rates were compared at baseline and after intubation at one minute interval for five minutes between the two groups. The patients were also compared for postoperative pain intensity and analgesic requirement. Results: Patients in the saline group experienced more pain in the recovery room (VAS 7.0 ± 1.24 vs. 6.15 ± 2.27; P value = 0.041) and required more fentanyl intraoperatively (150 µg vs. 87.7 ± 75; P value < 0.01) and meperidine postoperatively (12.88 ± 20.84 mg vs. 1.35 ± 5.73; P value = 0.002) than the paracetamol group. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) changes were similar after intubation in the both groups (P value = 0.71), however, pulse rates showed greater changes following intubation in the saline group (P value = 0.01). Conclusions: Intravenous acetaminophen administered before caesarean section reduced tachycardia after intubation, narcotic drugs administration during and after the operation and reduced pain in PACU. PMID:26705524

  7. Effect of some analgesics on paraoxonase-1 purified from human serum.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Deniz; Beydemir, Sükrü

    2009-08-01

    The in vitro effects of the analgesic drugs, lornoxicam, indomethacin, tenoxicam, diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen and lincomycine, on the activity of purified human serum paraoxonase (hPON1) (EC 3.1.8.1.) were evaluated. hPON1 was purified from human serum with a final specific activity of 3840 U mg(-1) and a purity of 25.3 % using simple chromatographic methods, including DEAE-Sephadex anion exchange and Sepharose 4B-L-tyrozine-1-napthylamine hydrophobic interaction chromatography. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated a single protein band corresponding to hPON1. The six analgesics dose-dependently decreased in vitro hPON1 activity, with IC(50) values for lornoxicam, indomethacin, tenoxicam, diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen and lincomycine of 0.136, 0.195, 0.340, 1.639, 6.23 and 9.638 mM, respectively. K(i) constants were 0.009, 0.097, 0.306, 0.805, 13.010 and 11.116 mM, respectively. Analgesics showed different inhibition mechanisms: lornoxicam, diclofenac sodium and lincomycine were uncompetitive, indomethacin and tenoxicam were competitive, ketoprofen was noncompetitive. According to the results, inhibition potency was lornoxicam>indomethacin>tenoxicam> diclofenac sodium>ketoprofen> lincomycine. PMID:19548782

  8. [Analgesic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Pintér, I; Nagy, J

    1998-11-22

    Analgesic nephropathy is a slowly progressive disease caused by the chronic abuse of analgesic mixtures containing two analgesic components combined with potentially addictive substances (coffeine and/or codeine). Pathologically, the nephropathy is characterized by renal papillary necrosis with calcification and chronic interstitial nephritis sometimes in association with transitional-cell carcinoma of the uroepithelium. In the early stage, the clinical characteristics are polyuria, sterile pyuria, sometimes renal colic and haematuria. With further progression of the disease, there are the nonspecific symptoms of advanced renal failure. The incidence of classic analgesic nephropathy among Hungarian patients on chronic renal replacement therapy has proven. There is an urgent need for the estimation of analgesic nephropathy among patients with chronic renal disease and among patients with chronic pain presumably regularly taking analgesics in Hungary. As long as analgesic mixtures containing phenacetin or paracetamol and/or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and addictive substances are available "over-the-counter", analgesic nephropathy will continue to be a problem also in our country. PMID:9846064

  9. [Analgesics in geriatric patients. Adverse side effects and interactions].

    PubMed

    Gosch, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Pain is a widespread symptom in clinical practice. Older adults and chronically ill patients are particularly affected. In multimorbid geriatric patients, pharmacological pain treatment is an extension of a previously existing multimedication. Besides the efficacy of pain treatment, drug side effects and drug-drug interactions have to be taken into account to minimize the health risk for these patients. Apart from the number of prescriptions, the age-related pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes significantly increase the risk among older adults. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) is widespread but NSAIDs have the highest risk of adverse drug reactions and drug interactions. In particular, the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal and coagulation systems are affected. Apart from the known toxic effect on the liver (in high doses), paracetamol (acetaminophen) has similar risks although to a lesser degree. According to current data, metamizol is actually better than its reputation suggests. The risk of potential drug interactions seems to be low. Apart from the risk of sedation in combination with other drugs, tramadol and other opioids can induce the serotonin syndrome. Among older adults, especially in the case of polypharmacy, an individualized approach should be considered instead of sticking to the pain management recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) in order to minimize drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions. PMID:26152872

  10. Spider peptide Phα1β induces analgesic effect in a model of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Flavia Karine; Trevisan, Gabriela; Rosa, Fernanda; Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Otuki, Michel Fleith; Cueto, Ana Paula; de Castro Junior, Célio José; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurelio; Cordeiro, Marta do N; Richardson, Michael; Ferreira, Juliano; Gomez, Marcus V

    2013-09-01

    The marine snail peptide ziconotide (ω-conotoxin MVIIA) is used as an analgesic in cancer patients refractory to opioids, but may induce severe adverse effects. Animal venoms represent a rich source of novel drugs, so we investigated the analgesic effects and the side-effects of spider peptide Phα1β in a model of cancer pain in mice with or without tolerance to morphine analgesia. Cancer pain was induced by the inoculation of melanoma B16-F10 cells into the hind paw of C57BL/6 mice. After 14 days, painful hypersensitivity was detected and Phα1β or ω-conotoxin MVIIA (10-100 pmol/site) was intrathecally injected to evaluate the development of antinociception and side-effects in control and morphine-tolerant mice. The treatment with Phα1β or ω-conotoxin MVIIA fully reversed cancer-related painful hypersensitivity, with long-lasting results, at effective doses 50% of 48 (32-72) or 33 (21-53) pmol/site, respectively. Phα1β produced only mild adverse effects, whereas ω-conotoxin MVIIA induced dose-related side-effects in mice at analgesic doses (estimated toxic dose 50% of 30 pmol/site). In addition, we observed that Phα1β was capable of controlling cancer-related pain even in mice tolerant to morphine antinociception (100% of inhibition) and was able to partially restore morphine analgesia in such animals (56 ± 5% of inhibition). In this study, Phα1β was as efficacious as ω-conotoxin MVIIA in inducing analgesia in a model of cancer pain without producing severe adverse effects or losing efficacy in opioid-tolerant mice, indicating that Phα1β has a good profile for the treatment of cancer pain in patients. PMID:23718272

  11. Preventive effect of ilioinguinal nerve block on postoperative pain after cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Naghshineh, Elham; Shiari, Samira; Jabalameli, Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cesarean section is a major operation that can be the predictor of postoperative pain and discomfort and, therefore, providing the effective postoperative analgesia is an important factor to facilitate sooner movement of the patient, better care of infants. The aim of this study was to determine the preventive effect of ilioinguinal nerve block on pain after cesarean section. Materials and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial study, 80 female candidates for cesarean section under general anesthesia were selected and divided into two groups. In the first group, ilioinguinal nerve was blocked and in the control group, ilioinguinal nerve block was not done. Finally, postoperative pain was compared between the two groups. Results: The mean pain intensity at 6 and 24 h after operation had no significant difference between two groups but in the rest of the times, it was different between two groups. Furthermore, in sitting position, except for 6 h, the pain intensity at the rest of the time had a significant difference between two groups. The pain intensity in 12 h after operation had a significant difference while in 24 h after operation; there was no difference between two groups. Doing repeated measures, ANOVA also indicated that the process of changes in the pain intensity in three positions of rest, sitting and walking had no significant difference up to 24 h after operation (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Control of pain after cesarean as one of the most common factors for abdominal surgery will lead to decrease the staying of the patient in hospital, reduce morbidity and lower use of narcotics and analgesics after surgery. PMID:26623404

  12. Effects of Anesthetic Agent Propofol on Postoperative Sex Hormone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H.; Ku, S.-Y.; Kim, H. C.; Suh, C. S.; Kim, S. H.; Choi, Y. M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have found anesthetic agents including propofol in ovarian follicular fluid. However, little is known about the effect of anesthetic agents on ovarian function. We aimed to investigate whether there were differences in the postoperative levels of sex hormones when propofol was used as the anesthetic agent. Methods: A retrospective review was done of 80 patients who underwent ovarian surgery, with 72 infertile women serving as controls. Patients were included in the study if their serum estradiol (E2) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were measured during their first postoperative menstrual cycle. Results: Patients were grouped according to the use or non-use of propofol as follows: propofol group (n = 39) and non-propofol group (n = 41). The control group did not undergo surgery. Postoperative E2 levels did not differ between the three groups, but FSH levels were significantly higher in the patients who had undergone surgery compared to controls (p < 0.05). Post-hoc analysis of E2 and FSH levels in the propofol and non-propofol groups did not show any significant differences. Conclusions: The use of propofol did not result in any differences compared to other anesthetic agents in terms of postoperative sex hormone levels after gynecologic surgery. The type of anesthetic agent does not seem to affect the postoperative levels of female sex hormones. PMID:27134297

  13. Shock titration in the rhesus monkey: effects of opiate and nonopiate analgesics.

    PubMed

    Bloss, J L; Hammond, D L

    1985-11-01

    This study evaluated the antinociceptive effects of several opiate and nonopiate analgesics in the rhesus monkey using a discrete trial shock titration paradigm. Morphine sulfate (1, 5 and 10 mg/kg i.m.) and codeine sulfate (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg i.m.) produced a significant and dose-dependent increase in mean shock threshold that was not accompanied by a significant increase in mean response latency. The mean number of shocks terminated was significantly decreased at the highest dose of each opiate. Aspirin (100 and 300 mg/kg p.o.) or ibuprofen (200 mg/kg p.o.) did not significantly increase mean shock threshold or mean response latency or decrease mean number of shocks terminated. However, 6 mg/kg i.m. of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo [5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol produced a significant increase in mean shock threshold and mean response latency with no significant effect on mean number of shocks terminated. The absence of any effects of a 2-mg/kg dose of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol and the severe side effects produced by 10 mg/kg prevented determination of its dose-response relationship. Diazepam (0.5, 2 and 8 mg/kg i.m.) produced a significant, dose-dependent increase in mean shock threshold and a significant increase in mean response latency with no consistent or significant effect on mean number of shocks terminated. Doses of 2 and 8 mg/kg of diazepam also produced signs of ataxia. These results suggest that the discrete trial shock titration paradigm is suitable for demonstration of the antinociceptive effects of opiate and certain nonopiate analgesics, but not nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics in the rhesus monkey. PMID:4057079

  14. Mechanism Underlying the Analgesic Effect Exerted by Endomorphin-1 in the rat Ventrolateral Periaqueductal Gray.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Li, Jing; Feng, Ban; Hui, Rui; Dong, Yu-Lin; Huo, Fu-Quan; Zhang, Ting; Yin, Jun-Bin; Du, Jian-Qing; Li, Yun-Qing

    2016-04-01

    The ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) is an important brain area, in which 5-HTergic neurons play key roles in descending pain modulation. It has been proposed that opioid peptides within the vlPAG can excite the 5-HTergic neurons by alleviating tonic inhibition from GABAergic neurons, the so-called disinhibitory effect. However, no direct morphological evidence has been observed for the micro-circuitry among the opioid peptide-, GABA-, and 5-HT-immunoreactive (ir) profiles nor for the functional involvement of the opioid peptides in the intrinsic properties of GABAergic and 5-HTergic neurons. In the present study, through microscopic observation of triple-immunofluorescence, we firstly identified the circuitry among the endomorphin-1 (EM1, an endogenous ligand for the μ-opioid receptor)-ir terminals and GABA-ir and 5-HT-ir neurons within the rat vlPAG. The synaptic connections of these neurons were further confirmed by electron microscopy. Through the in vitro whole-cell patch-clamp method, we showed that EM1 has strong inhibitory effects on the spiking of GABAergic neurons. However, although the resting membrane potential was hyperpolarized, EM1 actually increased the firing of 5-HTergic neurons. More interestingly, EM1 strongly inhibited the excitatory input to GABAergic neurons, as well as the inhibitory input to 5-HTergic neurons. Finally, behavioral results showed that pretreatment with a GABA(A) receptor antagonist potentiated the analgesic effect of EM1, while treatment with a GABA(A) receptor agonist blocked its analgesic effect. In summary, by utilizing morphological and functional methods, we found that the analgesic effect of EM1 is largely dependent on its potent inhibition on the inhibitory inputs to 5-HTergic neurons, which overwhelms EM1's direct inhibitory effect on 5-HTergic neurons. PMID:25876512

  15. Building a Better Analgesic: Multifunctional Compounds that Address Injury-Induced Pathology to Enhance Analgesic Efficacy while Eliminating Unwanted Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Largent-Milnes, T. M.; Brookshire, S. W.; Skinner, D. P.; Hanlon, K. E.; Giuvelis, D.; Yamamoto, T.; Davis, P.; Campos, C. R.; Nair, P.; Deekonda, S.; Bilsky, E. J.; Porreca, F.; Hruby, V. J.

    2013-01-01

    The most highly abused prescription drugs are opioids used for the treatment of pain. Physician-reported drug-seeking behavior has resulted in a significant health concern among doctors trying to adequately treat pain while limiting the misuse or diversion of pain medications. In addition to abuse liability, opioid use is associated with unwanted side effects that complicate pain management, including opioid-induced emesis and constipation. This has resulted in restricting long-term doses of opioids and inadequate treatment of both acute and chronic debilitating pain, demonstrating a compelling need for novel analgesics. Recent reports indicate that adaptations in endogenous substance P/neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1) are induced by chronic pain and sustained opioid exposure, and these changes may contribute to processes responsible for opioid abuse liability, emesis, and analgesic tolerance. Here, we describe a multifunctional mu-/delta-opioid agonist/NK1 antagonist compound [Tyr-d-Ala-Gly-Phe-Met-Pro-Leu-Trp-NH-Bn(CF3)2 (TY027)] that has a preclinical profile of excellent antinociceptive efficacy, low abuse liability, and no opioid-related emesis or constipation. In rodent models of acute and neuropathic pain, TY027 demonstrates analgesic efficacy following central or systemic administration with a plasma half-life of more than 4 hours and central nervous system penetration. These data demonstrate that an innovative opioid designed to contest the pathology created by chronic pain and sustained opioids results in antinociceptive efficacy in rodent models, with significantly fewer side effects than morphine. Such rationally designed, multitargeted compounds are a promising therapeutic approach in treating patients who suffer from acute and chronic pain. PMID:23860305

  16. Risk factors for postoperative ileus

    PubMed Central

    Kutun, Suat; Ulucanlar, Haluk; Tarcan, Oguz; Demir, Abdullah; Cetin, Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to examine extended postoperative ileus and its risk factors in patients who have undergone abdominal surgery, and discuss the techniques of prevention and management thereof the light of related risk factors connected with our study. Methods This prospective study involved 103 patients who had undergone abdominal surgery. The effects of age, gender, diagnosis, surgical operation conducted, excessive small intestine manipulation, opioid analgesic usage time, and systemic inflammation on the time required for the restoration of intestinal motility were investigated. The parameters were investigated prospectively. Results Regarding the factors that affected the restoration of gastrointestinal motility, resection operation type, longer operation period, longer opioid analgesics use period, longer nasogastric catheter use period, and the presence of systemic inflammation were shown to retard bowel motility for 3 days or more. Conclusion Our study confirmed that unnecessary analgesics use in patients with pain tolerance with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, excessive small bowel manipulation, prolonged nasogastric catheter use have a direct negative effect on gastrointestinal motility. Considering that an exact treatment for postoperative ileus has not yet been established, and in light of the risk factors mentioned above, we regard that prevention of postoperative ileus is the most effective way of coping with intestinal dysmotility. PMID:22111079

  17. The Analgesic Effects of Different Extracts of Aerial Parts of Coriandrum Sativum in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fatemeh Kazempor, Seyedeh; Vafadar langehbiz, Shabnam; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Naser Shafei, Mohammad; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Pourganji, Masoomeh

    2015-01-01

    Regarding the effects of Coriandrum sativum (C. sativum) on central nervous system, in the present study analgesic properties of different extracts of C. sativum aerial partswere investigated. The mice were treated by saline, morphine, three doses (20, 100 and 500 mg/kg) of aqueous, ethanolic, choloroformic extracts of C. sativum and one dose (100 mg/kg) of aqueous, two doses of ethanolic (100 and 500 mg/kg) and one dose of choloroformic (20 mg/kg) extracts of C. sativum pretreated by naloxone. Recording of the hot plate test was performed 10 min before injection of the drugs as a base and it was consequently repeated every 10 minutes after the extracts injection. The maximal percent effect (MPE) in the groups treated by three doses of aqueous, ethanolic and chloroformic extracts were significantly higher than saline group which were comparable to the effect of morphine. The effects of most effective doses of extracts were reversed by naloxone. The results of present study showed analgesic effect of aqueous, ethanolic and chloroformic extracts of C. sativum extract. These effects of the extracts may be mediated by opioid system. However, more investigations are needed to elucidate the exact responsible mechanism(s) and the effective compound(s).

  18. The Role of Spinal Dopaminergic Transmission in the Analgesic Effect of Nefopam on Rat Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Yun; Chae, Joo Wung; Lim, Chang Hun; Heo, Bong Ha; Park, Keun Suk; Lee, Hyung Gon; Choi, Jeong Il; Yoon, Myung Ha

    2016-01-01

    Background Nefopam has been known as an inhibitor of the reuptake of monoamines, and the noradrenergic and/or serotonergic system has been focused on as a mechanism of its analgesic action. Here we investigated the role of the spinal dopaminergic neurotransmission in the antinociceptive effect of nefopam administered intravenously or intrathecally. Methods The effects of intravenously and intrathecally administered nefopam were examined using the rat formalin test. Then we performed a microdialysis study to confirm the change of extracellular dopamine concentration in the spinal dorsal horn by nefopam. To determine whether the changes of dopamine level are associated with the nefopam analgesia, its mechanism was investigated pharmacologically via pretreatment with sulpiride, a dopaminergic D2 receptor antagonist. Results When nefopam was administered intravenously the flinching responses in phase I of the formalin test were decreased, but not those in phase II of the formalin test were decreased. Intrathecally injected nefopam reduced the flinching responses in both phases of the formalin test in a dose dependent manner. Microdialysis study revealed a significant increase of the level of dopamine in the spinal cord by intrathecally administered nefopam (about 3.8 fold the baseline value) but not by that administered intravenously. The analgesic effects of intrathecally injected nefopam were not affected by pretreatment with sulpiride, and neither were those of the intravenous nefopam. Conclusions Both the intravenously and intrathecally administered nefopam effectively relieved inflammatory pain in rats. Nefopam may act as an inhibitor of dopamine reuptake when delivered into the spinal cord. However, the analgesic mechanism of nefopam may not involve the dopaminergic transmission at the spinal level. PMID:27413481

  19. [Analgesic and opioid-sparing effects of intravenous paracetamol in the early period after aortocoronary bypass surgery].

    PubMed

    Eremenko, A A; Kuslieva, E V

    2008-01-01

    The study was to evaluate the analgesic and opioid-sparing effect of intravenous paracetamol injections in cardiosurgical patients in the early postoperative period. Adequate analgesia within the first 12-18 hours of the early postoperative period is very important for a good prognosis of the further course of pain syndrome and for the reduction of a risk for its progression to its chronic form. In early studies, propacetamol lowered morphine use after orthopedic and gynecological operations. The efficacy of paracetamol used in cardiac surgery has been little studied and the results of the studies are conflicting. The randomized, blind, placebo-controlled study included patients after aortocoronary bypass surgery, of them 22 patients received paracetamol and 23 had placebo. The test drug (perfalgan 100 ml or placebo) was intravenously injected 30 min before extubation and then every 6 hours within succeeding 18 hours. The intensity of the pain syndrome was rated by a 5-score verbal scale every 2 hours. With pain score of 2 or more, promedol was intramuscularly administered in a dose of 10 mg. Inspiratory volume was recorded before extubation and the first administration of a drug just after extubation and then every 2 hours. The baseline indices did not differ in both groups. Throughout the observation, the inspiratory volume was lower in the paracetamol group than in the placebo group; however, there was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.012) in the reduction in the manifestations of the pain syndrome (by 81%) only just after tracheal extubation. During this period, inspiratory volume values were higher in the paracetamol group; however, a statistically significant (39%) difference between the groups in the mean values was obtained only during and 2 hours after extubation. In the perfalgan group, the mean total use of promedol was 36% less than in the placebo-group, which was statistically significant (p = 0.019). The early postoperative use of

  20. Electroencephalography and analgesics.

    PubMed

    Malver, Lasse Paludan; Brokjaer, Anne; Staahl, Camilla; Graversen, Carina; Andresen, Trine; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2014-01-01

    To assess centrally mediated analgesic mechanisms in clinical trials with pain patients, objective standardized methods such as electroencephalography (EEG) has many advantages. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with an overview of present findings in analgesics assessed with spontaneous EEG and evoked brain potentials (EPs) in humans. Furthermore, EEG methodologies will be discussed with respect to translation from animals to humans and future perspectives in predicting analgesic efficacy. We searched PubMed with MeSH terms 'analgesics', 'electroencephalography' and 'evoked potentials' for relevant articles. Combined with a search in their reference lists 15 articles on spontaneous EEG and 55 papers on EPs were identified. Overall, opioids produced increased activity in the delta band in the spontaneous EEG, but increases in higher frequency bands were also seen. The EP amplitudes decreased in the majority of studies. Anticonvulsants used as analgesics showed inconsistent results. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine showed an increase in the theta band in spontaneous EEG and decreases in EP amplitudes. Tricyclic antidepressants increased the activity in the delta, theta and beta bands in the spontaneous EEG while EPs were inconsistently affected. Weak analgesics were mainly investigated with EPs and a decrease in amplitudes was generally observed. This review reveals that both spontaneous EEG and EPs are widely used as biomarkers for analgesic drug effects. Methodological differences are common and a more uniform approach will further enhance the value of such biomarkers for drug development and prediction of treatment response in individual patients. PMID:23593934

  1. Analgesic effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on central post-stroke pain.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sea-Hyun; Kim, Gi-Do; Kim, Kyung-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Pain that occurs after a stroke lowers the quality of life. Such post-stroke pain is caused in part by the brain lesion itself, called central post-stroke pain. We investigated the analgesic effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in stroke patients through quantitative sensory testing. Fourteen participants with central post-stroke pain (7 female and 7 male subjects) were recruited and were allocated to either tDCS (n = 7) or sham-tDCS (n = 7) group. Their ages ranged from 45 to 55 years. tDCS was administered for 20 min at a 2-mA current intensity, with anodal stimulations were performed at primary motor cortex. The sham-tDCS group was stimulated 30-second current carrying time. Both group interventions were given for 3 days per week, for a period of 3 weeks. Subjective pain was measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) of 0 to 10. Sensations of cold and warmth, and pain from cold and heat were quantified to examine analgesic effects. The sham-tDCS group showed no statistically significant differences in time. In contrast, tDCS group showed decreased VAS scores and skin temperature (p < 0.05). The threshold temperatures for the sense of cold and pain from cold increased (p < 0.05), and those for the sense of warmth and pain from heat decreased (p < 0.05). Our findings indicate that tDCS improved sensory identification and exerted analgesic effects in the stroke patients with central post-stroke pain. PMID:25341455

  2. The effect of pre-emptive analgesia on the level of postoperative pain in women undergoing surgery for breast neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Węgorowski, Paweł; Stanisławek, Andrzej; Sysiak, Justyna; Rząca, Marcin; Milanowska, Joanna; Janiszewska, Mariola; Dziubińska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Dynamic development of research on pain has resulted in the formulation of the concept of pre-emptive analgesia, which involves administration of analgesics before the first pain-producing stimulus appears. It is meant to prevent increased sensitivity to pain in the postoperative period. The aim of this study was to assess the possibilities of modifying the intensity of postoperative pain evaluated with the visual analogue scale (VAS) in patients after surgical treatment for breast neoplasm offered by pre-emptive analgesia. Material and methods The intensity of postoperative pain was measured immediately after the surgery as well as 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours later in 100 women who had undergone surgery for breast tumour. The correlation between experienced pain and the type of analgesic administered pre-emptively, including metamizole, tramadol, ketoprofen, and placebo was examined. The effect of other correlates such as the extensiveness of surgery, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate on the level of experienced pain as well as the usefulness of physiological parameters for its assessment were also analysed. Results The conducted study demonstrated the effectiveness of tramadol (p = 0.004) and ketoprofen (p = 0.039) administered half an hour before the beginning of surgery, but there was no similar effect in the case of metamizole (p = 1.0). A positive correlation was observed between the level of experienced pain and blood pressure values (p < 0.001). Heart rate does not seem to be significantly linked with the intensity of experienced pain (p = 0.157). PMID:27358596

  3. Antioxidant, Analgesic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Hepatoprotective Effects of the Ethanol Extract of Mahonia oiwakensis Stem

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jung; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Peng, Wen-Huang; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Pao, Li-Heng; Cheng, Hao-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pharmacological properties of ethanol extracted from Mahonia oiwakensis Hayata stems (MOSEtOH). The pharmacological properties included antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effects. The protoberberine alkaloid content of the MOSEtOH was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results revealed that three alkaloids, berberine, palmatine and jatrorrhizine, could be identified. Moreover, the MOSEtOH exhibited antioxidative activity using the DPPH assay (IC50, 0.743 mg/mL). The DPPH radical scavenging activity of MOSEtOH was five times higher that that of vitamin C. MOSEtOH was also found to inhibit pain induced by acetic acid, formalin, and carrageenan inflammation. Treatment with MOSEtOH (100 and 500 mg/kg) or silymarin (200 mg/kg) decreased the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels compared with the CCl4-treated group. Histological evaluation showed that MOSEtOH reduced the degree of liver injury, including vacuolization, inflammation and necrosis of hepatocytes. The anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effect of MOSEtOH were found to be related to the modulation of antioxidant enzyme activity in the liver and decreases in malondialdehyde (MDA) level and nitric oxide (NO) contents. Our findings suggest that MOSEtOH has analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effects. These effects support the use of MOSEtOH for relieving pain and inflammation in folk medicine. PMID:23364614

  4. [Evaluation of the peripartum effects of 2 analgesics: meperidine and tramadol, used in labor].

    PubMed

    Fieni, S; Angeri, F; Kaihura, C T; Ricci, L; Bedocchi, L; Galanti, B; Rossi, T; Benassi, G; Benassi, L

    2000-01-01

    The need for analgesia to overcome pain in labour is highly requested by women today. Various ways either non pharmachologic e.g. Emotional sustain, psycho-prophylactic preparation, yoga and hypnosis or pharmachologic such as epidural blockade or parenteral are used. Therefore in our study we evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of the two opioids usually used today in parenteral analgesia to reduce pain during labour: Tramadol and Meperidine. We studied two groups of patients each made up of 20 women in labour, all at term and with a physiologic course of pregnancy. 75 mg i.m. of Meperidine chloryhydrate were somministered in the first group while in the second group 100 mg i.m. of tramadol chloryhydrate were somministered. Various maternal, fetal and neonatal parameters were then monitored demonstrating--A moderate maternal analgesic effect in both drugs (evaluated through the analogic grading of pain). In the group to whom Meperidine was given, sedative effects on the mother were observed associated with respiratory depression in the newborn (the latter evaluated through the Apgar index at 1st and 5th minute of life and pH of the blood obtained at the umbilical cord. The data obtained permitted us to conclude that Tramadol in accordance to the obtained in literature gives an analogous analgesic effect, with better tolerability for the absence of collateral effects on the mother, fetus and newborn. PMID:11424777

  5. Effectiveness of green tea mouthwash in postoperative pain control following surgical removal of impacted third molars: double blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain following surgical removal of impacted molars has remained an important concern among practitioners. Various protocols have been proposed to reduce postoperative pain. However, each one has special side effects and limitations. As green tea possesses anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of green tea mouthwash in controlling postoperative pain. Materials and methods In a study with split-mouth and double blind design, 44 patients in need of bilateral removal of impacted third molars underwent randomized surgical extraction; following one surgery patients rinsed with a green tea mouthwash from the first to seventh postoperative day and after other extraction rinsed with placebo mouthwash in the same duration. Both patients and surgeon were blinded to the type of mouthwash. The predictor variable was type of mouthwash and primary outcome variable was postoperative pain measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) during first week after surgery. In addition, number of analgesics patients used after surgery recorded. To measure the effect of green tea mouthwash, repeated measures test with confidence interval of 95% was performed. Results Total of 43 patients with mean age of 24 years underwent total of 86 surgeries. VAS value had no statistically difference prior rinsing among groups (P-value > 0.05). However, the mean value of VAS following rinsing with green tea was statistically lower than placebo in postoperative days of 3–7 (P-value < 0.05). In addition, while rinsing with green tea, patients took significantly lower number of analgesics after surgery (P-value < 0.05). No side effects reported. Conclusion Green tea mouthwash could be an appropriate and safe choice to control postoperative pain after third molar surgery. PMID:23866761

  6. Clinical experimental studies of postoperative infusion analgesia.

    PubMed

    Knoche, E; Dick, W; Bowdler, I; Gundlach, G

    1983-01-01

    Thirty postoperative patients, after undergoing abdominal hysterectomy and standard general anesthesia, were randomly allocated to three groups and received, in the recovery ward, a continuous infusion of either pentazocine, piritramide, or ketamine. The patients rated their pain on a 15-cm visual analog scale. Patients in group 1 received pentazocine. Mean dosage was 0.12 mg/kg/hr on the day of operation, 0.1 mg/kg/hr on the first postoperative day, and only 0.07 mg/kg/hr on the second postoperative day. Pentazocine blood levels averaged 50 micrograms/L. Patients in group 2 received piritramide. Mean dosage was 0.038 mg/kg/hr on the day of operation, 0.024 mg/kg/hr on the first postoperative day, and 0.019 mg/kg/hr on the second postoperative day. Blood levels of piritramide were not determined because no satisfactory assay is available. Patients in group 3 received ketamine. Mean dosage was 0.32 mg/kg/hr on the day of operation, 0.28 mg/kg/hr on the first postoperative day, and 0.29 mg/kg/hr on the second postoperative day. Ketamine blood levels ranged between 120 and 180 micrograms/L. None of the three analgesics caused any important hemodynamic or respiratory side effects. Pentazocine and piritramide were more effective analgesics than ketamine was. Ketamine also had a higher incidence of side effects. PMID:6627285

  7. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of ketoprofen in palm oil esters nanoemulsion.

    PubMed

    Sakeena, M H F; Yam, M F; Elrashid, S M; Munavvar, A S; Azmin, M N

    2010-01-01

    Ketoprofen is a potent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug has been used in the treatment of various kinds of pains, inflammation and arthritis. However, oral administration of ketoprofen produces serious gastrointestinal adverse effects. One of the promising methods to overcome these adverse effects is to administer the drug through the skin. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects from topically applied ketoprofen entrapped palm oil esters (POEs) based nanoemulsion and to compare with market ketoprofen product, Fastum(®) gel. The novelty of this study is, use of POEs for the oil phase of nanoemulsion. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic studies were performed on rats by carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema test and carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia pain threshold test to compare the ketoprofen entrapped POEs based nanoemulsion formulation and market formulation. Results indicated that there are no significant different between ketoprofen entrapped POEs nanoemulsion and market formulation in carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema study and carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia pain threshold study. However, it shows a significant different between POEs nanoemulsion formulation and control group in these studies at p<0.05. From these results it was concluded that the developed nanoemulsion have great potential for topical application of ketoprofen. PMID:21099145

  8. Stress-induced changes in the analgesic and thermic effects of opioid peptides in the rat.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, B D; Holtzman, S G

    1986-07-01

    Stress (e.g. restraint) potentiates analgesia and alters changes in body temperature induced by morphine administered either systemically or intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) in rats. In order to extend the generality of this phenomenon to opioid peptides, we determined whether the analgesic and thermic effects of i.c.v. D-Ala2-D-Leu5-enkephalin (DADLE) or D-Ala2-N-MePhe4-Gly5(ol)-enkephalin (DAGO), agonists selective for delta- and mu-opioid receptors, respectively, were affected by restraint stress. Analgesia was measured in the tail-flick test and core body temperature by rectal probe. The unstressed rats exhibited a dose-dependent increase in tail-flick latencies after administration of either DAGO or DADLE. Restrained rats treated with DAGO or DADLE had a greater analgesic response to each dose of peptide than did unstressed rats; both the magnitude and duration of the drug effect were increased. The unstressed group of rats responded to all doses of DAGO and DADLE with an increase of core temperature. In contrast, restrained rats showed a decrease of core temperature following injection with either DAGO or DADLE. Thus, restraint stress can significantly modify the effects of DAGO and DADLE on analgesia and body temperature in a manner that is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that observed previously for morphine administered by the i.c.v. route. PMID:3015351

  9. Stress-induced changes in the analgesic and thermic effects of morphine administered centrally.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, B D; Holtzman, S G

    1985-12-01

    Stress (e.g. restraint) potentiates analgesia and changes in body temperature induced by morphine administered systemically to rats. In order to determine if stress-induced potentiation of these effects of morphine are mediated within the central nervous system, restrained and unstressed groups of rats were injected in the lateral ventricle (i.c.v.) with graded doses of morphine, and their analgesic and body temperature responses were measured. Compared to unstressed animals, restrained rats had a greater analgesic response at each dose of morphine, characterized by an increase in both the magnitude and duration of the drug effect. The unstressed group of rats responded consistently to 1.0-100 micrograms of morphine with a 1.5-2.0 degrees C increase in core temperature. Restrained rats had either a smaller increase in body temperature or a hypothermia at these doses of morphine. Thus, restraint stress can modify the effects of morphine administered i.c.v. on analgesia and body temperature in a manner similar to that seen after systemic administration of morphine, indicating that this phenomenon is mediated centrally. PMID:4075121

  10. The analgesic effect of clonixine is not mediated by 5-HT3 subtype receptors.

    PubMed

    Paeile, C; Bustamante, S E; Sierralta, F; Bustamante, D; Miranda, H F

    1995-10-01

    1. The analgesic effect of clonixinate of L-lysine (Clx) in the nociceptive C-fiber reflex in rat and in the writhing test in mice is reported. 2. Clx was administered by three routes, i.v., i.t. and i.c.v., inducing a dose-dependent antinociception. 3. The antinociceptive effect of Clx was 40-45% with respect to the control integration values in the nociceptive C-fiber reflex method. 4. The writhing test yielded ED50 values (mg/kg) of 12.0 +/- 1.3 (i.p.), 1.8 +/- 0.2 (i.t.) and 0.9 +/- 0.1 (i.c.v.) for Clx administration. 5. Ondansetron was not able to antagonize the antinociception response of Clx in the algesiometric tests used. 6. Chlorophenilbiguanide did not produce any significative change in the analgesic effect of Clx in the nociceptive C-fiber reflex method. 7. It is suggested that the mechanism of action of the central analgesia of Clx is not mediated by 5-HT3 subtype receptors. PMID:7590133

  11. Analgesic Effect of Intrathecal Gabapentin in a Rat Model of Persistent Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae-Wook; Sohn, Min Kyun; Park, Noh Kyoung; Ko, Sang Hyung; Cho, Kyoung Jin; Beom, Jaewon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the analgesic effect of intrathecal gabapentin therapy on secondary hyperalgesia in a rat model of persistent muscle pain. Methods Intrathecal catheters were implanted into rats. Mechanical secondary hyperalgesia was induced by repeated intramuscular injections of acidic solution into the gastrocnemius muscle. Gabapentin was administrated intrathecally. Rats were allocated to control and experimental (gabapentin 30, 100, 300, and 1,000 µg) group. After gabapentin administration, mechanical withdrawal threshold was measured every 15 minutes and the motor function was measured 30 minutes later. Results Mechanical hyperalgesia was evoked after the second acidic buffer injection. There was a significant improvement on the mechanical threshold after administration of 100, 300, and 1,000 µg gabapentin compared to pre-injection and the control group. The analgesic effect continued for 105, 135, and 210 minutes, respectively. To discern side effects, motor function was measured. Motor function was preserved in both groups after gabapentin administration, except for rats who received 1,000 µg gabapentin. Conclusion Intrathecal gabapentin administration produces dose-dependent improvements in mechanical hyperalgesia in a persistent muscle pain rat model. This implicates the central nervous system as having a strong influence on the development of persistent mechanical hyperalgesia. These results are helpful in understanding the pathophysiology of secondary hyperalgesia and in the treatment of patients with chronic muscle pain. PMID:25379498

  12. Comparison of the effect of chitosan and polyvinylpyrrolidone on dissolution properties and analgesic effect of naproxen.

    PubMed

    Zerrouk, Naima; Mennini, Natascia; Maestrelli, Francesca; Chemtob, Chantal; Mura, Paola

    2004-01-01

    The solubilizing and absorption enhancer properties towards naproxen of chitosan and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) have been investigated. Solid binary systems prepared at various drug-polymer ratios by mixing, cogrinding or kneading, were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, and tested for dissolution behavior. Both carriers improved drug dissolution and their performance depended on the drug-polymer ratio and the system preparation method. Chitosan was more effective than PVP, despite the greater amorphizing power of PVP as revealed by solid state analyses. The 3/7 (w/w) drug-carrier coground systems with chitosan and PVP were the best products enabling, respectively, an improvement of 4.8 and 3.6 times of drug dissolution efficiency. In vivo experiments in mice demonstrated that administration of 45 mg/kg of drug coground with PVP or chitosan resulted, respectively, in a 25 and 60% reduction of acetic acid-induced writhings in comparison to pure drug, which, instead, was statistically ineffective as compared to the control group. Moreover, the 3/7 (w/w) drug-chitosan coground product demonstrated an antiwrithing potency 2.4 times higher than the coground with PVP. Thus, the direct-compression properties and antiulcerogenic activity, combined with the demonstrated solubilizing power and analgesic effect enhancer ability towards the drug, make chitosan particularly suitable for developing a reduced-dose fast-release solid oral dosage form of naproxen. PMID:14729084

  13. Analgesic effect of ceruletide compared with pentazocine in biliary and renal colic: a prospective, controlled, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Lishner, M; Lang, R; Jutrin, I; De-Paolis, C; Ravid, M

    1985-06-01

    The analgesic effect of ceruletide in biliary and renal colic was evaluated by a randomized, double-blind study in 82 patients. Ceruletide was compared with pentazocine, a well-established analgetic agent. Rapid and effective analgesia was obtained by intramuscular injection of ceruletide 0.5 micrograms/kg in 56 patients with biliary colic. The analgesic effect of ceruletide compared well with pentazocine 0.5 mg/kg im, and was associated with remarkably fewer side effects. In 26 patients with renal colic, ceruletide was significantly inferior to pentazocine. These data support the recommendation of ceruletide as a first-choice analgetic agent for biliary colic. PMID:3891284

  14. The Analgesic Effect of the Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant SkQ1 in Pancreatic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Weniger, Maximilian; Reinelt, Leonard; Neumann, Jens; Holdt, Lesca; Ilmer, Matthias; Renz, Bernhard; Hartwig, Werner; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V.; D'Haese, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic pancreatitis is one of the main risk factors for pancreatic cancer. In acute and chronic pancreatitis, oxidative stress is thought to play a key role. In this respect, the recently described mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 effectively scavenges reactive oxygen species at nanomolar concentrations. Therefore, we aimed to characterize the influence of SkQ1 on tissue injury and pain in acute and chronic pancreatitis. Methods. Both acute and chronic pancreatitis were induced in C57BL/6 mice by intraperitoneal cerulein injections and treatment with SkQ1 was carried out by peroral applications. Hyperalgesia was assessed by behavioral observation and measurement of abdominal mechanical sensitivity. Blood serum and pancreatic tissue were harvested for analysis of lipase and histology. Results. SkQ1 did not influence pain, serological, or histological parameters of tissue injury in acute pancreatitis. In chronic pancreatitis, a highly significant reduction of pain-related behavior (p < 0.0001) was evident, but histological grading revealed increased tissue injury in SkQ1-treated animals (p = 0.03). Conclusion. After SkQ1 treatment, tissue injury is not ameliorated in acute pancreatitis and increased in chronic pancreatitis. However, we show an analgesic effect in chronic pancreatitis. Further studies will need to elucidate the risks and benefits of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants as an analgesic. PMID:27274778

  15. Evaluation of Skin Permeation and Analgesic Activity Effects of Carbopol Lornoxicam Topical Gels Containing Penetration Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A.; Taha, Ehab I.; Al-Qahtani, Fahad M.; Ahmed, Mahrous O.; Badran, Mohamed M.

    2014-01-01

    The current study was designed to develop a topical gel formulation for improved skin penetration of lornoxicam (LOR) for enhancement of its analgesic activity. Moreover, the effect of different penetration enhancers on LOR was studied. The LOR gel formulations were prepared by using hydroxylpropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and carbopol. The carbopol gels in presence of propylene glycol (PG) and ethanol were developed. The formulated gels were characterized for pH, viscosity, and LOR release using Franz diffusion cells. Also, in vitro skin permeation of LOR was conducted. The effect of hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (HP β-CD), beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD), Tween 80, and oleic acid on LOR permeation was evaluated. The optimized LOR gel formulation (LORF8) showed the highest flux (14.31 μg/cm2/h) with ER of 18.34 when compared to LORF3. Incorporation of PG and HP β-CD in gel formulation (LORF8) enhanced the permeation of LOR significantly. It was observed that LORF3 and LORF8 show similar analgesic activity compared to marketed LOR injection (Xefo). This work shows that LOR can be formulated into carbopol gel in presence of PG and HP β-CD and may be promising in enhancing permeation. PMID:25045724

  16. Effects of intravenous analgesia with combined dezocine and butorphanol on postoperative cognitive function in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Ren, B X; Zong, J; Tang, J C; Sun, D P; Hui, X; Li, R Q; Zhang, J L; Ji, Y

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the analgesic effects of the combination of dezocine and butorphanol on postoperative cognitive function in elderly patients. Forty elderly patients undergoing upper abdominal surgeries or thoracotomies with general anesthesia were randomly divided into the dezocine and butorphanol group or the butorphanol group (20 patients per group). A visual analog scale was used to evaluate analgesia and the degree of malignant vomiting. The Ramsay scoring method was used to evaluate sedation. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to evaluate cognitive function. Forty-eight hours after the operation, the pain score of the dezocine and butorphanol group (means ± SD, 1.75 ± 0.44) was lower than that of the butorphanol group (2.25 ± 0.79; P < 0.05), and the nausea and vomiting score of the dezocine and butorphanol group (0) was lower than that of the butorphanol group (0.70 ± 1.30; P < 0.05). Six hours after the operation, the sedative score of the butorphanol group (3.75 ± 0.79) was higher than that of the dezocine and butorphanol group (2.15 ± 0.75; P < 0.05). Compared to 1 day before the operation, the MMSE scores of both groups decreased 6 h after the operation, and the MMSE score of the butorphanol group (15.00 ± 2.00) was lower than that of the dezocine and butorphanol group (20.95 ± 1.54; P < 0.05). Dezocine and butorphanol analgesia had transient effects on postoperative cognitive function in elderly patients, and the effect of the combination was superior than butorphanol only. PMID:26125754

  17. Effect of postoperative extradural morphine on lower urinary tract function.

    PubMed

    Husted, S; Djurhuus, J C; Husegaard, H C; Jepsen, J; Mortensen, J

    1985-02-01

    The effect of postoperative extradurally administered morphine on lower urinary tract function was studied in female patients undergoing uterine surgery. Urodynamic measurements were made on the day before and on the day after the operation, using a DISA 2-channel carbon dioxide (CO2) cystomictrograph. In ten patients without postoperative urinary retention no changes in cystometry were found during morphine administration, while two patients who developed acute urinary retention had a marked increase in bladder capacity and of detrusor pressure. In contrast, the urethral pressure profile was unchanged in both groups of patients. Intravenously administered naloxone tended to normalize the bladder capacity in the patients with urinary retention. These findings seem to indicate a marked effect in some patients of extradurally administered morphine and the acute urinary retention, following morphine administration, may be treated with naloxone. PMID:3976331

  18. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of cucurbitacins from Wilbrandia ebracteata.

    PubMed

    Peters, R R; Farias, M R; Ribeiro-do-Valle, R M

    1997-12-01

    The anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive actions of the CH2Cl2 extract and semipurified fraction (F-III) from roots of Wilbrandia ebracteata Cogn. have been investigated in rats and mice. The CH2Cl2 extract (1-10 mg/kg, i.p.; ID50 5 mg/kg) and (3-30 mg/kg, p.o.; ID50 15 mg/kg) inhibited, in a dose-related manner, carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. The subfraction (F-III) from CH2Cl2 extract and compounds isolated as cucurbitacin B and E also inhibited carrageenan-induced edema. The CH2Cl2 extract and F-III also exhibited significant analgesic action in acetic acid-induced pain in mice. In the formalin test, the CH2Cl2 extract (0.3-10 mg/kg, i.p.) and (3-30 mg/kg, p.o.) caused inhibition of the neurogenic (first phase) and inflammatory phase (second phase) of formalin-induced pain. However, the CH2Cl2 extract was more effective in relation to the second phase than in inhibition of the formalin-induced edema. These findings suggest that CH2Cl2 extract has potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic action and that F-III and cucurbitacin B and E may account for these actions. PMID:9434604

  19. Variation in surgical trauma and baseline pain intensity: effects on assay sensitivity of an analgesic trial.

    PubMed

    Breivik, E K; Björnsson, G A

    1998-08-01

    The aims of this study were to test the hypotheses that the type of 3rd molar removal determines baseline pain and that baseline pain influences analgesic assay sensitivity. Three groups of patients were studied: (i) 100 patients that had one fully erupted maxillary 3rd molar extracted; (ii) 95 patients that had one lower impacted 3rd molar surgically removed; and (iii) 98 patients that had two ipsilateral impacted 3rd molars surgically removed. In a randomized, double-blind fashion, the patients received (every third hour, three times) either: (i) paracetamol 1g; (ii) paracetamol 1g plus codeine 60 mg; or (iii) placebo. Baseline pain intensity (100 mm Visual Analogue Scale) was significantly lower after extraction (8 mm (2-20)) (=median (25th -75th percentile) than after surgical removal of one 3rd molar (35 mm (15-57)), which was significantly lower than pain intensity after surgical removal of two 3rd molars (49 mm (24-82)). Analgesic effects of the active test drugs were superior to placebo. Paracetamol with and without codeine could be distinguished in patients after surgical removal of one 3rd molar. In conclusion, baseline pain was related to the degree of surgical trauma, but large inter-individual variation in baseline pain intensity reduced the ability to distinguish between paracetamol with and without codeine. PMID:9708687

  20. Analgesic Effects of a Standardized Biofavonoid Composition from Scutellaria baicalensis and Acacia catechu

    PubMed Central

    Yimam, Mesfin; Brownell, Lidia; Hodges, Mandee; Jia, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Anti-infammatory properties of both baicalin and catechins have been widely reported. However, the reports of analgesic effects of baicalin and catechins are limited. Three commonly used pain-related animal models were employed to evaluate the analgesic activity of UP446, a standardized biofavonoid composition of baicalin and catechins. Carrageenan-induced paw edema, formalin test, and abdominal constriction assays were used to evaluate antinociceptive activity of 150 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg oral doses of UP446. Ibuprofen was used as a reference compound in each test. Pretreatment of carrageenan-induced hyperalgesic animals with UP446 at 150 mg/kg oral dosage reduced the hypersensitivity of pain by 39.5%. Similarly, a single dose of UP446, given orally at 100 mg/kg, exhibited 58% and 71.9% inhibition in pain sensitivity compared to vehicle-treated control in writhing and formalin tests, respectively. These fndings suggest that the standardized anti-infammatory biofavonoid composition, UP446, could also be employed to inhibit nociception. PMID:22877413

  1. Mechanisms Underlying the Analgesic Effect of Moxibustion on Visceral Pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renjia; Zhao, Jimeng; Wu, Luyi; Dou, Chuanzi; Liu, Huirong; Weng, Zhijun; Shi, Yin; Zhou, Cili; Wu, Huangan

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder that causes recurrent abdominal (visceral) pain. Epidemiological data show that the incidence rate of IBS is as high as 25%. Most of the medications may lead to tolerance, addiction and toxic side effects. Moxibustion is an important component of traditional Chinese medicine and has been used to treat IBS-like abdominal pain for several thousand years in China. As a mild treatment, moxibustion has been widely applied in clinical treatment of visceral pain in IBS. In recent years, it has played an irreplaceable role in alternative medicine. Extensive clinical studies have demonstrated that moxibustion for treatment of visceral pain is simple, convenient, and inexpensive, and it is being accepted by an increasing number of patients. There have not been many studies investigating the analgesic mechanisms of moxibustion. Studies exploring the analgesic mechanisms have mainly focused on visceral hypersensitivity, brain-gut axis neuroendocrine system, and immune system. This paper reviews the latest developments in moxibustion use for treatment of visceral pain in IBS from these perspectives. It also evaluates potential problems in relevant studies on the mechanisms of moxibustion therapy to promote the application of moxibustion in the treatment of IBS. PMID:25093032

  2. A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study to Compare Preemptive Analgesic Efficacy of Novel Antiepileptic Agent Lamotrigine in Patients Undergoing Major Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Priyank; Bhosale, Uma A; Gupta, Ankush; Yegnanarayan, Radha; Sardesai, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Background: If postoperative acute pain remains unrelieved, it may result in significant morbidity and mortality. Preemptive analgesic initiated before surgery offers premature analgesia even before exposure to an initial noxious stimulus bestowing effective postoperative analgesia. In developed countries, it is regularly practiced as a part of well-defined protocol. In our country however, only a few centers practice it and that too irregularly and with undefined protocol. Few studies support preemptive analgesic efficacy of novel antiepileptic agent gabapentin. Though lamotrigine is a proven analgesic in animal models of chronic pain and clinical studies of gabapentin-resistant neuropathic pain, a literature search revealed scarce data on its preemptive analgesic efficacy. Aims: The present study is designed to study the preemptive analgesic efficacy of lamotrigine in comparison with diclofenac sodium in postoperative pain control. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial included 90 patients of both sexes, between 18 years and 70 years undergoing major surgeries. Patients were randomly allocated into placebo, control, and test groups and received the respective treatment 30 min before the induction of anesthesia. Aldrete score and pain score were recorded using visual analog scale (VAS), facial rating scale (FRS), and behavioral rating scale (BRS) at awakening and at 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, and 24 h. Postoperative rescue analgesic consumption for 24 h was recorded. Results: Significantly higher pain scores were observed in the placebo group postoperatively for 2 h on all pain scales (P < 0.05), whereas in the control group it was significantly higher at 1 h (P < 0.05). The test group patients were more comfortable throughout the study and postoperative analgesic requirement was significantly less (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The study recommends the use of single oral dose lamotrigine as preemptive analgesic for effective postoperative pain control. PMID

  3. The effect of dexmedetomidine added to preemptive (2% lignocaine with adrenaline) infiltration on intraoperative hemodynamics and postoperative pain after ambulatory maxillofacial surgeries under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Debabrata; Das, Anjan; Chhaule, Subinay; Halder, Partha Sarathi; Paul, Joydip; RoyBasunia, Sandip; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Mandal, Subrata Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lignocaine + adrenaline; a local anesthetic agent; frequently used for perilesional infiltration, maintains the stable hemodynamics and decreases the postoperative pain after maxillofacial surgery. α2 agonists have peripheral analgesic effects. This prospective study was to evaluate the effectiveness of perilesional dexmedetomidine administered preincisionally in addition to conventional lignocaine adrenaline combinations for reconstructive maxillofacial surgery in an ambulatory care setting. Materials and Methods: 76, American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients scheduled for unilateral traumatic maxillofacial surgeries were randomly allocated into group DL (n = 38) receiving 15 cc of 2% lignocaine + adrenaline (1:200,000) mixed with 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine and group PL receiving 15 cc of 2% lignocaine + adrenaline with normal saline (placebo) via local wound infiltration 5 min prior to skin incision. Perioperative hemodynamics, time to first analgesic use, total analgesic need, bleeding, and side effects were recorded for each patient. Results: Dosage of supplemental propofol; total perioperative, postoperative, and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) fentanyl consumption was significantly lower (P = 0.0001, P= 0.0001, P= 0.0001, P= 0.004, respectively) in dexmedetomine treated group than placebo. Rescue analgesic requirement was significantly earlier in group PL than group DL. Group DL patients suffered from significantly less (P = 0.02) bleeding and surgeon's satisfaction score was also high in this group. Discharge from PACU was significantly earlier in group DL. Intraoperative hemodynamic parameters were significantly lower in group DL (P < 0.05) without any appreciable side effects. Conclusion: Thus, prior dexmedetomidine local infiltration at the site of maxillofacial trauma has significantly reduced bleeding from wound site; perioperative fentanyl, propofol consumption, and subsequently ensured earlier discharge from PACU, better surgeon

  4. The Effect of Diclofenac Mouthwash on Periodontal Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Jaber; Abed, Ahmad Moghareh; Mostafavi, Seyed Abolfazl; Roshanzamir, Najmeh

    2011-01-01

    Background: The need to relieve pain and inflammation after periodontal surgery and the side effects of systemic drugs and advantages of topical drugs, made us to evaluate the effect of Diclofenac mouthwash on periodontal postoperative pain. Methods: In this double-blind, randomized clinical trial study 20 quadrants of 10 patients(n = 20) aged between 22-54 who also acted as their own controls, were treated using Modified Widman Flap procedure in two quadrants of the same jaw with one month interval between the operations. After the operation in addition to ibuprofen 400 mg, one quadrant randomly received Diclofenac mouthwash (0/01%) for 30 seconds, 4 times a day (for a week) and for the contrary quadrant, ibuprofen and placebo mouthwash was given to be used in the same manner. The patients scored the number of ibuprofen consumption and their pain intensity based on VAS index in a questionnaire in days 1, 2, 3 and the first week after operation. The findings were analysed using two-way ANOVA, t-test and Wilcoxon. P-value less than 0.05 considered to be significant. Results: There was a significant difference between the mean values of pain intensity of two quadrants in four periods (P = 0.031). But, there was no significant difference between the average ibuprofen consumption in two groups (P = 0.51). Postoperative satisfaction was not significantly different in two quadrants (P = 0.059). 60% of patients preferred Diclofenac mouthwash. Conclusion: Diclofenac mouthwash was effective in reducing postoperative periodontal pain but it seems that it isn’t enough to control postoperative pain on its own. PMID:22013478

  5. Postoperative exposure of bioresorbable GTR membranes: effect on healing results.

    PubMed

    Christgau, M; Bader, N; Schmalz, G; Hiller, K A; Wenzel, A

    1997-09-01

    The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of postoperative exposure of two different bioresorbable membranes on the guided tissue regeneration (GTR) healing results compared to nonexposed sites. In each of 25 patients one pair of contralateral intrabony lesions was treated either with polylactic acid (PLA) or polyglactin 910 (PG-910) membranes. Postoperative exposure occurred in 9 PLA and 13 PG-910 sites. Standardized clinical [papillary bleeding index (PBI), gingival recession (REC), probing pocket depth (PPD), probing attachment level (PAL)] and radiographic examinations (digital subtraction radiography) were performed immediately before (baseline) and 6 and 12 months postoperatively (p.o.). Subgingival bacterial samples from surgical sites were evaluated by culture at baseline, 6 weeks, and 6 and 12 months p.o. Six months after surgery the changes (delta) of REC were significantly (P < or = 0.05) greater in exposed than in nonexposed sites, independently of the membrane material (median): exposed sites, delta REC = -1 mm; nonexposed sites, delta REC = 0.0 mm. However, 12 months p.o. no significant differences were found due to a decrease in the initial recessions in exposed sites. Although a higher percentage of exposed than nonexposed sites harbored periodontal pathogens 6 weeks p.o. at the gingiva-faced membrane surface, membrane exposure did not have a significant negative effect on delta PPD, delta PAL, or radiographic bone density changes 6 and 12 months p.o. Both membranes showed significant gains in PAL and bone density in both exposed and nonexposed sites. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that with consistent infection control the postoperative exposure of PLA and PG-910 membranes has no significant negative effect on the regeneration outcome, although higher initial gingival recessions must be expected than in the nonexposed sites. However, in exposed sites plaque and infection control were clearly impeded by the rough, exposed

  6. NGF-trkA signaling modulates the analgesic effects of prostatic acid phosphatase in resiniferatoxin-induced neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Ho, Wan-Yi; Lee, Yi-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain in small-fiber neuropathy results from injury to and sensitization of nociceptors. Functional prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) acts as an analgesic effector. However, the mechanism responsible for the modulation of PAP neuropathology, which leads to loss of the analgesic effect after small-fiber neuropathy, remains unclear. Results We used a resiniferatoxin (RTX)-induced small-fiber neuropathy model to examine whether functional PAP(+) neurons are essential to maintain the analgesic effect. PAP(+) neurons were categorized into small to medium neurons (25th–75th percentile: 17.1–23.7 µm); these neurons were slightly reduced by RTX (p = 0.0003). By contrast, RTX-induced activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), an injury marker, in PAP(+) neurons (29.0% ± 5.6% vs. 0.2% ± 0.2%, p = 0.0043), indicating PAP neuropathology. Moreover, the high-affinity nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor (trkA) colocalized with PAP and showed similar profiles after RTX-induced neuropathy, and the PAP/trkA ratios correlated with the degree of mechanical allodynia (r = 0.62, p = 0.0062). The NGF inducer 4-methylcatechol (4MC) normalized the analgesic effects of PAP; specifically, it reversed the PAP and trkA profiles and relieved mechanical allodynia. Administering 2.5S NGF showed similar results to those of administering 4MC. This finding suggests that the analgesic effect of functional PAP is mediated by NGF-trkA signaling, which was confirmed by NGF neutralization. Conclusions This study revealed that functional PAP(+) neurons are essential for the analgesic effect, which is mediated by NGF-trkA signaling. PMID:27306411

  7. A comparison of the analgesic effects of butorphanol with those of meloxicam after elective ovariohysterectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Caulkett, Nigel; Read, Matt; Fowler, David; Waldner, Cheryl

    2003-07-01

    This study was designed to compare the analgesic effects of butorphanol with those of meloxicam following ovariohysterectomy. Fifteen dogs were premedicated with 0.05 mg/kg body weight (BW) of acepromazine by intramuscular (IM) injection, plus 0.2 mg/kg BW of meloxicam by subcutaneous (SC) injection. Fifteen dogs were premedicated with 0.05 mg/kg BW of Acepromazine, IM, plus 0.2 mg/kg BW of butorphanol, IM. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental, and dogs were maintained on halothane. All pain measurements were performed by 1 experienced individual, blinded to treatment. Pain scores and visual analogue scales (VAS) were performed at 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hours postpremedication. An analgesiometer was used to determine the pressure required to produce an active avoidance response to pressure applied at the incision line. Pain scores, VAS, and analgesiometer scores were analyzed by using a generalized estimating equations method. A significance level of P < 0.05 was considered significant. Animals that received meloxicam demonstrated significantly lower pain scores and VAS than did animals that received butorphanol in the first 12 hours after surgery. Results of this study suggest that meloxicam will produce better postoperative analgesia than will butorphanol. Mucosal bleeding times were performed on cooperative animals in the study group (11 butorphanol, 13 meloxicam). Bleeding times were performed prior to premedication, 6 hours following premedication, and 24 hours after premedication. The 6- and 24-hour readings were compared with baseline bleeding times by using a paired t-test with a Bonferroni correction (a significance level of P < 0.025). Bleeding times did not change significantly over time. PMID:12892286

  8. Analgesic effect of minocycline in rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Kannampalli, Pradeep; Pochiraju, Soumya; Bruckert, Mitchell; Shaker, Reza; Banerjee, Banani; Sengupta, Jyoti N

    2014-03-15

    The present study investigates the analgesic effect of minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic, in a rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain. Inflammation was induced in male rats by intracolonic administration of tri-nitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS). Visceral hyperalgesia was assessed by comparing the viscero-motor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distension (CRD) prior and post 7 days after TNBS treatment. Electrophysiology recordings from CRD-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents (PNA) and lumbo-sacral (LS) spinal neurons were performed in naïve and inflamed rats. Colonic inflammation produced visceral hyperalgesia characterized by increase in the VMRs to CRD accompanied with simultaneous activation of microglia in the spinal cord and satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Selectively inhibiting the glial activation following inflammation by araC (Arabinofuranosyl Cytidine) prevented the development of visceral hyperalgesia. Intrathecal minocycline significantly attenuated the VMR to CRD in inflamed rats, whereas systemic minocycline produced a delayed effect. In electrophysiology experiments, minocycline significantly attenuated the mechanotransduction of CRD-sensitive PNAs and the responses of CRD-sensitive LS spinal neurons in TNBS-treated rats. While the spinal effect of minocycline was observed within 5min of administration, systemic injection of the drug produced a delayed effect (60min) in inflamed rats. Interestingly, minocycline did not exhibit analgesic effect in naïve, non-inflamed rats. The results demonstrate that intrathecal injection of minocycline can effectively attenuate inflammation-induced visceral hyperalgesia. Minocycline might as well act on neuronal targets in the spinal cord of inflamed rats, in addition to the widely reported glial inhibitory action to produce analgesia. PMID:24485889

  9. Analgesic effect of Minocycline in rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Kannampalli, Pradeep; Pochiraju, Soumya; Bruckert, Mitchell; Shaker, Reza; Banerjee, Banani; Sengupta, Jyoti N.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the analgesic effect of minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic, in a rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain. Inflammation was induced in male rats by intracolonic administration of tri-nitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS). Visceral hyperalgesia was assessed by comparing the viscero-motor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distension (CRD) prior and post 7 days after TNBS treatment. Electrophysiology recordings from CRD-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents (PNA) and lumbo-sacral (LS) spinal neurons were performed in naïve and inflamed rats. Colonic inflammation produced visceral hyperalgesia characterized by increase in the VMRs to CRD accompanied with simultaneous activation of microglia in the spinal cord and satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Selectively inhibiting the glial activation following inflammation by araC (Arabinofuranosyl Cytidine) prevented the development of visceral hyperalgesia. Intrathecal minocycline significantly attenuated the VMR to CRD in inflamed rats, whereas systemic minocycline produced a delayed effect. In electrophysiology experiments, minocycline significantly attenuated the mechanotransduction of CRD-sensitive PNAs and the responses of CRD-sensitive LS spinal neurons in TNBS-treated rats. While the spinal effect of minocycline was observed within 5 min of administration, systemic injection of the drug produced a delayed effect (60 min) in inflamed rats. Interestingly, minocycline did not exhibit analgesic effect in naïve, non-inflamed rats. The results demonstrate that intrathecal injection of minocycline can effectively attenuate inflammation-induced visceral hyperalgesia. Minocycline might as well act on neuronal targets in the spinal cord of inflamed rats, in addition to the widely reported glial inhibitory action to produce analgesia. PMID:24485889

  10. The effect of peritoneal gas drain on postoperative pain in benign gynecologic laparoscopic surgery: a double-blinded randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tharanon, Chantip; Khampitak, Kovit

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare the effect of peritoneal gas drain on postoperative pain in benign gynecologic laparoscopic surgery and the amount of postoperative analgesic dosage. Methods The trial included 45 females who had undergone operations during the period December 2014 to October 2015. The patients were block randomized based on operating time (<2 and ≥2 hours). The intervention group (n=23) was treated with postoperative intraperitoneal gas drain and the control group (n=22) was not. The mean difference in scores for shoulder, epigastric, suprapubic, and overall pain at 6, 24, 48 hours postoperatively were statistically evaluated using mixed-effect restricted maximum likelihood regression. The differences in the analgesic drug usage between the groups were also analyzed using a Student’s t-test. The data were divided and analyzed to two subgroups based on operating time (<2 hours, n=20; and $2 hours, n=25). Results The intervention had significantly lower overall pain than the control group, with a mean difference and 95% confidence interval at 6, 24, and 48 hours of 2.59 (1.49–3.69), 2.23 (1.13–3.34), and 1.48 (0.3–2.58), respectively. Correspondingly, analgesic drug dosage was significantly lower in the intervention group (3.52±1.47 mg vs 5.72±2.43 mg, P<0.001). The three largest mean differences in patients with operating times of ≥2 hours were in overall pain, suprapubic pain at 6 hours, and shoulder pain at 24 hours at 3.27 (1.14–5.39), 3.20 (1.11–5.26), and 3.13 (1.00–5.24), respectively. These were greater than the three largest mean differences in the group with operating times of <2 hours, which were 2.81 (1.31–4.29), 2.63 (0.51–4.73), and 2.02 (0.68–3.36). The greatest analgesic drug requirement was in the control group with a longer operative time. Conclusion The use of intraperitoneal gas drain was shown to reduce overall postoperative pain in benign gynecologic laparoscopic surgery. The effects were higher in patients who

  11. Analgesic effects of Chinese Tuina massage in a rat model of pain

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, SHICHAO; ZHANG, HAO; FANG, MIN; ZHANG, YUQUI; LU, NING; ZHU, QINGGUANG; CHENG, YANBIN; AI, JIAN; ZHOU, NAN; LI, JIANHUA; FANG, LEI; YAO, FEI

    2016-01-01

    Previous clinical trials have suggested that the Chinese Tuina massage may exert transient analgesic effects. However, further investigation regarding the underlying mechanism has been hindered by the lack of a suitable animal model of pain. The present study established a rat model of hind leg pain by injecting 5.8% hypertonic saline solution (HSS) into the left gastrocnemius muscle. The effects of various Tuina massages on the pain thresholds of the rats were then measured. In addition, the effects of ipsilateral and contralateral Tuina massages on C-fiber-evoked field potentials following electrical stimulation of the left sciatic nerve were determined. Alterations in the gastrocnemius muscle tissues following various Tuina applications were investigated using hematoxylin and eosin, and desmin staining, as well as malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase assays. Heavy hand pressure transiently reduced the pain sensitivity of both posterior limbs, despite HSS only being injected into the left hind leg. Tuina massage treatments that lasted for 15 min were associated with the best results and an absence of local tissue changes. The results of electrical sciatic nerve stimulation demonstrated that ipsilateral and contralateral Tuina massage may decrease the level of peripheral nociceptive C-fiber activity. In the present study, the Chinese Tuina massage exerted analgesic effects in a rat model of pain, which did not involve tissue damage, following a 15 min massage. Therefore, the rat model of pain used in the present study may provide a novel approach for investigating the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of Tuina massage. PMID:27073451

  12. Alprazolam role in the analgesic effect of ibuprofen on postendodontic pain

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Mahmoud; Hamidi, Mahmoud Reza; Moghimi Firoozabad, Mohammad Reza; Kazemi, Sohrab; Ashrafpour, Manouchehr; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Postendodontic pain (PEP) has always been a major problem for patients and dentists and NSAIDs are being used to relieve PEP and it is supposed that some benzodiazepines may potentiate facilitate the analgesic effects of the NSAIDs. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of alprazolam on the analgesic effect of ibuprofen in PEP treatment. Methods: This randomized double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 45 patients aged 20-45 years who were subjected of root canal treatment. A written informed consent was obtained from each patient. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups; placebo, ibuprofen (400 mg) and alprazolam (0.5) mg + ibuprofen (400 mg). The intensity of pain was recorded using visual analog scale (VAS) at 4, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours after drug administration. Results: Of the participants, twenty six (57.8%) were males and 19 patients (42.2%) were females. Four hours after starting treatment, the VAS scores in the placebo and ibuprofen -treated groups were significantly higher than ibuprofen and alprazolam+ibuprofen groups (4.93±1.16, 3.67±1.88 and 2.67±1.11, respectively, p<0.0001). The VAS scores in alprazolam + ibuprofen group (2.33±1.05) were significantly lower at 6 hours after treatment when compared to the other groups (Ibuprofen: 3.00±1.36 and placebo: 3.08±1.74, P=0.002). This decrease in VAS score sustained to 12 hours after the start of alprazolam + ibuprofen treatment when compared to ibuprofen or placebo receiving group alone (p<0.003). The average pain score in female patients who received alprazolam + ibuprofen was significantly lower than males at 12 hours (1.3±0.6 v.s 2.14±0.9, P=0.002) and 24 hours after treatment (0.88±0.6 v.s 1.86±0.9, P=0.003). Conclusion: According to the results, it can conclude that alprazolam may enhance the analgesic efficacy of ibuprofen in postendodontic pain. PMID:25489429

  13. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Enhanced Analgesic Effect of Oxycodone Compared to Morphine in Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Rivals, Isabelle; Marchand, Fabien; Dubacq, Sophie; McMahon, Stephen B.; Pezet, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute) anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone. PMID:24618941

  14. Molecular mechanisms underlying the enhanced analgesic effect of oxycodone compared to morphine in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Rivals, Isabelle; Marchand, Fabien; Dubacq, Sophie; McMahon, Stephen B; Pezet, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute) anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone. PMID:24618941

  15. The effect of perioperative esmolol infusion on the postoperative nausea, vomiting and pain after laparoscopic appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Background Perioperative opioid administration results in postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and acute opioid tolerance that manifests in increased postoperative pain. Esmolol is an ultra short acting cardioselective β1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, and it has been successfully used for perioperative sympatholysis and it reduces the opioid requirement during total intravenous anesthesia. We tested the hypothesis that perioperative esmolol administration results in decreased PONV and postoperative pain. Methods Sixty patients undergoing laparoscopic appendectomy were randomly assigned to two groups (Group E and Group C). The Group E patients were administered 5-10 µg/kg/min esmolol with remifentanil that was titrated to the autonomic response. The Group C patients received normal saline that was of the same volume as the esmolol in Group E, and the remifentanil was also titrated to the vital sign. Before intubation and extubation, the Group E patients were administered 1.0 mg/kg esmolol, and the Group C patients were administered normal saline of the same volume. The incidence and severity of PONV, the pain score, the rescue antiemetics and the rescue analgesics were assessed 30 min, 6 h and 24 h after surgery. The mean arterial pressure and heart rate under anesthesia were also recorded. Results PONV and postoperative pain were significantly increased in Group C. These patients needed more antiemetics and analgesics in the first 24 postoperative hours. The mean arterial pressure and heart rate were significantly higher in Group C at the time of intubation and extubation. Conclusions Perioperative esmolol administration contributes to the significant decrease in PONV and postoperative pain, and so this facilitates earlier discharge. PMID:20877702

  16. Noninterventional Study of Transdermal Fentanyl (Fentavera) Matrix Patches in Chronic Pain Patients: Analgesic and Quality of Life Effects

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Fentanyl is considered to be an effective, transdermal treatment of chronic, cancer, and noncancer pain. This noninterventional, clinical practice-based study, on 426 patients attending 42 practices, assessed a proprietary, Aloe vera-containing, transdermal fentanyl matrix patch (Fentavera), for its analgesic effects, patients' quality of life (QoL) effects, tolerability, and adhesiveness. Study outcomes were mean changes from baseline of patient (11-point scales) and physician (5-point scales) ratings. After 1 and 2 months treatment, there were significant (P < 0.0001) decreases in patients' ratings of pain intensity, and impairment of walking, general activity, sleep quality, and QoL. For each parameter, the patient response rate was >30% at 2 months (response = 2-point decrease on 11-point rating scale). In a large majority of patients, the physicians rated the matrix patch as good or very good for analgesic effect, systemic and local tolerance, and adhesiveness. There were 30 adverse events in 4.2% of patients and analgesic comedications were reduced during treatment compared to before treatment. It is concluded, from this population-based data, that the proprietary, transdermal fentanyl matrix patch is effective and safe for chronic pain management in clinical practice, with significant positive analgesic and QoL effects, while being well tolerated and exhibiting good or very good adhesiveness. PMID:25861472

  17. Noninterventional study of transdermal fentanyl (fentavera) matrix patches in chronic pain patients: analgesic and quality of life effects.

    PubMed

    Heim, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Fentanyl is considered to be an effective, transdermal treatment of chronic, cancer, and noncancer pain. This noninterventional, clinical practice-based study, on 426 patients attending 42 practices, assessed a proprietary, Aloe vera-containing, transdermal fentanyl matrix patch (Fentavera), for its analgesic effects, patients' quality of life (QoL) effects, tolerability, and adhesiveness. Study outcomes were mean changes from baseline of patient (11-point scales) and physician (5-point scales) ratings. After 1 and 2 months treatment, there were significant (P < 0.0001) decreases in patients' ratings of pain intensity, and impairment of walking, general activity, sleep quality, and QoL. For each parameter, the patient response rate was >30% at 2 months (response = 2-point decrease on 11-point rating scale). In a large majority of patients, the physicians rated the matrix patch as good or very good for analgesic effect, systemic and local tolerance, and adhesiveness. There were 30 adverse events in 4.2% of patients and analgesic comedications were reduced during treatment compared to before treatment. It is concluded, from this population-based data, that the proprietary, transdermal fentanyl matrix patch is effective and safe for chronic pain management in clinical practice, with significant positive analgesic and QoL effects, while being well tolerated and exhibiting good or very good adhesiveness. PMID:25861472

  18. Analgesic effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy versus ultrasound therapy in chronic tennis elbow

    PubMed Central

    Lizis, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the analgesic effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy with those of ultrasound therapy in patients with chronic tennis elbow. [Subjects] Fifty patients with tennis elbow were randomized to receive extracorporeal shock wave therapy or ultrasound therapy. [Methods] The extracorporeal shock wave therapy group received 5 treatments once per week. Meanwhile, the ultrasound group received 10 treatments 3 times per week. Pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale during grip strength evaluation, palpation of the lateral epicondyle, Thomsen test, and chair test. Resting pain was also recorded. The scores were recorded and compared within and between groups pre-treatment, immediately post-treatment, and 3 months post-treatment. [Results] Intra- and intergroup comparisons immediately and 3 months post-treatment showed extracorporeal shock wave therapy decreased pain to a significantly greater extent than ultrasound therapy. [Conclusion] Extracorporeal shock wave therapy can significantly reduce pain in patients with chronic tennis elbow. PMID:26357440

  19. Analgesic Effect of Intra-Articular Injection of Temperature-Responsive Hydrogel Containing Bupivacaine on Osteoarthritic Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taemin; Seol, Dong Rim; Hahm, Suk-Chan; Ko, Cheolwoong; Kim, Eun-Hye; Chun, Keyoungjin; Kim, Junesun; Lim, Tae-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the analgesic effects of slow-releasing bupivacaine from hydrogel on chronic arthritic pain in rats. Osteoarthritis (OA) was induced by monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) injection into the right knee joint. Hydrogel (HG: 20, 30, and 50 μL) and temperature-sensitive hydrogel containing bupivacaine (T-gel: 20, 30, and 50 μL) were injected intra-articularly 14 days after MIA injection. Behavioral tests were conducted. The rats showed a significant decrease in weight load and paw withdrawal threshold (PWT). Intra-articular 0.5% bupivacaine (10 and 20 μL) significantly reversed MIA-induced decreased PWT, with no effect on weight load. In normal rats, hydrogel did not produce significant changes in PWT but at 30 and 50 μL slightly decreased weight bearing; T-gel did not cause any changes in both the weight load and PWT. In OA rats, T-gel at 20 μL had a significant analgesic effect for 2 days, even though T-gel at 50 μL further reduced the weight load, demonstrating that intra-articular T-gel (20 μL) has long-lasting analgesic effects in OA rats. Thus, T-gel designed to deliver analgesics into the joint cavity could be an effective therapeutic tool in the clinical setting. PMID:26881207

  20. Analgesic efficacy of intrathecal fentanyl during the period of highest analgesic demand after cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Weigl, Wojciech; Bierylo, Andrzej; Wielgus, Monika; Krzemień-Wiczyńska, Swietlana; Szymusik, Iwona; Kolacz, Marcin; Dabrowski, Michal J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cesarean section (CS) is one of the most common surgical procedures in female patients. We aimed to evaluate the postoperative analgesic efficacy of intrathecal fentanyl during the period of greatest postoperative analgesic demand after CS. This period was defined by detailed analysis of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) usage. This double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group randomized trial included 60 parturients who were scheduled for elective CS. Participants received spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine supplemented with normal saline (control group) or with fentanyl 25 μg (fentanyl group). To evaluate primary endpoints, we measured total pethidine consumption over the period of greatest PCA pethidine requirement. For verification of secondary endpoints, we recorded intravenous PCA requirement in other time windows, duration of effective analgesia, pain scores assessed by visual analog scale, opioid side effects, hemodynamic changes, neonatal Apgar scores, and intraoperative pain. Detailed analysis of hour-by-hour PCA opioid requirements showed that the greatest demand for analgesics among patients in the control group occurred during the first 12 hours after surgery. Patients in the fentanyl group had significantly reduced opioid consumption compared with the controls during this period and had a prolonged duration of effective analgesia. The groups were similar in visual analog scale, incidence of analgesia-related side effects (nausea/vomiting, pruritus, oversedation, and respiratory depression), and neonatal Apgar scores. Mild respiratory depression occurred in 1 patient in each group. Fewer patients experienced intraoperative pain in the fentanyl group (3% vs 23%; relative risk 6.8, 95% confidence interval 0.9–51.6). The requirement for postoperative analgesics is greatest during the first 12 hours after induction of anesthesia in patients undergoing CS. The addition of intrathecal fentanyl to spinal anesthesia is effective for

  1. Role of central arginine vasopressin receptors in the analgesic effect of CDP-choline on acute and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Bagdas, Deniz; Yucel-Ozboluk, Hasret; Orhan, Fulya; Kanat, Ozkan; Isbil-Buyukcoskun, Naciye; Gurun, Mine S

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays a crucial role in pain modulation. In addition, our previous studies have proven that centrally administered cytidine-5'-diphosphate-choline (CDP-choline; citicoline) elicits an analgesic effect in different pain models in rats. Given that CDP-choline enhances central and peripheral vasopressin levels, the present study was designed to investigate the role of central AVP receptors in the analgesic effect of CDP-choline in acute and chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain models. For this purpose, rats were pretreated intracerebroventricularly with the AVP V1 or AVP V2 receptor antagonist 15 min before intracerebroventricular injection of CDP-choline or saline, and pain threshold was determined using the Randall-Selitto test. AVP V1 and AVP V2 receptor antagonist blocked the CDP-choline-induced analgesic effect either in acute or neuropathic models of pain in rats. These results suggest, for the first time, that central AVP receptors are involved in the CDP-choline-elicited analgesic effect. PMID:24089014

  2. Analgesic Activity of Tramadol and Buprenorphine after Voluntary Ingestion by Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bryan F; Ramirez, Harvey E; Battles, August H; Andrutis, Karl A; Neubert, John K

    2016-01-01

    Effective pain management for rats and mice is crucial due to the continuing increase in the use of these species in biomedical research. Here we used a recently validated operant orofacial pain assay to determine dose–response curves for buprenorphine and tramadol when mixed in nut paste and administered to male and female rats. Statistically significant analgesic doses of tramadol in nut paste included doses of 20, 30, and 40 mg/kg for female rats but only 40 mg/kg for male rats. For male rats receiving buprenorphine mixed in nut paste, a significant analgesic response was observed at 0.5 and 0.6 mg/kg. None of the doses tested produced a significant analgesic response in female rats. Our results indicate that at the doses tested, tramadol and buprenorphine produced an analgesic response in male rats. In female rats, tramadol shows a higher analgesic effect than buprenorphine. The analgesic effects observed 60 min after administration of the statistically significant oral doses of both drugs were similar to the analgesic effects of 0.03 mg/kg subcutaneous buprenorphine 30 min after administration. The method of voluntary ingestion could be effective, is easy to use, and would minimize stress to the rats during the immediate postoperative period. PMID:26817983

  3. The effect of preoperative warming on patients' postoperative temperatures.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Shauna

    2006-05-01

    Many perioperative clinicians encounter difficulty in preventing hypothermia in surgical patients. One intervention to prevent perioperative hypothermia is the use of forced-air warming. Although forced-air warming is used most frequently in the intraoperative area, prewarming patients with forced-air warming systems before induction of anesthesia may be enough to prevent hypothermia throughout the surgical procedure, allowing patients to arrive in the postanesthesia care unit in a normothermic state. A review of the literature on preoperative forced-air warming is provided, and the effect of prewarming on postoperative patient temperatures is discussed. PMID:16722285

  4. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Rosa damascena Hydroalcoholic Extract and its Essential Oil in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Ghannadi, Alireza; Hajiloo, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Extracts obtained from the petals of Rosa damascena (Rosaceae) are used in Iranian folk medicine as remedies for the treatment of some inflammatory diseases. In this study the hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of the plant were investigated for its possible anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. The extract was administered at the doses (p.o.) of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg and the doses of essential oil were 100, 200 and 400 μL/kg. The acetic acid-induced writhing response, formalin-induced paw licking time in the early and late phases and light tail flick test were used in mice to assess analgesic activity. For evaluation of anti-inflammatory effect carrageenan-induced paw edema served as a valid animal model in rats. The extract significantly attenuated the writhing responses induced by an intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid and also showed potent analgesic effect in both phases of formalin test but not in light tail flick test. In addition, the higher dose of the extract significantly (P < 0.05) reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema. Essential oil of the plant at all administered doses failed to show any analgesic or anti-inflammatory effect in above mentioned tests. These results provide support for the use of hydroalcoholic extract of Rosa damascena in relieving inflammatory pain, and insight into the development of new agents for treating inflammatory diseases. PMID:24363723

  5. Long-term effect of ropivacaine nanoparticles for sciatic nerve block on postoperative pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi; Huang, Haizhen; Yang, Shaozhong; Huang, Shanshan; Guo, Jingxuan; Tang, Qi; Qi, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The analgesic effect of ropivacaine (Rop) for nerve block lasts only ~3–6 hours for single use. The aim of this study was to develop long-acting regional anesthetic Rop nanoparticles and investigate the effects of sciatic nerve block on postoperative pain in rats. Materials and methods Rop nanoparticles were developed using polyethylene glycol-co-polylactic acid (PELA). One hundred and twenty adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=30, each): Con (control group; 0.9% saline, 200 µL), PELA (PELA group; 10 mg), Rop (Rop group; 0.5%, 200 µL), and Rop-PELA (Rop-PELA group; 10%, 10 mg). Another 12 rats were used for the detection of Rop concentration in plasma. The mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were measured at 2 hours, 4 hours, 8 hours, 1 day, 2 days, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days after incision. The expression of c-FOS was determined by immunohistochemistry at 2 hours, 8 hours, 48 hours, and 7 days. Nerve and organ toxicities were also evaluated at 7 days. Results The duration of Rop absorption in the plasma of the Rop-PELA group was longer (>8 hours) than that of the Rop group (4 hours). Mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency in the Rop-PELA group were higher than that in other groups (4 hours–3 days). c-FOS expression in the Rop-PELA group was lower than that in the control group at 2 hours, 8 hours, and 48 hours and lower than that in the Rop group at 8 hours and 48 hours after paw incision. Slight foreign body reactions were observed surrounding the sciatic nerve at 7 days. No obvious pathophysiological change was found in the major organs after Rop-PELA administration at 7 days. Conclusion Rop-PELA provides an effective analgesia for nerve block over 3 days after single administration, and the analgesic mechanism might be mediated by the regulation of spinal c-FOS expression. However, its potential long-term tissue toxicity needs to be further investigated. PMID:27274236

  6. In Vivo Antiplasmodial and Analgesic Effect of Crude Ethanol Extract of Piper guineense Leaf Extract in Albino Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kabiru, A. Y.; Ibikunle, G. F.; Innalegwu, D. A.; Bola, B. M.; Madaki, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Antiplasmodial and analgesic effects of crude ethanol extract of Piper guineense was investigated in mice. The antiplasmodial and analgesic efficacy of the extract was judged on its ability to reduce parasitemia and writhing, respectively, in mice. The antiplasmodial screening involved treating infected mice with 200, 400, and 600 mg/kg body weight of extract while the positive control group was given standard artesunate drug. The analgesic test was carried out by administering 1000, 1500, and 2000 mg/kg body weight of extract to three groups of healthy mice, respectively, after induction of pain with 0.75% acetic acid. The positive control group was given aspirin drug. Parasitemia was reduced by 28.36%, 43.28%, and 62.69% in a dose-dependent pattern in the curative test which was significantly different (P < 0.05) from 96.03% of the standard drug. The reduction of writhing by mice given the extract was also dose-dependent (36.29, 45.43, and 59.07%). Aspirin drug was however more effective (86.36%). The extract was safe at 2000 mg/kg body weight. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of flavonoids, tannins, phlobatannins, terpenoids, and coumarins. Result obtained in this study demonstrated the efficacy of ethanol extract of Piper guineense as an antiplasmodial and analgesic agent. PMID:27446637

  7. Individual Difference Variables and the Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Analgesic Imagery Interventions on Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kwekkeboom, Kristine L.; Wanta, Britt; Bumpus, Molly

    2008-01-01

    Clinicians in acute care settings are often called upon to manage cancer pain unrelieved by medications. Cognitive-behavioral strategies, such as relaxation and imagery, are recommended for cancer pain management; however, there appear to be individual differences in their effects. This pilot study examined variation in pain outcomes achieved with progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and analgesic imagery interventions among hospitalized patients with cancer pain, and assessed the influence of four individual difference variables (cognitive ability, outcome expectancy, previous experience, and concurrent symptoms) on pain relief achieved with each intervention. A crossover design was used in which 40 hospitalized cancer patients received two trials of PMR, two trials of analgesic imagery, and two trials of a control condition. In comparing means between treatment and control conditions, both PMR and analgesic imagery produced greater improvements in pain intensity, pain-related distress, and perceived control over pain than the control condition. However, individual responder analysis revealed that only half of the participants achieved a clinically meaningful improvement in pain with each intervention. Patients who achieved a meaningful improvement in pain with analgesic imagery reported greater imaging ability, more positive outcome expectancy, and fewer concurrent symptoms than those who did not achieve a meaningful reduction in pain. Similar relationships were not significant for the PMR intervention. Investigators should continue efforts to identify factors that moderate the effects of cognitive-behavioral pain coping strategies so that clinicians can identify the most beneficial treatments for individual patients. PMID:18504089

  8. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Bi-yuan-ling granules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Bing; Su, Han-Wen; Liu, Huan-Xiang; Yin, Xian; He, Feng; Ren, Yong-Shen; Dai, Kang; Xiang, Mei-Xian

    2016-06-01

    Bi-yuan-ling granule (BLG) is a traditional Chinese medicine compound composed mainly of baicalin and chlorogenic acid. It has been demonstrated to be clinically effective for various inflammatory diseases such as acute rhinitis, chronic rhinitis, atrophic rhinitis and allergic rhinitis. However, the underlying mechanisms of BLG against these diseases are not fully understood. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of BLG, and examine its protective effects on mouse acute lung injury (ALI). The hot plate test and acetic acid-induced writhing assay in Kunming mice were adopted to evaluate the pain-relieving effects of BLG. The anti-inflammatory activities of BLG were determined by examining the effects of BLG on xylene-caused ear swelling in Kunming mice, the cotton pellet-induced granuloma in rats, carrageenan-induced hind paw edema and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. The results showed that BLG at 15.5 mg/g could significantly relieve the pain by 82.5% (P<0.01) at 1 h after thermal stimulation and 91.2% (P<0.01) at 2 h after thermal stimulation. BLG at doses of 7.75 and 15.5 mg/g reduced the writhing count up to 33.3% (P<0.05) and 53.4% (P<0.01), respectively. Additionally, the xylene-induced edema in mice was markedly restrained by BLG at 7.75 mg/g (P<0.05) and 15.5 mg/g (P<0.01). BLG at 5.35 and 10.7 mg/g significantly reduced paw edema by 34.8% (P<0.05) and 37.9% (P<0.05) at 5 h after carrageenan injection. The granulomatous formation of the cotton pellet was profoundly suppressed by BLG at 2.68, 5.35 and 10.7 mg/g by 15.4%, 38.2% (P<0.01) and 58.9% (P<0.001), respectively. BLG also inhibited lung W/D ratio and the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in ALI mice. In addition, the median lethal dose (LD50), median effective dose (ED50) and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of BLG were found to be 42.7, 3.2 and 12.33 mg/g, respectively. All the findings suggest that BLG has

  9. Analgesic effects of noninvasive brain stimulation in rodent animal models: A systematic review of translational findings

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Magdalena Sarah; Volz, Theresa Sophie; Brunoni, Andre Russowsky; de Oliveira, João Paulo Vaz Tostes Ribeiro; Fregni, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) interventions have demonstrated promising results in the clinical treatment of pain, according to several preliminary trials, although the results have been mixed. The limitations of clinical research on NIBS are the insufficient understanding of its mechanisms of action, a lack of adequate safety data, and several disparities with regard to stimulation parameters, which have hindered the generalizability of such studies. Thus, experimental animal research that allows the use of more invasive interventions and creates additional control of independent variables and confounders is desirable. To this end, we systematically reviewed animal studies investigating the analgesic effects of NIBS. In addition we also explored the investigation of NIBS in animal models of stroke as to compare these findings with NIBS animal pain research. Methods Of 1916 articles that were found initially, we identified 15 studies (stroke and pain studies) per our eligibility criteria that used NIBS methods, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), paired associative stimulation (PAS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and transcranial electrostimulation (TES). We extracted the main outcomes on stroke and pain, as well as the methods and electrical parameters of each technique. Results NIBS techniques are effective in alleviating pain. Similar beneficial clinical effects are observed in stroke. The main insights from these animal studies are: (i) combination of NIBS with analgesic drugs has a synergistic effect; (ii) effects are dependent on the parameters of stimulation, and in fact, not necessarily the strongest stimulation parameter (i.e., the largest intensity of stimulation) is associated with the largest benefit; (iii) pain studies show an overall good quality as indexed by ARRIVE guidelines of the reporting of animal experiments, but insufficient with regard to the reporting of safety data for brain stimulation; (iv

  10. Probable role of spinal purinoceptors in the analgesic effect of Trigonella foenum (TFG) leaves extract.

    PubMed

    Parvizpur, Aliresa; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan; Kamalinejad, Mohammad

    2006-03-01

    In our previous work, we demonstrated that Trigonella foenum (TFG) leaves extract can exert analgesic effects in both formalin (F.T.) and tail flick (T.F.) tests. Spinal serotonergic system, but not endogenous opioid system, was involved in TFG induced analgesia (in the second phase of formalin test). Some reports concern the similarity between NSAIDs and TFG extract in many pharmacological effects or the interaction between NSAIDs and purinergic system; so the present study was designed to investigate the relationship between TFG extract and purinergic system or the inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase (COX). We examined the effect of TFG extract on: (1) the response of rabbit platelets to ADP induced aggregation, (2) the contraction of mouse vas deferens induced by alpha,beta-Me-ATP (a P(2) receptor agonist; this receptor mediates the rapid phase of ADP- and ATP-evoked influx of Ca(2+) through a non-specific cation channel in platelets), (3) alpha,beta-Me-ATP induced hyperalgesia in tail flick test in male rats and (4) the specific inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2. Our results showed that TFG extract (0.5, 1, 1.5, 3 mg/ml) inhibited ADP (10(-5) mol) induced platelet aggregation (IC(50)=1.28 mg/ml). alpha,beta-Me-ATP (30 microM) induced isometric contraction in vas deferens while suramin (a P(2) receptor antagonist, 50, 150, 300 microM) or TFG extract (0.5, 1, 2, 3 mg/ml) inhibited this effect significantly (IC(50) were 91.07 microM and 1.57 mg/ml, respectively). Moreover, alpha,beta-Me-ATP (3 microg/rat, i.t.) induced hyperalgesia in tail flick test, but it was prevented by co-injection of alpha,beta-Me-ATP with suramin (120 microg/rat, i.t.) or TFG extract (1mg/rat, i.t.). Effective concentrations of TFG extract in the above mentioned experiments did not inhibit COX enzymes in EIA tests. In conclusion, these results indicate that the blocking of spinal purinoceptors may contribute in the analgesic effect of TFG leaves extract. PMID:16298092

  11. [Metamizol--a new effective analgesic with a long history. Overview of its pharmacology and clinical use].

    PubMed

    Fendrich, Z

    2000-07-19

    Metamizol is an effective, non-opioid analgesics which was originally introduced to the therapy in the year 1922. However, with the reference to the side effects of other related pyrazolone derivatives its administration, similarly as the usage of other pyrazolones, was significantly limited. Later, metamizol has been used, usually mixed, with spasmolytic agents and quite recently it has been introduced as a mono-component medicament. Metamizol proved to be a very effective analgesic. When administered in equipotent doses, it had its effects comparable to various opioid analgesics, such as tramadol, pentazocine and pethidine. Beside the strong analgesic effect, it produces also significant antipyretic and splasmolytic effects without the adverse, unpleasant anticholinergic impact. Its spasmolytic effect on the smooth muscle of the sphincter Oddi, urinary tract, and the gal bladder is comparable to the effects of buthylscopolamine. Unlike aspirin and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs it has, however, no antiinflammatory activity when administered in clinical doses. Similarly, metamizol has no effect on the CNS, cardiovascular system, renal and metabolic functions. On the other hand, metamizol, like aspirin, has got a significant effect on the aggregation of platelets. Metamizol is basically a prodrug. The parent substance is not effective before its conversion into two active metabolites (4-methylaninoantipyrine and 4-aminoantipyrine) in the body. Metamizol is well absorbed from the small intestine but only two above mentioned active metabolites and no parent drug can be detected in the blood. The active metabolites are consequently metabolised to ineffective metabolites including the relevant acetylderivatives, in which the acetylation phenotypes can be distinguished. In the therapy, metamizol can be used, as an analgesic, at post-surgical pain, patient's controlled analgesia (PCA), at the cancer's pain and in the pains of different origin (post

  12. Evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of ethanol extract of Ficus iteophylla leaves in rodents.

    PubMed

    Abdulmalik, I A; Sule, M I; Musa, A M; Yaro, A H; Abdullahi, M I; Abdulkadir, M F; Yusuf, H

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the leaf part of the plant for analgesic and anti-inflammatory. The ethanol extract of Ficus iteophylla leaves (100, 200, and 400 mg kg(-1), i.p) was evaluated for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. The analgesic effect was studied using acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction and hot plate test in mice, while the anti-inflammatory effect was investigated using carrageenan induced paw oedema in rats. The ethanol extract at 100 mg kg(-1), 200 mg kg(-1), and 400 mg kg(-1) significantly (P< 0.05) inhibited acetic acid induced writhes by 1.50 ± 0.43, 3.0 ± 0.82 and 1.0 ± 0.82 respectively. It also exhibited significantly (P< 0.05) anti-inflammatory by 0.11 ± 0.02, 0.11 ± 0.03, 0.08 ± 0.01 respectively. The preliminary phytochemical screening of the plant extract revealed the presence of flavonoids, steroids, tannins and saponins while the effect of flavonoids, steroids and tannins on analgesic and inflammatory has been reported. The intraperitoneal median lethal dose (LD(50)) value of the extract was found to be 3807.8 mgkg(-1) body weights. The result obtained from this study shows that the extract of Ficus iteophylla contained phytochemical constituents with analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities, therefore the leaf part of the plant could be used in the management of pain and inflammatory conditions. PMID:22654227

  13. Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic effects of Securidaca longepedunculata (Fresen.) [Polygalaceae] root-bark aqueous extract.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, J A O

    2008-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic properties of Securidaca longepedunculata (Fresen.) root-bark aqueous extract (SLE) in mice and rats. The analgesic effect of SLE was evaluated by 'hot-plate' and 'acetic acid' analgesic test methods in mice; while its anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic effects were examined in rats, using fresh egg albumin-induced pedal oedema, and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus models. Morphine (MPN, 10 mg/kg), diclofenac (DIC, 100 mg/kg) and chlorpropamide (250 mg/kg) were used as reference drugs for comparison. SLE (50-800 mg/kg i. p.) produced dose-dependent, significant (p < 0.05-0.001) analgesic effects against thermally- and chemically-induced nociceptive pain in mice. The plant's extract (SLE, 50-800 mg/kg p. o.) also dose-dependently and significantly inhibited (p < 0.05-0.001) fresh egg albumin-induced acute inflammation, and caused significant hypoglycaemia (p < 0.05-0.001) in normal (normoglycaemic) and STZ-treated diabetic (hyperglycaemic) rats. The results of this experimental animal study indicate that S. longepedunculata root-bark aqueous extract (SLE) possesses analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycaemic properties. These findings lend pharmacological credence to the anecdotal, folkloric and ethnomedical uses of S. longepedunculata root-bark in the treatment, management and/or control of painful, arthritic, inflammatory conditions, as well as in the management and/or control of type 2 diabetes mellitus in some rural communities of South Africa. PMID:18046514

  14. Analgesic Effect of Intrathecal Ginsenosides in a Murine Bone Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woong Mo; Lee, Hyung Gon; Choi, Jeong Il; Kim, Yeo Ok; Song, Ji A

    2010-01-01

    Background Bone cancer pain has a disruptive effect on the cancer patient's quality of life. Although ginsenosides have been used as traditional medicine in Eastern Medicine, the effect on bone cancer pain has not been thoroughly studied. The aim of this study was to determine whether ginsenosides may alter the bone cancer pain at the spinal level. Methods NCTC 2472 tumor cells (2.5 × 105) were injected into the femur of adult male C3H/HeJ mice to evoke bone tumor and bone cancer pain. To develop bone tumor, radiologic pictures were obtained. To assess pain, the withdrawal threshold was measured by applying a von Frey filament to the tumor cells inoculation site. The effect of intrathecal ginsenosides was investigated. Effect of ginsenosides (150, 500, 1,000 µg) was examined at 15, 30, 60, 90, 120 min after intrathecal delivery. Results The intrafemoral injection of NCTC 2472 tumor cells induced a radiological bone tumor. The withdrawal threshold with tumor development was significantly decreased compared to the sham animals. Intrathecal ginsenosides effectively increased the withdrawal threshold in the bone cancer site. Conclusions NCTC 2472 tumor cells injection into the mice femur caused bone tumor and bone cancer pain. Intrathecal ginsenosides attenuated the bone cancer-related pain behavior. Therefore, spinal ginsenosides may be an alternative analgesic for treating bone cancer pain. PMID:21217885

  15. Acute analgesic effects of nicotine and tobacco in humans: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ditre, Joseph W; Heckman, Bryan W; Zale, Emily L; Kosiba, Jesse D; Maisto, Stephen A

    2016-07-01

    Although animal models have consistently demonstrated acute pain inhibitory effects of nicotine and tobacco, human experimental studies have yielded mixed results. The main goal of this meta-analysis was to quantify the effects of nicotine/tobacco administration on human experimental pain threshold and tolerance ratings. A search of PubMed and PsycINFO online databases identified 13 eligible articles, including k = 21 tests of pain tolerance (N = 393) and k = 15 tests of pain threshold (N = 339). Meta-analytic integration for both threshold and tolerance outcomes revealed that nicotine administered through tobacco smoke and other delivery systems (eg, patch, nasal spray) produced acute analgesic effects that may be characterized as small to medium in magnitude (Hedges g = 0.35, 95% confidence interval = 0.21-0.50). Publication bias-corrected estimates remained significant and indicated that these effects may be closer to small. Sex composition was observed to be a significant moderator, such that pain threshold effects were more robust among samples that included more men than women. These results help to clarify a mixed literature and may ultimately help to inform the treatment of both pain and nicotine dependence. Pain and tobacco smoking are both highly prevalent and comorbid conditions. Current smoking has been associated with more severe chronic pain and physical impairment. Acute nicotine-induced analgesia could make smoking more rewarding and harder to give up. Future research should use dynamic measures of experimental pain reactivity and further explore biopsychosocial mechanisms of action. PMID:27023418

  16. Fasciola hepatica: the flukicidal effect of some anaesthetics and analgesics in common use.

    PubMed

    Burden, D J; Hammet, N C

    1983-09-01

    The anaesthetic halothane and the sedative xylazine were shown to have anthelmintic properties in rats against the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica. Flukes in rats treated with the local anaesthetic lignocaine or the anaesthetic/analgesic ketamine were unaffected. PMID:6635348

  17. Three Newly Approved Analgesics: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Saraghi, Mana; Hersh, Elliot V.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2008, three new analgesic entities, tapentadol immediate release (Nucynta) diclofenac potassium soft gelatin capsules (Zipsor), and bupivacaine liposome injectable suspension (EXPAREL) were granted US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval to treat acute pain. Tapentadol immediate-release is a both a mu-opioid agonist and a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, and is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Diclofenac potassium soft gelatin capsules are a novel formulation of diclofenac potassium, which is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and its putative mechanism of action is through inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. This novel formulation of diclofenac allows for improved absorption at lower doses. Liposomal bupivacaine is a new formulation of bupivacaine intended for single-dose infiltration at the surgical site for postoperative analgesia. Bupivacaine is slowly released from this liposomal vehicle and can provide prolonged analgesia at the surgical site. By utilizing NSAIDs and local anesthetics to decrease the transmission of afferent pain signals, less opioid analgesics are needed to achieve analgesia. Since drug-related adverse events are frequently dose related, lower doses from different drug classes may be employed to reduce the incidence of adverse effects, while producing synergistic analgesia as part of a multimodal analgesic approach to acute pain. PMID:24423420

  18. Effects of reflexotherapy on acute postoperative pain and anxiety among patients with digestive cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsay, Shiow-Luan; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chen, Su-Chiu; Lin, Hung-Ru; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2008-01-01

    Even after receiving analgesia, patients with gastric and liver cancer still report moderate levels of postoperative pain. The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of foot reflexotherapy as adjuvant therapy in relieving pain and anxiety in postoperative patients with gastric cancer and hepatocellular cancer. The study design was a randomized controlled trial. Data were collected from 4 surgical wards of a medical center in 2005 in Taipei, Taiwan. Sixty-one patients who had received surgery for gastric cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma were randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 30) or control (n = 31) group. Patients in the intervention group received the usual pain management plus 20 minutes of foot reflexotherapy during postoperative days 2, 3, and 4. Patients in the control group received usual pain management. Outcome measures included the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, visual analog scale for pain, summary of the pain medications consumed, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results demonstrated that studied patients reported moderately high levels of pain and anxiety postoperatively while patients were managed with patient-controlled analgesia. Using generalized estimation equations and controlling for confounding variables, less pain (P < .05) and anxiety (P < .05) over time were reported by the intervention group compared with the control group. In addition, patients in the intervention group received significantly less opioid analgesics than the control group (P < .05). Findings from this study provide nurses with an additional treatment to offer postoperative digestive cancer patients. PMID:18490886

  19. Comparative study of ibuprofen lysine and acetaminophen in patients with postoperative dental pain.

    PubMed

    Mehlisch, D R; Jasper, R D; Brown, P; Korn, S H; McCarroll, K; Murakami, A A

    1995-01-01

    This single-dose, double-blind, parallel-group, single-site study compared ibuprofen lysine 400 mg with acetaminophen 1000 mg and placebo in 240 patients with moderate-to-severe postoperative dental pain. The relative onset of analgesic response, overall analgesic efficacy, duration of effect, and safety were assessed over a 6-hour postdose period. Analgesic efficacy was assessed by patient self-rating of pain intensity, pain relief, time to meaningful pain relief, need for additional analgesic medication, and patient global evaluation. Both ibuprofen lysine 400 mg and acetaminophen 1000 mg were significantly (P < or = 0.05) more effective than placebo. Ibuprofen lysine had a significantly (P < or = 0.05) faster onset of action with greater peak and overall analgesic effect than did effect than did acetaminophen. All treatments were generally well tolerated. PMID:8595637

  20. Putative Kappa Opioid Heteromers As Targets for Developing Analgesics Free of Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is now generally recognized that upon activation by an agonist, β-arrestin associates with G protein-coupled receptors and acts as a scaffold in creating a diverse signaling network that could lead to adverse effects. As an approach to reducing side effects associated with κ opioid agonists, a series of β-naltrexamides 3–10 was synthesized in an effort to selectively target putative κ opioid heteromers without recruiting β-arrestin upon activation. The most potent derivative 3 (INTA) strongly activated KOR-DOR and KOR-MOR heteromers in HEK293 cells. In vivo studies revealed 3 to produce potent antinociception, which, when taken together with antagonism data, was consistent with the activation of both heteromers. 3 was devoid of tolerance, dependence, and showed no aversive effect in the conditioned place preference assay. As immunofluorescence studies indicated no recruitment of β-arrestin2 to membranes in coexpressed KOR-DOR cells, this study suggests that targeting of specific putative heteromers has the potential to identify leads for analgesics devoid of adverse effects. PMID:24978316

  1. The effects of early postoperative radiation on vascularized bone grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.B.; Brown, S.; Hurst, L.N. )

    1991-06-01

    The effects of early postoperative radiation were assessed in free nonvascularized and free vascularized rib grafts in the canine model. The mandibles of one-half of the dogs were exposed to a cobalt 60 radiation dose of 4080 cGy over a 4-week period, starting 2 weeks postoperatively. The patency of vascularized grafts was confirmed with bone scintigraphy. Histological studies, including ultraviolet microscopy with trifluorochrome labeling, and histomorphometric analyses were performed. Osteocytes persist within the cortex of the vascularized nonradiated grafts to a much greater extent than in nonvascularized, nonradiated grafts. Cortical osteocytes do not persist in either vascularized or nonvascularized grafts subjected to radiation. New bone formation is significantly retarded in radiated grafts compared with nonradiated grafts. Periosteum and endosteum remained viable in the radiated vascularized grafts, producing both bone union and increased bone turnover, neither of which were evident to any significant extent in nonvascularized grafts. Bone union was achieved in vascularized and non-vascularized nonradiated bone. In the radiated group of dogs, union was only seen in the vascularized bone grafts.

  2. UP1306, a Botanical Composition with Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effect

    PubMed Central

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Nam, Jeong-Bum; Brownell, Lidia; Hyun, Eujin; Jia, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain, one of the cardinal signs of inflammation, is the most common clinical manifestations of arthritis. Conventional pain relief therapy heavily relies on the use of prescription and over the counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as the first line of defense where their long-term usage causes deleterious gastrointestinal and cardiovascular-related side-effects. Hence, there is an equivocal need for evidence-based safer and efficacious alternatives from natural sources to overcome the most prominent and disabling symptoms of arthritis. Materials and Methods: Carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and abdominal constriction (writhing's) assays in mouse were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of UP1306, a composition that contains a standardized blend of extracts from the heartwood of Acacia catechu and the root bark of Morus alba administered orally at dose ranges of 100–300 mg/kg. Cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibition assays were carried out to determine the IC50 of Acacia and Morus extracts. The merit of combining these two extracts was also assessed. Results: Statistically significant improvement in pain resistance and suppression of edema were observed in animals treated with UP1306, when compared to vehicle-treated diseased rats and mice. Results from the high dose of UP1306 (300 mg/kg) were similar to those achieved by ibuprofen treatment at a dose of 200 mg/kg in early hours of treatment. In vitro, UP1306 showed dose-dependent inhibition of the enzymatic activities of COX and LO with IC50 values of 20.9 μg/mL, 49.2 μg/mL, and 11.1 μg/mL in COX-1, COX-2, and 5’-LO, respectively. Conclusions: These data suggest that UP1306, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory agent of botanical origin with dual COX-LO inhibition activity, could potentially be used to alleviate symptom associated to osteoarthritis. SUMMARY Pain is the most common clinical manifestations of arthritisCarrageenan-induced rat paw edema

  3. Antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of lavender essential oil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriela L da; Luft, Carolina; Lunardelli, Adroaldo; Amaral, Robson H; Melo, Denizar A da Silva; Donadio, Márcio V F; Nunes, Fernanda B; de Azambuja, Marcos S; Santana, João C; Moraes, Cristina M B; Mello, Ricardo O; Cassel, Eduardo; Pereira, Marcos Aurélio de Almeida; de Oliveira, Jarbas R

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have investigated the antinociceptive, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of compounds found in the lavender essential oil (LEO), however to date, there is still lack of substantial data. The objective of this study was to assess the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of lavender essential oil. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical decolorization assay was used for antioxidant activity evaluation. The anti-inflammatory activity was tested using two models of acute inflammation: carrageenan-induced pleurisy and croton oil-induced ear edema. The antinociceptive activity was tested using the pain model induced by formalin. LEO has antioxidant activity, which is dose-dependent response. The inflammatory response evoked by carrageenan and by croton oil was reduced through the pre-treatment of animals with LEO. In the pleurisy model, the drug used as positive control, dexamethasone, was more efficacious. However, in the ear swelling, the antiedematogenic effect of the oil was similar to that observed for dexamethasone. In the formalin test, LEO consistently inhibited spontaneous nociception and presented a similar effect to that of tramadol. The results of this study reveal (in vivo) the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of LEO and demonstrates its important therapeutic potential. PMID:26247152

  4. Pharmacology of kratom: an emerging botanical agent with stimulant, analgesic and opioid-like effects.

    PubMed

    Prozialeck, Walter C; Jivan, Jateen K; Andurkar, Shridhar V

    2012-12-01

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a plant indigenous to Thailand and Southeast Asia. Kratom leaves produce complex stimulant and opioid-like analgesic effects. In Asia, kratom has been used to stave off fatigue and to manage pain, diarrhea, cough, and opioid withdrawal. Recently, kratom has become widely available in the United States and Europe by means of smoke shops and the Internet. Analyses of the medical literature and select Internet sites indicate that individuals in the United States are increasingly using kratom for the self-management of pain and opioid withdrawal. Kratom contains pharmacologically active constituents, most notably mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine. Kratom is illegal in many countries. Although it is still legal in the United States, the US Drug Enforcement Administration has placed kratom on its "Drugs and Chemicals of Concern" list. Physicians should be aware of the availability, user habits, and health effects of kratom. Further research on the therapeutic uses, toxic effects, and abuse potential of kratom and its constituent compounds are needed. PMID:23212430

  5. Electroencephalography and analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Malver, Lasse Paludan; Brokjær, Anne; Staahl, Camilla; Graversen, Carina; Andresen, Trine; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2014-01-01

    To assess centrally mediated analgesic mechanisms in clinical trials with pain patients, objective standardized methods such as electroencephalography (EEG) has many advantages. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with an overview of present findings in analgesics assessed with spontaneous EEG and evoked brain potentials (EPs) in humans. Furthermore, EEG methodologies will be discussed with respect to translation from animals to humans and future perspectives in predicting analgesic efficacy. We searched PubMed with MeSH terms ‘analgesics’, ‘electroencephalography’ and ‘evoked potentials’ for relevant articles. Combined with a search in their reference lists 15 articles on spontaneous EEG and 55 papers on EPs were identified. Overall, opioids produced increased activity in the delta band in the spontaneous EEG, but increases in higher frequency bands were also seen. The EP amplitudes decreased in the majority of studies. Anticonvulsants used as analgesics showed inconsistent results. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine showed an increase in the theta band in spontaneous EEG and decreases in EP amplitudes. Tricyclic antidepressants increased the activity in the delta, theta and beta bands in the spontaneous EEG while EPs were inconsistently affected. Weak analgesics were mainly investigated with EPs and a decrease in amplitudes was generally observed. This review reveals that both spontaneous EEG and EPs are widely used as biomarkers for analgesic drug effects. Methodological differences are common and a more uniform approach will further enhance the value of such biomarkers for drug development and prediction of treatment response in individual patients. PMID:23593934

  6. Effects of Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine on Postoperative Pain in Highly Nicotine-Dependent Patients After Thoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xingzhi; Zhang, Ping; Lu, Sufen; Zhang, Zongwang; Yu, Ailan; Liu, Donghua; Wu, Shanshan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on pain in highly nicotine-dependent patients after thoracic surgery. Highly nicotine-dependent men underwent thoracic surgery and received postoperative patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with sufentanil. In dexmedetomidine group (experimental group, n = 46), dexmedetomidine was given at a loading dose of 1 μg/kg for 10 minutes, followed by continuous infusion at 0.5 μg/kg/h until 30 minutes before the end of surgery. The saline group (control group, n = 48) received the same volume of saline. General anesthesia was administered via a combination of inhalation and intravenous anesthetics. If necessary, patients were administered a loading dose of sufentanil by an anesthesiologist immediately after surgery (0 hours). Patient-controlled analgesia was started when the patient's resting numerical rating scale (NRS) score was less than 4. Resting and coughing NRS scores and sufentanil dosage were recorded 0, 1, 4 hours, and every 4 hours until 48 hours after surgery. Dosages of other rescue analgesics were converted to the sufentanil dosage. Surgical data, adverse effects, and degree of satisfaction were obtained. Cumulative sufentanil dosage, resting NRS, and coughing NRS in the first 24 hours after surgery and heart rate were lower in the experimental compared with the control group (P <0.05). No patient experienced sedation or respiratory depression. Frequency of nausea and vomiting and degree of satisfaction were similar in both groups. Intraoperative dexmedetomidine was associated with reduced resting and coughing NRS scores and a sufentanil-sparing effect during the first 24 hours after thoracic surgery. PMID:27258524

  7. Analgesic, Anxiolytic and Anaesthetic Effects of Melatonin: New Potential Uses in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Lucia; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Manti, Sara; Aversa, Salvatore; Arrigo, Teresa; Reiter, Russel J.; Gitto, Eloisa

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous melatonin is used in a number of situations, first and foremost in the treatment of sleep disorders and jet leg. However, the hypnotic, antinociceptive, and anticonvulsant properties of melatonin endow this neurohormone with the profile of a drug that modulates effects of anesthetic agents, supporting its potential use at different stages during anesthetic procedures, in both adults and children. In light of these properties, melatonin has been administered to children undergoing diagnostic procedures requiring sedation or general anesthesia, such as magnetic resonance imaging, auditory brainstem response tests and electroencephalogram. Controversial data support the use of melatonin as anxiolytic and antinociceptive agents in pediatric patients undergoing surgery. The aim of this review was to evaluate available evidence relating to efficacy and safety of melatonin as an analgesic and as a sedative agent in children. Melatonin and its analogs may have a role in antinociceptive therapies and as an alternative to midazolam in premedication of adults and children, although its effectiveness is still controversial and available data are clearly incomplete. PMID:25569095

  8. Effects of some analgesic anaesthetic drugs on human erythrocyte glutathione reductase: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Murat; Irfan Kufrevioglu, O; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2009-04-01

    Inhibitory effects of some analgesic and anaesthetic drugs on human erythrocyte glutathione reductase were investigated. For this purpose, human erythrocyte glutathione reductase was initially purified 2139-fold in a yield of 29% by using 2', 5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity gel and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration chromatography. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis confirmed the purity of the enzyme by sharing a single band. A constant temperature (+4 degrees C) was maintained during the purification process. Diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen, lornoxicam, tenoxicam, etomidate, morphine and propofol exhibited inhibitory effects on the enzyme in vitro using the Beutler assay method. K(i) constants and IC(50) values for drugs were determined from Lineweaver-Burk graphs and plotting activity % versus [I] graphs, respectively. The IC(50) values of diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen, lornoxicam, propofol, tenoxicam, etomidate and morphine were 7.265, 6.278, 0.3, 0.242, 0.082, 0.0523 and 0.0128 mM and the K(i) constants were 23.97 +/- 2.1, 22.14 +/- 7.6, 0.42 +/- 0.18, 0.418 +/- 0.056, 0.13 +/- 0.025, 0.0725 +/- 0.0029 and 0.0165 +/- 0.0013 mM, respectively. While diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen, lornoxicam, tenoxicam etomidate and morphine showed competitive inhibition, propofol displayed noncompetitive inhibition. PMID:18608753

  9. Enhancement of Analgesic Effect by Combination of Non-Noxious Stimulation and Noxious Stimulation in Humans.

    PubMed

    Fujii-Abe, Keiko; Umino, Masahiro; Fukayama, Haruhisa; Kawahara, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the this study was to investigate the combined effects of heterosegmental non-noxious and noxious stimulation on electrically induced tooth pain. The late component of somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEP), induced by electrical tooth stimulation and pain intensity, were examined under electrical stimulation to forearms. Noxious, non-noxious, and combined non-noxious and noxious electrical stimulation were applied to median nerves on the forearms. Four experimental sessions (ie, control session, combined non-noxious and noxious stimulation session, non-noxious stimulation session, and noxious stimulation session were performed for each subject at each 10-minute interval for 30 minutes. The amplitudes of the SEP and VAS scores in the combined stimulation session decreased significantly compared with those in the control session and the reduction rates were 51.1% (13.4 μV) and 41.0% (23.5 mm), respectively. These results show that the combined stimulation has a more potent analgesic effect than that of either the non-noxious or the noxious stimulation. It is suggested that a potent analgesia was produced by an activated central mechanism, including endogenous opioid and descending pain inhibitory systems due to combined non-noxious and noxious stimulation. PMID:25490991

  10. Analgesic Effects and the Mechanisms of Anti-Inflammation of Hispolon in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Heng-Yuan; Sheu, Ming-Jyh; Yang, Chun-Hung; Lu, Tsung-Chun; Chang, Yuan Shiun; Peng, Wen-Huang; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Huang, Guan-Jhong

    2011-01-01

    Hispolon, an active ingredient in the fungi Phellinus linteus was evaluated with analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. Treatment of male ICR mice with hispolon (10 and 20 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the numbers of acetic acid-induced writhing response. Also, our result showed that hispolon (20 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the formalin-induced pain in the later phase (P<.01). In the anti-inflammatory test, hispolon (20 mg/kg) decreased the paw edema at the fourth and fifth hour after λ-carrageenin (Carr) administration, and increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GRx) in the liver tissue. We also demonstrated that hispolon significantly attenuated the malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the edema paw at the fifth hour after Carr injection. Hispolon (10 and 20 mg/kg) decreased the nitric oxide (NO) levels on both the edema paw and serum level at the fifth hour after Carr injection. Also, hispolon (10 and 20 mg/kg) diminished the serum TNF-α at the fifth hour after Carr injection. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of hispolon might be related to the decrease in the level of MDA in the edema paw by increasing the activities of SOD, GPx and GRx in the liver. It probably exerts anti-inflammatory effects through the suppression of TNF-α and NO. PMID:19349477

  11. Effect of low-dose dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol on postoperative complications after impacted third molar surgery on healthy volunteers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Durmus, Ercan; Kiresi, Demet

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of dexketoprofen trometamol (DT) and paracetamol on deep acute somatic pain and inflammation in patients undergoing impacted third molar surgery. This study was planned to present benefits that we could obtain with low burden of drug. Study Design: Effects of drugs, which were administered preemptively before the procedure, on pain, mouth-opening limitation, and swelling were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and mouth-opening measurement. Following surgery, time intervals when the patients first need to receive the drug were measured. Results: The VAS scores of the patients were lower in the side treated with DT than that in the paracetamol treated side. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of mouth-opening limitation. MRI recordings revealed that swelling was lower in the side treated with paracetamol than DT treated side. Conclusions: Administration of the drugs before surgery contributed to the postoperative patient comfort. The analgesic activity of 12.5 mg dose of DT was similar to, even better than, the analgesic activity of 500 mg dose of paracetamol; however, DT had insufficient anti-inflammatory efficacy. Key words:Dexketoprofen trometamol, paracetamol, magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25129247

  12. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF ACUTE POST-OPERATIVE PAIN MANAGEMENT & ITS ASSESSMENT

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anuj; Kaur, Kirtipal; Sharma, Sheeshpal; Goyal, Shubham; Arora, Saahil; Murthy, R.S.R

    2010-01-01

    Management of postoperative pain relieve suffering and leads to earlier mobilization, shortened hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An effective postoperative management is not a standardized regime rather is tailored to the needs of the individual patient, taking into account medical, psychological, and physical condition; age; level of fear or anxiety; surgical procedure; personal preference; and response to therapeutic agents given. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is to minimize the dose of medications to lessen side effects & provide adequate analgesia. Postoperative pain is still under managed due to obstacles in implementation of Acute Pain Services due to insufficient education, fear of complications associated with available analgesic drugs, poor pain assessment and inadequate staff. This review reflects the clinical aspects of postoperative pain & its assessment & management with an emphasis on research for new analgesic molecules & delivery system. PMID:22247838

  13. Postoperative analgesia following total hip replacement: a comparison of intrathecal morphine and diamorphine.

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, D J; Milligan, K R

    1995-01-01

    Sixty patients undergoing elective total hip replacement under spinal anaesthesia were randomly assigned to receive either intrathecal (IT) diamorphine 0.75 mg (n = 30) or IT morphine 1.0 mg (n = 30). Postoperative pain scores, analgesic requirements and side effects were assessed by a blinded observer. Postoperative pain scores were broadly similar and satisfactory for both groups but the amount of additional IV morphine required to achieve this was significantly reduced in the morphine compared with the diamorphine group (P < 0.05). Twelve of the morphine group required no postoperative analgesics compared with four in the diamorphine group (P < 0.02). There were no differences between the groups in the incidence of side effects such as emesis and pruritus. No significant postoperative respiratory depression was noted. In the doses used intrathecal morphine provided superior postoperative analgesia to that of intrathecal diamorphine. PMID:7769597

  14. Enhanced analgesic effects of propacetamol and tramadol combination in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyang; Du, Lili; Pan, He; Li, Li; Su, Xing

    2011-01-01

    Drug combinations have more potential advantage of greater analgesia than monotherapy. By the combination of analgesics with different mechanism, potency of analgesia can be maximized while the incidence of adverse effects is minimized. This study was aimed to assess a possible interaction in the antinociceptive effects between tramadol (T) and propacetamol (P) when administered in combination against nociceptive effects induced by physical or chemical injury in mice and rats. Three series of experiments were performed. The first was to determine effects of P and T alone or in combination in the acetic acid (AA)-induced writhing test in mice. Combination of T/P (3.9/67.5, 7.8/135, 15.6/271 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) elicited dose-dependent antinociception. The second determined whether the antinociceptive effects of the drugs observed in a test of persistent chemical pain could be seen in a test of acute thermal pain and the back-paw licking response was tested on the hot plate. The back-paw licking latency at different times after drugs obtained with the combination (16/270, 32/540 mg/kg, i.p. T/P) was longer than the respective values obtained with the individual agents. The third was designed to compare the antinociceptive effects between the drugs, either alone or in combination in the rat tail-flicks test. Combination of T/P (5.5/96, 11/192 mg/kg i.p.) both showed effects of higher potency than T and P, respectively. The data obtained confirmed that propacetamol is able to enhance the antinociceptive activity of tramadol. PMID:21372383

  15. The analgesic effect of combined treatment with intranasal S-ketamine and intranasal midazolam compared with morphine patient-controlled analgesia in spinal surgery patients: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Riediger, Christine; Haschke, Manuel; Bitter, Christoph; Fabbro, Thomas; Schaeren, Stefan; Urwyler, Albert; Ruppen, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Ketamine is a well-known analgesic and dose-dependent anesthetic used in emergency and disaster medicine. Recently, a new formulation of S-ketamine, as an intranasal spray, was developed and tested in our institution in healthy volunteers. The authors investigated the effect of intranasal S-ketamine spray combined with midazolam intranasal spray in postoperative spinal surgery patients. Materials and methods In this prospective, computer-randomized, double-blinded noninferiority study in spinal surgery patients, the effects of intranasal S-ketamine and midazolam were compared with standard morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The primary end point was the numeric rating scale pain score 24 hours after surgery. Results Twenty-two patients finished this study, eleven in each group. There were similar numeric rating scale scores in the morphine PCA and the S-ketamine-PCA groups at 1, 2, 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery during rest as well as in motion. There were no differences in the satisfaction scores at any time between the groups. The number of bolus demands and deliveries was not significantly different. Discussion In our study, we found that an S-ketamine intranasal spray combined with intra-nasal midazolam was similar in effectiveness, satisfaction, number of demands/deliveries of S-ketamine and morphine, and number/severity of adverse events compared with standard intravenous PCA with morphine. S-ketamine can be regarded as an effective alternative for a traditional intravenous morphine PCA in the postoperative setting. PMID:25709497

  16. The analgesic effect of electrostimulation (WoundEL®) in the treatment of leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Leloup, Pauline; Toussaint, Pascal; Lembelembe, Jean-Paul; Célérier, Philippe; Maillard, Hervé

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to demonstrate the analgesic efficacy of electrostimulation (ES), a recognised treatment for leg ulcers. Patients treated by ES for leg ulcers between 2011 and 2013 were included in the study. The pain score obtained with the numerical rating scale (NRS) was reported before the start of the ES (D0), after 3 days (D3) and 1 week following treatment initialisation. The analgesic treatments (AT) were reported at each assessment. Seventy-three patients were included (mean age 75·19 years): 31 venous leg ulcers, 21 mixed venous leg ulcers, 2 arterial ulcers, 17 hypertensive ischaemic ulcers, 1 Hydrea(®)-induced ulcer and an amputation stump ulcer. The NRS at D0 was on average 5·3 (median = 6) while it was 2·2 at D7 (median = 2), that is P < 0·001. The results were also significant between D0 and D3 (P < 0·001). A decrease in the number of AT used was observed between D0 (2·0 AT per patient on average) and D7 (1·7 AT on average) (P < 0·001). We also observed a decrease in the consumption of grade 3 analgesics on D0 and D7 (P = 0·03). This study demonstrates the rapid analgesic efficacy of ES in leg ulcers, with a clear impact on the NRS score and especially on the decrease in analgesic consumption. PMID:24618089

  17. The Effect of Gabapentin on Acute Postoperative Pain in Patients Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lifeng; Song, Zhoufeng; Liu, Kang

    2016-01-01

    cumulative morphine consumption via PCA at 24 hours (MD = −8.28; 95% CI −12.57 to −3.99; P = 0.000) and 48 hours (MD = −4.50; 95% CI −10.98 to −3.61; P = 0.221). Furthermore, gabapentin decreased the rate of postoperative dizziness (relative risk [RR], 0.68; 95% CI 0.47–0.99, P = 0.044) and the occurrence of pruritus (RR, 0.50; 95% CI 0.37–0.67, P = 0.000). Based on the current meta-analysis, gabapentin exerts an analgesic and opioid-sparing effect in acute postoperative pain management without increasing the rate of dizziness and pruritus. PMID:27196473

  18. Characterization of novel cannabinoid based T-type calcium channel blockers with analgesic effects.

    PubMed

    Bladen, Chris; McDaniel, Steven W; Gadotti, Vinicius M; Petrov, Ravil R; Berger, N Daniel; Diaz, Philippe; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2015-02-18

    Low-voltage-activated (T-type) calcium channels are important regulators of the transmission of nociceptive information in the primary afferent pathway and finding ligands that modulate these channels is a key focus of the drug discovery field. Recently, we characterized a set of novel compounds with mixed cannabinoid receptor/T-type channel blocking activity and examined their analgesic effects in animal models of pain. Here, we have built on these previous findings and synthesized a new series of small organic compounds. We then screened them using whole-cell voltage clamp techniques to identify the most potent T-type calcium channel inhibitors. The two most potent blockers (compounds 9 and 10) were then characterized using radioligand binding assays to determine their affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors. The structure-activity relationship and optimization studies have led to the discovery of a new T-type calcium channel blocker, compound 9. Compound 9 was efficacious in mediating analgesia in mouse models of acute inflammatory pain and in reducing tactile allodynia in the partial nerve ligation model. This compound was shown to be ineffective in Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel null mice at therapeutically relevant concentrations, and it caused no significant motor deficits in open field tests. Taken together, our data reveal a novel class of compounds whose physiological and therapeutic actions are mediated through block of Cav3.2 calcium channels. PMID:25314588

  19. Characterization of Novel Cannabinoid Based T-Type Calcium Channel Blockers with Analgesic Effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Low-voltage-activated (T-type) calcium channels are important regulators of the transmission of nociceptive information in the primary afferent pathway and finding ligands that modulate these channels is a key focus of the drug discovery field. Recently, we characterized a set of novel compounds with mixed cannabinoid receptor/T-type channel blocking activity and examined their analgesic effects in animal models of pain. Here, we have built on these previous findings and synthesized a new series of small organic compounds. We then screened them using whole-cell voltage clamp techniques to identify the most potent T-type calcium channel inhibitors. The two most potent blockers (compounds 9 and 10) were then characterized using radioligand binding assays to determine their affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors. The structure–activity relationship and optimization studies have led to the discovery of a new T-type calcium channel blocker, compound 9. Compound 9 was efficacious in mediating analgesia in mouse models of acute inflammatory pain and in reducing tactile allodynia in the partial nerve ligation model. This compound was shown to be ineffective in Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel null mice at therapeutically relevant concentrations, and it caused no significant motor deficits in open field tests. Taken together, our data reveal a novel class of compounds whose physiological and therapeutic actions are mediated through block of Cav3.2 calcium channels. PMID:25314588

  20. The ventral striatum is implicated in the analgesic effect of mood changes

    PubMed Central

    Villemure, Chantal; Laferrière, Audrey C; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ventral striatum, particularly the nucleus accumbens, is commonly associated with the processing of reward and positive stimuli, positive affect as well as antinociceptive processes. OBJECTIVES: The present study examined whether the ventral striatum is implicated in analgesia resulting from positive mood change induced by pleasant odours. METHODS: Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies were conducted in healthy individuals receiving painful heat stimuli in the presence of pleasant or unpleasant odours, which were used to induce positive and negative mood states. Ventral striatum activity was examined in the two mood states. RESULTS: For most subjects, pleasant odours improved mood and reduced pain unpleasantness perception relative to unpleasant odours. In the pleasant odour condition, the maximum activation of both the left and right ventral striatum was positively correlated with the amount of pain reduction. Furthermore, the left and right ventral striatum activations positively covaried with one another, and the right ventral striatum activation positively correlated with that in the periaqueductal grey matter. Both ventral striatum activations negatively covaried with the activation of the right mediodorsal thalamus, left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, left medial prefrontal cortex and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. CONCLUSIONS: Because both the mediodorsal thalamus and anterior cingulate are involved in pain affect perception, and activation within the prefrontal areas and periaqueductal grey matter were previously shown to correlate with mood-related pain modulation, it is concluded that the ventral striatum is likely implicated in the analgesic effect of positive mood changes induced by pleasant odours on pain unpleasantness. PMID:22518367

  1. The effects of an internal analgesic formulary restriction on Medicaid drug expenditures in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Kreling, D H; Knocke, D J; Hammel, R W

    1989-01-01

    The effects of removing propoxyphene napsylate products from the Wisconsin Medicaid drug program formulary were examined. Internal analgesic expenditures and usage data for 3-month periods before and after the removal were compared (April through June 1984 versus the same period in 1985). After adjusting for price and reimbursement changes between the two study periods, overall expenditures were slightly higher after removal of these products. Expenditures per recipient, prescription, and unit all increased, as did the number of prescriptions per recipient. Expenditures, prescriptions, and recipients increased more for propoxyphene hydrochloride products as substitutes for propoxyphene napsylate products than for products in any other category. Increases also occurred for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory products, suggesting they may have been chosen as replacement therapy. The proportion of napsylate prescriptions converted to hydrochloride prescriptions was larger for institutional patients than for noninstitutional patients. Although program expenditures did not decrease, as intended by the formulary change, other qualitative outcomes also should be considered, such as any therapeutic advantages the replacement products may have had for the patients. PMID:2562996

  2. Fast Left Prefrontal rTMS Acutely Suppresses Analgesic Effects of Perceived Controllability on the Emotional Component of Pain Experience

    PubMed Central

    Borckardt, Jeffrey J.; Reeves, Scott T.; Frohman, Heather; Madan, Alok; Jensen, Mark P.; Patterson, David; Barth, Kelly; Smith, A. Richard; Gracely, Richard; George, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex may be a promising target for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the management of pain. It is not clear how prefrontal TMS affects pain perception, but previous findings suggest that ventral lateral and medial prefrontal circuits may comprise an important part of a circuit of ‘perceived controllability’ regarding pain, stress and learned helplessness. While the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is a common TMS target for treating clinical depression as well as modulating pain, little is known about whether TMS over this area may affect perceived controllability. The present study explored the immediate effects of fast TMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on the analgesic effects of perceived pain controllability. Twenty-four healthy volunteers underwent a laboratory pain task designed to manipulate perception of pain controllability. Real TMS, compared to sham, suppressed the analgesic benefits of perceived-control on the emotional dimension of pain, but not the sensory/discriminatory dimension. Findings suggest that, at least acutely, fast TMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may interrupt the perceived-controllability effect on the emotional dimension of pain experience. While it is not clear whether this cortical area is directly involved with modulating perceived controllability or whether downstream effects are responsible for the present findings, it appears possible that left dorsolateral prefrontal TMS may produce analgesic effects by acting through a cortical ‘perceived control’ circuit regulating limbic and brainstem areas of the pain circuit. PMID:21122992

  3. Effects of MIAVS on Early Postoperative ELWI and Respiratory Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Xue, Qian; Liu, Kai; Hong, Jiang; Xu, Jibin; Wu, Lihui; Ji, Guangyu; Wang, Zhinong; Zhang, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Background The effects of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery (MIAVS) on the early postoperative extravascular lung water index (ELWI) and respiratory mechanics have rarely been studied. Material/Methods A total of 90 patients were divided into 3 groups: a conventional full sternotomy (CS) group (n=30), an upper ministernotomy (US) group (n=30), and a right anterior thoracotomy (RT) group (n=30). Hemodynamic and respiratory mechanics parameters were recorded at perioperative time points, including before skin incision (T(−1)); at sternum closing (T0); and 4 h (T4), 8 h (T8), 12 h (T12), and 24 h (T24) after the operation. The ventilator support time, ICU length of stay, and postoperative hospitalization time, as well as the thoracic drainage volume and blood transfusion volume, were recorded. Results The ELWI and pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) increased at T4, and the values were significantly lower in the US group than in the RT group and CS group (P<0.05). At T8, the ELWI and PVPI in the US group and RT group were significantly lower than in the CS group. At T12, there were no significant differences among the 3 groups. In addition, at T4 static lung compliance decreased, plateau airway pressure increased, and airway resistance changed non-significantly. There were no significant differences between the US group and the RT group, but both groups showed better results than the CS group did. Conclusions The ELWI and PVPI may transiently increase after aortic valve surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Compared with the 12 h required to recover from a conventional sternotomy operation, it may only take 8 h to recover from MIAVS. PMID:27036392

  4. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the aqueous extract of leaves of Persea americana mill (lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, O O; Okpo, S O; Ogunti, O O

    2002-08-01

    The aqueous extract of Persea americana leaves produced a dose-dependent inhibition of both phases of formalin pain test in mice, a reduction in mouse writhing induced by acetic acid and an elevation of pain threshold in the hot plate test in mice. The extract also produced a dose-dependent inhibition of carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema. The results obtained indicate that the extract possesses analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:12165331

  5. Analgesic efficacy of the cyclooxygenase-2-specific inhibitor rofecoxib in post-dental surgery pain: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Morrison, B W; Christensen, S; Yuan, W; Brown, J; Amlani, S; Seidenberg, B

    1999-06-01

    Previous data have suggested that rofecoxib, a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-specific inhibitor, had analgesic effects similar to those of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs when tested in the post-dental surgery pain model. The objective of this parallel-group, double-masked, randomized, placebo- and active comparator-controlled clinical trial was to assess more fully the analgesic efficacy of rofecoxib in the treatment of postoperative dental pain. After dental surgery, 151 patients (50.3% women; mean age, 18.3 years; 93.4% white) experiencing moderate-to-severe pain were to receive a single dose of placebo, rofecoxib 50 mg, or ibuprofen 400 mg. Analgesic efficacy was assessed for up to 24 hours postdose using self-administered questionnaires. Tolerability was assessed using spontaneous reports of adverse experiences, physical findings, and laboratory measurements. The results of this study demonstrated that rofecoxib 50 mg was more effective than placebo on all measures of analgesic efficacy. Rofecoxib 50 mg exhibited overall analgesic effects, onset of analgesia, and peak analgesic effects that were not significantly different from those of ibuprofen 400 mg, with a significantly longer duration of action (P < 0.05). We concluded that rofecoxib was efficacious in the treatment of postoperative dental pain and that COX-2-derived prostanoids play a role in treatment of the pain associated with dental surgery. PMID:10440619

  6. Effects of Suppository Acetaminophen, Bupivacaine Wound Infiltration, and Caudal Block With Bupivacaine on Postoperative Pain in Pediatric Inguinal Herniorrhaphy

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini Jahromi, Seyed Abbas; Sadeghi poor, Sadegh; Hosseini Valami, Seyedeh Masoumeh; Javadi, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Background: The control of postoperative pain is important in children, and poor pain control leads to organ dysfunction and behavioral problems. Objectives: We compared the analgesic effects of suppository acetaminophen, bupivacaine wound infiltration, and caudal block with bupivacaine on postoperative pain in pediatric inguinal herniorrhaphy. Patients and Methods: In this double-blinded, randomized controlled clinical trial, 90 children of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade I-II, aged between 3 months and 7 years, and scheduled for elective unilateral inguinal herniorrhaphy under general anesthesia were assigned to three equal groups. Patients in the first group received 20 mg/kg of suppository acetaminophen. In the second group, 2 mg/kg of 0.5% bupivacaine was infiltrated in the incisional site, and in the third group, a caudal block was performed with 0.75 mL/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine. The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) pain scale was applied 30 minutes after operation. Thereafter, the FLACC score was obtained every hour during the next 6 hours. If the FLACC score was 4 or over, we administered 0.5 mg/kg of intravenous meperidine. The data was transferred to SPSS-10 software and analyzed statistically with chi-square and analysis of variance tests. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The mean analgesic duration in the acetaminophen, bupivacaine infiltration, and caudal block groups was 4.07, 5.40, and 5.37 hours, respectively. Significant differences were not observed between the bupivacaine infiltration and caudal block groups (P = 0.9), but the differences between the bupivacaine infiltration and acetaminophen groups (P = 0.034) and the caudal block and acetaminophen groups (P = 0.039) were significant. With regard to meperidine administration, significant differences were not observed between the bupivacaine infiltration and caudal block groups (P = 0.848), but significant differences were observed between these two

  7. Synthesis and Analgesic Effects of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on Models of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Tang, Jianguang; Zhang, Yunxiao; Xun, Xiaohong; Tang, Dongfang; Peng, Dezheng; Yi, Jianming; Liu, Zhonghua; Shi, Xiaoliu

    2014-01-01

    μ-TRTX-Hhn1b (HNTX-IV) is a 35-amino acid peptide isolated from the venom of the spider, Ornithoctonus hainana. It inhibits voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7, which has been considered as a therapeutic target for pain. The goal of the present study is to elucidate the analgesic effects of synthetic μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on animal models of pain. The peptide was first synthesized and then successfully refolded/oxidized. The synthetic peptide had the same inhibitory effect on human Nav1.7 current transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells as the native toxin. Furthermore, the analgesic potentials of the synthetic peptide were examined on models of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain. μ-TRTX-Hhn1b produced an efficient reversal of acute nociceptive pain in the abdominal constriction model, and significantly reduced the pain scores over the 40-min period in the formalin model. The efficiency of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on both models was equivalent to that of morphine. In the spinal nerve model, the reversal effect of μ-TRTX-Hhn1b on allodynia was longer and higher than mexiletine. These results demonstrated that μ-TRTX-Hhn1b efficiently alleviated acute inflammatory pain and chronic neuropathic pain in animals and provided an attractive template for further clinical analgesic drug design. PMID:25123556

  8. Analgesic effect of simultaneous exposure to infrared laser radiation and μT magnetic field in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslar, Grzegorz; Mrowiec, Janina; Kasperczyk, Slawomir; Sieron-Stoltny, Karolina; Sieron, Aleksander

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the experiment was to estimate the effect of repeated simultaneous exposures to infrared laser radiation and μT variable magnetic field used in magnetostimulation on pain perception in rats, as well as the involvement of endogenous opioid system in the mechanism of this effect. In experimental group clean-shaven scull of male Wistar rats placed individually in a specially designed plastic chamber were simultaneously exposed to infrared laser radiation (wavelength - 855 nm, mean power - 4,1 mW, energy density - 30 J/cm2) and variable magnetic field of saw-like shape of impulse, at a frequency of basic impulse 180-195 Hz and mean induction value of 120 μT generated by magneto-laser applicator of device for magnetostimulation Viofor JPS (Med & Life, Poland) 12 minutes daily for 2 periods of 5 consecutive days, with 2 days-lasting break between them, while control animals were sham-exposed. The pain perception was determined by means of "hot plate" test on the basis of calculated analgesic index. As a result of repeated exposures a significant increase in analgesic index persisting also till 14 th day after the end of a cycle of exposures was observed. This analgesic effect was inhibited by prior i.p. injection of opioid antagonist - Naloxone.

  9. The magnitude and duration of the analgesic effect of morphine, butorphanol, and buprenorphine in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Gades, N M; Danneman, P J; Wixson, S K; Tolley, E A

    2000-03-01

    This study was designed to determine the magnitude and duration of the analgesic effect of three commonly used opioids: buprenorphine (0.5 mg/kg for rats; 2.0 mg/kg for mice), butorphanol (2.0 mg/kg for rats; 5.0 mg/kg for mice), and morphine (10 mg/kg for rats and mice). We used two standard tests, the hot plate and tail flick assays, to measure opioid analgesia in 62 male, 200 to 300 g Sprague-Dawley rats and 61 male, 25 to 35 g ICR mice. We obtained five baseline measurements then administered the drugs subcutaneously. Morphine gave the highest analgesic effect and was intermediate in duration (2 to 3 h in rats and mice) of analgesia. Butorphanol provided the lowest level of and shortest (1 to 2 h in rats and mice) analgesia. Buprenorphine had an intermediate analgesic effect and the longest duration (6 to 8 h in rats and 3 to 5 h in mice). In light of our results, we recommend the use of morphine (with frequent redosing) for severe pain, butorphanol for mild pain of short duration, and buprenorphine for mild to moderate pain of increased duration. The dosing intervals suggested by our study are 2 to 3 h for morphine in both rats and mice, 1 to 2 h for butorphanol in both rats and mice; and 6 to 8 h in rats and 3 to 5 h in mice for buprenorphine. PMID:11487232

  10. Conventional and microwave assisted synthesis of pyrazolone Mannich bases possessing anti-inflammatory, analgesic, ulcerogenic effect and antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Kullampalayam Krishnasamy; Rajasekaran, Aiyalu; Senthilkumar, Palaniappan; Wattamwar, Prasad P

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, an efficient synthesis of some Mannich base of 5-methyl-2-[(2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl)carbonyl]-2,4-dihydro-3H-pyrazol-3-one (4a-j) have been described by using conventional and non-conventional (microwave) techniques. Microwave assisted reactions showed that require shorter reaction time and good yield. The newly synthesized compounds were screened for their anti-inflammatory, analgesic activity, antioxidant, and antibacterial effects were compared with standard drug. Among the compounds studied, compound (4f) showing nearly equipotent anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity than the standard drug (indomethacin), along with minimum ulcerogenic index. Compounds (4b and 4i) showing 1.06 times more active than ciprofloxacin against tested Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:24835630

  11. Prescription Opioid Analgesics: Promoting Patient Safety with Better Patient Education.

    PubMed

    Costello, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Patients expect and deserve adequate postoperative pain relief. Opioid analgesics are widely used and effective in controlling postoperative pain, but their use poses risks that many patients don't understand and that all too often result in adverse outcomes. Inappropriate and often dangerous use of prescription medication has increased sharply in the past two decades in the United States. Patients and caregivers must have an adequate understanding of safe use, storage, and disposal of opioids to prevent adverse drug events in patients and others. Nurses play a key role in providing this patient education. This article provides a case study that highlights the risks and important aspects of opioid medication use in the postoperative patient. PMID:26510070

  12. [Clinical experimental studies of postoperative infusion analgesia].

    PubMed

    Dick, W; Knoche, E; Grundlach, G; Klein, I

    1983-06-01

    30 postoperative patients, who had undergone abdominal gynaecological surgery with standard general anaesthesia were randomly divided into three groups and received, in the recovery ward, a continuous infusion of either pentazocine, piritramid, or ketamine. The patients rated their pain on a 15 cm pain analogue score. Group I pentazocine: Mean dosage on the day of operation 0.12 mg/kg/h, 0.1 mg/kg/h on the first and only 0.07 mg/kg/h on the second postoperative day. Pentazocine blood levels were on average 50 micrograms/l. Group II piritramid: Mean dosage on the day of operation 0.038 mg/kg/h, 0.024 mg/kg/h on the first and 0.019 mg/kg/h on the second postoperative day. Blood levels of piritramid were not determined because there is no satisfactory assay available. Group III ketamine: mean dosage on the day of operation 0.32 mg/kg/h, 0.28 mg/kg/h on the first and 0.29 mg/kg/h on the second postoperative day. Ketamine blood levels lay between 120 and 180 micrograms/l. The three analgesics did not cause any important haemodynamic or respiratory side effects. Pentazocine and piritramid were the most effective analgesics, ketamine was the least effective with a high incidence of side effects. PMID:6412586

  13. The future of topical analgesics.

    PubMed

    Arnstein, Paul M

    2013-07-01

    Topically applied analgesic therapies have been used throughout history to treat a variety of patient conditions that present with pain. Before modem pharmaceuticals became readily available, mud-based emollients, salves, cold therapies, and other natural remedies were often used. Now we have effective therapies and are developing advanced topical analgesics as we learn more about the physiology and pathophysiology of pain. The use of topical analgesics may be associated with fewer patient systemic side effects than are seen with oral, parenteral, or transdermally administered agents, making the topical route of administration attractive to prescribers and patients. With further refinement of existing drugs and the development of novel agents, topical analgesics may offer relief for treating patient pain conditions that are currently challenging to treat, such as pain resulting from burns, wound debridement, and pressure ulcers. Recognizing the value of a multimodal approach, topical analgesics may offer a therapeutic option that can become part of a comprehensive treatment plan for the patient. With continued advancements in targeted drug-delivery systems, topical analgesics may be able to provide a method to prevent or reverse the phenomena of peripheral and central sensitization, or the neuroplastic changes believed to be responsible for the transition from acute to chronic pain states in patients. For those patients at risk for developing chronic pain states, such as complex regional pain syndrome, the combination of cutaneous stimulation (achieved through rubbing during application) and analgesic effects produced by the drug itself may prevent the disabling pain that often emerges during the subacute phase of disease. In summary, better utilization of currently available topical analgesics and continued research promise to ensure that topical analgesics are, and will continue to be, important tools in the treatment of patients with resistant pain. PMID

  14. The dexmedetomidine “augmented” sedato analgesic cocktail: An effective approach for sedation in prolonged endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Sandip; Niyogi, Mausumi; Sarkar, Joydip; Mukhopadhyay, Basabdatta Samanta; Halder, Swapan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: In absence of any published standard guideline for sedation or anesthesia practice for prolonged therapeutic “endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP)”, safe and cost-effective sedation protocol is the need of the hour. Our study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a dexmedetomidine as an add-on for prolonged deep sedation for ERCP and to compare three deep sedation regimens regarding safety and efficacy. Material and Methods: Forty-five consecutively enrolled patients planned for therapeutic ERCP and assumed to have prolonged procedural duration (>50 min) were divided into three groups in a randomized assessor blinded fashion. Group 1 received propofol and midazolam, Group 2 received the sedato-analgesic cocktail containing ketamine-propofol-midazolam-pentazocine, and the Group 3 received sedate-analgesic cocktail plus dexmedetomidine infusion under monitoring of vital parameters and according to the judgment of the concerned anesthesiologist. Total propofol requirement, episodes of gagging, oxygen desaturation, changes in mean blood pressure (MBP), recovery and satisfaction score of endoscopist, anesthetist and patient were noted and analyzed statistically using one way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction and Chi-square test. Results: Mean propofol requirement, incidences of gagging and oxygen desaturation was significantly less in Group 2 and 3 compared to Group 1. MBP was more stable and recovery was faster in Group 3. Anesthetist's satisfaction was more with Group 2 and even more with Group 3. Conclusions: The sedato-analgesic cocktail was superior to the conventional propofol-midazolam regimen, dexmedetomidine as add-on increased the efficacy and safety of sedate-analgesic cocktail. It reduces propofol requirement, helps to maintain the patient in a safe and more stable level of sedation and increases satisfaction of the anesthetist. PMID:25948901

  15. Brain P450 Epoxygenase Activity is Required for the Antinociceptive Effects of Improgan, a Non-Opioid Analgesic

    PubMed Central

    Hough, Lindsay B.; Nalwalk, Julia W.; Yang, Jun; Conroy, Jennie L.; VanAlstine, Melissa A.; Yang, Weizhu; Gargano, Joseph; Shan, Zhixing; Zhang, Shao-Zhong; Wentland, Mark P; Phillips, James G.; Knapp, Brian I.; Bidlack, Jean M.; Zuiderveld, Obbe P.; Leurs, Rob; Ding, Xinxin

    2011-01-01

    The search for the mechanism of action of improgan (a non-opioid analgesic) led to the recent discovery of CC12, a compound which blocks improgan antinociception. Since CC12 is a cytochrome P450 inhibitor, and brain P450 mechanisms were recently shown to be required in opioid analgesic signaling, pharmacological and transgenic studies were performed in rodents to test the hypothesis that improgan antinociception requires brain P450 epoxygenase activity. Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of the P450 inhibitors miconazole and fluconazole, and the arachidonic acid (AA) epoxygenase inhibitor N-methylsulfonyl-6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (MS-PPOH) potently inhibited improgan antinociception in rats at doses which were inactive alone. MW06-25, a new P450 inhibitor which combines chemical features of CC12 and miconazole, also potently blocked improgan antinociception. Although miconazole and CC12 were weakly active at opioid and histamine H3 receptors, MW06-25 showed no activity at these sites, yet retained potent P450-inhibiting properties. The P450 hypothesis was also tested in Cprlow mice, a viable knock-in model with dramatically reduced brain P450 activity. Improgan (145 nmol, icv) antinociception was reduced by 37-59% in Cprlow mice, as compared with control mice. Moreover, CC12 pretreatment (200 nmol, icv) abolished improgan action (70-91%) in control mice, but had no significant effect in Cprlow mice. Thus, improgan’s activation of bulbospinal non-opioid analgesic circuits requires brain P450 epoxygenase activity. A model is proposed in which 1) improgan activates an unknown receptor to trigger downstream P450 activity, and 2) brainstem epoxygenase activity is a point of convergence for opioid and non-opioid analgesic signaling. PMID:21316152

  16. Analgesic and thermic effects, and cerebrospinal fluid and plasma pharmacokinetics, of intracerebroventricularly administered morphine in normal and sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, H N; Villar, V M; Cortijo, J; Morcillo, E J

    1998-02-01

    The relationship between asthma and opioids has barely been investigated. This study examines whether active sensitization of rats changes the analgesic and thermic effects of intracerebroventricular morphine or the pharmacokinetics of the drug. Morphine (5, 10 and 20 microg) was given intracerebroventricularly to sensitized (active immunization to ovalbumin and Al(OH)3 then airway challenge with ovalbumin after 12 days) and normal (i.e. non-sensitized) male Sprague-Dawley rats. The tail-flick latencies and changes in colon temperature were determined before morphine injection and at 30 min intervals for a period of 300 min afterwards. Results were expressed as the area under the time-response curve. The analgesic and hyperthermic response to morphine for sensitized rats was less than that obtained for normal rats. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood samples were collected periodically for a period of 240 min and morphine levels were determined by a highly sensitive radioimmunoassay. The pharmacokinetic parameters half-life, terminal elimination rate constant and the mean residence time were determined in both cerebrospinal fluid and plasma by non-compartmental analysis. The area under the cerebrospinal fluid concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity was higher for sensitized rats than for normal rats for all three doses of morphine but these differences did not correspond with similar changes in pharmacological responses. In conclusion, the attenuated analgesic and thermic responses to intracerebroventricular morphine in the sensitized rats might be a result of pharmacodynamic alterations rather than to pharmacokinetic changes. PMID:9530988

  17. Effects of narcotic analgesics and antagonists on the in vivo release of acetylcholine from the cerebral cortex of the cat.

    PubMed

    Jhamandas, K; Phillis, J W; Pinsky, C

    1971-09-01

    1. In cats under light allobarbitone anaesthesia, the effects of intravenous injections of narcotic and non-narcotic analgesics, of a general depressant, and of narcotic antagonists were investigated on the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) from the surface of the sensorimotor cortex.2. The narcotic analgesics morphine (0.1, 1.0 and 5 mg/kg), meperidine (1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg), methadone (1.0 mg/kg) and codeine (5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg) greatly reduced ACh release.3. The non-narcotic analgesics pentazocine (1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg) and propoxyphene (5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg) as well as the depressant chlorpromazine (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg) also greatly reduced ACh release.4. Two of the three narcotic antagonists examined, levallorphan (0.1, 1.0 and 5 mg/kg) and nalorphine (1.0 mg/kg) had the property of reducing ACh release. They were thus partial agonists. With levallorphan the greatest reduction occurred with the smallest dose injected and the effect was regularly obtained, whereas with nalorphine a reduction was obtained in some experiments only. The third, naloxone, was a specific narcotic antagonist and did not reduce the ACh release in any dose (0.01, 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg) examined. In a dose of 1.0 mg/kg it actually produced a small increase in Ach release.5. Naloxone (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) restored the reduction in ACh release produced by the narcotic analgesics and by the partial agonist levallorphan. It partially restored the reduction produced by the non-narcotic analgesics and by nalorphine, but had no effect on the reduction produced by chlorpromazine.6. The relevance of these results with regard to analgesia and to the narcotic abstinence syndrome is discussed. PMID:5136464

  18. Interdose interval effects on the development of contextual tolerance to nicotine's analgesic effects in rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Cepeda-Benito, Antonio; Reynoso, Jose T; Davis, Kristina W; Susabda, Agnes; Mendez, Ian A; Harraid, James H

    2006-05-01

    Learning models of associative and nonassociative drug tolerance predict that the development of contextual tolerance to drug effects is disrupted when the drug is delivered at short interdose intervals (IDIs). The authors examined the impact of 1 long IDI and 2 short IDIs in the development of contextual nicotine tolerance. Associative tolerance was investigated by giving rats (Rattus norvegicus) 10 subcutaneous injections of nicotine at either long (72-hr) IDIs or short (6-hr and 4.5-hr) IDIs. The delivery of nicotine was either explicitly paired or explicitly unpaired with a distinctive context. A 3rd group of rats was exposed to the experimental procedures but received only saline. Associative tolerance to nicotine's analgesic effects was defined as a shift to the right of the dose-response curve (DRC) of rats in the explicitly paired condition with respect to the DRC of rats in the explicitly unpaired condition. Analgesia was assessed with the tail-flick and hot-plate devices. In the tail-flick assessment, associative tolerance was evident in the 72-hr and the 6-hr IDI conditions only. In the hot-plate assessment, associative tolerance was present in the 72-hr IDI condition only. The findings suggest that contextual tolerance to nicotine's analgesic effects are positively related to IDI length and are more readily demonstrated with the tail-flick method than with the hot-plate method. Overall, the results supported the thesis that nicotine tolerances that develop to different IDIs are qualitatively different and may be mediated by different psychological and physiological mechanisms. PMID:16756422

  19. Effect of postoperative delirium on outcome after hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, David M; Aharonoff, Gina B; Karp, Adam; Capla, Edward L; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Koval, Kenneth J

    2004-05-01

    Nine-hundred twenty-one community-dwelling patients 65 years of age or older, who sustained an operatively treated hip fracture from July 1, 1987 to June 30, 1998 were followed up for the development of postoperative delirium. The outcomes examined in the current study were postoperative complication rates, in-hospital mortality, hospital length of stay, hospital discharge status, 1-year mortality rate, place of residence, recovery of ambulatory ability, and activities of daily living 1 year after surgery. Forty-seven (5.1%) patients were diagnosed with postoperative delirium. Patients who had delirium develop were more likely to be male, have a history of mild dementia, and have had surgery under general anesthesia. Patients who had postoperative delirium develop had a significantly longer length of hospitalization. They also had significantly higher rates of mortality at 1 year, were less likely to recover their prefracture level of ambulation, and were more likely to show a decline in level of independence in basic activities of daily living at the 1-year followup. There was no difference in the rate of postoperative complications, in-hospital mortality, discharge residence, and recovery of instrumental activities of daily living at 1 year. PMID:15187857

  20. Ibuprofen arginate provides effective relief from postoperative dental pain with a more rapid onset of action than ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Paul; Black, Peter; Papageorge, Maria; Norwood, Tom; Shen, Danny D; Norris, Lonnie; Ardia, Alfredo

    2002-09-01

    Ibuprofen is a safe and effective analgesic, but some formulations have a slow onset of action. Ibuprofen arginate is a rapidly absorbed salt designed to promote more rapid onset of analgesia. A clinical trial was conducted in 226 patients with postoperative dental pain to assess the analgesic efficacy and speed of onset of the arginine salt of ibuprofen compared with one of the commercially available forms of ibuprofen. Patients were administered a single dose of either ibuprofen arginate (200 mg or 400 mg), ibuprofen (200 mg or 400 mg), or placebo in this double-blind, randomized trial. To determine the onset of action of the study medication patients were required to note time to "any" pain relief and then time to "meaningful" pain relief, using the two-stopwatch method. Pain intensity and relief were assessed using traditional categorical scales over a 6-h period. Meaningful pain relief was achieved in 42 min and 24 min for ibuprofen arginate 200 mg and 400 mg, respectively, compared with 50 min and 48 min for ibuprofen 200 mg and 400 mg, respectively ( P<0.05). The results for the measurements of analgesic effectiveness [sum of pain intensity difference, total pain relief (TOTPAR), peak pain relief and overall evaluation of treatment] all showed that both doses of ibuprofen arginate and both doses of ibuprofen were significantly better than placebo and both 200-mg and 400-mg ibuprofen arginate doses were significantly better than ibuprofen 200 mg for peak pain relief. Mean plasma ibuprofen concentrations at 30 min and 60 min, respectively, were: ibuprofen arginine 200 mg, 13.9 micro g/ml and 15.7 micro g/ml; ibuprofen arginine 400 mg, 29.5 micro g/ml and 29.3 micro g/ml; ibuprofen 200 mg 2.5 micro g/ml and 5 micro g/ml; ibuprofen 400 mg, 2.3 micro g/ml and 7.4 micro g/ml. ( P<0.05). Adverse event profiles were similar across treatment groups. These results overall suggest that ibuprofen arginate when taken at doses equivalent to commercially available

  1. Comparative clinical study of gabapentin and pregabalin for postoperative analgesia in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rajshree; Tripathi, Manoj; Chandola, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduction in central sensitization by gabapentinoids that include gabapentin and pregabalin may reduce acute postoperative pain. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate postoperative analgesic benefit and efficacy in patients administered with oral gabapentin or pregabalin as premedication for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. Settings and Design: Randomized, prospective, and comparative study. Materials and Methods: In this study, recruited patients were randomly allocated in three groups. Groups A, B, and C received 2 capsules of B complex, 3 capsules of 300 mg gabapentin each, and 2 capsules of 75 mg pregabalin, respectively, each in 30 patients of each group, 1 h before induction of anesthesia. Postoperative efficacy among these three groups was compared with respect to increase in duration of analgesia, reduction in postoperative pain scores, total postoperative requirements of analgesics and side effects. Statistical Analysis: Mean and standard deviation were calculated. Test of analysis between two groups was done by t-test and among three groups by analysis of variance, and then P value was calculated. Results: Pregabalin and gabapentin group had lower visual analog scale (VAS) score (P < 0.05), prolonged timing of first rescue analgesic (4.67 ± 14.79 vs. 158 ± 13.10 vs. 343.16 ± 9.69) min, and less opioid consumption (169.87 ± 20.32 vs. 116.13 ± 14.08 vs. 64.67 ± 16.69) mg compared to placebo group. Between the gabapentinoids, pregabalin group had lower VAS score, prolonged timing of first rescue analgesic, and less opioids consumption than the gabapentin group. Conclusion: It is concluded in this study that pregabalin group had lower VAS score, prolonged timing of first rescue analgesic, and less opioids consumption than the gabapentin group. Both gabapentinoids had better postoperative analgesic profile than placebo. PMID:27212747

  2. Effect of tourniquet time on postoperative quadriceps function.

    PubMed

    Saunders, K C; Louis, D L; Weingarden, S I; Waylonis, G W

    1979-09-01

    Postoperative weakness of quadriceps function following knee arthrotomy has often been attributed to pain inhibition or lack of motivation. However, the delayed recovery may be the result of a slowly resolving axonal compression syndrome caused by the pneumatic tourniquet. Forty-eight patients who underwent knee arthrotomy were evaluated including postoperative electromyographic testing and clinical follow-up. Thirty of these patients (62.5%) developed postoperative EMG changes. Abnormalities were noted in various muscle groups but most commonly involved the quadriceps alone or quadriceps and gastrocnemius. An effort was made in 20 patients to substantially decrease the duration of tourniquet compression by limiting tourniquet inflation to intracapsular portions of the procedures. Fewer EMG changes and more rapid clinical recovery were noted in patients with decreased tourniquet times, suggesting that it is beneficial to minimize the duration of tourniquet compression. In all patients who returned for serial testing, the EMG abnormalities eventually resolved. PMID:509826

  3. Preferences for Analgesic Treatments Are Influenced by Probability of the Occurrence of Adverse Effects and the Time to Reach Maximal Therapeutic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Shu; Wu, Shih-Yun; Wu, Long-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Research on shared medical decision-making suggested that both the potency of a treatment and the probability of it being successful influence individual treatment preferences. Patients also need to consider the negative attributes of treatments, such as the occurrence of adverse effects or a slow start to the therapeutic effects. It remains unclear how these attributes influence individual treatment preferences. We investigated how the analgesic effect, the adverse effect, and the time-course effect influenced the preference of analgesic treatments. Forty-five healthy volunteers participated in three hypothetical analgesic decision-making tasks. They were instructed to imagine that they were experiencing pain and choose between two hypothetical analgesic treatments: the more potent radical treatment and the less potent conservative treatment. The potency of a treatment was countered by the following attributes: the probability of working successfully, the probability of inducing an adverse effect, and the time required for the treatment to reach its maximal effect. We found that (a) when the overall probability that a treatment would induce an adverse effect decreased, the participants changed their preference from a conservative treatment to a radical treatment; (b) when the time-course for a treatment to reach its maximal effect was shortened, the participants changed their preference from a conservative treatment to a radical treatment, and (c) individual differences in prior clinical pain and the degree of imagined pain relief were associated with preferences. The findings showed that the adverse effects and the time course of treatments guide the analgesic treatment preferences, highlighting the importance of sharing information about negative attributes of treatments in pain management. The findings imply that patients may over-emphasize the occurrence of adverse effect or a slow time-course of treatment effect. In terms of shared medical decision

  4. Effects of Analgesic Use on Inflammation and Hematology in a Murine Model of Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hish, Gerald A; Diaz, Jose A; Hawley, Angela E; Myers, Daniel D; Lester, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Surgical animal models are crucial in studies investigating the pathogenesis of this disease and evaluating VT therapies. Because inflammation is critical to both the development and resolution of VT, analgesic medications have the potential to adversely affect multiple parameters of interest in VT research. The objective of this study was to determine how several common analgesics affect key variables in a murine ligation model of deep vein thrombosis. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to receive either local (bupivacaine) or systemic parenteral analgesia (buprenorphine, tramadol, or carprofen) or 0.9% NaCl (control). All mice underwent laparotomy and ligation of the inferior vena cava, and treatment was continued until euthanasia at 6 or 48 h after surgery. Analysis of harvested tissues and blood included: hematology, thrombus weight, serum and vein-wall cytokines (IL1β, IL6, IL10, TNFα), soluble P-selectin, and vein-wall leukocyte infiltration. Compared with 0.9% NaCl, all of the analgesics affected multiple parameters important to VT research. Carprofen and tramadol affected the most parameters and should not be used in murine models of VT. Although they affected fewer parameters, a single dose of bupivacaine increased thrombus weight at 6 h, and buprenorphine was associated with reduced vein wall macrophages at 48 h. Although we cannot recommend the use of any of the evaluated analgesic dosages in this mouse model of VT, buprenorphine merits additional investigation to ensure the highest level of laboratory animal care and welfare. PMID:25255071

  5. Antinociceptive effect of clinical analgesics in a nonhuman primate model of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shinya; Awaga, Yuji; Takashima, Miyuki; Hama, Aldric; Matsuda, Akihisa; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    A number of potential analgesic pharmacotherapies developed in preclinical osteoarthritis animal models have failed clinical trials. A possible basis for the lack of translation of preclinical findings to clinical efficacy is the use of a preclinical species that is distinct from that of humans. The current study tested clinical analgesics in a nonhuman primate model of knee osteoarthritis. Following a medial meniscectomy, the animals developed a robust ipsilateral reduction in knee pressure threshold (hyperalgesia) and an ipsilateral reduction in weight bearing (resting pain). The serotonin-noradrenalin reuptake inhibitor duloxetine and opioid morphine increased ipsilateral pressure threshold and weight bearing. By contrast, the anticonvulsant pregabalin did not affect either pressure hyperalgesia or resting pain. The current findings in the nonhuman primate model of osteoarthritis parallel clinical findings, in that duloxetine and opioids are used in the management of osteoarthritis pain whereas pregabalin is not. The current findings also suggest the possible differentiation of pharmacotherapeutics in a nonhuman primate model, of distinguishing potential clinically useful analgesics for the management of osteoarthritic pain from those that are not. PMID:27266666

  6. Pediatric nurses' thinking in response to vignettes on administering analgesics.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle Vincent, Catherine; Gaddy, Erica J

    2009-10-01

    Pediatric nurses are not administering available and recommended analgesics to hospitalized children after surgery. This descriptive study was conducted to examine 30 pediatric nurses' thinking-in response to case study vignettes-about pain assessment and morphine administration for children experiencing postoperative pain. Nurses considered numerous factors when assessing and managing children's pain, including pain level, vital signs, and facial expression. Nurses frequently relied, however, on behavioral and physiological manifestations, as opposed to self-report, when choosing whether to administer morphine. Nurses demonstrated misconceptions about pharmacokinetics and unwarranted concerns about the adverse effects of morphine. These findings partly explain why children continue to report high levels of pain after surgery and why nurses may not administer adequate analgesics to relieve children's pain. PMID:19504564

  7. Are children given insufficient pain-relieving medication postoperatively?

    PubMed

    Hamers, J P; Abu-Saad, H H; van den Hout, M A; Halfens, R J

    1998-01-01

    The literature often suggests and assumes that children are under-medicated postoperatively. A review of the literature leads to the conclusion that only a few studies answer the question of whether children's pain is relieved insufficiently. The lack of consensus on expected pain intensity after surgery and caution about prescribing analgesics could explain why analgesics are often prescribed on a pro re nata (prn) basis. Prescription on a prn basis, in fact, means that the nurse makes the decision whether or not an analgesic should be administered. Some studies suggest, however, that nurses under-medicate children and that postoperative pain is relieved insufficiently. In some situations, nurses under-estimate the child's pain, while in others, nurses' attitudes, beliefs and knowledge regarding pain relief strategies play an important role. On the basis of this review of the literature standard prescription of pain medication instead of prn is recommended. Furthermore, research on the incidence and prevalence of pain in children and on the effectiveness of analgesic administration postoperatively is warranted. PMID:9515606

  8. Analgesic Effects of Intra-Articular Bupivacaine/Intravenous Parecoxib Combination Therapy versus Intravenous Parecoxib Monotherapy in Patients Receiving Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized, Double-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shih-Jyun; Peng, Pei-Yu; Chen, Hsiu-Pin; Lin, Jr-Rung; Lee, Mel S.; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of this double-blind, randomized study was to investigate whether the addition of intra-articular bupivacaine to intravenous parecoxib could improve pain relief in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Methods. A total of 36 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty were enrolled into our study. These patients were randomly allocated either to a placebo-controlled group or study group. Postoperative pain scores and analgesic consumption were evaluated. Results. Numeric rating scale (NRS) data of bupivacaine group in postoperative room were significantly lower than that of control group (control group versus bupivacaine group, 7.9 (6.7–9.1) (mean and 95% confidence interval) versus 4.5 (3.2–5.8) (mean and 95% confidence interval), p = 0.001). NRS data of bupivacaine group in ward were also significantly lower than that of control group. A significantly lower dose of meperidine was used in the study group postoperatively during the first 24 hours (control group versus bupivacaine group, 3.08 ± 0.80 mg/Kg versus 2.34 ± 0.42 mg/Kg, p = 0.001). Conclusion. Intra-articular bupivacaine in combination with intravenous parecoxib may improve pain relief and reduce the demand for rescue analgesics in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. The trial is registered with Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12615000463572). PMID:26171392

  9. [Administration of Perfalgan (paracetamol) for postoperative analgesia in obstetrics and gynaecology].

    PubMed

    Tablov, B; Popov, I; Tablov, V; Radev, R

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the quality of postoperative analgesia by using of Perfalgan (injectable paracetamol)--alone or in combination with other analgesics for different operations in obstetric and gynecology. We have evaluated 60 women, divided into four groups each one of 15 according to the kind of surgical intervention: section cesarean, laparoscopy, laparohysterectomy or cystectomy. The effect of administered Perfalgan over postoperative pain was estimated by different objective and subjective parameters after standard general anesthesia. As a result of our study we consider that postoperative analgesia with Perfalgan is suitable enough after section cesarean and laparoscopy. As a component of multimodal analgesic combination it gives a good quality of postoperative pain relief in condition of laparohysterectomy or cystectomy. It is very important that this is without any adverse effects. PMID:16544723

  10. The effect of music on postoperative pain and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Allred, Kelly D; Byers, Jacqueline F; Sole, Mary Lou

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if listening to music or having a quiet rest period just before and just after the first ambulation on postoperative day 1 can reduce pain and/or anxiety or affect mean arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and/or oxygen saturation in patients who underwent a total knee arthroplasty. Fifty-six patients having a total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to either a music intervention group or a quiet rest group. A visual analog scale was used to measure pain and anxiety. Physiologic measures, including blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate, were also obtained. Statistical findings between groups indicated that the music group's decrease in pain and anxiety was not significantly different from the comparison rest group's decrease in pain (F = 1.120; p = .337) or anxiety (F = 1.566; p = .206) at any measurement point. However, statistical findings within groups indicated that the sample had a statistically significant decrease in pain (F = 6.699; p = .001) and anxiety (F = 4.08; p = .013) over time. Results of this research provide evidence to support the use of music and/or a quiet rest period to decrease pain and anxiety. The interventions pose no risks and have the benefits of improved pain reports and decreased anxiety. It potentially could be opioid sparing in some individuals, limiting the negative effects from opioids. Nurses can offer music as an intervention to decrease pain and anxiety in this patient population with confidence, knowing there is evidence to support its efficacy. PMID:20207324

  11. Analgesic efficacy of intrathecal fentanyl during the period of highest analgesic demand after cesarean section: A randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Weigl, Wojciech; Bierylo, Andrzej; Wielgus, Monika; Krzemień-Wiczyńska, Swietlana; Szymusik, Iwona; Kolacz, Marcin; Dabrowski, Michal J

    2016-06-01

    Cesarean section (CS) is one of the most common surgical procedures in female patients. We aimed to evaluate the postoperative analgesic efficacy of intrathecal fentanyl during the period of greatest postoperative analgesic demand after CS. This period was defined by detailed analysis of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) usage.This double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group randomized trial included 60 parturients who were scheduled for elective CS. Participants received spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine supplemented with normal saline (control group) or with fentanyl 25 μg (fentanyl group). To evaluate primary endpoints, we measured total pethidine consumption over the period of greatest PCA pethidine requirement. For verification of secondary endpoints, we recorded intravenous PCA requirement in other time windows, duration of effective analgesia, pain scores assessed by visual analog scale, opioid side effects, hemodynamic changes, neonatal Apgar scores, and intraoperative pain.Detailed analysis of hour-by-hour PCA opioid requirements showed that the greatest demand for analgesics among patients in the control group occurred during the first 12 hours after surgery. Patients in the fentanyl group had significantly reduced opioid consumption compared with the controls during this period and had a prolonged duration of effective analgesia. The groups were similar in visual analog scale, incidence of analgesia-related side effects (nausea/vomiting, pruritus, oversedation, and respiratory depression), and neonatal Apgar scores. Mild respiratory depression occurred in 1 patient in each group. Fewer patients experienced intraoperative pain in the fentanyl group (3% vs 23%; relative risk 6.8, 95% confidence interval 0.9-51.6).The requirement for postoperative analgesics is greatest during the first 12 hours after induction of anesthesia in patients undergoing CS. The addition of intrathecal fentanyl to spinal anesthesia is effective for intraoperative

  12. Effectiveness of the association between carbamazepine and peripheral analgesic block with ropivacaine for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Laurinda; Fontes, Ramalho; Flores, Sara; Oliveira, Pedro; Almeida, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is achieved by using adjuvant analgesics like antiepileptics, with carbamazepine (CBZ) being the first-line approach for TN patients, although side effects may be present. Other approaches using gabapentin, namely when associated with peripheral analgesic block of TN trigger points with the local anesthetic ropivacaine (ROP), resulted in decreased pain and daily drug intake (reduced side effects). This study evaluates if the association between CBZ and the peripheral block with ROP reinforces the clinical value of CBZ. In this parallel, double-blinded study, idiopathic TN patients were randomized to receive during 4 weeks either CBZ (CBZ; n = 21) or CBZ associated with the peripheral analgesic block using ROP (CBZ + ROP; n = 24). The primary outcome measures were the following: i) pain intensity, evaluated by the numerical rating scale; ii) number of pain crises; and iii) number needed to treat. Evaluation points were at the beginning (day 1) and end (day 29) of treatment and after a follow-up of 5 months (month 6). Both protocols resulted in a decrease of pain intensity and number of pain crises, but only the association CBZ + ROP showed i) a significant stronger reduction in pain intensity at month 6 and ii) a significant decrease in the daily dose of CBZ given to patients (both at day 29 and month 6). In contrast, the daily dose in CBZ-only patients remained constant or even increased. The number needed to treat for the association CBZ + ROP over the CBZ protocol reduced from 5 at the end of the 4-week treatment to 3 after the 5-month follow-up. Data reinforce the use of CBZ as a primary tool to control pain in TN patients, as the association CBZ + ROP i) improves the clinical qualities of CBZ, ii) strongly reduces the daily dose of CBZ, and iii) reduces the potential side effects attributed to high doses of CBZ. PMID:21197324

  13. Evaluation of the analgesic effect of subcutaneous methadone after cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Jabalameli, Mitra; Kalantari, Forough

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inadequate pain control has a significant role in maternal and neonatal health in early post-partum period which interferes with breastfeeding and has a negative influence on child normal growth. The aim of this study is evaluation of subcutaneous methadone effectiveness on post-operative pain control. Materials and Methods: Double blind randomized prospective clinical trial involving 60 term pregnancy patients through 2008 to 2009 Undergo cesarean. Inclusion criteria: Prime gravid candidate of elective cesarean and spinal anesthesia class 1 or 2. Known case of drug allergy and methadone interaction, addiction, uncontrolled medical disease excluded. Case group injected 10 mg of subcutaneous methadone in the site of incision before final suture. Morphine was a pain reliever in follow up examination. Data include mean of pain, nausea and vomiting, MAP, etc., collected and analyzed by independent-T test and Man Whitney test. Results: Although mean usage of morphine between groups was not significant statistically but the mean pain severity (P value < 0.05) and mean satisfactory (P value = 0.02) was statistically significant between groups. Other parameters were not statistically significant. Conclusion: We suggest subcutaneous methadone as a safe pain reliever in post cesarean section patients. PMID:25337527

  14. Antinociceptive effect of palm date spathe hydroalcoholic extract on acute and chronic pain in mice as compared with analgesic effect of morphine and diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Peyghambari, Fatemeh; Dashti-Rahmatabadi, Mohammad Hossein; Rozabadi, Mansooreh Dehghanfi; Rozabadi, Razieh Dehghanfi; Rozabadi, Fatemeh Dehghanfi; Pangalizadeh, Mohammadesmaeil; Dehghanimohammadabadi, Narges

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds: In Persian traditional medicine, palm date spathe (PDS) is introduced as an analgesic. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the analgesic effect of hydroalcoholic extract of PDS on acute and chronic pain in mice in comparison with diclofenac and morphine. Materials and Methods: In this study, which was conducted in summer 2014, 220 male mice (20–30 g) were randomly divided into two categories, each consists of 11 groups as follows: A normal control group, a solvent (Tween 80) control group, 3 morphine positive control groups (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg), 3 diclofenac positive control groups (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg), and 3 main experimental PDS groups (2, 20, and 200 mg/kg). Hot plate was applied on animals in one category and writing test on the other category to assess acute and chronic pain, respectively. Results: In the writing test, the average writing time and number of animals receiving a maximum dosage of morphine, diclofenac, and PDS were significantly less than the control group. In the hot plate test, only groups receiving different doses of morphine at different time points and those received 30 mg/kg diclofenac at 15 min after the intervention showed significant difference with the control group. Conclusion: 200 mg/kg extract of PDS, revealed a significant analgesic effect on chronic pain, but it did not show any analgesic effect on acute pain. PMID:26693469

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial on Analgesic Effects of Intravenous Acetaminophen versus Dexamethasone after Pediatric Tonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Alebouyeh, Mahmoud Reza; Sedaghat, Minow

    2013-01-01

    Background A few studies are available actually comparing the clinical efficacy of intravenous acetaminophen with other medications such as dexamethasone to inhibit postoperative adverse events in children. Objectives This randomized blinded controlled trial was designed to compare controlling status of postoperative events in children after tonsillectomy randomized to receive either intravenous acetaminophen or dexamethasone. Patients and Methods Eighty four children aged between 4 to 13 undergoing tonsillectomy were randomized using a computer-generated schedule to double-blind treatment with intravenous acetaminophen (15 mg/kg) or intravenous dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg). Children were post-operatively assessed for swallowing pain, pain while opening mouth, ear pain, and postoperative sore throat in recovery room (within one hour after surgery), at the time of admission to the ward, as well as at 12 and 24 hours after surgery, assessed by the objective pain scoring system (OPS; minimum score: 0 = no pain, maximum score: 10 = extreme pain). Results There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to the severity of postoperative pain due to swallowing or opening mouth measured at the different study time points from postoperative recovery to 24 hours after the surgery. There was no difference in ear pain severity at the time of postoperative recovery, at the admission time to ward and also at 12 hours after surgery; however mean score of ear pain severity was significantly higher in those who administered acetaminophen 24 hours after operation. Also, the mean score severity of sore throat was significantly higher in the acetaminophen compared with the dexamethasone group within 12 hours of surgery. Postoperative vomiting and bleeding were similarly observed between the two study groups. The severity of swallowing pain, pain while opening mouth, ear pain, as well as postoperative sore throat as gradually assuaged within 24 hours of

  16. Analgesic Techniques in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: From the Daily Practice to Evidence-Based Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anastase, Denisa Madalina; Cionac Florescu, Simona; Munteanu, Ana Maria; Ursu, Traian; Stoica, Cristian Ioan

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are major orthopedic surgery models, addressing mainly ageing populations with multiple comorbidities and treatments, ASA II–IV, which may complicate the perioperative period. Therefore effective management of postoperative pain should allow rapid mobilization of the patient with shortening of hospitalization and social reintegration. In our review we propose an evaluation of the main analgesics models used today in the postoperative period. Their comparative analysis shows the benefits and side effects of each of these methods and guides us to how to use evidence-based medicine in our daily practice. PMID:25484894

  17. A new method for demonstration of central effects of analgesic agents in man.

    PubMed Central

    Torebjörk, H E; Schady, W; Ochoa, J L

    1984-01-01

    A new method of eliciting experimental pain in man is described. Microelectrodes are inserted percutaneously into the peripheral nerves of awake subjects, and are positioned close to nociceptive fibres in order to elicit pain during intraneural electrical stimulation. Under fixed stimulation conditions the estimated magnitude of evoked pain remains relatively stable, unless a high stimulus frequency is used, which may lead to excitation failure of nociceptive fibres. This method can be employed to test for possible central modulation of pain, for instance by analgesic agents, since peripheral receptors are bypassed. PMID:6470727

  18. The impact of listening to music on analgesic use and length of hospital stay while recovering from laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Vaajoki, Anne; Kankkunen, Päivi; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Kokki, Hannu; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative pain management is based on the use of analgesics; however, music may alleviate pain either by direct analgesic effects or by relaxing and distracting the mind from pain and unpleasant feelings. Conflicting results have been presented about how listening to music affects analgesic use and length of hospital stay after surgery. We assessed the effect of music listening on analgesic use, length of hospital stay, and adverse effects in adult patients having laparotomy, using a prospective design with two parallel groups. Patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery (n = 168) were assigned to either a music group (n = 83) operated on odd weeks or a control group (n = 85) operated on even weeks. The music group listened to music 7 times for 30 minutes at a time during the first 3 postoperative days. The control group did not listen to the music. The hypotheses that patients in the music group will need less analgesic, have a shorter length of hospital stay, and experience less adverse effects than those in the control group were not supported by the data, although patients recovering from surgery enjoyed listening to music. Music listening may enhance quality of hospital stay and recovery in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery and could be a useful tool to relieve the patient's pain experience. PMID:22847288

  19. Effectiveness and safety of continuous wound infiltration for postoperative pain management after open gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xing; Feng, Xu; Cai, Xiu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    . All three groups had similar patient satisfaction and wound healing, but group PCIA was prone to higher sedation scores when compared with groups CWI and EA, especially during the first 12 h after surgery. Group EA had a lower mean arterial pressure within the first postoperative 12 h compared with the other two groups. CONCLUSION: CWI with ropivacaine yields a satisfactory analgesic effect within the first 48 h after open gastrectomy, with lower morphine consumption and accelerated recovery. PMID:26855550

  20. Antitussive, expectorant and analgesic effects of the ethanol seed extract of Picralima nitida (Stapf) Th. & H. Durand.

    PubMed

    Dapaah, Gabriel; Koffuor, George Asumeng; Mante, Priscilla Kolibea; Ben, Inemesit Okon

    2016-01-01

    Picralima nitida is used traditionally for management of cough. This study, therefore, investigated the antitussive, expectorant, and analgesic properties of the ethanolic seed extract of Picralima nitida (PNE), and ascertained its safety for use. Presence of secondary metabolites, and safety of PNE (10-2000 mg/kg) were evaluated by preliminary phytochemical screening, and by Irwin's test respectively. Percentage reduction in cough count, percentage increase in latency of cough, and percentage protection offered by PNE were established by the citric acid-induced cough, acetylcholine- and Histamine-induced bronchoconstriction models. Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs were treated with 100-500 mg/kg PNE or reference drugs, dihydrocodiene, atropine, mepyramine. Expectorant property of PNE (100-1000 mg/kg) was determined using the tracheal phenol red secretion; with ammonium chloride as a reference medication. Percentage maximal possible analgesic effect in the tail immersion test and the total nociceptive score in acetic acid-induced abdominal writhes, after treatment of BALB/c mice with PNE (100-500 mg/kg), diclofenac, and morphine were also estimated. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of tannins, alkaloids, glycosides, saponins, steroids, terpenoids and anthraquinones. PNEdid not cause any extract-related physical, pharmacological and CNS toxicities or mortality; sedation was observed at doses 1000-2000 mg/kg. It showed significant dose-dependent reduction in cough count, and increased cough latency. PNE (1000 mg/kg) enhanced tracheal phenol red secretion. PNE (100-500 mg/kg) significantly and dose dependently increased tail withdrawal latencies, and nociceptive score. PNE has antitussive, expectorant, and analgesic properties, with an LD50>2000 mg/kg. PMID:27168749

  1. Antitussive, expectorant and analgesic effects of the ethanol seed extract of Picralima nitida (Stapf) Th. & H. Durand

    PubMed Central

    Dapaah, Gabriel; Koffuor, George Asumeng; Mante, Priscilla Kolibea; Ben, Inemesit Okon

    2016-01-01

    Picralima nitida is used traditionally for management of cough. This study, therefore, investigated the antitussive, expectorant, and analgesic properties of the ethanolic seed extract of Picralima nitida (PNE), and ascertained its safety for use. Presence of secondary metabolites, and safety of PNE (10-2000 mg/kg) were evaluated by preliminary phytochemical screening, and by Irwin's test respectively. Percentage reduction in cough count, percentage increase in latency of cough, and percentage protection offered by PNE were established by the citric acid-induced cough, acetylcholine- and Histamine-induced bronchoconstriction models. Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs were treated with 100-500 mg/kg PNE or reference drugs, dihydrocodiene, atropine, mepyramine. Expectorant property of PNE (100-1000 mg/kg) was determined using the tracheal phenol red secretion; with ammonium chloride as a reference medication. Percentage maximal possible analgesic effect in the tail immersion test and the total nociceptive score in acetic acid-induced abdominal writhes, after treatment of BALB/c mice with PNE (100-500 mg/kg), diclofenac, and morphine were also estimated. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of tannins, alkaloids, glycosides, saponins, steroids, terpenoids and anthraquinones. PNEdid not cause any extract-related physical, pharmacological and CNS toxicities or mortality; sedation was observed at doses 1000-2000 mg/kg. It showed significant dose-dependent reduction in cough count, and increased cough latency. PNE (1000 mg/kg) enhanced tracheal phenol red secretion. PNE (100–500 mg/kg) significantly and dose dependently increased tail withdrawal latencies, and nociceptive score. PNE has antitussive, expectorant, and analgesic properties, with an LD50>2000 mg/kg. PMID:27168749

  2. Evaluation of analgesic effect of two different doses of fentanyl in combination with bupivacaine for surgical site infiltration in cases of modified radical mastoidectomy: A double blind randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Geeta; Shahi, Kedar Singh; Parmar, Nitish Kumar; Asad, Mohammad; Joshi, Hemchandra Kumar; Bhakuni, Rajni

    2013-01-01

    Background: Limited evidence supports the efficacy of peripheral route fentanyl and local anesthetic combination for postoperative analgesia. Our study was therefore designed to demonstrate the analgesic efficacy of two different doses of fentanyl in combination with bupivacaine for surgical site infiltration in patients undergoing modified radical mastoidectomy (MRM). Materials and Methods: 60 patients undergoing MRM under general anesthesia were randomly allocated into two groups, first group receiving 0.5% bupivacaine at a dose of 2 mg/kg body weight with 50 μg fentanyl and second group receiving bupivacaine 0.5% at a dose of 2 mg/kg body weight with 100 μg fentanyl as infiltration of operative field in and around the incision site, after the incision and just before completion of surgery. In postoperative period pain, nausea-vomiting and sedation was recorded at 0 hr, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hrs. Results: Both the combinations of bupivacaine and fentanyl (Group I and Group II) were effective for postoperative analgesia. In both the groups the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score was less than 3 at each time interval. None of the patients required rescue analgesia. The comparison of VAS scores at different intervals showed that group II had lower VAS scores at all time points. Conclusions: Fentanyl and bupivacaine combinations in doses of 50 and 100 μg along with 0.5% bupivacaine at a fixed dose of 2 mg/kg body weight are effective in the management of postoperative pain. Patients who received 100 μg fentanyl (Group II) had lower VAS scores as compared to the patients who received 50 μg fentanyl (Group I) with similar side effects. PMID:25885841

  3. Contribution of anterior cingulate cortex and descending pain inhibitory system to analgesic effect of lemon odor in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Affections are thought to regulate pain perception through the descending pain inhibitory system in the central nervous system. In this study, we examined in mice the affective change by inhalation of the lemon oil, which is well used for aromatherapy, and the effect of lemon odor on pain sensation. We also examined the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and descending pain inhibitory system to such regulation of pain. Results In the elevated plus maze, the time spent in the open arms was increased by inhalation of lemon oil. The pain behavior induced by injection of formalin into the hind paw was decreased. By inhalation of lemon oil, the number of c-Fos expression by formalin injection was significantly increased in the ACC, periaqueductal grey (PAG), nucleu raphe magnus (NRM) and locus ceruleus, and decreased in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH). The destruction of the ACC with ibotenic acid led to prevent the decrease of formalin-evoked nocifensive behavior in mice exposed to lemon oil. In these mice, the change of formalin-induced c-Fos expression in the ACC, lateral PAG, NRM and SDH by lemon odor was also prevented. Antagonize of dopamine D1 receptor in the ACC prevented to the analgesic effect of lemon oil. Conclusions These results suggest that the analgesic effect of lemon oil is induced by dopamine-related activation of ACC and the descending pain inhibitory system. PMID:24555533

  4. Comparative study between paracetamol and two different doses of pregabalin on postoperative pain in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Esmat, Ibrahim M.; Farag, Hanan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is the primary reason for prolonged hospital stay after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This study compared the effect of a single oral preoperative administration of paracetamol (1 g) with 2 different doses of pregabalin (150 or 300 mg) for attenuating postoperative pain and analgesic consumption. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients, aged 18-60 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists’ physical status I and II undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were included in this randomized controlled study. Patients were divided into three groups, 25 each to receive either oral paracetamol 1 g (group I, control group) or pregabalin 150 (group II) or 300 mg (group III), 2 h before surgery. Postoperative pain was evaluated based on visual analog scale over a period of 6 h and 1st time for rescue analgesia. Postoperative sedation, hemodynamic changes, serum cortisol level, and side effects were also evaluated. Results: There was a significant decrease in mean heart rate, mean systolic blood pressure, sedation score, pain score, and delayed the first request for analgesics postoperatively in group (II) and group (III) compared to group (I) 2 h postoperatively. There was no significant difference in group (III) compared to group (II) postoperatively. The incidence of postoperative side effects was more in group (III). Conclusion: The single oral preoperative dose administration of pregabalin had significant opioid-sparing effect in the first 6 h after surgery, whereas side effects were more common with administration of pregabalin 300 mg. PMID:26543452

  5. Aerosol Stable Peptide-Coated Liposome Nanoparticles: A Proof-of-Concept Study with Opioid Fentanyl in Enhancing Analgesic Effects and Reducing Plasma Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    HOEKMAN, JOHN D; SRIVASTAVA, PRAMOD; HO, RODNEY J Y

    2014-01-01

    Previous we reported a novel pressurized olfactory drug (POD) delivery device that deposit aerosolized drug preferentially to upper nasal cavity. This POD device provided sustained CNS levels of soluble morphine analgesic effects. However, analgesic onset of less soluble fentanyl was more rapid but brief, likely due to hydrophobic fentanyl redistribution readily back to blood. To determine whether fentanyl incorporated into an aerosol stable liposome that binds to nasal epithelial cells will enhance CNS drug exposure and analgesic effects and reduce plasma exposure, we constructed RGD liposomes anchored with acylated integrin binding peptides (palmitoyl-GRGDS). The RGD liposomes, which assume gel-phase membrane structure at 25°C were stable under the stress of aerosolization as only 2.2 ± 0.5 % calcein leakage detected. The RGD mediated integrin binding of liposome is also verified to be unaffected by aerosolization. Rats treated with fentanyl in RGD-liposome and POD device exhibited greater analgesic effect, compared to the free drug counterpart (AUCeffect = 1387.l vs. 760.1 %MPE*min); while ~20% reduced plasma drug exposure was noted (AUC0-120 = 208.2 vs 284.8 ng*min/ml). Collectively, fentanyl incorporated in RGD-liposomes are physically and biologically stable under aerosolization, enhanced the overall analgesic effects and reduced plasma drug exposure for the first 2 hours. PMID:24909764

  6. Anti-Arthritic and Analgesic Effect of NDI10218, a Standardized Extract of Terminalia chebula, on Arthritis and Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jong Bae; Jeong, Jae-Yeon; Park, Jae Young; Jun, Eun Mi; Lee, Sang-Ik; Choe, Sung Sik; Park, Do-Yang; Choi, Eun-Wook; Seen, Dong-Seung; Lim, Jong-Soon; Lee, Tae Gyu

    2012-01-01

    The fruit of Terminalia chebula Retzius has been used as a panacea in India and Southeast Asia but its biological activities have not been fully elucidated. Here we report anti-arthritic and analgesic effect of NDI10218, a standardized ethanol extract of Terminalia chebula, on collagen-induced arthritis and acetic acid-induced writhing model, respectively. Arthritis was induced in DBA/1J mice by immunizing bovine type II collagen and mice were treated with NDI10218 daily for 5 weeks after the onset of the disease. NDI10218 reduced the arthritis index and blocked the synovial hyperplasia in a dose-dependent manner. The serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β were significantly reduced in mice treated with NDI10218. Production of the inflammatory IL-17, but not immunosuppressive IL-10, was also inhibited in splenocytes isolated from NDI10218-treated arthritis mice. Administration of NDI10218 markedly decreased the number of T cell subpopulations in the regional lymph nodes of the arthritis mice. Finally, NDI10218 reduced the number of abdominal contractions in acetic acid-induced writhing model, suggesting an analgesic effect of this extract. Taken together, these results suggest that NDI10218 can be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of rheuma-toid arthritis. PMID:24116282

  7. Evaluation of analgesic effect of skin-to-skin contact compared to oral glucose in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Freire, Nájala Borges de Sousa; Garcia, João Batista Santos; Lamy, Zeni Carvalho

    2008-09-30

    Nonpharmacological interventions are important alternatives for pain relief during minor procedures in preterm neonates. Skin-to-skin contact or kangaroo mother care is a human and efficient way of caring for low-weight preterm neonates. The aim of the present study was to assess the analgesic effect of kangaroo care compared to oral glucose on the response of healthy preterm neonates to a low-intensity acute painful stimulus. Ninety-five preterm neonates with a postmenstrual age of 28-36 weeks were randomly assigned to three groups in a single-blind manner. In group 1 (isolette, n=33), the neonate was in the prone position in the isolette during heel lancing and did not receive analgesia. In group 2 (kangaroo method, n=31), the neonate was held in skin-to-skin contact for 10 min before and during the heel-lancing procedure. In group 3 (glucose, n=31), the neonate was in the prone position in the isolette and received oral glucose (1 ml, 25%) 2 min before heel lancing. A smaller variation in heart rate (p=0.0001) and oxygen saturation (p=0.0012), a shorter duration of facial activity (brow bulge, eye squeeze and nasolabial furrowing) (p=0.0001), and a lower PIPP (Premature Infant Pain Profile) score (p=0.0001) were observed in group 2. In conclusion, skin-to-skin contact produced an analgesic effect in preterm newborns during heel lancing. PMID:18434021

  8. Analgesic Effects of Meloxicam, Morphine Sulfate, Flunixin Meglumine, and Xylazine Hydrochloride in African-Clawed Frogs (Xenopus laevis)

    PubMed Central

    Coble, Dondrae J; Taylor, Douglas K; Mook, Deborah M

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated analgesic use and analgesiometry in aquatic African-clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis). We used the acetic acid test (AAT) to assess the analgesic potential of systemic xylazine hydrochloride, meloxicam, flunixin meglumine, and morphine sulfate after injection into the dorsal lymph sac. Flunixin meglumine provided better analgesia than did the other drugs, most evident at 5 and 9 h after administration. Because the AAT was associated with the development of dermal lesions, we discontinued use of this assay and chose the Hargreaves test as an alternative method of measuring nociception in Xenopus. This assay is commonly performed in rodents, but its efficacy in an aquatic species such as Xenopus was unknown prior to this study. We found that the Hargreaves test was an effective measure of nociception in Xenopus, and we used it to evaluate the effectiveness of the nonopiod agents xylazine hydrochloride, meloxicam, and flunixin meglumine both in the absence of surgery and after surgical oocyte harvest. Similar to findings from the AAT, flunixin meglumine provided better analgesia in the Hargreaves test than did the other agents when analyzed in the absence of surgical intervention. Results were equivocal after oocyte harvest. Although surgical oocyte harvest is a common procedure in Xenopus, and currently there are no published recommendations for analgesia after this invasive surgery. Future studies are needed to clarify the efficacy of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs for that purpose. PMID:21640031

  9. The effects of preoperative oral administration of carprofen or tramadol on postoperative analgesia in dogs undergoing cutaneous tumor removal

    PubMed Central

    Karrasch, Nicole M.; Lerche, Phillip; Aarnes, Turi K.; Gardner, Heather L.; London, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    This prospective, blinded, controlled clinical study compared the effects of pre-emptive oral administration of carprofen or tramadol on pain scores and analgesic requirement in dogs undergoing cutaneous tumor removal. Thirty-six client-owned dogs presenting for cutaneous tumor removal were randomly assigned to receive carprofen, tramadol, or no treatment prior to surgery. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS), the Modified Glasgow Composite Measure Pain Score (MGCMPS), and algometry at enrollment, prior to premedication, at extubation, then hourly for the first 4 h, and every 4 h for 24 h. Dogs scoring ≥ 7 (MGCMPS), or having a VAS measurement ≥ 40 mm were given rescue analgesia. There were no significant differences in pain VAS, MGCMPS, or algometry. There were no differences in rescue analgesia requirement, or time to rescue analgesia among groups. Carprofen, tramadol, or no pre-emptive analgesia, combined with pre-operative hydromorphone and rescue analgesia, resulted in satisfactory analgesia in the 24-hour postoperative period. PMID:26246627

  10. [Analgesic properties of morpholinoethylimidazobenzimidazole derivative RU-1205].

    PubMed

    Spasov, A A; Grechko, O Iu; Shtareva, D M; Anisimova, V A

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the analgesic activity of a morpholinoethylimidazobenzimidazole derivative (RU-1205) in comparison to butorphanol. It is established that the test compound exhibits a pronounced analgesic activity, which exceeded that ofbutorphanol six times in the hot-plate test and was comparable to the reference drug effect in the tail-flick and acetic acid-induced writhing tests. It is established that the analgesic action of RU-1205 is based on the kappa-opioidergic mechanism. PMID:24432563

  11. Effects of continuous fascia iliaca compartment blocks for postoperative analgesia in patients with hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Hongling; Yang, Ya-Xiong; Wang, Yang; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Bin; Luan, Bo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Effective analgesia is essential for the postoperative care of orthopedic patients. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of continuous fascia iliaca compartment block (FIB) as postoperative analgesia after hip fracture surgery, and to compare FIB with patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) using fentanyl for 48 h postoperatively. METHODS: Patients with hip fractures who were scheduled for open reduction and internal fixation surgery using the antirotation proximal femoral nail technique were randomly assigned to the FIB or PCIA groups. Postoperative pain was assessed using a numeral rating scale at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h after analgesia was started. Delirium, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), and pruritus were also monitored. RESULTS: Patients in the FIB group reported less pain than those in the PCIA group (P=0.039, d=−0.3). The change in pain scores over time was similar between the two groups. There were six patients with PONV and five patients with pruritus in the PCIA group, while no PONV or pruritus was noticed in the FIB group (P=0.013). Ten (19.6%) patients in the FIB group and three (5.7%) patients in the PCIA group developed postoperative delirium (P=0.032, d=0.77). CONCLUSION: Continuous FIB is a safe and effective technique for postoperative analgesia after hip fracture surgery, making it an option for pain management in elderly patients with hip fractures. PMID:26125194

  12. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Brendan; Zheng, Ming; Harter, Scott; Sultan, Pervez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD). Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Pain (FPQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0–10), anticipated analgesic threshold (0–10), and perceived analgesic needs (0–10). Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement) and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r = 0.349), anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r = −0.349), and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r = 0.313). Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R2 = 0.443, p < 0.0001); expected postoperative pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R2 = 0.421, p < 0.0001). Conclusion. Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements. PMID:27143966

  13. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Brendan; Zheng, Ming; Harter, Scott; Sultan, Pervez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD). Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Pain (FPQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0-10), anticipated analgesic threshold (0-10), and perceived analgesic needs (0-10). Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement) and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r = 0.349), anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r = -0.349), and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r = 0.313). Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R (2) = 0.443, p < 0.0001); expected postoperative pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R (2) = 0.421, p < 0.0001). Conclusion. Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements. PMID:27143966

  14. Clinical pharmacology of non opioid analgesics in neonates.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, K; de Hoon, J; Van Overmeire, B; Devlieger, H

    2005-01-01

    An integrated approach of neonatal analgesia starts with the systematic evaluation of pain and should be followed by effective interventions, mainly based on the appropriate (i.e. safe and effective) administration of analgesics. In contrast to the more potent opioids, data on the pharmacokinetics and -dynamics of non-opioid analgesics in this specific population are still rare or even lacking. We therefore evaluated various aspects of developmental pharmacology of non-opioid analgesics (paracetamol, ibuprofen, acetylsalicyl acid) in neonates. We first performed a single dose propacetamol study in preterm and term neonates. Based on these preliminary findings, a repeated dose administration scheme was developed and tested and maturational aspects from preterm till teenage were documented. Although non-selective COX-inhibitors might be effective in the treatment of postoperative or inflammatory pain syndromes in neonates, potential efficacy should be balanced against the drugs' safety profile. Neonatal renal clearance strongly depends on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and GFR itself strongly depends on the vaso-dilatative of prostaglandins on the afferent arterioli. We therefore evaluated the impact of the administration of ibuprofen or acetylsalicylic acid on renal clearance in preterm infants and hereby used amikacin clearance as a surrogate marker. We hereby documented the negative effect of ibuprofen on glomerular filtration rate in preterm infants up to 34 weeks and we were able to show that ibuprofen and acetylsalicylic acid had an equal impact on the glomerular filtration rate. PMID:16408826

  15. Effect of Motor Impairment on Analgesic Efficacy of Dopamine D2/3 Receptors in a Rat Model of Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, Margarida; Cardoso-Cruz, Helder; Monteiro, Clara; Galhardo, Vasco

    2016-01-01

    Testing the clinical efficacy of drugs that also have important side effects on locomotion needs to be properly designed in order to avoid erroneous identification of positive effects when the evaluation depends on motor-related tests. One such example is the evaluation of analgesic role of drugs that act on dopaminergic receptors, since the pain perception tests used in animal models are based on motor responses that can also be compromised by the same substances. The apparent analgesic effect obtained by modulation of the dopaminergic system is still a highly disputed topic. There is a lack of acceptance of this effect in both preclinical and clinical settings, despite several studies showing that D2/3 agonists induce antinociception. Some authors raised the hypothesis that this antinociceptive effect is enhanced by dopamine-related changes in voluntary initiation of movement. However, the extent to which D2/3 modulation changes locomotion at analgesic effective doses is still an unresolved question. In the present work, we performed a detailed dose-dependent analysis of the changes that D2/3 systemic modulation have on voluntary locomotor activity and response to four separate tests of both thermal and mechanical pain sensitivity in adult rats. Using systemic administration of the dopamine D2/3 receptor agonist quinpirole, and of the D2/3 antagonist raclopride, we found that modulation of D2/3 receptors impairs locomotion and exploratory activity in a dose-dependent manner across the entire range of tested dosages. None of the drugs were able to consistently diminish either thermal or mechanical pain perception when administered at lower concentrations; on the other hand, the larger concentrations of raclopride (0.5–1.0 mg/kg) strongly abolished pain responses, and also caused severe motor impairment. Our results show that administration of both agonists and antagonists of dopaminergic D2/3 receptors affects sensorimotor behaviors, with the effect over

  16. Effect of Motor Impairment on Analgesic Efficacy of Dopamine D2/3 Receptors in a Rat Model of Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dourado, Margarida; Cardoso-Cruz, Helder; Monteiro, Clara; Galhardo, Vasco

    2016-01-01

    Testing the clinical efficacy of drugs that also have important side effects on locomotion needs to be properly designed in order to avoid erroneous identification of positive effects when the evaluation depends on motor-related tests. One such example is the evaluation of analgesic role of drugs that act on dopaminergic receptors, since the pain perception tests used in animal models are based on motor responses that can also be compromised by the same substances. The apparent analgesic effect obtained by modulation of the dopaminergic system is still a highly disputed topic. There is a lack of acceptance of this effect in both preclinical and clinical settings, despite several studies showing that D2/3 agonists induce antinociception. Some authors raised the hypothesis that this antinociceptive effect is enhanced by dopamine-related changes in voluntary initiation of movement. However, the extent to which D2/3 modulation changes locomotion at analgesic effective doses is still an unresolved question. In the present work, we performed a detailed dose-dependent analysis of the changes that D2/3 systemic modulation have on voluntary locomotor activity and response to four separate tests of both thermal and mechanical pain sensitivity in adult rats. Using systemic administration of the dopamine D2/3 receptor agonist quinpirole, and of the D2/3 antagonist raclopride, we found that modulation of D2/3 receptors impairs locomotion and exploratory activity in a dose-dependent manner across the entire range of tested dosages. None of the drugs were able to consistently diminish either thermal or mechanical pain perception when administered at lower concentrations; on the other hand, the larger concentrations of raclopride (0.5-1.0 mg/kg) strongly abolished pain responses, and also caused severe motor impairment. Our results show that administration of both agonists and antagonists of dopaminergic D2/3 receptors affects sensorimotor behaviors, with the effect over

  17. Drug-drug interaction between oxycodone and adjuvant analgesics in blood-brain barrier transport and antinociceptive effect.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Yusuke; Okura, Takashi; Shimomura, Keita; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    To examine possible blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport interactions between oxycodone and adjuvant analgesics, we firstly screened various candidates in vitro using [(3)H]pyrilamine, a substrate of the oxycodone transporter, as a probe drug. The uptake of [(3)H]pyrilamine by conditionally immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cells (TR-BBB13) was inhibited by antidepressants (amitriptyline, imipramine, clomipramine, amoxapine, and fluvoxamine), antiarrhythmics (mexiletine, lidocaine, and flecainide), and ketamine. On the other hand, antiepileptics (carbamazepine, phenytoin, and clonazepam) and corticosteroids (dexamethasone and prednisolone) did not inhibit [(3)H]pyrilamine uptake, with the exception of sodium valproate. The uptake of oxycodone was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by amitriptyline, fluvoxamine and mexiletine with K(i) values of 13, 65, and 44 microM, respectively. These K(i) values are 5-300 times greater than the human therapeutic plasma concentrations. Finally, we evaluated in vivo interaction between oxycodone and amitriptyline in mice. Antinociceptive effects of oxycodone were increased by coadministration of amitriptyline. The oxycodone concentrations in plasma and brain were not changed by coadministration of amitriptyline. Overall, the results suggest that several adjuvant analgesics may interact with the BBB transport of oxycodone at relatively high concentrations. However, it is unlikely that there would be any significant interaction at therapeutically or pharmacologically relevant concentrations. PMID:19499573

  18. A Review of Current Analgesic Techniques in Cardiac Surgery. Is Epidural Worth it?

    PubMed Central

    Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Golzari, Samad EJ

    2014-01-01

    In this review we addressed the various analgesic techniques in cardiac surgery, especially regional methods such as thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA). There are many techniques available for management of postoperative pain after cardiac operation including intravenous administration of analgesic drugs, infiltration of local anesthetics, nerve blocks, and neuroaxial techniques. Although there are many evidences declaring the benefits of neuroaxial blockade in improving postoperative well-being and quality of care in these patients, some studies have revealed limited effect of TEA on overall morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. On the other hand, some investigators have raised the concern about epidural hematoma in altered coagulation and risks of infection and local anesthetics toxicity during and after cardiac procedures. In present review, we tried to discuss the most recent arguments in the field of this controversial issue. The final conclusion about either using regional anesthesia in cardiac surgery or not has been assigned to the readers. PMID:25320659

  19. Effect of the analgesic butorphanol on activity behaviour in turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Buchwalder, T; Huber-Eicher, B

    2005-12-01

    During fattening, the bodyweight of modern broad-breasted turkeys increases considerably within a very short space of time. In particular, the breast muscles increase disproportionately. This leads to a disadvantageous distribution in weight, and as a consequence, to a disturbed leg position and skeletal deformations like antitrochanteric degeneration, tibial dyschondroplasia, bending, twisting and rotation of the tibia, osteochondrosis, osteomyelitis, rickets, and epiphyseolysis of the femoral head increases. This cases of degenerative joint disease cause severe pain in humans and there are indications that this is also true for turkeys. The purpose of this study was to determine if behaviour indicative of such pain in turkeys of the B.U.T. Big 6 breeding line could be attenuated by administering a quick-acting analgesic, butorphanol. Twelve pairs of turkeys were tested at the ages of 7 and 12 weeks. One bird in each pair received an analgesic opioid injection, while the other one received a control injection of physiologically balanced saline solution. The time the birds spent putting weight on their legs, i.e., 'walking' and 'standing' and the distance covered by the birds were recorded during the 30 min periods before and after the application of the drug. At week seven the treated birds spent significantly more time putting weight on their legs than control birds. At week 12, the same tendency was observed. No significant differences were found in the distances covered by the animals. It is concluded that fattening turkeys reduce the time they are putting weight on their legs because these behaviours may be associated with pain. PMID:16054894

  20. Analgesic effects of clinically used compounds in novel mouse models of polyneuropathy induced by oxaliplatin and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R.; Lim, Yu Ling; Rodrigues de Sousa, Silmara; Lewis, Richard J.; Alewood, Paul F.; Cabot, Peter J.; Vetter, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral neuropathy is the major dose-limiting side effect of cisplatin and oxaliplatin, and there are currently no effective treatments available. The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacological mechanisms underlying chemotherapy-induced neuropathy in novel animal models based on intraplantar administration of cisplatin and oxaliplatin and to systematically evaluate the analgesic efficacy of a range of therapeutics. Methods Neuropathy was induced by a single intraplantar injection of cisplatin or oxaliplatin in C57BL/6J mice and assessed by quantification of mechanical and thermal allodynia. The pharmacological basis of cisplatin-induced neuropathy was characterized using a range of selective pharmacological inhibitors. The analgesic effects of phenytoin, amitriptyline, oxcarbazepine, mexiletine, topiramate, retigabine, gabapentin, fentanyl, and Ca2+/Mg2+ were assessed 24 hours after induction of neuropathy. Results Intraplantar administration of cisplatin led to the development of mechanical allodynia, mediated through Nav1.6-expressing sensory neurons. Unlike intraplantar injection of oxaliplatin, cold allodynia was not observed with cisplatin, consistent with clinical observations. Surprisingly, only fentanyl was effective at alleviating cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia despite a lack of efficacy in oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia. Conversely, lamotrigine, phenytoin, retigabine, and gabapentin were effective at reversing oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia but had no effect on cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Oxcarbazepine, amitriptyline, mexiletine, and topiramate lacked efficacy in both models of acute chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. Conclusion This study established a novel animal model of cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia consistent with the A-fiber neuropathy seen clinically. Systematic assessment of a range of therapeutics identified several candidates that warrant further clinical investigation. PMID:24714523

  1. [Chronic use of analgesics].

    PubMed

    Bronder, E; Klimpel, A; Pommer, W; Molzahn, M

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative aspects of longterm analgesic intake are presented, based on a case-control-study on the relation between regular analgesic intake and endstage renal failure in the area of West Berlin (1984-86). Lifetime analgesic consumption of more than 1000 persons were investigated. A total of 285 longterm analgesic users (185 cases = 35.8%; 100 controls = 19.3%) were detected. An odd ratio of 2.44 (95% CI: 1.77-3.39) was computed. Regular analgesic intake was defined as an intake of at least 15 analgesic doses per month continuously over a period of at least 12 months. 90% of the regular users preferred mixed analgesics compounds, in most cases with the psychotropic additive caffeine. PMID:2238838

  2. Avoiding Opioids and Their Harmful Side Effects in the Postoperative Patient: Exogenous Opioids, Endogenous Endorphins, Wellness, Mood, and Their Relation to Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Bradley C; Parsa, Fereydoun D

    2016-03-01

    Prescribed opioids are routinely used for many postoperative patients. However, these medications have daunting adverse effects on the body's innate pain management system - the action of the beta-endorphins. The prescribed opioids not only severely impair the function of the mu-opioid receptors, but also inhibit the release of beta-endorphin. This is unfortunate, because beta-endorphin appears to be a much more potent agonist of the mu-opioid receptor than opioids. In addition, beta-endorphin indirectly elevates dopamine, a neurotransmitter related to feelings of euphoria. Therefore, by prescribing opioids, practitioners may inadvertently prolong and increase the overall intensity of the postoperative patients' pain as well as herald anhedonia. This article highlights the relationships between prescribed (exogenous) opioids, beta-endorphins, mu-opioid receptors, wellness, mood, and postoperative pain. The role of patient education, opioid alternatives, and additional recommendations regarding pain control in the postoperative patient are also discussed. PMID:27011886

  3. Avoiding Opioids and Their Harmful Side Effects in the Postoperative Patient: Exogenous Opioids, Endogenous Endorphins, Wellness, Mood, and Their Relation to Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Fereydoun D

    2016-01-01

    Prescribed opioids are routinely used for many postoperative patients. However, these medications have daunting adverse effects on the body's innate pain management system - the action of the beta-endorphins. The prescribed opioids not only severely impair the function of the mu-opioid receptors, but also inhibit the release of beta-endorphin. This is unfortunate, because beta-endorphin appears to be a much more potent agonist of the mu-opioid receptor than opioids. In addition, beta-endorphin indirectly elevates dopamine, a neurotransmitter related to feelings of euphoria. Therefore, by prescribing opioids, practitioners may inadvertently prolong and increase the overall intensity of the postoperative patients' pain as well as herald anhedonia. This article highlights the relationships between prescribed (exogenous) opioids, beta-endorphins, mu-opioid receptors, wellness, mood, and postoperative pain. The role of patient education, opioid alternatives, and additional recommendations regarding pain control in the postoperative patient are also discussed. PMID:27011886

  4. A Comparision of Nalbuphine with Morphine for Analgesic Effects and Safety : Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zheng; Lu, Jianhua; Shu, Chang; Chen, Yuanli; Guo, Tong; Wu, Qing-ping; Yao, Shang-long; Yin, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Although morphine is the standard opioid analgesic for pain control and has been widely used, certain drug-induced adverse effects have been reported as intolerable and need to be addressed. Nalbuphine may have a few advantages over morphine in this respect. We aimed to describe the effect of nalbuphine as well as its saftey compared to morphine by analyzing published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with meta-analysis approach. We analysed 15 trials (820 patients). Overall, there was no evidence to show that the effect of pain relief had any difference between nalbuphine and morphine (pooled relative risks [RRs], 1.01; 95% CI, 0.91 to 1.11; P = 0.90). On the other hand, the incidences of pruritus, nausea, vomiting, respiratory depression were significantly lower in nalbuphine group compared with morphine group, and the pooled RRs were 0.78(95%CI, 0.602–0.997; P = 0.048) for nausea, 0.65(95%CI, 0.50–0.85; P = 0.001) for vomiting, 0.17(95%CI, 0.09–0.34; P < 0.0001) for pruritus, and 0.27(95%CI, 0.12–0.57; P = 0.0007) for respiratory depression. The analgesic efficacy of nalbuphine is comparable to morphine, but nalbuphine provides a better safety profile than morphine in the aspect of certain side-effects, especially related to pruritus and respiratory depression. PMID:26039709

  5. Optimising postoperative pain management in the ambulatory patient.

    PubMed

    Shang, Allan B; Gan, Tong J

    2003-01-01

    Over 60% of surgery is now performed in an ambulatory setting. Despite improved analgesics and sophisticated drug delivery systems, surveys indicate that over 80% of patients experience moderate to severe pain postoperatively. Inadequate postoperative pain relief can prolong recovery, precipitate or increase the duration of hospital stay, increase healthcare costs, and reduce patient satisfaction. Effective postoperative pain management involves a multimodal approach and the use of various drugs with different mechanisms of action. Local anaesthetics are widely administered in the ambulatory setting using techniques such as local injection, field block, regional nerve block or neuraxial block. Continuous wound infusion pumps may have great potential in an ambulatory setting. Regional anaesthesia (involving anaesthetising regional areas of the body, including single extremities, multiple extremities, the torso, and the face or jaw) allows surgery to be performed in a specific location, usually an extremity, without the use of general anaesthesia, and potentially with little or no sedation. Opioids remain an important component of any analgesic regimen in treating moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. However, the incorporation of non-opioids, local anaesthetics and regional techniques will enhance current postoperative analgesic regimens. The development of new modalities of treatment, such as patient controlled analgesia, and newer drugs, such as cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, provide additional choices for the practitioner. While there are different routes of administration for analgesics (e.g. oral, parenteral, intramuscular, transmucosal, transdermal and sublingual), oral delivery of medications has remained the mainstay for postoperative pain control. The oral route is effective, the simplest to use and typically the least expensive. The intravenous route has the advantages of a rapid onset of action and easier titratibility, and so is recommended for the

  6. [Effective Dexmedetomidine Administration for the Prevention of Emergence Agitation and Postoperative Delirium in Patients with a History of Postoperative Delirium].

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Takanobu; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Kido, Haruki; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    We successfully performed intraoperative dexmedetomidine (DEX) administration for the prevention of emergence agitation or postoperative delirium after lung resection in four patients (71.3 ± 5.7 year old, 3 males and 1 female) with a past history of postoperative delirium. DEX was started at 0.35-0.45 μg x kg(-1) x hr(-1) continuously without loading. The average time from DEX initiation to extubation was 141.3 ± 94.4 minutes. No patient had emergence agitation, and DEX administration was continued until the following morning with monitoring in all patients without any symptoms of delirium. Intraoperative DEX administration may be beneficial for the prevention of emergence agitation or postoperative delirium in patients with a past history of postoperative delirium. PMID:27188116

  7. Effect of Intraoperative and Postoperative Infusion of Dexmedetomidine on the Quality of Postoperative Analgesia in Highly Nicotine-Dependent Patients After Thoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chunguang; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Zhong; Li, Changying; Zhang, Zongwang; Qi, Feng

    2015-01-01

    with S group, the NRS scores at rest at 1, 4, and 8 hours after surgery and with coughing at 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours after surgery were significantly lower in D2 group (P < 0.05). However, compared with D1 group, the NRS scores both at rest and with coughing at 4 and 8 hours after surgery were significantly lower in D2 group (P < 0.05). The NRS scores both at rest and with coughing show that there were no significant differences between D1 group and S group at each time point after surgery (P > 0.05). LOS of group D2 was higher than S and D1 groups at 1 hour after surgery (P < 0.05), BCS of group D2 was higher than S and D1 groups at 4, 8, and 16 hours after surgery (P < 0.05), and FAS of group D2 was higher than S and D1 groups at 48 and 72 hours after surgery (P < 0.05). The number of rescue analgesia during 72 hours after surgery in D2 group was lower than S and D1 groups (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences among the 3 groups in terms of baseline clinical characteristics and postoperative adverse effects except for itching (P > 0.05). Among the tested patient-controlled analgesia options, the addition of dexmedetomidine (0.04 μg/kg/h) and sufentanil (0.02 μg/kg/h) showed better analgesic effect and greater patient satisfaction without other clinically relevant side effects for highly nicotine-dependent patients during the initial 72 hours after thoracic surgery. Trial Registration: chictr.org (ChiCTR-TRC-14004191). PMID:26266376

  8. Comparison of the Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects in Rats of Diclofenac-Sodium, Felbinac and Indomethacin Patches

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Kozo; Hirose, Akihiko; Suda, Ikuko; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Oguchi, Masao; Onotogi, Masako; Fotopoulos, Grigorios

    2011-01-01

    Background: Topically applied nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used widely for the treatment of pain and inflammation in musculoskeletal disorders. This study compared the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of patches of 1% diclofenac-sodium, 3.5% and 0.5% felbinac and 3.75% indomethacin in rats using the carrageenan-induced paw pad edema model and the brewer’s yeast-induced hyper algesia model. Two studies were conducted: in the preliminary study, the patch was removed at 2 or 24 hrs after application, and in the main study the patch was removed at 2 hrs. The volume of the right hind paw and the pain threshold were assessed at 1, 3, 5, and 7 hrs after induction of inflammation in both studies. Results: In the main study, the edema ratio in the 1% diclofenac group at 5 hrs after induction of inflammation and the AUEC (Area Under the Effect Curve) were significantly lower than in the control animals (p=0.009). The edema suppression rate in the 1% diclofenac group (12.1–33.2%) was higher than in the 3.5% and 0.5% felbinac and 3.75% indomethacin groups. The pain threshold ratio did not decrease in the 1% diclofenac group and it was significantly higher than in the control group at 3 (p=0.0004) and 5 hrs (p=0.029). The 1/AUEC was significantly lower than that in the control group (p=0.004) and the lowest among all the NSAID groups. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the 1% diclofenac sodium patch in a rat model may be exerted more promptly and persistently than with the 3.5% and 0.5% felbinac and 3.75% indomethacin patches. PMID:23675240

  9. Differential proteomics analysis of the analgesic effect of electroacupuncture intervention in the hippocampus following neuropathic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence is building steadily on the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy in pain relief and repeated acupuncture-induced pain relief is accompanied by improvement of hippocampal neural synaptic plasticity. To further test the cellular and molecular changes underlying analgesic effect of acupuncture, the global change of acupuncture associated protein profiles in the hippocampus under neuropathic pain condition was profiled. Methods The chronic constrictive injury (CCI) model was established by ligature of the unilateral sciatic nerve in adult Wistar rats. Rats were randomized into normal control (NC) group, CCI group, and CCI with electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation group. EA was applied to bilateral Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34) in the EA group. Differentially expressed proteins in the hippocampus in the three groups were identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. The functional clustering of the identified proteins was analyzed by Mascot software. Results After CCI, the thermal pain threshold of the affected hind footpad was decreased and was reversed gradually by 12 sessions of acupuncture treatment. Following EA, there were 19 hippocampal proteins identified with significant changes in expression (>2-fold), which are involved in metabolic, physiological, and cellular processes. The top three canonical pathways identified were “cysteine metabolism”, “valine, leucine, and isoleucine degradation” and “mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling”. Conclusions These data suggest that the analgesic effect of EA is mediated by regulation of hippocampal proteins related to amino acid metabolism and activation of the MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:23198761

  10. Analgesic effects of ketamine infusion therapy in korean patients with neuropathic pain: A 2-week, open-label, uncontrolled study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin Gu; Lee, Chul Joong; Kim, Tae Hyeong; Sim, Woo Seok; Shin, Byung Seop; Lee, Sang Hyun; Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Lee, Pyung Bok; Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    Background: The overexcitation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor complex appears to play a critical role in the development of neuropathic pain, and ketamine acts as an antagonist to that receptor. Some publications have reported on the prominent relief of neuropathic pain with intravenous or subcutaneous ketamine infusions or a single-dose intravenous ketamine injection despite adverse effects. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to determine the analgesic effect of intravenous ketamine infusion therapy for neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatments. Secondary objectives included identifying the variables related to the analgesic effect and the pain descriptors susceptible to ketamine infusion. Methods: This 2-week, open-label, uncontrolled study was conducted in Korean patients with neuropathic pain recruited from the Samsung Seoul Hospital (Seoul, Republic of Korea) outpatient pain management unit. Patients were required to have a pain severity score >5 (visual analog scale [VAS], where 0 = no pain and 10 = worst pain imaginable) over a period of ≥1 month while on standard treatment. The patients were required to have shown no benefit from standard treatment and no pain relief lasting over 1 month. The ketamine infusion therapy was composed of 3 sessions performed consecutively every other day. Midazolam was administered concomitantly to reduce the occurrence of central nervous system-related adverse events (AEs) secondary to ketamine. Each session was as follows: ketamine 0.2 mg/kg and midazolam 0.1 mg/kg were administered intravenously for 5 minutes as a loading dose, followed by a continuous infusion of ketamine 0.5 mg/kg/h and midazolam 0.025 mg/kg/h for 2 hours. AEs were assessed in the following ways: close monitoring of ECG, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and evaluating the need for treatment of AEs during infu- sion and until discharge by an attending anesthesiologist; an open question about discomfort at the end of

  11. Tramadol: a new centrally acting analgesic.

    PubMed

    Lewis, K S; Han, N H

    1997-03-15

    The pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, adverse effects, and dosage and administration of tramadol are reviewed. Tramadol is a synthetic analogue of codeine that binds to mu opiate receptors and inhibits norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake. It is rapidly and extensively absorbed after oral doses and is metabolized in the liver. Analgesia begins within one hour and starts to peak in two hours. In patients with moderate postoperative pain, i.v. or i.m. tramadol is roughly equal in efficacy to meperidine or morphine; for severe acute pain, tramadol is less effective than morphine. Oral tramadol can also be effective after certain types of surgery. Tramadol and meperidine are equally effective in postoperative patient-controlled analgesia. In epidural administration for pain after abdominal surgery, tramadol is more effective than bupivacaine but less effective than morphine. In patients with ureteral calculi, both dipyrone and butylscopolamine are more effective than tramadol. For labor pain, i.m. tramadol works as well as meperidine and is less likely to cause neonatal respiratory depression. Oral tramadol is as effective as codeine for acute dental pain. In several types of severe or refractory cancer pain, tramadol is effective, but less so than morphine; for other types of chronic pain, such as low-back pain, oral tramadol works as well as acetaminophen-codeine. Common adverse effects of tramadol include dizziness, nausea, dry mouth, and sedation. The abuse potential seems low. The recommended oral dosage is 50-100 mg every four to six hours. Tramadol is an effective, if expensive, alternative to other analgesics in some clinical situations. PMID:9075493

  12. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Atiba, Ayman; Ghazy, Alaa; Gomaa, Naglaa; Kamal, Tarek; Shukry, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick test. Onset time, duration, and degree of analgesia and ataxia were recorded after each treatment. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature, and haematobiochemical parameters were recorded after all treatments. Time to onset and duration of analgesia, respectively, were as follows: tramadol 11 ± 2 min and 208 ± 15 min; tramadol-lidocaine 6 ± 2 min and 168 ± 9 min; lidocaine 4 ± 1 min and 67 ± 13 min. Onset time and duration were significantly longer with tramadol than the other treatments. Duration was significantly longer with tramadol-lidocaine than lidocaine. Ataxia was mildly observed in tramadol-lidocaine and was moderate in lidocaine. HR, RR, and rectal temperature did not differ significantly from baseline after any treatment. Haematobiochemical parameters returned to basal levels by 24 h after all treatments. This combination might be clinically useful to provide analgesia in buffalo for long-duration surgical procedures. PMID:26770870

  13. Development of a minimum-anesthetic-concentration depression model to study the effects of various analgesics in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Ward, Jessica L; McCartney, Sean P; Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Posner, Lysa P

    2012-06-01

    Teleost fish demonstrate the neurophysiologic capacity to experience pain and analgesia. A common model for assessing analgesic effect is the reduction of minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC). The present study adapted the model of MAC depression to evaluate the analgesic effects of morphine, butorphanol, medetomidine, and ketoprofen in goldfish (Carassius auratus). MAC was determined by an up-down method of sequential population sampling, anesthetizing fish with tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) in concentration increments of 10 parts per million (ppm), and using intramuscular needle insertion as a supramaximal noxious stimulus. Baseline MAC was determined in triplicate at the beginning (MACi) and conclusion (MACe) of the experiment (approximately 60 days). For drug trials, MAC was redetermined 1 hr after administration of morphine (10, 20, 40 mg/kg i.m.), butorphanol (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 mg/kg i.m.), medetomidine (0.01, 0.015, 0.025 mg/kg i.m.), ketoprofen (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mg/kg i.m.), or saline control. Each drug/dose was tested in random order with a > 6-day washout period. MACi and MACf were 163 and 182 ppm, respectively, and were significantly different from each other (P = 0.02). All doses of morphine and ketoprofen decreased MAC below MACi. The highest dose of medetomidine decreased MAC below MACi. The lowest dose of butorphanol decreased MAC below MACi, but higher doses increased MAC above MACf. The authors conclude that MAC determination in fish using MS-222 was feasible and reproducible in the short term. The fact that MAC increased over time and/or exposure may limit the usefulness of MS-222 in MAC depression studies. Morphine and ketoprofen decrease anesthetic needs in goldfish and may provide analgesia. PMID:22779222

  14. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Atiba, Ayman; Ghazy, Alaa; Gomaa, Naglaa; Kamal, Tarek; Shukry, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick test. Onset time, duration, and degree of analgesia and ataxia were recorded after each treatment. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal temperature, and haematobiochemical parameters were recorded after all treatments. Time to onset and duration of analgesia, respectively, were as follows: tramadol 11 ± 2 min and 208 ± 15 min; tramadol-lidocaine 6 ± 2 min and 168 ± 9 min; lidocaine 4 ± 1 min and 67 ± 13 min. Onset time and duration were significantly longer with tramadol than the other treatments. Duration was significantly longer with tramadol-lidocaine than lidocaine. Ataxia was mildly observed in tramadol-lidocaine and was moderate in lidocaine. HR, RR, and rectal temperature did not differ significantly from baseline after any treatment. Haematobiochemical parameters returned to basal levels by 24 h after all treatments. This combination might be clinically useful to provide analgesia in buffalo for long-duration surgical procedures. PMID:26770870

  15. Analgesic Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A2 in a Mouse Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongxing; Lee, Younju; Kim, Woojin; Lee, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2015-01-01

    A single infusion of oxaliplatin, which is widely used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are triggered or aggravated when exposed to cold or mechanical stimuli. Bee Venom (BV) has been traditionally used in Korea to treat various pain symptoms. Our recent study demonstrated that BV alleviates oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia in rats, via noradrenergic and serotonergic analgesic pathways. In this study, we have further investigated whether BV derived phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) attenuates oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia in mice and its mechanism. The behavioral signs of cold and mechanical allodynia were evaluated by acetone and a von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The significant allodynia signs were observed from one day after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). Daily administration of bvPLA2 (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days markedly attenuated cold and mechanical allodynia, which was more potent than the effect of BV (1 mg/kg, i.p.). The depletion of noradrenaline by an injection of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4, 50 mg/kg, i.p.) blocked the analgesic effect of bvPLA2, whereas the depletion of serotonin by injecting DL-p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 150 mg/kg, i.p.) for three successive days did not. Furthermore, idazoxan (α2-adrenegic receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) completely blocked bvPLA2-induced anti-allodynic action, whereas prazosin (α1-adrenegic antagonist, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. These results suggest that bvPLA2 treatment strongly alleviates oxaliplatin-induced acute cold and mechanical allodynia in mice through the activation of the noradrenergic system, via α2-adrenegic receptors, but not via the serotonergic system. PMID:26131771

  16. Comparison of analgesic effects of nimesulide, paracetamol, and their combination in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mushtaq; Upadhyaya, Prerna; Seth, Vikas

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the analgesic activity of nimesulide and paracetamol alone and their combination in animal models for the degree of analgesia and the time course of action. Materials and Methods: Analgesia was studied in albino rats using formalin test and in albino mice using writhing test and the radiant heat method. For each test, four groups of six animals each were orally fed with a single dose of nimesulide, paracetamol, and combination of nimesulide + paracetamol and gum acacia as control, respectively. Results: In all the three test models, all three drug treatments showed significant analgesia (P < 0.001) as compared to control, but there was no significant difference in the analgesia produced by either drugs alone or in combination. The radiant heat method demonstrated a quicker onset and longer duration of action with nimesulide, whereas writhing test showed a quicker onset of action with paracetamol. In formalin test, greater degree of analgesia was seen with individual drugs than that of the combination, though this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Nimesulide and paracetamol combination offers no advantage over nimesulide alone or paracetamol alone, either in terms of degree of analgesia or onset of action. Therefore, our study supports the reports claiming irrationality of the fixed dose combination of nimesulide and paracetamol. PMID:21189904

  17. Current issues in postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Narinder

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative pain has been poorly managed for decades. Recent surveys from USA and Europe do not show any major improvement. Persistent postoperative pain is common after most surgical procedures, and after thoracotomy and mastectomy, about 50% of patients may experience it. Opioids remain the mainstay of postoperative pain treatment in spite of strong evidence of their drawbacks. Multimodal analgesic techniques are widely used but new evidence is disappointing. Regional anaesthetic techniques are the most effective methods to treat postoperative pain. Current evidence suggests that epidural analgesia can no longer be considered the 'gold standard'. Perineural techniques are good alternatives for major orthopaedic surgery but remain underused. Infiltrative techniques with or without catheters are useful for almost all types of surgery. Simple surgeon-delivered local anaesthetic techniques such as wound infiltration, preperitoneal/intraperitoneal administration, transversus abdominis plane block and local infiltration analgesia can play a significant role in improvement of postoperative care, and the last of these has changed orthopaedic practice in many institutions. Current postoperative pain management guidelines are generally 'one size fits all'. It is well known that pain characteristics such as type, location, intensity and duration vary considerably after different surgical procedures. Procedure-specific postoperative pain management recommendations are evidence based, and also take into consideration the role of anaesthetic and surgical techniques, clinical routines and risk-benefit aspects. The role of acute pain services to improve pain management and outcome is well accepted but implementation seems challenging. The need for upgrading the role of surgical ward nurses and collaboration with surgeons to implement enhanced recovery after surgery protocols with regular audits to improve postoperative outcome cannot be overstated. PMID:26509324

  18. Effect of preoperative suggestion on postoperative gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed Central

    Disbrow, E A; Bennett, H L; Owings, J T

    1993-01-01

    Autonomic behavior is subject to direct suggestion. We found that patients undergoing major operations benefit more from instruction than from information and reassurance. We compared the return of intestinal function after intra-abdominal operations in 2 groups of patients: the suggestion group received specific instructions for the early return of gastrointestinal motility, and the control group received an equal-length interview offering reassurance and nonspecific instructions. The suggestion group had a significantly shorter average time to the return of intestinal motility, 2.6 versus 4.1 days. Time to discharge was 6.5 versus 8.1 days. Covariates including duration of operation, amount of intraoperative bowel manipulation, and amount of postoperative narcotics were also examined using the statistical model analysis of covariance. An average savings of $1,200 per patient resulted from this simple 5-minute intervention. In summary, the use of specific physiologically active suggestions given preoperatively in a beleivable manner can reduce the morbidity associated with an intra-abdominal operation by reducing the duration of ileus. PMID:8342264

  19. Opioid Analgesics.

    PubMed

    Jamison, Robert N; Mao, Jianren

    2015-07-01

    Chronic pain is an international health issue of immense importance that is influenced by both physical and psychological factors. Opioids are useful in treating chronic pain but have accompanying complications. It is important for clinicians to understand the basics of opioid pharmacology, the benefits and adverse effects of opioids, and related problematic issues of tolerance, dependence, and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. In this article, the role of psychiatric comorbidity and the use of validated assessment tools to identify individuals who are at the greatest risk for opioid misuse are discussed. Additionally, interventional treatment strategies for patients with chronic pain who are at risk for opioid misuse are presented. Specific behavioral interventions designed to improve adherence with prescription opioids among persons treated for chronic pain, such as frequent monitoring, periodic urine screens, opioid therapy agreements, opioid checklists, and motivational counseling, are also reviewed. Use of state-sponsored prescription drug monitoring programs is also encouraged. Areas requiring additional investigation are identified, and the future role of abuse-deterrent opioids and innovative technology in addressing issues of opioid therapy and pain are presented. PMID:26141334

  20. Effectiveness of Submucosal Dexamethasone to Control Postoperative Pain & Swelling in Apicectomy of Maxillary Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shahzad Ali; Khan, Irfanullah; Shah, Humera Shahzad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucosal dexamethasone injection to control postoperative pain and swelling in apicectomy of maxillary anterior teeth. Methods A randomized, controlled trial comprising 60 adult patients (68.3% male, 31.7% female) with no local or systemic problems was conducted. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was given 4mg dexamethasone injection perioperatively. Group B (control group) was treated conventionally without any steroid injection. Postoperative pain and swelling was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). Objective measurements of facial pain and swelling were performed daily up to six days postoperatively. Results Dexamethasone group showed significant reduction in pain and swelling postoperatively compared with the control. Conclusion Submucosal dexamethasone 4mg injection is an effective therapeutic strategy for swift and comfortable improvement after surgical procedure and has a significant effect on reducing postoperative pain and swelling. The treatment offers a simple, safe, painless, noninvasive and cost effective therapeutic option for moderate and severe cases. PMID:23267293

  1. [Paracetamol (perfalgane) as analgesic component of medicinal sedation].

    PubMed

    Mustafaeva, M N; Mizikov, V M

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the possibility of the use of paracetamol (perfalgane) as an analgesic component of medical sedation. The actuality of the problem is the choice effective pharmacological means of protection from peri-operative pain. The theoretical advantages of paracetamol in the scheme of sedoanalgesia are exquisite. We describe a personal experience of efficacy assessment and safety of paracetamol as an analgesic component of the methodology of drug sedation for bronchoscopy in the early postoperative period. We compare analgesia by the means of paracetamol 1000 mg (IV) and tramadol 100 mg (IV). The sedative agent in both groups was midazolam. It turned out, that despite the high efficacy of tramadol as a component of sedoanalgesia, the quality of anialgesia when using perfalagane is almost 5 times higher, both due to the significant number of good results, and to reduced number of adverse events. Use of paracetamol (Perfalgane) instead of tramadol for medical sedation during fibrotracheoscopy in patients in the early postoperative period leads to better quality of analgesia, thus avoiding such undesirable phenomena as hypersedation, respiratory depression, dizziness, and nausea. PMID:21688656

  2. Gabapentin, an Analgesic Used Against Cancer-Associated Neuropathic Pain: Effects on Prostate Cancer Progression in an In Vivo Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Bugan, Ilknur; Karagoz, Zeynep; Altun, Seyhan; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2016-03-01

    A major problem associated with clinical management of cancer is controlling the accompanying pain, and various analgesics are in common use for this purpose. Recent evidence suggests that some of the targets of analgesics, such as ion channels and receptors, may also be involved in the cancer process, thereby raising the possibility that such use of some analgesics may impact upon cancer itself. The main aim of this study was to determine whether gabapentin, a common adjuvant analgesic in current use against cancer-associated neuropathic pain, would affect tumour development and progression in vivo. The Dunning rat model of prostate cancer was used. Strongly metastatic Mat-LyLu cells were implanted subcutaneously into syngeneic Copenhagen rats which were then treated every other day with 4.6-16.8 μg/kg gabapentin by gavage. Primary tumourigenesis was monitored daily. Lung metastases were counted and measured after killing the rats 21 days later. Gabapentin had no effect on primary tumourigenesis but produced dose-dependent effects on lung metastasis. Whilst 4.6 μg/kg had no effect, 9.1 μg/kg gabapentin decreased the number of lung metastases significantly by 64%. In contrast, 16.8 μg/kg gabapentin promoted metastasis significantly by 112% and showed a strong tendency to shorten mean survival time. It is concluded that gabapentin prescribed to cancer patients against pain could impact upon the cancer process itself. PMID:26335695

  3. The analgesic and toxic effects of nornicotine enantiomers alone and in interaction with morphine in rodent models of acute and persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Holtman, Joseph R.; Crooks, Peter A.; Johnson-Hardy, Jaime K.; Wala, Elzbieta P.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholinic receptors (nAChR) are promising targets for the development of novel analgesics. Nicotine and other nAChR-agonists produce profound analgesia in rodent models of acute and persistent pain. However, significant side-effects are of concern. Nornicotine (N-desmethyl-nicotine) appears to activate different nAChR subtypes, has a better pharmacokinetic profile, and produces less toxicity than nicotine. Little is known about its analgesic properties. In the present study, the S(−)- and R(+)- enantiomers of nornicotine were characterized with regard to analgesia and side-effects profile. Efficacy was demonstrated in rat models of pain where central sensitization is involved: i.e. the chronic constriction nerve injury model of peripheral neuropathy and the formalin model of tonic inflammatory pain. The desirable (analgesic) properties resided predominantly in the S(−)- rather than the R(+)- enantiomer. In contrast, undesirable effects (motor in-coordination, reduced locomotor activity, ataxia) were more pronounced with the R(+)- enantiomer. This is an interesting finding, which may suggest separation of toxicity from analgesia by utilization of S(−)-enantiomer of nornicotine. Maximum analgesic effectiveness without significant side-effects was achieved when S(−)-nornicotine (sub-analgesic dose) was combined with a low-dose of the μ-opioid, morphine. These preclinical data suggest that S(−)-nornicotine may be of value, either alone or in combination with an opioid, for treatment of a broad-spectrum of pain (i.e. nociceptive, neuropathic, mixed pain). PMID:19800911

  4. Serial Analgesic Consumptions and Predictors of Intravenous Patient-controlled Analgesia with Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To elucidate the dynamics of analgesic consumption regarding intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IVPCA) during postoperative period is rather complex partly due to between-patient variation and partly due to within-patient variation. A statistical method was proposed to classify serial analgesic consumption into different classifications that were further taken as the multiple outcomes on which to explore the associated predictors. Methods: We retrospectively included 3284 patients administrated by IVPCA for 3 days after surgery. A repeated measurement design corresponding to serial analgesic consumption variables defined as six-hour total analgesic consumptions was adopted. After determining the numbers of clusters, serial analgesic consumptions were classified into several homogeneous subgroups. Factors associated with new classifications were identified and quantified with a multinominal logistic regression model. Results: Three distinct analgesic classifications were aggregated, including “high”, ”middle” and “low” level of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. The mean analgesic consumptions on 12 successive analgesic consumptions at 6-hour interval of each classification consistently revealed a decreasing trend. As the trends were almost parallel with time, this suggests the time-invariant proportionality of analgesic consumption between the levels of analgesic consumption of IVPCA. Patient’s characteristics, like age, gender, weight, height, and cancer status, were significant factors associated with analgesic classifications. Surgical sites had great impacts on analgesic classifications. Discussion: The serial analgesic consumptions were simplified into 3 analgesic consumptions classifications. The identified predictors are useful to recognize patient’s analgesic classifications before using IVPCA. This study explored a new approach to analysing dynamic changes of postoperative analgesic consumptions. PMID:26710218

  5. The effect of postoperative positive end-expiratory pressure on postoperative bleeding after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Salihoglu, Ece; Celik, Sezai; Ugurlucan, Murat; Caglar, Ilker Murat; Turhan-Caglar, Fatma Nihan; Isik, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Introduction To compare postoperative prophylactic use of two positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels in order to prevent postoperative bleeding in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. Material and methods Sixty patients undergoing an elective off-pump CABG operation were included in this prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial. Patients were divided into two groups as receiving either 5 cm H2O (group 1) or 8 cm H2O PEEP (group 2) after the operation until being extubated. Chest tube outputs, use of blood products and other fluids, postoperative hemoglobin levels, accumulation of pleural and pericardial fluid after the removal of chest tubes, and duration of hospital stay were recorded and compared. Results Low- and high-pressure PEEP groups did not differ with regard to postoperative chest tube outputs, amounts of transfusions and crystalloid/colloid infusion requirements, or postoperative hemoglobin levels. However, low-pressure PEEP application was associated with significantly higher pleural (92 ±37 ml vs. 69 ±29 ml, p = 0.03) and pericardial fluid (17 ±5 ml vs. 14 ±6 ml, p = 0.04) accumulation. On the other hand, high-pressure PEEP application was associated with significantly longer duration of hospitalization (6.25 ±1.21 days vs. 5.25 ±0.91 days, p = 0.03). Conclusions Prophylactic administration of postoperative PEEP levels of 8 cm H2O, although safe, does not seem to reduce chest-tube output or transfusion requirements in off-pump CABG when compared to the lower level of PEEP. Further studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to confirm the benefits and identify ideal levels of PEEP administration in this group of patients. PMID:25395944

  6. Transdermal Buprenorphine Patches for Postoperative Pain Control in Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Prithvi Kumar; Verma, Reetu; Chandra, Girish; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Bogra, Jaishri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic derivative of thebaine; its low concentration is sufficient to provide effective pain relief. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch in postoperative pain management. Materials and Methods After ethical approval and taking informed consent from the patients, they were randomized into three groups (n=30 in each group) using a computer generated random number table. Group A: placebo patch; Group B: buprenorphine (10mg) patch and Group C: buprenorphine (20mg) patch. Haemodynamic and analgesic effects were compared by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Turkey’s post hoc test. The proportion of side effects was compared using the Chi-square test. Results Haemodynamic changes were not statistically different in all the three groups A, B and C, whereas at the end of surgery VAS score of Group A subjects was significantly higher (4.93±0.98) as compared to Group B (1.73±0.64) and Group C (1.40±0.50). On 2nd postoperative day, no pain was reported by the Group C patients and on 4th day after surgery, no pain was reported by Group B patients. Conclusion The transdermal buprenorphine patch (20mg) was effective in attenuating postoperative pain, maintaining haemodynamic stability requiring no rescue analgesia, with fewer postoperative rescue analgesic requirements in low dose of buprenorphine patch (10mg) group. PMID:27504383

  7. Effects of Intra-Operative Total Intravenous Anaesthesia with Propofol versus Inhalational Anaesthesia with Sevoflurane on Post-Operative Pain in Liver Surgery: A Retrospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Siu Wai; Wong, Stanley Sau Ching; Chan, Albert Chi Yan; Irwin, Michael G; Cheung, Chi Wai

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients receiving total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol have been shown to experience less postoperative pain. We evaluated the post-operative analgesic effects of propofol compared with sevoflurane maintenance of anesthesia in liver surgery. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02179437). Methods In this retrospective study, records of patients who underwent liver surgery between 2010 and 2013 were reviewed. Ninety-five patients anesthetized with propofol TIVA were matched with 95 patients anesthetized with sevoflurane. Numeric pain rating scale (NRS) pain scores, postoperative morphine consumption, side effects and patients’ satisfaction with pain relief were evaluated. Results The TIVA group reported lower NRS pain scores during coughing on postoperative days 1 and 2 but not 3 (p = 0.0127, p = 0.0472, p = 0.4556 respectively). They also consumed significantly less daily (p = 0.001 on day 1, p = 0.0231 on day 2, p = 0.0004 on day 3), accumulative (p = 0.001 on day 1, p<0.0001 on day 2 and p = 0.0064 on day 3) and total morphine (p = 0.03) when compared with the sevoflurane group. There were no differences in total duration of intravenous patient controlled analgesia (PCA) morphine use and patient satisfaction. No difference was found in reported side effects. Conclusion Patients anesthetized with propofol TIVA reported less pain during coughing and consumed less daily, accumulative and total morphine after liver surgery. PMID:26901037

  8. The Effect of Gabapentin on Acute Postoperative Pain in Patients Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Lifeng; Song, Zhoufeng; Liu, Kang

    2016-05-01

    consumption via PCA at 24 hours (MD = -8.28; 95% CI -12.57 to -3.99; P = 0.000) and 48 hours (MD = -4.50; 95% CI -10.98 to -3.61; P = 0.221). Furthermore, gabapentin decreased the rate of postoperative dizziness (relative risk [RR], 0.68; 95% CI 0.47-0.99, P = 0.044) and the occurrence of pruritus (RR, 0.50; 95% CI 0.37-0.67, P = 0.000).Based on the current meta-analysis, gabapentin exerts an analgesic and opioid-sparing effect in acute postoperative pain management without increasing the rate of dizziness and pruritus. PMID:27196473

  9. Antinociceptive effects of vitexin in a mouse model of postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Mao, Li-Na; Liu, Cheng-Peng; Sun, Yue-Hua; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jun-Xu

    2016-01-01

    Vitexin, a C-glycosylated flavone present in several medicinal herbs, has showed various pharmacological activities including antinociception. The present study investigated the antinociceptive effects of vitexin in a mouse model of postoperative pain. This model was prepared by making a surgical incision on the right hindpaw and von Frey filament test was used to assess mechanical hyperalgesia. Isobolographical analysis method was used to examine the interaction between vitexin and acetaminophen. A reliable mechanical hyperalgesia was observed at 2 h post-surgery and lasted for 4 days. Acute vitexin administration (3–10 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently relieved this hyperalgesia, which was also observed from 1 to 3 days post-surgery during repeated daily treatment. However, repeated vitexin administration prior to surgery had no preventive value. The 10 mg/kg vitexin-induced antinociception was blocked by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone or the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. The doses of vitexin used did not significantly suppress the locomotor activity. In addition, the combination of vitexin and acetaminophen produced an infra-additive effect in postoperative pain. Together, though vitexin-acetaminophen combination may not be useful for treating postoperative pain, vitexin exerts behaviorally-specific antinociception against postoperative pain mediated through opioid receptors and GABAA receptors, suggesting that vitexin may be useful for the control of postoperative pain. PMID:26763934

  10. [The effect of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in postoperative respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Ozyılmaz, Ezgi; Kaya, Akın

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative respiratory failure is related with the highest mortality and morbidity among all perioperative complications. The most common underlying mechanism of postoperative respiratory failure is the development of atelectasis. Anaesthesia, medications which cause respiratory depression, high FiO2 use, postoperative pain and disruption of muscle forces due to surgery leads to decrease in functional residual capacity and results in atelectasis formation. Atelectasis causes severe hypoxemia due to ventilation, perfusion mismatch, shunt and increased peripheral vascular resistance. Intrathoracic positive pressure is an effective therapeutic option in both prevention and treatment of atelectasis. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation is related with a lower mortality and morbidity rate due to lack of any potential complication risks of endotracheal intubation. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation can be applied as prophylactic or curative. Both of these techniques are related with lower reintubation rates, nosocomial infections, duration of hospitalization and mortality in patients with postoperative respiratory failure. The differences of this therapy from standard application and potential complications should be well known in order to improve prognosis in these group of patients. The primary aim of this review is to underline the pathogenesis of postoperative respiratory failure. The secondary aim is to clarify the optimum method, effect and complications of non-invasive mechanical ventilation therapy under the light of the studies which was performed in specific patient groups. PMID:22779943

  11. Anxiolytic, Psychostimulant, and Analgesic Effects of Various Volumes of Ethanol Solution in Different Concentrations, but in the Same Dose.

    PubMed

    Sudakov, S K; Alekseeva, E V; Bogdanova, N G; Kolpakov, A A; Nazarova, G A

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effect of ethanol (dose 2 g/kg) in various concentrations (5, 13, and 40%) and different volumes (40, 15.5, and 5 ml/kg) on the level of anxiety, locomotor activity, and pain sensitivity in rats. Administration of 40 ml/kg water to animals was followed by a significant increase in the time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. Administration of water in a volume of 5 or 15.5 ml/kg had little effect on the level of anxiety. The greater was the volume of intragastrically administered ethanol, the stronger was the anxiolytic effect. The psychostimulant and analgesic effects of ethanol were more pronounced after administration of medium volumes and intermediate concentrations of ethanol-containing solutions. Since administration of these solutions cannot produce maximum blood concentration of ethanol, we believe that the observed effects are mainly related to the direct effect of ethanol on the stomach tissue. PMID:27270926

  12. Safety issues of current analgesics: an update

    PubMed Central

    CAZACU, IRINA; MOGOSAN, CRISTINA; LOGHIN, FELICIA

    2015-01-01

    Pain represents a complex experience which can be approached by various medicines. Non-opioid and opioid analgesics are the most common drugs used to manage different types of pain. The increased attention nowadays to pain management entailed concomitantly more frequent adverse drug reactions (ADRs) related to analgesic use. Drug-drug interactions can be sometimes responsible for the adverse effects. However, a significant proportion of analgesic ADRs are preventable, which would avoid patient suffering. In order to draw the attention to analgesics risks and to minimize the negative consequences related to their use, the present review comprises a synthesis of the most important safety issues described in the scientific literature. It highlights the potential risks of the most frequently used analgesic medicines: non-opioid (paracetamol, metamizole, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and opioid analgesics. Even if there is a wide experience in their use, they continue to capture attention with safety concerns and with potential risks recently revealed. Acknowledging potential safety problems represents the first step for health professionals in assuring a safe and efficient analgesic treatment with minimum risks to patients. Taking into consideration all medical and environmental factors and carefully monitoring the patients are also essential in preventing and early detecting analgesic ADRs. PMID:26528060

  13. Analgesic and antiinflammatory effects of mollic acid glucoside, a 1 alpha-hydroxycycloartenoid saponin extractive from Combretum molle R. Br. ex G. Don (Combretaceae) leaf.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, John A O

    2008-01-01

    The analgesic and antiinflammatory properties of mollic acid glucoside (MAG), a 1 alpha-hydroxycycloartenoid extract from Combretum molle leaf, have been investigated in mice and rats. The effects of graded doses of mollic acid glucoside (MAG, 5-80 mg/kg i.p.) were examined against thermally- and chemically-induced nociceptive pain in mice. Furthermore, the effects of graded doses of the plant extract (MAG, 5-80 mg/kg p.o.) were also investigated on rat paw oedema induced by subplantar injections of fresh egg albumin (0.5 mg/kg). Morphine (MPN, 10 mg/kg i.p.) and diclofenac (DIC, 100 mg/kg i.p.) were used as reference analgesic and antiinflammatory agents for comparison, respectively. Like DIC (100 mg/kg i.p.) and MPN (10 mg/kg i.p.), MAG (5-80 mg/kg i.p.) produced dose-dependent, significant (p < 0.05-0.001) analgesic effects against thermally and chemically induced nociceptive pain in mice. The extractive (MAG, 5-80 mg/kg i.p.) also significantly reduced (p < 0.05-0.001) rat paw oedema induced by subplantar injections of fresh egg albumin in a dose-related fashion. However, the extract (MAG, 5-80 mg/kg i.p.) was found to be less potent than diclofenac (DIC) as an analgesic or antiinflammatory agent. Experimental evidence obtained from this laboratory animal study indicates that the Combretum molle leaf extractive (MAG) possesses analgesic and antiinflammatory properties, and thus lend pharmacological credence to the folkloric, ethnomedical uses of the plant's leaf in the management, control and/or treatment of painful, arthritic and other inflammatory conditions in some rural communities of southern Africa. PMID:17685389

  14. The analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block with mid-axillary approach after gynecologic laparoscopic surgery: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Ryoko; Tamai, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Kyoko; Okuno, Satoko; Hanada, Rumi; Funato, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is widely used in clinical practice as a part of the multimodal analgesic regimen after abdominal surgery. The analgesic efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided TAP block with the mid-axillary approach was investigated in patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery in a randomized controlled clinical trial. Materials and Methods: Adult patients (n = 119) undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery were randomized to undergo either TAP block with ropivacaine (Group A, n = 60) or that with saline (Group B, n = 59), in a blinded manner. Following general anesthesia, TAP block was performed bilaterally by infusion of either 20-mL 0.375% ropivacaine/one side in Group A or 20-mL saline/one side in Group B, under US guidance with a mid-axillary approach. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was performed postoperatively with tramadol. The analgesic effect was postoperatively evaluated using a four-grade pain score and the prince Henry pain scale (PHS) at 0, 6, 12, and 24 h. Postoperative tramadol PCA consumption and vomiting/nausea were recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney U-test or Fisher's exact probability test. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in background characteristics. The dose of remifentanil was significantly higher in Group B (P = 0.01). The pain score (P = 0.02) and PHS (P = 0.01) were significantly lower in Group A at 0 h. Tramadol PCA consumption in the period of 0-6 h (P = 0.01) and postoperative nausea (P = 0.04) were significantly less in Group A. Conclusion: Postoperative pain/nausea and PCA consumption were significantly lower in patients with TAP block in the early postoperative stage. TAP block with a mid-axillary approach holds considerable promise as a part of a balanced postoperative analgesic regimen following laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. PMID:25788776

  15. Comparison of single-dose ibuprofen lysine, acetylsalicylic acid, and placebo for moderate-to-severe postoperative dental pain.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S L; Brahim, J S; Korn, S H; Greene, S S; Suchower, L J

    1994-01-01

    In a single-dose, double-blind, parallel-group, single-site study, ibuprofen lysine 200 mg (IBL 200) was compared with acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg (ASA 500) and placebo in 183 patients with moderate-to-severe postoperative dental pain. The relative onset of analgesic response, duration and degree of analgesia, and safety were assessed over a 6-hour postdose period. Analgesic efficacy was assessed by patient self-rating of pain intensity, pain relief, time to meaningful pain relief, global evaluation, and requirement for additional analgesic medication; both IBL 200 and ASA 500 were significantly more effective than placebo. IBL 200 also had a significantly faster onset of action, greater peak and overall analgesic effect, and longer duration of analgesia than ASA 500. All treatments were generally well tolerated. PMID:7923312

  16. Comparing the Effects of Morphine Sulfate and Diclofenac Suppositories on Postoperative Pain in Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Patients

    PubMed Central

    Imantalab, Vali; Mirmansouri, Ali; Sedighinejad, Abbas; Naderi Nabi, Bahram; Farzi, Farnoush; Atamanesh, Hadi; Nassiri, Nassir

    2014-01-01

    Background: Simple and efficient way of pain management after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) surgery is an important aspect of patients' care. Objectives: This study aimed to compare the effects of morphine and diclofenac suppositories on postoperative pain management. Patients and Methods: In this double-blinded clinical trial study, 120 patients aged 30-65 years old, undergone CABG, were equally divided into two groups of A (morphine) and B (diclofenac). All patients were anesthetized with intravenous fentanyl 10 μg/kg, etomidate 0.2 mg/kg and cisatracurium 0.2 mg/kg. Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen 50% and air 50%, propofol 50 μg/kg/min, fentanyl 1-2 μg/kg/h and atracurium 0.6 mg/kg/h. Analgesics were administered after the operation at intensive care unit (ICU) and Visual Analogue Score (VAS) was evaluated in both groups in 4-hour intervals after extubation for 24 hours. After extubation in case of VAS > 3, morphine suppository 10 mg (group A) or diclofenac suppository 50 mg (group B) was administered for patients. Results: No significant statistical relationship was found between the two groups regarding gender, age, BMI, paracetamol consumption, length of operation time, cardiopulmonary bypass pump (CPB) time, and stay time at ICU (P Value ≥ 0.05). Total dosage of used morphine was 22 ± 8.3 mg in each patient and total dosage of used diclofenac was 94 ± 32.01 mg. Average variation of VAS at measured intervals was significant (P Value ≤ 0.0001), but these variations were not significantly different when comparing the two groups (P Value = 0.023). Conclusions: Both morphine and diclofenac suppositories reduced pain significantly and similarly after CABG surgery. PMID:25346897

  17. Postoperative analgesia at home after ambulatory hand surgery: a controlled comparison of tramadol, metamizol, and paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Rawal, N; Allvin, R; Amilon, A; Ohlsson, T; Hallén, J

    2001-02-01

    We compared in a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study the analgesic efficacy of three drugs in 120 ASA I and II patients scheduled to undergo ambulatory hand surgery with IV regional anesthesia. At discharge, oral analgesic tablets were prescribed as follows: tramadol 100 mg every 6 h, metamizol 1 g every 6 h, and paracetamol (acetaminophen) 1 g every 6 h. Rescue medication consisted of oral dextropropoxyphene 100 mg on demand. Analgesic efficacy was evaluated by self-assessment of pain intensity by visual analog score at six different time intervals during the 48-h study period. Patients also recorded global pain relief on a 5-grade scale, total number of study and rescue analgesic tablets, frequency and severity of adverse effects, sleep pattern, and overall satisfaction. None of the study drugs alone provided effective analgesia in all patients. The percentage of patients who required supplementary analgesics was 23% with tramadol, 31% with metamizol, and 42% with acetaminophen. Tramadol was the most effective analgesic, as evidenced by low pain scores, least rescue medication, and fewest number of patients with sleep disturbance. However, the incidence of side effects was also increased with tramadol. Seven patients (17.5%) withdrew from the study because of the severity of nausea and dizziness associated with the use of tramadol. Metamizol and acetaminophen provided good analgesia in about 70% and 60% of patients, respectively, with a decreased incidence of side effects. Despite receiving oral analgesic medication, up to 40% of patients undergoing hand surgery experienced inadequate analgesia in this controlled trial. Although tramadol was more effective, its use was associated with the highest frequency and intensity of adverse effects and the most patient dissatisfaction. Metamizol and acetaminophen provided good analgesia with a small incidence of side effects. For patients undergoing ambulatory hand surgery, postoperative pain can last longer than

  18. Magnesium Versus Bupivacaine Infiltration in Controlling Postoperative Pain in Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Peyvandi, Hasan; Badrkhani Jam, Ali Reza; Safari, Farhad; Teymourian, Houman; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is one of the most common problems after hernia repair. Decrease in postoperative pain accelerates functional recovery, decreases duration of hospital stay and postoperative morbidity. Objectives: To compare postoperative analgesic effect of infiltration of magnesium versus bupivacaine into incision of inguinal hernia repair. Patients and Methods: In a double blind clinical trial, 80 patients’ candidates for elective inguinal hernia repair were enrolled. Right before closure of incision, in Bupivacaine group 5 mL Bupivacaine 0.5% added to 5 mL normal saline and in Magnesium group, 10 mL Magnesium sulfate 20% was infused subcutaneously. Pain score was measured using numeric rating score (NRS) at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours postoperatively. If NRS was above 3, 1 mg morphine was administered as rescue analgesic until patient felt comfortable or NRS < 3. Results: Postoperative pain scores at 1 and 3 hours were not significantly different between bupivacaine and magnesium groups (P = 0.21, 0.224; respectively). However, at 6 (P = 0.003), 12 (P = 0.028) and 24 (P = 0.022) hours postoperative, pain score (NRS) was significantly lower in bupivacaine group. Number of patients needed at least 1 dose of rescue morphine (P = 0.001), mean number of episodes asked for morphine during next 24 hours (P = 0.001) and total dose of morphine requirement (P = 0.01) were significantly lower in bupivacaine group. Conclusions: Magnesium infiltration did not decrease total dose and number of episodes needed for morphine rescue analgesic. Bupivacaine infiltration into surgical site was more effective than magnesium sulfate infiltration in postoperative pain control. PMID:26705525

  19. Black Cumin (Nigella sativa) and Its Active Constituent, Thymoquinone: An Overview on the Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects.

    PubMed

    Amin, Bahareh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    For many centuries, seeds of Nigella sativa (black cumin), a dicotyledon of the Ranunculaceae family, have been used as a seasoning spice and food additive in the Middle East and Mediterranean areas. Traditionally, the plant is used for asthma, hypertension, diabetes, inflammation, cough, bronchitis, headache, eczema, fever, dizziness, and gastrointestinal disturbances. The literature regarding the biological activities of seeds of this plant is extensive, citing bronchodilative, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, antibacterial, hypotensive, hypolipidemic, cytotoxic, antidiabetic, and hepatoprotective effects. The active ingredients of N. sativa are mainly concentrated in the fixed or essential oil of seeds, which are responsible for most health benefits. This review will provide all updated reported activities of this plant with an emphasis on the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. Results of various studies have demonstrated that the oil, extracts, and their active ingredients, in particular, thymoquinone, possess antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects, supporting the common folk perception of N. Sativa as a potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory agent. Many protective properties are attributed to reproducible radical scavenging activity as well as an interaction with numerous molecular targets involved in inflammation, including proinflammatory enzymes and cytokines. However, there is a need for further investigations to find out the precise mechanisms responsible for the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of this plant and its active constituents. PMID:26366755

  20. Morphine-Induced Analgesic Tolerance Effect on Gene Expression of the NMDA Receptor Subunit 1 in Rat Striatum and Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Rafieenia, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Morphine is a potent analgesic but its continual use results in analgesic tolerance. Mechanisms of this tolerance remain to be clarified. However, changes in the functions of μ-opioid and N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors have been proposed in morphine tolerance. We examined changes in gene expression of the NMDA receptor subunit 1 (NR1) at mRNA levels in rat striatum and prefrontal cortex (PFC) after induction of morphine tolerance. Methods: Morphine (10 mg/kg, IP) was injected in male Wistar rats for 7 consecutive days (intervention group), but control rats received just normal saline (1 mL/kg, IP). We used a hotplate test of analgesia to assess induction of tolerance to analgesic effects of morphine on days 1 and 8 of injections. Later, two groups of rats were sacrificed one day after 7 days of injections, their whole brains removed, and the striatum and PFC immediately dissected. Then, the NR1 gene expression was examined with a semi-quantitative RT-PCR method. Results: The results showed that long-term morphine a administration induces tolerance to analgesic effect of the opioid, as revealed by a significant decrease in morphine-induced analgesia on day 8 compared to day 1 of the injections (P<0.001). The results also showed that the NR1 gene expression at mRNA level in rats tolerant to morphine was significantly increased in the striatum (P<0.01) but decreased in the PFC (P<0.001). Conclusion: Therefore, changes in the NR1 gene expression in rat striatum and PFC have a region-specific association with morphine-induced analgesic tolerance. PMID:27563417

  1. The application of postoperative chemotherapy in thymic tumors and its prognostic effect

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke; Gu, Zhitao; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Li, Yin; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Pang, Liewen; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background To study the role of postoperative chemotherapy and its prognostic effect in Masaoka-Koga stage III and IV thymic tumors. Methods Between 1994 and 2012, 1,700 patients with thymic tumors who underwent surgery without neoadjuvant therapy were enrolled for the study. Among them, 665 patients in Masaoka-Koga stage III and IV were further analyzed to evaluate the clinical value of postoperative chemotherapy. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to obtain the survival curve of the patients divided into different subgroups, and the Cox regression analysis was used to make multivariate analysis on the factors affecting prognosis. A Propensity-Matched Study was used to evaluate the clinical value of chemotherapy. Results Two-hundred and twenty-one patients were treated with postoperative chemotherapy, while the rest 444 cases were not. The two groups showed significant differences (P<0.05) regarding the incidence of myasthenia gravis, World Health Organization (WHO) histological subtypes, pathological staging, resection status and the use of postoperative radiotherapy. WHO type C tumors, incomplete resection, and postoperative radiotherapy were significantly related to increased recurrence and worse survival (P<0.05). Five-year and 10-year disease free survivals (DFS) and recurrence rates in patients who underwent surgery followed by postoperative chemotherapy were 51% and 30%, 46% and 68%, comparing with 73% and 58%, 26% and 40% in patients who had no adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery (P=0.001, P=0.001, respectively). In propensity-matched study, 158 pairs of patients with or without postoperative chemotherapy (316 patients in total) were selected and compared accordingly. Similar 5-year survival rates were detected between the two groups (P=0.332). Conclusions Pathologically higher grade histology, incomplete resection, and postoperative radiotherapy were found to be associated with worse outcomes in advanced stage thymic tumors. At present, there is no evidence

  2. Pharmacogenetics of analgesic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Giovanna; Gubbay, Anthony; Branford, Ruth; Sato, Hiroe

    2013-01-01

    Summary points • Individual variability in pain perception and differences in the efficacy of analgesic drugs are complex phenomena and are partly genetically predetermined. • Analgesics act in various ways on the peripheral and central pain pathways and are regarded as one of the most valuable but equally dangerous groups of medications. • While pharmacokinetic properties of drugs, metabolism in particular, have been scrutinised by genotype–phenotype correlation studies, the clinical significance of inherited variants in genes governing pharmacodynamics of analgesics remains largely unexplored (apart from the µ-opioid receptor). • Lack of replication of the findings from one study to another makes meaningful personalised analgesic regime still a distant future. • This narrative review will focus on findings related to pharmacogenetics of commonly used analgesic medications and highlight authors’ views on future clinical implications of pharmacogenetics in the context of pharmacological treatment of chronic pain. PMID:26516523

  3. Effect of hyaluronic acid on postoperative intraperitoneal adhesion formation in the rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Urman, B.; Gomel, V.; Jetha, N. )

    1991-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid solution in preventing intraperitoneal (IP) adhesions. The study design was prospective, randomized and blinded and involved 83 rats. Measured serosal injury was inflicted using a CO2 laser on the right uterine horn of the rat. Animals randomized to groups 1 and 2 received either 0.4% hyaluronic acid or its diluent phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally before and after the injury. In groups 3 and 4, the same solutions were used only after the injury. Postoperative adhesions were assessed at second-look laparotomy. Histologic assessment of the fresh laser injury was carried out on uteri pretreated with hyaluronic acid, PBS, or nothing. Pretreatment with hyaluronic acid was associated with a significant reduction in postoperative adhesions and a significantly decreased crater depth. Hyaluronic acid appears to reduce postoperative IP adhesion formation by coating the serosal surfaces and decreasing the extent of initial tissue injury.

  4. Evaluation of in vitro effects of some analgesic drugs on erythrocyte and recombinant carbonic anhydrase I and II.

    PubMed

    Gökçe, Başak; Gençer, Nahit; Arslan, Oktay; Turkoğlu, Sumeyye Aydogan; Alper, Meltem; Köçkar, Feray

    2012-02-01

    The in vitro effects of the injectable form of analgesic drugs, dexketoprofen trometamol, dexamethasone sodium phosphate, metamizole sodium, diclofenac sodium, thiocolchicoside, on the activity of purified human carbonic anhydrase I and II were evaluated. The effect of these drugs on erythrocyte hCA I and hCA II was compared to recombinant hCA I and hCA II expressed in Ecoli. IC(50) values of the drugs that caused inhibition were determined by means of activity percentage diagrams. The IC(50) concentrations of dexketoprofen trometamol and dexamethasone sodium phosphate on hCA I were 683 μM and 4250 μM and for hCA II 950 μM and 6200 μM respectively. Conversely, the enzyme activity was increased by diflofenac sodium. In addition, thiocolchicoside has not any affect on hCA I and hCA II. The effect of these drugs on erythrocyte hCA I and hCA II were consistent with the inhibition of recombinant enzymes. PMID:21534860

  5. Post-operative effects on silver coated tumor endoprosthesis and biofilm prophylaxis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, L.; Ahrens, H.; Wahrenburg, M.; Pajaziti, B.; Kurzina, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    Despite the high state of the art in limp replacement and the reconstructive tumor surgery, failures cannot be excluded. Investigations on post-operative effects on explanted silver coated modules of MUTARS® prostheses have disclosed changes in the silver surface. Both, the silver coatings and the perioperative lavage with antiseptics reduce efficiently the risks of infections.

  6. [Postoperatively conformed effectiveness of preoperative radio therapy, combined with chemotherapy - cysplatin].

    PubMed

    Lazarov, N; Lazarov, L; Lazarov, S

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a case of a 35 years old female patient with spinocellular carcinoma of the cervix, diagnosed after byopsy and treated with radiotherapy 30 Gray, combined with Cisplatin 50 mg. per square meter, per week, 6 months before radical histerectomy and lymphonodulectomy was performed. The postoperative histology shows only traces of dysplastic epithelia, which proves preoperative therapy effective. PMID:22639781

  7. Effect of Pre-Designed Instructions for Mothers of Children with Hypospadias on Reducing Postoperative Complications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamed, Sanaa A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common congenital anomaly with a prevalence estimated to be as high as 1 in 125 live male births. Complications after surgical procedures are possible. The incidence of complications can be reduced by meticulous preoperative planning, and judicious postoperative care. So the aim of the study was to investigate the effect of…

  8. Comparison of the effects of remifentanil-based general anesthesia and popliteal nerve block on postoperative pain and hemodynamic stability in diabetic patients undergoing distal foot amputation: A retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Young; Lee, Ki-Young; Bai, Sun Joon; Hong, Jung Hwa; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Jong Min; Kim, Shin Hyung

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is the most common cause of diabetes-associated nontraumatic lower extremity amputation. Most patients who undergo lower extremity amputation for a diabetic foot have had diabetes for a long time and suffer from multiorgan disorder; thus, it can be a challenge to ensure sufficient anesthetic and analgesic effects while maintaining stable hemodynamics. Recently, peripheral nerve block has gained popularity owing to its attenuating effects of systemic concerns. This retrospective observational study aimed to compare the effects of remifentanil-based general anesthesia (GEA) and popliteal nerve block (PNB) on postoperative pain and hemodynamic stability in diabetic patients undergoing distal foot amputation.A total of 59 consecutive patients with a diabetic foot who underwent distal foot amputation between January 2012 and May 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients received remifentanil-based GEA (GEA group, n = 32) or PNB (PNB group, n = 27). The primary outcomes were to evaluate postoperative analgesic effects and perioperative hemodynamics. Also, postoperative pulmonary complications and 6-month mortality were assessed as secondary outcomes.Significant differences in pain scores using numeric rating scale were observed between the groups in a linear mixed model analysis (PGroup×Time = 0.044). Even after post hoc analysis with the Bonferroni correction, the numeric rating scale scores were significantly lower in the PNB group. Furthermore, patients in the PNB group required less pethidine during the first 6 hours after surgery (27 ± 28 vs 9 ± 18 mg; P = 0.013). The GEA group had a lower mean blood pressure (Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.01), despite receiving more ephedrine (P < 0.001). Significantly more patients in the GEA group suffered from postoperative pneumonia and required the management in intensive care unit (P = 0.030 and 0.038, respectively). However, the groups did not differ in terms of

  9. [Mechanism of action of the analgesic flupirtine].

    PubMed

    Nickel, B; Herz, A; Jakovlev, V; Tibes, U

    1985-01-01

    To answer the questions of mode and site of action partly supplementary, partly new investigations with flupirtine (Katadolon) were carried out which are described below. The investigation for opiate receptor affinity of flupirtine in rat brain homogenate did not show any reduction in 3He-etorphine binding up to the highest concentration of flupirtine of 10(-5) mol/1. This result suggests that flupirtine either has a very low opiate receptor affinity or lacks it fully. Therefore the analgesic activity of flupirtine is not based on opiate mechanism. The intracerebroventricular and intrathecal administration of flupirtine and the other analgesics tested showed dose dependent analgesic activity in doses which, when applied systemically, did not cause any analgesia in rats. Thus these substances show cerebral or spinal analgesic activity. In relation to the effective doses (ED50 in micrograms/rat) flupirtine was of the same efficacy in both kinds of administration. Pethidine tested comparatively was found to be less potent by intrathecal than by intracerebroventricular application. On the other hand, morphine was weaker by intracerebroventricular than by intrathecal application. As in the experiments by oral administration, naloxone did not show any effect on the analgesic activity of flupirtine, neither by intracerebroventricular nor by intrathecal application. On the other hand, the analgesic effects of pethidine and morphine were completely suppressed by naloxone. These results demonstrate that the analgesic activity of flupirtine is not caused by the opiate mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3002399

  10. Superior analgesic effect of an active distraction versus pleasant unfamiliar sounds and music: the influence of emotion and cognitive style.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Eduardo A Garza; Brattico, Elvira; Vase, Lene; Østergaard, Leif; Vuust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Listening to music has been found to reduce acute and chronic pain. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood; however, emotion and cognitive mechanisms have been suggested to influence the analgesic effect of music. In this study we investigated the influence of familiarity, emotional and cognitive features, and cognitive style on music-induced analgesia. Forty-eight healthy participants were divided into three groups (empathizers, systemizers and balanced) and received acute pain induced by heat while listening to different sounds. Participants listened to unfamiliar Mozart music rated with high valence and low arousal, unfamiliar environmental sounds with similar valence and arousal as the music, an active distraction task (mental arithmetic) and a control, and rated the pain. Data showed that the active distraction led to significantly less pain than did the music or sounds. Both unfamiliar music and sounds reduced pain significantly when compared to the control condition; however, music was no more effective than sound to reduce pain. Furthermore, we found correlations between pain and emotion ratings. Finally, systemizers reported less pain during the mental arithmetic compared with the other two groups. These findings suggest that familiarity may be key in the influence of the cognitive and emotional mechanisms of music-induced analgesia, and that cognitive styles may influence pain perception. PMID:22242169

  11. Differential Postoperative Effects of Volatile Anesthesia and Intraoperative Remifentanil Infusion in 7511 Thyroidectomy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Jun-Young; Choi, Seong-Soo; Yi, Jung Min; Joo, Eun Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Se Ung; Sim, Ji-Hoon; Karm, Myong-Hwan; Ku, Seungwoo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although remifentanil is used widely by many clinicians during general anesthesia, there are recent evidences of opioid-induced hyperalgesia as an adverse effect. This study aimed to determine if intraoperative remifentanil infusion caused increased pain during the postoperative period in patients who underwent a thyroidectomy. A total of 7511 patients aged ≥ 20 years, who underwent thyroidectomy between January 2009 and December 2013 at the Asan Medical Center were retrospectively analyzed. Enrolled patients were divided into 2 groups: group N (no intraoperative remifentanil and only volatile maintenance anesthesia) and group R (intraoperative remifentanil infusion including total intravenous anesthesia and balanced anesthesia). Following propensity score matching analysis, 2582 patients were included in each group. Pain scores based on numeric rating scales (NRS) were compared between the 2 groups at the postoperative anesthetic care unit and at the ward until 3 days postoperation. Incidences of postoperative complications, such as nausea, itching, and shivering were also compared. The estimated NRS pain score on the day of surgery was 5.08 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.97–5.19) in group N patients and 6.73 (95% CI 6.65–6.80) in group R patients (P < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in NRS scores on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3 between the 2 groups. Postoperative nausea was less frequent in group R (31.4%) than in group N (53.5%) (P < 0.001). However, the incidence of itching was higher in group R (4.3%) than in group N (0.7%) (P < 0.001). Continuous infusion of remifentanil during general anesthesia can cause higher intensity of postoperative pain and more frequent itching than general anesthesia without remifentanil infusion immediately after thyroidectomy. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of continuous remifentanil infusion, volatile anesthesia without opioid may be a good choice for minor

  12. A Comparison of Three Methods for Postoperative Pain Control in Patients Undergoing Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Kyung; Choi, Sung Wook; Song, Sung Wook

    2015-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic shoulder operations (ASS) are often associated with severe postoperative pain. Nerve blocks have been studied for pain in shoulder surgeries. Interscalene brachial plexus blocks (ISB) and an intra-articular injection (IA) have been reported in many studies. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of ISB, a continuous cervical epidural block (CCE) and IA as a means of postoperative pain control and to study the influence of these procedures on postoperative analgesic consumption and after ASS. Methods Fifty seven patients who underwent ASS under general anesthesia were randomly assigned to one of three groups: the ISB group (n = 19), the CCE group (n = 19), and the IA group (n = 19). Patients in each group were evaluated on a postoperative numerical rating scale (NRS), their rescue opioid dosage (ROD), and side effects. Results Postoperative NRSs were found to be higher in the IA group than in the ISB and CCE groups both at rest and on movement. The ROD were 1.6 ± 2.3, 3.0 ± 4.9 and 7.1 ± 7.9 mg morphine equivalent dose in groups CCE, ISB, and IA groups (P = 0.001), respectively, and statistically significant differences were noted between the CCE and IA groups (P = 0.01) but not in between the ISB and CCE groups. Conclusions This prospective, randomized study demonstrated that ISB is as effective analgesic technique as a CCE for postoperative pain control in patients undergoing ASS. PMID:25589946

  13. Effects of intraoperative single bolus fentanyl administration and remifentanil infusion on postoperative nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyungsun; Doo, A Ram; Son, Ji-Seon; Kim, Jin-Wan; Lee, Ki-Jae; Kim, Dong-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the use of postoperative opioids is a well-known risk factor for postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), few studies have been performed on the effects of intraoperative opioids on PONV. We examined the effects of a single bolus administration of fentanyl during anesthesia induction and the intraoperative infusion of remifentanil on PONV. Methods Two hundred and fifty women, aged 20 to 65 years and scheduled for thyroidectomy, were allocated to a control group (Group C), a single bolus administration of fentanyl 2 µg/kg during anesthesia induction (Group F), or 2 ng/ ml of effect-site concentration-controlled intraoperative infusion of remifentanil (Group R) groups. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane and 50% N2O. The incidence and severity of PONV and use of rescue antiemetics were recorded at 2, 6, and 24 h postoperatively. Results Group F showed higher incidences of nausea (60/82, 73% vs. 38/77, 49%; P = 0.008), vomiting (40/82, 49% vs. 23/77 30%; P = 0.041) and the use of rescue antiemetics (47/82, 57% vs. 29/77, 38%; P = 0.044) compared with Group C at postoperative 24 h. However, there were no significant differences in the incidence of PONV between Groups C and R. The overall incidences of PONV for postoperative 24 h were 49%, 73%, and 59% in Groups C, F, and R, respectively (P = 0.008). Conclusions A single bolus administration of fentanyl 2 µg/kg during anesthesia induction increases the incidence of PONV, but intraoperative remifentanil infusion with 2 ng/ml effect-site concentration did not affect the incidence of PONV. PMID:26885302

  14. The Efficacy of Acupuncture in Post-Operative Pain Management: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Shun; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Chen, I-Fan; Huang, Shihping Kevin; Tzeng, Pei-Chuan; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative pain resulting from surgical trauma is a significant challenge for healthcare providers. Opioid analgesics are commonly used to treat postoperative pain; however, these drugs are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. Objective This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupuncture-related techniques in treating postoperative pain. Data Source MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases were searched until Sep 30, 2014. Study Eligibility Criteria Randomized controlled trials of adult subjects (≥ 18 years) who had undergone surgery and who had received acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or acupoint electrical stimulation for managing acute post-operative pain were included. Results We found that patients treated with acupuncture or related techniques had less pain and used less opioid analgesics on Day 1 after surgery compared with those treated with control (P < 0.001). Sensitivity analysis using the leave-one-out approach indicated the findings are reliable and are not dependent on any one study. In addition, no publication bias was detected. Subgroup analysis indicated that conventional acupuncture and transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) were associated with less postoperative pain one day following surgery than control treatment, while electroacupuncture was similar to control (P = 0.116). TEAS was associated with significantly greater reduction in opioid analgesic use on Day 1 post surgery than control (P < 0.001); however conventional acupuncture and electroacupuncture showed no benefit in reducing opioid analgesic use compared with control (P ≥ 0.142). Conclusion Our findings indicate that certain modes of acupuncture improved postoperative pain on the first day after surgery and reduced opioid use. Our findings support the use of acupuncture as adjuvant therapy in treating postoperative pain. PMID:26959661

  15. [Analgesic-antispasmodic effect and safety of lysine clonixinate and L-hyoscinbutylbromide in the treatment of dysmenorrhea].

    PubMed

    Hernández Bueno, J A; de la Jara Díaz, J; Sedeño Cruz, F; Llorens Torres, F

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal open but not comparative study was to confirm the safety and efficacy of Lysine clonixinate (125 mg) and hyoscinbutylbromide (10 mg) capsules, during a period of observation of there menstrual cycles on 30 women with uterine dysfunction due to primary or secondary dysmenorrhea. The time of evolution for primary dysmenorrhea was of 4.46 years, and for secondary was of 1.77 years. Some associated manifestations of dysmenorrhea were: nausea (92%), vomit (92%), general pain (82.1%), abdominal pain (85.7%) and headache (46.4%). Regarding to the menstrual pain intensity, at first was highly severe in 10.7% severe in 42.9%, and moderate in 46.4%. At the end of the study, only 1 of 28 patients showed menstrual pain of moderate intensity. Only three adverse effects of light intensity were found without needing treatment, related to the manifestations of gastralgia and sleepiness. The association of a spasmolytic analgesic (Lysine clonixinate and hyoscinbutylbromide bromide) on the treatment for primary or secondary dysmenorrhea, reduces and prevents the menstrual pain (colic) as well as the associated manifestations with few spasmolytic association is efficacy and safety. PMID:9580220

  16. Effect of resiniferatoxin on the noxious heat threshold temperature in the rat: a novel heat allodynia model sensitive to analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Almási, Róbert; Pethö, Gábor; Bölcskei, Kata; Szolcsányi, János

    2003-01-01

    An increasing-temperature hot plate (ITHP) was introduced to measure the noxious heat threshold (45.3±0.3°C) of unrestrained rats, which was reproducible upon repeated determinations at intervals of 5 or 30 min or 1 day. Morphine, diclofenac and paracetamol caused an elevation of the noxious heat threshold following i.p. pretreatment, the minimum effective doses being 3, 10 and 200 mg kg−1, respectively. Unilateral intraplantar injection of the VR1 receptor agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX, 0.048 nmol) induced a profound drop of heat threshold to the innocuous range with a maximal effect (8–10°C drop) 5 min after RTX administration. This heat allodynia was inhibited by pretreatment with morphine, diclofenac and paracetamol, the minimum effective doses being 1, 1 and 100 mg kg−1 i.p., respectively. The long-term sensory desensitizing effect of RTX was examined by bilateral intraplantar injection (0.048 nmol per paw) which produced, after an initial threshold drop, an elevation (up to 2.9±0.5°C) of heat threshold lasting for 5 days. The VR1 receptor antagonist iodo-resiniferatoxin (I-RTX, 0.05 nmol intraplantarly) inhibited by 51% the heat threshold-lowering effect of intraplantar RTX but not α,β-methylene-ATP (0.3 μmol per paw). I-RTX (0.1 or 1 nmol per paw) failed to alter the heat threshold either acutely (5–60 min) or on the long-term (5 days). The heat threshold of VR1 receptor knockout mice was not different from that of wild-type animals (45.6±0.5 vs 45.2±0.4°C). In conclusion, the RTX-induced drop of heat threshold measured by the ITHP is a novel heat allodynia model exhibiting a high sensitivity to analgesics. PMID:12746222

  17. Physiopathology and control of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Pflug, A E; Bonica, J J

    1977-06-01

    Potent systemic (narcotic) analgesics, when given in doses sufficient to produce ample pain relief, usually also produce mental and respiratory depression and, at times, circulatory impairment, that prolong postoperative morbidity. Complications due to morphine sulfate or meperidine hydrochloride can be minimized by titrating the patient's pain with small intravenous doses of narcotics (morphine sulfate, 2 to 3 mg, or meperidine hydrochloride, 15 to 25 mg) administered slowly at 15- to 20-minute intervals until the pain is relieved. On the third or fourth postoperative day, acetaminophen tablets usually suffice to provide relief of pain with little or no risk to patients. Continuous segmental epidural block or intercostal block, with or without splanchnic block, provide excellent pain relief that, in contrast to the narcotic, is complete. These are especially useful after operations on the chest or abdomen or the lower extremity. Regional analgesia is especially indicated in patients not adequately relieved from severe postoperative pain with narcotics, or when these drugs are contraindicated by advanced pulmonary, renal, or hepatic disease. Continuous caudal analgesia is also effective to completely releive severe postoperative pain in the lower limbs and perineum. PMID:871249

  18. Correlation between the cumulative analgesic effect of electroacupuncture intervention and synaptic plasticity of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons in rats with sciatica☆

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiuling; Liu, Tao; Chen, Shuping; Gao, Yonghui; Wang, Junying; Qiao, Lina; Liu, Junling

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, a rat model of chronic neuropathic pain was established by ligation of the sciatic nerve and a model of learning and memory impairment was established by ovariectomy to investigate the analgesic effect of repeated electroacupuncture stimulation at bilateral Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34). In addition, associated synaptic changes in neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus were examined. Results indicate that the thermal pain threshold (paw withdrawal latency) was significantly increased in rats subjected to 2-week electroacupuncture intervention compared with 2-day electroacupuncture, but the analgesic effect was weakened remarkably in ovariectomized rats with chronic constrictive injury. 2-week electroacupuncture intervention substantially reversed the chronic constrictive injury-induced increase in the synaptic cleft width and thinning of the postsynaptic density. These findings indicate that repeated electroacupuncture at bilateral Zusanli and Yanglingquan has a cumulative analgesic effect and can effectively relieve chronic neuropathic pain by remodeling the synaptic structure of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. PMID:25206591

  19. Opioid and adjuvant analgesics: compared and contrasted.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed Ilyas Ahmed; Walsh, Declan; Brito-Dellan, Norman

    2011-08-01

    An adjuvant (or co-analgesic) is a drug that in its pharmacological characteristic is not necessarily primarily identified as an analgesic in nature but that has been found in clinical practice to have either an independent analgesic effect or additive analgesic properties when used with opioids. The therapeutic role of adjuvant analgesics (AAs) is to increase the therapeutic index of opioids by a dose-sparing effect, add a unique analgesic action in opioid-resistant pain, or reduce opioid side effects. A notable difference between opioids and AAs is that unlike opioids some AAs are associated with permanent organ toxicity, for example, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and renal failure. It is impossible to predict in advance in a given individual what opioid dose they may require to control cancer pain. Most AAs have a ceiling effect for their analgesic actions, but often with continued dose-related toxicities and side effects (with the exception of glucocorticoids). The blood levels of opioids (and their metabolites) can be measured with great precision and accuracy. There is sometimes a role for drug blood levels of certain AAs, like tricyclic antidepressants or anticonvulsants when used for neuropathic pain. Age affects metabolism of most opioids. The therapeutic window of opioids is wide, with no ceiling effect. Most AAs (except corticosteroids) have a narrow therapeutic window. Naloxone is a pure opioid antagonist that competes and displaces opioids from their receptor sites. All clinically useful opioids are mu opioid receptor agonists. Not all routes of administration are available to all opioids. Adjuvant analgesics lack the versatility in routes of administration that opioids possess. Dosing flexibility is a major advantage when treating cancer-related pain with opioids. Dose flexibility is much less with AAs than opioids. Unlike opioids, the analgesic response is usually observed within hours to days of attaining an adequate dose with most

  20. Intravenous administration of lidocaine directly acts on spinal dorsal horn and produces analgesic effect: An in vivo patch-clamp analysis.

    PubMed

    Kurabe, Miyuki; Furue, Hidemasa; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous lidocaine administration produces an analgesic effect in various pain states, such as neuropathic and acute pain, although the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that intravenous lidocaine acts on spinal cord neurons and induces analgesia in acute pain. We therefore examined the action of intravenous lidocaine in the spinal cord using the in vivo patch-clamp technique. We first investigated the effects of intravenous lidocaine using behavioural measures in rats. We then performed in vivo patch-clamp recording from spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons. Intravenous lidocaine had a dose-dependent analgesic effect on the withdrawal response to noxious mechanical stimuli. In the electrophysiological experiments, intravenous lidocaine inhibited the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by noxious pinch stimuli. Intravenous lidocaine also decreased the frequency, but did not change the amplitude, of both spontaneous and miniature EPSCs. However, it did not affect inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, intravenous lidocaine induced outward currents in SG neurons. Intravenous lidocaine inhibits glutamate release from presynaptic terminals in spinal SG neurons. Concomitantly, it hyperpolarizes postsynaptic neurons by shifting the membrane potential. This decrease in the excitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons may be a possible mechanism for the analgesic action of intravenous lidocaine in acute pain. PMID:27188335

  1. Topical Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Multiple Applications of S(+)-Flurbiprofen Plaster (SFPP) in a Rat Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masanori; Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of multiple applications of S(+)-flurbiprofen plaster (SFPP), a novel Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) patch, for the alleviation of inflammatory pain and edema in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model as compared to other NSAID patches. The AIA model was induced by the injection of Mycobacterium butyricum and rats were treated with a patch (1.0 cm × 0.88 cm) containing each NSAID (SFP, ketoprofen, loxoprofen, diclofenac, felbinac, flurbiprofen, or indomethacin) applied to the paw for 6 h per day for 5 days. The pain threshold was evaluated using a flexion test of the ankle joint, and the inflamed paw edema was evaluated using a plethysmometer. cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 inhibition was evaluated using human recombinant proteins. Multiple applications of SFPP exerted a significant analgesic effect from the first day of application as compared to the other NSAID patches. In terms of paw edema, SFPP decreased edema from the second day after application, Multiple applications of SFPP were superior to those of other NSAID patches, in terms of the analgesic effect with multiple applications. These results suggest that SFPP may be a beneficial patch for providing analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects clinically. Drug Dev Res 77 : 206-211, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Drug Development Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27241582

  2. Flexibilide Obtained from Cultured Soft Coral Has Anti-Neuroinflammatory and Analgesic Effects through the Upregulation of Spinal Transforming Growth Factor-β1 in Neuropathic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan-Fu; Huang, Shi-Ying; Lu, Ching-Hsiang; Chen, Chun-Lin; Feng, Chien-Wei; Chen, Chun-Hong; Hung, Han-Chun; Lin, Yen-You; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Sung, Chun-Sung; Yang, San-Nan; Wang, Hui-Min David; Chang, Yu-Chia; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Chen, Wu-Fu; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Chronic neuroinflammation plays an important role in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. The compound flexibilide, which can be obtained from cultured soft coral, possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects in the rat carrageenan peripheral inflammation model. In the present study, we investigated the antinociceptive properties of flexibilide in the rat chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of neuropathic pain. First, we found that a single intrathecal (i.t.) administration of flexibilide significantly attenuated CCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia at 14 days after surgery. Second, i.t. administration of 10-μg flexibilide twice daily was able to prevent the development of thermal hyperalgesia and weight-bearing deficits in CCI rats. Third, i.t. flexibilide significantly inhibited CCI-induced activation of microglia and astrocytes, as well as the upregulated proinflammatory enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthase, in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn. Furthermore, flexibilide attenuated the CCI-induced downregulation of spinal transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) at 14 days after surgery. Finally, i.t. SB431542, a selective inhibitor of TGF-β type I receptor, blocked the analgesic effects of flexibilide in CCI rats. Our results suggest that flexibilide may serve as a therapeutic agent for neuropathic pain. In addition, spinal TGF-β1 may be involved in the anti-neuroinflammatory and analgesic effects of flexibilide. PMID:24979268

  3. Truncated G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1 splice variants are targets for highly potent opioid analgesics lacking side effects.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Susruta; Grinnell, Steven; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Burgman, Maxim; Polikar, Lisa; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2011-12-01

    Pain remains a pervasive problem throughout medicine, transcending all specialty boundaries. Despite the extraordinary insights into pain and its mechanisms over the past few decades, few advances have been made with analgesics. Most pain remains treated by opiates, which have significant side effects that limit their utility. We now describe a potent opiate analgesic lacking the traditional side effects associated with classical opiates, including respiratory depression, significant constipation, physical dependence, and, perhaps most important, reinforcing behavior, demonstrating that it is possible to dissociate side effects from analgesia. Evidence indicates that this agent acts through a truncated, six-transmembrane variant of the G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1. Although truncated splice variants have been reported for a number of G protein-coupled receptors, their functional relevance has been unclear. Our evidence now suggests that truncated variants can be physiologically important through heterodimerization, even when inactive alone, and can comprise new therapeutic targets, as illustrated by our unique opioid analgesics with a vastly improved pharmacological profile. PMID:22106286

  4. Truncated G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1 splice variants are targets for highly potent opioid analgesics lacking side effects

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Susruta; Grinnell, Steven; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Burgman, Maxim; Polikar, Lisa; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2011-01-01

    Pain remains a pervasive problem throughout medicine, transcending all specialty boundaries. Despite the extraordinary insights into pain and its mechanisms over the past few decades, few advances have been made with analgesics. Most pain remains treated by opiates, which have significant side effects that limit their utility. We now describe a potent opiate analgesic lacking the traditional side effects associated with classical opiates, including respiratory depression, significant constipation, physical dependence, and, perhaps most important, reinforcing behavior, demonstrating that it is possible to dissociate side effects from analgesia. Evidence indicates that this agent acts through a truncated, six-transmembrane variant of the G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1. Although truncated splice variants have been reported for a number of G protein-coupled receptors, their functional relevance has been unclear. Our evidence now suggests that truncated variants can be physiologically important through heterodimerization, even when inactive alone, and can comprise new therapeutic targets, as illustrated by our unique opioid analgesics with a vastly improved pharmacological profile. PMID:22106286

  5. Intravenous administration of lidocaine directly acts on spinal dorsal horn and produces analgesic effect: An in vivo patch-clamp analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kurabe, Miyuki; Furue, Hidemasa; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous lidocaine administration produces an analgesic effect in various pain states, such as neuropathic and acute pain, although the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that intravenous lidocaine acts on spinal cord neurons and induces analgesia in acute pain. We therefore examined the action of intravenous lidocaine in the spinal cord using the in vivo patch-clamp technique. We first investigated the effects of intravenous lidocaine using behavioural measures in rats. We then performed in vivo patch-clamp recording from spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons. Intravenous lidocaine had a dose-dependent analgesic effect on the withdrawal response to noxious mechanical stimuli. In the electrophysiological experiments, intravenous lidocaine inhibited the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by noxious pinch stimuli. Intravenous lidocaine also decreased the frequency, but did not change the amplitude, of both spontaneous and miniature EPSCs. However, it did not affect inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, intravenous lidocaine induced outward currents in SG neurons. Intravenous lidocaine inhibits glutamate release from presynaptic terminals in spinal SG neurons. Concomitantly, it hyperpolarizes postsynaptic neurons by shifting the membrane potential. This decrease in the excitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons may be a possible mechanism for the analgesic action of intravenous lidocaine in acute pain. PMID:27188335

  6. Intravenous acetaminophen is superior to ketamine for postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy: results of a prospective, randomized, double-blind, multicenter clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Hamid Reza; Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Visnjevac, Ognjen; Behzadi, Behzad; Ghodraty, Mohammad Reza; Nader, Nader D

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, intravenously (IV) administered acetaminophen has become one of the most common perioperative analgesics. Despite its now-routine use, IV acetaminophen’s analgesic comparative efficacy has never been compared with that of ketamine, a decades-old analgesic familiar to obstetricians, gynecologists, and anesthesiologists alike. This doubleblind clinical trial aimed to evaluate the analgesic effects of ketamine and IV acetaminophen on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. Methods Eighty women aged 25–70 years old and meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria were randomly allocated into two groups of 40 to receive either IV acetaminophen or ketamine intraoperatively. Postoperatively, each patient had patient-controlled analgesia. Pain and sedation (Ramsay Sedation Scale) were documented based on the visual analog scale in the recovery room and at 4 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after the surgery. Hemodynamic changes, adverse medication effects, and the need for breakthrough meperidine were also recorded for both groups. Data were analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results Visual analog scale scores were significantly lower in the IV acetaminophen group at each time point (P<0.05), and this group required significantly fewer doses of breakthrough analgesics compared with the ketamine group (P=0.039). The two groups had no significant differences in terms of adverse effects. Conclusion Compared with ketamine, IV acetaminophen significantly improved postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:24465135

  7. Analgesic effects of an ethanol extract of the fruits of Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal) A. Rich (Annonaceae) and the major constituent, xylopic acid in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Woode, Eric; Ameyaw, Elvis O.; Boakye-Gyasi, Eric; Abotsi, Wonder K. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fruit extracts of Xylopia aethiopica are used traditionally in the management of pain disorders including rheumatism, headache, colic pain, and neuralgia. Little pharmacological data exists in scientific literature of the effect of the fruit extract and its major diterpene, xylopic acid, on pain. The present study evaluated the analgesic properties of the ethanol extract of X. aethiopica (XAE) and xylopic acid (XA), in murine models. Materials and Methods: XAE and XA were assessed in chemical (acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing and formalin tests), thermal (Tail-flick and Hargreaves thermal hyperalgesia tests), and mechanical (Randall-Selitto paw pressure test) pain models. Results: XAE and XA exhibited significant analgesic activity in all the pain models used. XAE (30-300 mg kg-1, p.o.) and XA (10-100 mg kg-1, p.o.) inhibited acetic acid-induced visceral nociception, formalin- induced paw pain (both neurogenic and inflammatory), thermal pain as well as carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in animals. Morphine (1-10 mg kg-1, i.p.) and diclofenac (1-10 mg kg-1, i.p.), used as controls, exhibited similar anti-nociceptive activities. XAE and XA did not induce tolerance to their respective anti-nociceptive effects in the formalin test after chronic administration. Morphine tolerance did not also cross-generalize to the analgesic effects of XAE or XA. Conclusions: These findings establish the analgesic properties of the ethanol fruit extract of X. aethiopica and its major diterpene, xylopic acid. PMID:23248562

  8. Single dose oral piroxicam for acute postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R Andrew; Edwards, Jayne; Loke, Yoon; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 2, 2000. Piroxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with analgesic properties, and is used mainly for treating rheumatic disorders. Some drugs have been directly compared against each other within a trial setting to determine their relative efficacies, whereas other have not. It is possible, however, to compare analgesics indirectly by examining the effectiveness of each drug against placebo when used in similar clinical situations. Objectives To determine the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of single-dose piroxicam compared with placebo in moderate to severe postoperative pain. To compare the effects of piroxicam with other analgesics. Search methods Published studies were identified from systematic searching of MEDLINE, Biological Abstracts, EMBASE, CENTRAL and the Oxford Pain Relief Database in December 2007. Additional studies were identified from the reference lists of retrieved reports. Selection criteria The following inclusion criteria were used: full journal publication, randomised placebo controlled trial, double-blind design, adult participants, postoperative pain of moderate to severe intensity at the baseline assessment, postoperative administration of oral or intramuscular piroxicam. Data collection and analysis Summed pain intensity and pain relief data were extracted and converted into dichotomous information to yield the number of participants obtaining at least 50% pain relief. This was used to calculate estimates of relative benefit and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) for one participant to obtain at least 50% pain relief. Information was collected on adverse effects and estimates of relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-harm (NNH) were calculated. Main results In this update no further studies were found. The original search identified three studies (141 participants) which compared oral piroxicam 20 mg with placebo and

  9. Effect of dietary combinations on plaque pH recovery after the intake of pediatric liquid analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Shaam; Bshara, Nada; Trak, Juliana; Mahmoud, Ghiath

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To study the effect of water, halloumi cheese and sugar-free (SF) chewing gum on plaque pH recovery after the intake of sweetened PLAs. Settings and Design: A randomized clinical trial was conducted on 17 children (10 females, 7 males) aged 11–12 years with DFT/dft of more than 3. Materials and Methods: Each volunteer tested paracetamol and ibuprofen suspension alone or followed with water, halloumi cheese or SF gum, as well as 10% sucrose and 10% sorbitol as controls. Plaque pH was measured using the sampling method before and after 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 min of ingestion. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance followed by least significant difference test to assess minimum pH (min pH), maximum pH drop (ΔpH), and the area under baseline pH, and P value was set as 0.05. Results: Both ibuprofen and paracetamol were not significantly different from 10% sucrose in terms of min pH, ΔpH, and area under baseline pH except for min pH of ibuprofen (P = 0.034). Water and halloumi cheese did not have a significant effect on plaque pH recovery after the intake of both analgesics as min pH, ΔpH, and area under baseline pH were similar to 10% sucrose except for min pH of ibuprofen + water (P = 0.048). However, plaque pH variables after chewing SF gum for 20 min were similar to 10% sorbitol. Conclusion: Chewing SF gum immediately after the intake of sweetened PLAs for 20 min restores plaque pH and could be recommended as a complementary aid in caries prevention. PMID:26430360

  10. Narcotic receptor blockade and its effect on the analgesic response to placebo and ibuprofen after oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Hersh, E V; Ochs, H; Quinn, P; MacAfee, K; Cooper, S A; Barasch, A

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of endogenous opiates to the analgesic response after treatment with placebo, codeine, and ibuprofen after oral surgery. Eighty-one patients undergoing complicated dental extractions were pretreated with either a placebo or the narcotic antagonist naltrexone 50 mg, 30 minutes before surgery. After surgery, patients self administered one of three possible postsurgical medications, which included placebo, codeine 60 mg, and ibuprofen 400 mg, when their pain reached a moderate or severe intensity. The study was double-blind with the three postsurgical treatments being randomly allocated within each presurgical treatment block. Pain intensity, pain relief, pain half gone, and overall evaluations were assessed for up to 6 hours. Ibuprofen was significantly more efficacious (p < .05) than codeine or placebo for most analgesic measures. The administration of naltrexone before surgery reduced the analgesic response to both placebo and codeine. Pretreatment with naltrexone did not diminish the peak analgesic response to ibuprofen, but surprisingly prolonged (p < .05) the duration of its action. The results suggest that a blockade of endogenous opiates by naltrexone diminished the placebo response, but that naltrexone may prolong ibuprofen analgesia by some unknown mechanism. PMID:8387662

  11. Analgesic effects of dextromethorphan and morphine in patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Heiskanen, Tarja; Härtel, Brita; Dahl, Marja-Liisa; Seppälä, Timo; Kalso, Eija

    2002-04-01

    N-methyl-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been shown to improve opioid analgesia in the animal model. The cough suppressant dextromethorphan is a clinically available NMDA-receptor antagonist. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study 20 patients with chronic pain of several years duration were given 100 mg of oral dextromethorphan or matching placebo 4 h prior to an intravenous infusion of morphine 15 mg. Pain intensity and adverse effects were assessed at 0, 4, 5 and 7 h. Dextromethorphan had no effect on morphine analgesia: the mean (+/-SEM) visual analogue scores for pain relief (VAS, 0-100 mm) at the end of the morphine infusion were 38 (+/-6) for dextromethorphan+morphine and 38 (+/-7) for placebo+morphine. VAS scores for pain intensity were comparable both at rest and at movement at all time points. The most common adverse effects reported were dizziness, nausea and sedation. There were no significant differences in either the incidence or severity of adverse effects. In conclusion, oral dextromethorphan 100 mg had no effect on pain relief by intravenous morphine 15 mg in patients with chronic pain. PMID:11972998

  12. Novel associations between FAAH genetic variants and postoperative central opioid-related adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Sadhasivam, S; Zhang, X; Chidambaran, V; Mavi, J; Pilipenko, V; Mersha, T B; Meller, J; Kaufman, K M; Martin, L J; McAuliffe, J

    2015-10-01

    Opioid effects are potentiated by cannabinoid agonists including anandamide, an endocannabinoid. Inter-individual variability in responses to opioids is a major clinical problem. Multiple deaths and anoxic brain injuries occur every year because of opioid-induced respiratory depression (RD) in surgical patients and drug abusers of opioids and cannabinoids. This study aimed to determine specific associations between genetic variants of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and postoperative central opioid adverse effects in children undergoing tonsillectomy. This is a prospective genotype-blinded observational study in which 259 healthy children between 6 and 15 years of age who received standard perioperative care with a standard anesthetic and an intraoperative dose of morphine were enrolled. Associations between frequent polymorphisms of FAAH and central postoperative opioid adverse effects including, RD, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and prolonged stay in Post Anesthesia Recovery Room (postoperative anesthesia care unit, PACU) due to RD and PONV were analyzed. Five specific FAAH single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had significant associations with more than twofold increased risk for refractory PONV (adjusted P<0.0018), and nominal associations (P<0.05) with RD and prolonged PACU stay in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. The FAAH SNP, rs324420, is a missense mutation with altered FAAH function and it is linked with other FAAH SNPs associated with PONV and RD in our cohort; association between PONV and rs324420 was confirmed in our extended cohort with additional 66 white children. Specific FAAH polymorphisms are associated with refractory PONV, opioid-related RD, and prolonged PACU stay due to opioid adverse effects in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. PMID:25558980

  13. A comparison of the effects of local analgesic solution in the navicular bursa of horses with lameness caused by solar toe or solar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, J; Schumacher, J; de Graves, F; Schramme, M; Smith, R; Coker, M; Steiger, R

    2001-07-01

    We hypothesised that analgesia of the navicular bursa is not selective for the navicular apparatus; and that solar pain in some horses can be temporarily abolished or attenuated by analgesia of the navicular bursa. To test this hypothesis, we caused lameness in horses by inducing pain in the dorsal margin or the angles of the sole and then evaluated the ability of a local analgesic solution administered into the navicular bursa to attenuate lameness. The response of horses with solar pain in the dorsal or palmar aspect of the foot to 3.5 ml local analgesic solution administered into the navicular bursa was examined. Lameness was induced in 6 horses by creating solar pain in the dorsal aspect of one forefoot and, at another time, the palmar aspect of the other forefoot, with set-screws inserted into a custom-made shoe. Horses were videotaped trotting before and after application of set-screws and after administering 3.5 ml local analgesic solution into the navicular bursa. Lameness scores were assigned by examining videotaped gaits. Scores were significantly lower (P<0.05) for all horses with set-screws applied to the dorsal margin of the sole after administration of local analgesic solution into the navicular bursa. In conclusion, analgesia of the navicular bursa was less effective in desensitising the angles of the sole than in desensitising the dorsal margin of the sole. Pain arising from the sole should not be excluded as a cause of lameness when lameness is attenuated by analgesia of the navicular bursa. PMID:11469772

  14. [The effect of blood serum proteins from the seal on the analgetic action of narcotic analgesics].

    PubMed

    Aslaniants, Zh K; Melik-Eganov, G R; Evstratov, A V; Ivanov, M P; Batrakov, S G; Korobov, N V; Iasnetsov, V V

    1991-11-01

    The protein fraction isolated from blood of seal, Phoca groenlandica, has been found to produce hyperalgesic effect on rats exposed to thermic or electrocutaneous nociceptive stimulation, but fail to affect writhes provoked by intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid solution on mice. When combined with morphine, the fraction lowered completely its narcotic analgetic action in the above mentioned tests. On the contrary, these same proteins combined with promedol or fentanil enhanced and prolonged analgetic effect of the latter. Tested in vitro the protein showed neither opioid nor anti-opioid activity. Therefore it is reasonable to suppose that neurophysiological activity of the isolated fraction is due to the peptides formed on enzymatic hydrolysis of proteins in vivo rather than these proteins as such. PMID:1687360

  15. Attitudes and concerns of Canadian animal health technologists toward postoperative pain management in dogs and cats.

    PubMed Central

    Dohoo, S E; Dohoo, I R

    1998-01-01

    Three hundred and twenty-two Canadian animal health technologists (AHTs) were surveyed to determine their attitudes toward postoperative pain management in dogs and cats following 6 surgical procedures, their concerns regarding the use of opioid analgesics, and their role within veterinary practices with respect to postoperative pain control. Two hundred and sixty-four (82%) returned the questionnaire. Pain perception was defined as the average of pain rankings for dogs and cats (on a scale of 1 to 10) following abdominal surgery, or the value for dogs or cats if the AHT worked with only 1 of the 2 species. Maximum concern about the risks associated with the postoperative use of morphine or oxymorphone was defined as the highest rating assigned to any of the 6 risks evaluated in either dogs or cats. Animal health technologists reported significantly higher pain perception scores than did veterinarians who completed a similar survey 2 years previously. Higher pain perception scores were associated with decreased satisfaction with the adequacy of analgesic therapy in their practice, higher pain control goals, and attendance at continuing education within the previous 12 months. The majority of AHTs (55%) agreed that one or more risks associated with the use of morphine or oxymorphone outweighed the benefits. The 3 issues that were perceived to pose the greatest risk were respiratory depression, bradycardia, and sedation and excitement, for dogs and cats, respectively. Most AHTs (68%) considered their knowledge related to the recognition and control of pain to be adequate, compared with 24% of veterinarians who responded to a similar previous survey. As for veterinarians, experience gained while in practice was ranked as the most important source of knowledge, while the technical program attended was ranked as least important. Over 88% of the AHTs provided nursing care during the postoperative period, monitored animals for side effects of postoperative analgesic

  16. Analgesic Effect of the Newly Developed S(+)-Flurbiprofen Plaster on Inflammatory Pain in a Rat Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masanori; Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Hirose, Takuya; Endo, Hiromi; Futaki, Nobuko; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical Research This article describes the properties of a novel topical NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) patch, SFPP (S(+)-flurbiprofen plaster), containing the potent cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, S(+)-flurbiprofen (SFP). The present studies were conducted to confirm human COX inhibition and absorption of SFP and to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of SFPP in a rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. COX inhibition by SFP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen was evaluated using human recombinant COX proteins. Absorption of SFPP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen from patches through rat skin was assessed 24 h after application. The AIA model was induced by injecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis followed 20 days later by the evaluation of the prostaglandin PGE2 content of the inflamed paw and the pain threshold. SFP exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against COX-1 (IC50  = 8.97 nM) and COX-2 (IC50  = 2.94 nM) than the other NSAIDs evaluated. Absorption of SFP was 92.9%, greater than that of ketoprofen and loxoprofen from their respective patches. Application of SFPP decreased PGE2 content from 15 min to 6 h and reduced paw hyperalgesia compared with the control, ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches. SFPP showed analgesic efficacy, and was superior to the ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches, which could be through the potent COX inhibitory activity of SFP and greater skin absorption. The results suggested SFPP can be expected to exert analgesic effect clinically. PMID:26763139

  17. Morphine-6-glucuronide: analgesic effects and receptor binding profile in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, F.V.; Palmour, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The antinociceptive effects of morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) were examined in two animal models of pain, the tail immersion test (reflex withdrawal to noxious heat) and the formalin test (behavioral response to minor tissue injury). In the tail immersion test, M6G produced and increase in withdrawal latency that rose rapidly between 0.01 and 0.025 ug ICV or 1 and 2 mg/kg SC. A further increase occurred at doses greater than 0.2 ug ICV or 4 mg/kg SC and was associated with marked catelepsy and cyanosis. Naloxone, 0.1 mg/kg SC, shifted the lower component of the dose-effect relation by a factor of 24. In the formalin test, 0.01 ug M6G ICV produced hyperalgesia, while between 0.05 and 0.2 ug ICV, antinociception increased rapidly without toxicity. The dose effect relations for hyperalgesia and antinociception were shifted to the right by factors of 20- and 3-fold, respectively. By comparison, ICV morphine was 60 (formalin test) to 145-200 (tail immersion test) times less potent than M6G. At sub-nanomolar concentrations, M6G enhanced the binding of (/sup 3/H)-etorphine, (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine and (/sup 3/H)-naloxone to rat brain membrane receptors by 20-40%. At higher concentrations, M6G displaced each ligand from binding sites, with K/sub i/ values of about 30 nM, as compared to morphine K/sub i/ values of about 3 nM.

  18. [Effect of narcotic analgesics on impulse conduction along the afferent pathways of visceral nerves].

    PubMed

    Churiukanov, V V; Sinitsyn, L N

    1976-06-01

    Experiments were conducted on chloralose-anesthetized cats. The action of morphine and promedol upon the potentials of the cortical and subcortical structures occurring after the visceral nerve stimulation was studied. Morphine proved to depress the potentials evoked by stimulation of the inferior cardiac and vagus nerves, in the specific, associative and nonspecific structures of the brain; promedol produced an analogous effect. Morphine also inhibited the potentials occurring after the stimulation of the splanchnic nerve in the associative and nonspecific structures; depression of the responses in the specific pathways was less pronounced. PMID:953307

  19. Potential avoidance of adverse analgesic effects using a biologically "smart" hydrogel capable of controlled bupivacaine release.

    PubMed

    Taraballi, Francesca; Minardi, Silvia; Corradetti, Bruna; Yazdi, Iman K; Balliano, Marta A; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Allegri, Massimo; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2014-11-01

    Acute pain remains a tremendous clinical and economic burden, as its prevalence and common narcotic-based treatments are associated with poorer outcomes and higher costs. Multimodal analgesia portends great therapeutic promise, but rarely allows opioid sparing, and new alternatives are necessary. Microparticles (MPs) composed of biodegradable polymers [e.g., poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) or PLGA] have been applied for controlled drug release and acute pain treatment research. However, foreign particles' presence within inflamed tissue may affect the drug release or targeting, and/or cause a secondary inflammatory reaction. We examined how small alterations in the particulate nature of MPs affect both their uptake into and subsequent activation of macrophages. MPs composed of PLGA and chitosan (PLGA-Chi) loaded with bupivacaine (BP) were engineered at different sizes and their opsonization by J774 macrophages was assessed. Uptake of PLGA-Chi by macrophages was found to be size dependent, but they were not cytotoxic or proinflammatory in effect. Moreover, encapsulation of MPs in a thermoresponsive loading gel (pluronic F-127) effectively prevented opsonization. Finally, MPs displayed sustained, tunable release of BP up to 7 days. These results demonstrate our ability to develop a drug delivery system capable of controlled release of local anesthetics to treat acute/subacute pain while concurrently avoiding enhanced inflammation. PMID:25266282

  20. The Effect of Pre-Incision Field Block versus Post-Incision Inguinal Wound Infiltration on Postoperative Pain after Paediatric Herniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Olanipekun, Simeon Olafimihan; Adekola, Oyebola Olubodun; Desalu, Ibironke; Kushimo, Olusola Temitayo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric nerve block has been shown to significantly decrease opioid analgesic requirements and side effects after inguinal herniotomy. We compared the effect of pre-incisional field block with 0.25% bupivacaine and post-incisional wound infiltration with 0.25% bupivacaine for postoperative pain control after inguinal herniotomy. PATIENTS & METHODS: This was a randomized controlled double blind study in 62 ASA I and II children aged 1-7 years scheduled for inguinal herniotomy. They were assigned to receive either pre-incision field block (group I) or post-incision wound infiltration at the time of wound closure (group II). The pain score was assessed in the recovery room using mCHEOPS score and VAS or FLACC score at home by the parents for 24 hours. RESULTS: The mean pain scores during the 2 hour stay in the recovery room, at 12 and 18 hours at home were similar in both groups, p > 0.05. However, the mean pain scores were significantly lower at 6 hours at home in group I (1.22 ± 0.57) than in group II (1.58 ±0.90), p <0.001, but significantly higher at 24 hours at home in group I (3.29 ± 0.46) than in group II (2.32 ± 0.24), p = 0.040. There was no difference in mean paracetamol requirement, and in the number of patients who required paracetamol for pain relief at home in both groups, p > 0.05. CONCLUSION: We have demonstrated that both pre-incisional ilioinguinal/iliohypogastric field block and post incisional wound infiltration provided adequate postoperative analgesia for 24 hours after inguinal herniotomy. PMID:27275305

  1. Combined traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine. Relieving effects of Chinese herbs, ear-acupuncture and epidural morphine on postoperative pain in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Q S; Cao, S H; Xie, G M; Gan, Y H; Ma, H J; Lu, J Z; Zhang, Z H

    1994-04-01

    In the evaluation of Chinese herbs (A), ear-acupuncture (B) and epidural morphine (C) to relieve postoperative pain and abdominal distension, sixteen male patients with primary liver cancer were observed. This study was conducted by means of orthogonal experiment and double blind, randomized design. The patients received various treatments according to the display of the orthogonal table L16(2)15 which corresponds to 2(3) factorial experiment design. C+ (morphine 2 mg) was given before the peritoneum was sutured. A+ (orally administered) and B+ were given 24 hours after operation. 50-100 mg of pethidine was given when the pain intensity VAS (0-100) exceeded 50-70. The observation parameters included plasma leucine enkephalin (LEK), postoperative total dosage of narcotics administered for 5 days, VAS for pain and pain reliever, abdominal distension, urinary retention, constipation, etc. The results were as follows: a. Patients who had received A (A+B+C+, A+B+C-, A+B-C-, A+B-C+); C (C+A+B+, C+A+B-, C+A-B+, C+A-B-), or B (B+A+C+, B+A+C-, B+A-C+, B+A-C-) produced better analgesic effects than those who had received placebo. The A, B, and C reduced narcotics 650, 450 and 550 mg respectively when compared with placebo. The effects of A and C were of statistical significance (P < 0.05), while AB, BC, and AC interactions were not found; b. A and B minimized abdominal distension and urinary retention, while C prolonged them. As compared with the placebo, A and B accelerated restoration of bowel peristalsis (P < 0.05, ANOVA). Both A and B decreased it for 165 hours, while epidural morphine prolonged it for 49 hours; and c.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8088198

  2. A pilot study assessing the effectiveness of postoperative splinting after limited fasciectomy for Dupuytren's disease.

    PubMed

    Kemler, M A; Houpt, P; van der Horst, C M A M

    2012-10-01

    Before surgery for Dupuytren's contracture, 54 patients with a proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint flexion contractures of at least 30° were randomized to receive either a 3-month splinting protocol together with hand therapy under the direct supervision of hand therapists, or the same hand therapy alone. Extension deficit of the PIP joint (primary outcome measure), global perceived effect, pain intensity, comfort and complications were assessed at baseline and 1 year after surgery. In an intention-to-treat analysis, the group assigned to splint-plus-hand therapy had a mean reduction of 21° in flexion contracture after 1 year, compared with 29° in the group receiving hand therapy alone (p = 0.1). There was no difference between the groups regarding other parameters. After operative release of a Dupuytren's contracture, a postoperative protocol using a splint and hand therapy was no better than hand therapy alone in minimizing postoperative flexion contractures. PMID:22311918

  3. The Effect of the Gelatinous Lactulose for Postoperative Bowel Movement in the Patients Undergoing Cesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Shigemi, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Miwa; Shibata, Yoshie; Suzuki, Shunji

    2014-01-01

    Lactulose is a non-digestible disaccharide formed from fructose and galactose. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of lactulose on gastrointestinal function after cesarean section. One hundred patients who underwent cesarean section at the Japanese Red Cross Katsushika Maternity Hospital were enrolled in this study. They were divided into 2 groups by randomization: (1) an L group that was treated with gelatinous lactulose (N = 48) and (2) a control group (C group) that did not receive gelatinous lactulose (N = 52). The interval between cesarean section and first postoperative flatus, defecation, and walking; appearance of symptoms of ileus; use of other medicines for stimulating bowel movement; properties and state of feces; and duration of postoperative hospital stay were compared between the two groups. The two groups did not show a significant difference in postoperative outcomes, except for the incidence of loose or watery stools (50% in the L group and 26.9% in the C group, P = 0.03). This study could not demonstrate the apparent effectiveness of lactulose in improving bowel function after cesarean section. Therefore, a routine use of gelatinous lactulose after surgery may negatively impact the patients undergoing cesarean section.

  4. Repeated dosing of ABT-102, a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, enhances TRPV1-mediated analgesic activity in rodents, but attenuates antagonist-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Honore, Prisca; Chandran, Prasant; Hernandez, Gricelda; Gauvin, Donna M; Mikusa, Joseph P; Zhong, Chengmin; Joshi, Shailen K; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Sevcik, Molly A; Fryer, Ryan M; Segreti, Jason A; Banfor, Patricia N; Marsh, Kennan; Neelands, Torben; Bayburt, Erol; Daanen, Jerome F; Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung; Kort, Michael E; Reilly, Regina M; Surowy, Carol S; Kym, Philip R; Mantyh, Patrick W; Sullivan, James P; Jarvis, Michael F; Faltynek, Connie R

    2009-03-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a ligand-gated ion channel that functions as an integrator of multiple pain stimuli including heat, acid, capsaicin and a variety of putative endogenous lipid ligands. TRPV1 antagonists have been shown to decrease inflammatory pain in animal models and to produce limited hyperthermia at analgesic doses. Here, we report that ABT-102, which is a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, is effective in blocking nociception in rodent models of inflammatory, post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain. ABT-102 decreased both spontaneous pain behaviors and those evoked by thermal and mechanical stimuli in these models. Moreover, we have found that repeated administration of ABT-102 for 5-12 days increased its analgesic activity in models of post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain without an associated accumulation of ABT-102 concentration in plasma or brain. Similar effects were also observed with a structurally distinct TRPV1 antagonist, A-993610. Although a single dose of ABT-102 produced a self-limiting increase in core body temperature that remained in the normal range, the hyperthermic effects of ABT-102 effectively tolerated following twice-daily dosing for 2 days. Therefore, the present data demonstrate that, following repeated administration, the analgesic activity of TRPV1 receptor antagonists is enhanced, while the associated hyperthermic effects are attenuated. The analgesic efficacy of ABT-102 supports its advancement into clinical studies. PMID:19135797

  5. Evaluation of a Postoperative Pain-Like State on Motivated Behavior in Rats: Effects of Plantar Incision on Progressive-Ratio Food-Maintained Responding.

    PubMed

    Warner, Emily; Krivitsky, Rebecca; Cone, Katherine; Atherton, Phillip; Pitre, Travis; Lanpher, Janell; Giuvelis, Denise; Bergquist, Ivy; King, Tamara; Bilsky, Edward J; Stevenson, Glenn W

    2015-12-01

    There has been recent interest in characterizing the effects of pain-like states on motivated behaviors in order to quantify how pain modulates goal-directed behavior and the persistence of that behavior. The current set of experiments assessed the effects of an incisional postoperative pain manipulation on food-maintained responding under a progressive-ratio (PR) operant schedule. Independent variables included injury state (plantar incision or anesthesia control) and reinforcer type (grain pellet or sugar pellet); dependent variables were tactile sensory thresholds and response breakpoint. Once responding stabilized on the PR schedule, separate groups of rats received a single ventral hind paw incision or anesthesia (control condition). Incision significantly reduced breakpoints in rats responding for grain, but not sugar. In rats responding for sugar, tactile hypersensitivity recovered within 24 hr, indicating a faster recovery of incision-induced tactile hypersensitivity compared to rats responding for grain, which demonstrated recovery at PD2. The NSAID analgesic, diclofenac (5.6 mg/kg) completely restored incision-depressed PR operant responding and tactile sensitivity at 3 hr following incision. The PR schedule differentiated between sucrose and grain, suggesting that relative reinforcing efficacy may be an important determinant in detecting pain-induced changes in motivated behavior. PMID:26494422

  6. Evaluation of the analgesic effect of low-power optical radiation in acute inflammatory process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Denise M.; Zangaro, Renato A.; Cury, Yara; Frigo, Lucio; Barbosa, Daniella G.; da Silva Melo, Milene; Munin, Egberto

    2004-07-01

    Many research works have explored the use of the low power laser as a tool for the control of inflammatory processes. The anti-inflammatory effect of low power optical radiation and its ability to induce analgesia has been reported for different experimental conditions. Many published works are very qualitative in nature. In this work the action of low power laser radiation on acute inflammatory process is evaluated. The time evolution of rat paw edema and pain induced by carrageenan was experimentally monitored. A 632.8 nm He-Ne laser was used for the treatment. The laser treatment, at a dosage of 2,5 J/cm2, was applied at the first, second and third hour after the induction of the inflammation. A hydroplethysmometer was used for the evaluation of the inflammation. The measurement of pain sensitivity was performed according to the method described by Randall and Selito, (1957). The laser treatment was capable of inhibiting the carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia by 49% (p<0,001) at the second hour after the induction, as compared to the non-treated group. At the fourth hour (peak of the carrageenan action on hyperalgesia) and at the sixth hour, the achieved inhibition was 49% (p<0,001) and 61% (p<0,001), respectively. In the treated groups, the edema evolution was inhibited by 38% (p<0,01), at the second hour after induction, as compared to the non-treated groups. At the fourth hour (peak of the carrageenan action on leakage) and at sixth hour the achieved inhibition was 35% (p<0,01) and 30% (p<0,05) respectively.

  7. A Randomized Double Blinded Comparison of Epidural Infusion of Bupivacaine, Ropivacaine, Bupivacaine-Fentanyl, Ropivacaine-Fentanyl for Postoperative Pain Relief in Lower Limb Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Krishan Yogesh; Grewal, Anju; Katyal, Sunil; Singh, Gurdeep; Kaur, Ananjit

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous epidural infusion of Bupivacaine and Ropivacaine with or without the addition of Fentanyl has been evaluated by various researchers for effective postoperative pain relief. Studies however, depict significant variability in their results with regard to analgesic efficacy and adverse effects like hypotension, motor blockade etc. Aim To comparatively evaluate postoperative analgesic efficacy, motor sparing effect, postoperative haemodynamic variations and total postoperative analgesic consumption in first 24 hours. Materials and Methods A randomised double blind study was conducted on 100 adult, ASA grade I and II patients, of either sex who had undergone elective lower limb surgery under spinal anaesthesia. According to the group allocated, patients were started on epidural infusion after completion of surgery. Group I (0.2% Ropivacaine), Group II (0.1% Ropivacaine + 2μg/ml Fentanyl), Group III (0.2% Bupivacaine), Group IV (0.1% Bupivacaine + 2μg/ml Fentanyl) at the rate of 6 ml/hour. VAS scores, epidural consumption, supplemental epidural boluses, rescue analgesics, haemodynamics, motor block, sensory block regression, sedation, nausea and pruritis were recorded by a blinded observer for 24 hours. Results The haemodynamic parameters were stable in all the groups. Side effects including the motor block were negligible and comparable in all groups. Group I patients had significantly lower VAS scores, mean total epidural consumption, supplemental epidural bolus requirement and rescue analgesic requirement among all groups. Conclusion It can be concluded that epidural analgesia using Ropivacaine 0.2% infusion is more effective than other study groups when used for postoperative pain relief in lower limb surgeries. PMID:26500984

  8. Effect of preoperative forced-air warming on postoperative temperature and postanesthesia care unit length of stay.

    PubMed

    Fettes, Sondra; Mulvaine, Mary; Van Doren, Elaine

    2013-03-01

    Unintended hypothermia in the surgical patient has been linked to numerous postoperative complications, including increased risk for surgical site infection, increased oxygen demands, and altered medication metabolism. The lack of literature on the subject was part of the impetus for perioperative nurses in one hospital to conduct a quality improvement project to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative warming on patients' postoperative temperatures. We randomly assigned 128 patients to either a group that received a forced-air warming blanket preoperatively or a group that did not. Our results showed that prewarming patients before surgery did not have an effect on patients' postoperative temperatures. PMID:23452697

  9. [Ultrasound-guided cutaneous intercostal branches nerves block: A good analgesic alternative for gallbladder open surgery].

    PubMed

    Fernández Martín, M T; López Álvarez, S; Mozo Herrera, G; Platero Burgos, J J

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the standard treatment for gallbladder diseases. However, there are still some patients for whom conversion to open surgery is required. This surgery can produce significant post-operative pain. Opioids drugs have traditionally been used to treat this pain, but side effects have led to seeking alternatives (plexus, nerve or fascia blocks or wound). The cases are presented of 4 patients subjected to ultrasound-guided intercostal branches blocks in the mid-axillary line from T6 to T12 with levobupivacaine as an analgesic alternative in open surgery of gallbladder, with satisfactory results. PMID:25896736

  10. Predictive Effects of Lung function test on Postoperative Pneumonia in Squamous Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ran; Dong, Wei; Shen, Hongchang; Ni, Yang; Zhang, Tiehong; Wang, Yibing; Du, Jiajun

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests had prospective implications for postoperative pneumonia, which occurred frequently after esophagectomy. Understanding factors that were associated with pulmonary infection may help in patient selection and postoperative management. We performed a retrospective review of 2 independent cohorts including 216 patients who underwent esophagectomy between November 2011 and May 2014, aiming at identifying predictors of primary pneumonia. Univariate analysis was used to identify potential covariates for the development of primary pneumonia. Adjustments for multiple comparisons were made using False Discovery Rate (FDR) (Holm-Bonferroni method). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors and construct a regression model based on a training cohort (n = 166) and then the regression model was validated using an independent cohort (n = 50). It showed that low PEF (hazard ratio 0.97, P = 0.009) was independent risk factors for the development of primary pneumonia in multivariate analyses and had a predictive effect for primary pneumonia (AUC = 0.691 and 0.851 for training and validation data set, respectively). Therefore, PEF has clinical value in predicting postoperative pneumonia after esophagectomy and it may serve as an indicator of preoperative lung function training. PMID:27004739

  11. Effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in the patients that underwent CABG

    PubMed Central

    Özülkü, Mehmet; Aygün, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study investigated effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods A total of 256 patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in the Cardiovascular Surgery clinic were enrolled in the study. Jostra-Cobe (Model 043213 105, VLC 865, Sweden) heart-lung machine was used in on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting was performed using Octopus and Starfish. Proximal anastomoses to the aorta in both on-pump and off-pump techniques were performed by side clamps. The patients were discharged from the hospital between postoperative day 6 and day 11. Results The incidence of postoperative right pleural effusion and bilateral pleural effusion was found to be higher as a count in Group 1 (on-pump) as compared to Group 2 (off-pump). But the difference was not statistically significant [P>0.05 for right pleural effusion (P=0.893), P>0.05 for bilateral pleural effusion (P=0.780)]. Left pleural effusion was encountered to be lower in Group 2 (off-pump). The difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.05, P=0.006). Conclusion Under the light of these results, it can be said that left pleural effusion is less prevalent in the patients that underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting when compared to the patients that underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. PMID:27163421

  12. The Effect of Ringer versus Haemaccel Preload on Incidence of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Ghafourifard, Mansour; Zirak, Mohammad; Broojerdi, Mohammad Hossein; Bayendor, Ali; Moradi, Abolfaz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is the most common and unpleasant postoperative complication. There is much controversy on preoperative fluid therapy. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of crystalloid fluid (Ringer solution) versus colloid (Haemaccel solution) on the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients receiving spinal anesthesia. Methods: In this double-blinded clinical trial, 46 patients were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients were randomly allocated to one of two groups. The crystalloid group received Ringer solution at a volume of 7 ml/kg and colloid group received 7ml/kg of 3% Modified Gelatin (Haemaccel) as a preoperative intravenous bolus. We used a Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) for assessing the nausea and vomiting occurrence. Data were analyzed using SPSS software ver.13 and χ2 test and independent t-test. Results: The result showed that the incidence of PONV was less frequent in both Ringer and Haemaccel groups, but the incidence of vomiting and the intensity of nausea was not significantly different in any time point after anesthesia. Conclusion: We conclude that preoperative fluid administration decreases the incidence of PONV, and both Crystalloids (Ringer) and colloids (haemaccel) solution were found to be equivalent in prevention of PONV. Therefore using of either Ringer or haemaccel solution is recommended for prevention of PONV. PMID:26161365

  13. Predictive Effects of Lung function test on Postoperative Pneumonia in Squamous Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ran; Dong, Wei; Shen, Hongchang; Ni, Yang; Zhang, Tiehong; Wang, Yibing; Du, Jiajun

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests had prospective implications for postoperative pneumonia, which occurred frequently after esophagectomy. Understanding factors that were associated with pulmonary infection may help in patient selection and postoperative management. We performed a retrospective review of 2 independent cohorts including 216 patients who underwent esophagectomy between November 2011 and May 2014, aiming at identifying predictors of primary pneumonia. Univariate analysis was used to identify potential covariates for the development of primary pneumonia. Adjustments for multiple comparisons were made using False Discovery Rate (FDR) (Holm-Bonferroni method). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors and construct a regression model based on a training cohort (n = 166) and then the regression model was validated using an independent cohort (n = 50). It showed that low PEF (hazard ratio 0.97, P = 0.009) was independent risk factors for the development of primary pneumonia in multivariate analyses and had a predictive effect for primary pneumonia (AUC = 0.691 and 0.851 for training and validation data set, respectively). Therefore, PEF has clinical value in predicting postoperative pneumonia after esophagectomy and it may serve as an indicator of preoperative lung function training. PMID:27004739

  14. The effect of watching live arthroscopic views on postoperative anxiety of patients.

    PubMed

    Bayar, Ahmet; Tuncay, Ibrahim; Atasoy, Nuray; Ayoğlu, Hilal; Keser, Selçuk; Ege, Ahmet

    2008-11-01

    Surgery is a stressful experience. Many minor interventions have been shown to cause considerable anxiety in patients, but whether arthroscopy leads to such anxiety is not well-known. Methods for lowering perioperative anxiety have been sought and listening to music or watching a movie have been recommended. The method of permitting patients to watch their own endoscopy has been studied infrequently. Our aim in this study was to find out the effect of watching simultaneous arthroscopic views on postoperative anxiety. A total of 63 patients were randomly divided into two groups: those watching their own arthroscopy formed group W, while patients that were only verbally informed formed group NW. The mean age of patients in both groups were 33 and 34, respectively. Meniscal surgery was the most commonly performed procedure (49/63 patients). The patients filled in state scale of State-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) forms and the study questionnaire (SQ) prepared for this study, just before and after the arthroscopy. Group W had significantly lower postoperative scores of STAI-S, whole questionnaire (Q-score) and all but one of individual statements in SQ. Having a previous operation history did not affect STAI scores. Age and level of education was not correlated with any of the studied parameters either. The ratio of patients that were pleased with the arthroscopy experience in group W and NW were 94 and 63%, respectively. Watching live arthroscopic views has led to a significant decrease in postoperative anxiety and worries about the surgery and the postoperative period, while increasing overall understanding and satisfaction of the patient. PMID:18566798

  15. Caudal ropivacaine and bupivacaine for postoperative analgesia in infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Surhan Ozer; Isil, Canan Tulay; Sahin, Sevtap Hekimoglu; Paksoy, Inci

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the postoperative analgesic efficacy of ropivacaine 0.175% and bupivacaine 0.175% injected caudally into infants for lower abdominal surgery. Methods: Eighty infants, aged 3-12 months, ASA I-II scheduled to undergo lower abdominal surgery were randomly allocated to one of the two groups: Group R received 1ml.kg-1 0.175% ropivacaine and Group B received 1ml.kg-1 0.175% bupivacaine via caudal route. Postoperative analgesia, sedation and motor block were evaluated with modified objective pain scale, three-point scale and modified Bromage scale respectively. Postoperative measurements including mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), pain (OPS), sedation and motor block score were recorded for four hours in the postoperative recovery room. Parents were contacted by telephone after 24 hours to question duration of analgesia and side effects. Results: No significant differences were found among the groups in demographic data, MAP, HR, OPS and sedation scores during four hours postoperatively. The duration of analgesia was 527.5±150.62 minutes in Group R, 692.77±139.01 minutes in Group B (p=0.004). Twelve (30%) patients in Group R, 16 (40%) patients in groupB needed rescue analgesics (p=0.348). Rescue analgesics were administered (1 time/2 times) (9/3) (22.5/7.5%) in Group R and 16/0 (40/0%) in Group B, where no statistically significant difference was determined between the groups (p=0.071). Motor blockade was observed in 7 (17.5%) patients in Group R, and 8 (20%) patients in Group B (p=0.774). Conclusion: This study indicated, that a concentration of 0.175% ropivacaine and 0.175% bupivacaine administered to the infants via caudal route both provided effective and similar postoperative pain relief in infants, who underwent lower abdominal surgery. PMID:26430427

  16. A comparison of the effects of two volumes of local analgesic solution in the distal interphalangeal joint of horses with lameness caused by solar toe or solar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, J; Schumacher, J; de Graves, F; Steiger, R; Schramme, M; Smith, R; Coker, M

    2001-05-01

    The response of horses, with solar pain in the dorsal or palmar aspect of the foot, to 6 or 10 ml local analgesic solution administered into the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint was examined. Lameness was induced in 7 horses by creating solar pain in the dorsal aspect of one forefoot and, at another time, the palmar aspect of the other forefoot with set-screws inserted into a custom-made shoe. Horses were videotaped trotting before and after application of set-screws and, in separate trials, after 6 or 10 ml local analgesic solution was administered into the DIP joint. Lameness scores were assigned by examining videotaped gaits. Scores were significantly lower (P < 0.05) for horses with set-screws applied to the angles of the sole and receiving 10 ml, but not 6 ml, local analgesic solution into the DIP joint. Scores were significantly lower (P < 0.05) for all horses with set-screws in the dorsal margin of the sole receiving either volume of local analgesic solution. Analgesia of the DIP joint was less effective in desensitising the angles of the sole than in desensitising the dorsal margin of the sole, and 10 ml local analgesic solution was more effective than 6 ml in desensitising these regions. The response of horses with solar pain to local analgesic solution in the DIP joint was influenced by the volume administered and the region of sole affected. PMID:11352348

  17. Alternative Therapies for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting.

    PubMed

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gan, Tong J; Joseph, Nicholas; Uribe, Alberto; Pandya, Jyoti; Dalal, Rohan; Bergese, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a complication affecting between 20 and 40% of all surgery patients, with high-risk patients experiencing rates of up to 80%. Recent studies and publications have shed light on the uses of alternative treatment for PONV through their modulation of endogenous opioid neuropeptides and neurokinin ligands. In addition to reducing PONV, hypnosis was reported to be useful in attenuating postoperative pain and anxiety, and contributing to hemodynamic stability. Music therapy has been utilized to deepen the sedation level and decrease patient anxiety, antiemetic and analgesic requirements, hospital length of stay, and fatigue. Isopropyl alcohol and peppermint oil aromatherapy have both been used to reduce postoperative nausea. With correct training in traditional Chinese healing techniques, acupuncture (APu) at the P6 acupoint has also been shown to be useful in preventing early PONV, postdischarge nausea and vomiting, and alleviating of pain. Electro-acupuncture (EAPu), as with APu, provided analgesic and antiemetic effects through release and modulation of opioid neuropeptides. These non-pharmacological modalities of treatment contribute to an overall patient wellbeing, assisting in physical and emotional healing. PMID:26734609

  18. Alternative Therapies for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gan, Tong J.; Joseph, Nicholas; Uribe, Alberto; Pandya, Jyoti; Dalal, Rohan; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a complication affecting between 20 and 40% of all surgery patients, with high-risk patients experiencing rates of up to 80%. Recent studies and publications have shed light on the uses of alternative treatment for PONV through their modulation of endogenous opioid neuropeptides and neurokinin ligands. In addition to reducing PONV, hypnosis was reported to be useful in attenuating postoperative pain and anxiety, and contributing to hemodynamic stability. Music therapy has been utilized to deepen the sedation level and decrease patient anxiety, antiemetic and analgesic requirements, hospital length of stay, and fatigue. Isopropyl alcohol and peppermint oil aromatherapy have both been used to reduce postoperative nausea. With correct training in traditional Chinese healing techniques, acupuncture (APu) at the P6 acupoint has also been shown to be useful in preventing early PONV, postdischarge nausea and vomiting, and alleviating of pain. Electro-acupuncture (EAPu), as with APu, provided analgesic and antiemetic effects through release and modulation of opioid neuropeptides. These non-pharmacological modalities of treatment contribute to an overall patient wellbeing, assisting in physical and emotional healing. PMID:26734609

  19. Structure-activity studies related to ABT-594, a potent nonopioid analgesic agent: effect of pyridine and azetidine ring substitutions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding affinity and analgesic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Holladay, M W; Bai, H; Li, Y; Lin, N H; Daanen, J F; Ryther, K B; Wasicak, J T; Kincaid, J F; He, Y; Hettinger, A M; Huang, P; Anderson, D J; Bannon, A W; Buckley, M J; Campbell, J E; Donnelly-Roberts, D L; Gunther, K L; Kim, D J; Kuntzweiler, T A; Sullivan, J P; Decker, M W; Arneric, S P

    1998-10-01

    Analogs of A-98593 (1) and its enantiomer ABT-594 (2) with diverse substituents on the pyridine ring were prepared and tested for affinity to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites in rat brain and for analgesic activity in the mouse hot plate assay. Numerous types of modifications were consistent with high affinity for [3H]cytisine binding sites. By contrast, only selected modifications resulted in retention of analgesic potency in the same range as 1 and 2. Analogs of 2 with one or two methyl substituents at the 3-position of the azetidine ring also were prepared and found to be substantially less active in both assays. PMID:9873625

  20. Caudal bupivacaine and morphine provides effective postoperative analgesia but does not prevent hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum for major laparoscopic surgeries in children.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Riddhi; Baidya, Dalim K; Arora, Mahesh Kumar; Maitra, Souvik; Darlong, Vanlal; Goswami, Devalina; Mohanaselvi, S; Bajpai, Minu

    2015-08-01

    The use of a caudal block in laparoscopic surgery in children is limited to minor procedures like inguinal hernia repair, and intravenous opioids remain the analgesic modality of choice in major laparoscopic surgery. However, a caudal block is frequently performed at our institute even for laparoscopic surgery. Therefore, we planned to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of caudal bupivacaine and morphine in major laparoscopic surgery as compared to intravenous opioids. Our hypothesis was that a single-shot caudal block would increase the duration of analgesia and minimize the hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum. After institutional ethics committee clearance, data were collected for 65 ASA I-II children aged 6 months to 12 years who underwent laparoscopic surgery in the last 14 months. Demographic, surgical, and perioperative anesthetic and analgesic data were noted and analyzed. Twenty-four children received a caudal block with 0.25 % bupivacaine (1-1.25 ml/kg) with morphine (30-50 mcg/kg). In the caudal group, the time to first analgesic request was increased (165 vs. 45 min; p = 0.00) and tachycardia response to port site incision was less observed (33 vs. 63 % children; p = 0.019). Hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum was equal in both of the groups. Single-shot caudal injection of local anesthetic with morphine reduces port site skin incision response and increases the duration of postoperative analgesia but fails to prevent hemodynamic response to pneumoperitoneum. PMID:25686563

  1. The Analgesic Effect of Oxytocin in Humans: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Cross-Over Study Using Laser-Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Paloyelis, Y; Krahé, C; Maltezos, S; Williams, S C; Howard, M A; Fotopoulou, A

    2016-04-01

    Oxytocin is a neuropeptide regulating social-affiliative and reproductive behaviour in mammals. Despite robust preclinical evidence for the antinociceptive effects and mechanisms of action of exogenous oxytocin, human studies have produced mixed results regarding the analgesic role of oxytocin and are yet to show a specific modulation of neural processes involved in pain perception. In the present study, we investigated the analgesic effects of 40 IU of intranasal oxytocin in 13 healthy male volunteers using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design and brief radiant heat pulses generated by an infrared laser that selectively activate Aδ- and C-fibre nerve endings in the epidermis, at the same time as recording the ensuing laser-evoked potentials (LEPs). We predicted that oxytocin would reduce subjective pain ratings and attenuate the amplitude of the N1, N2 and P2 components. We observed that oxytocin attenuated perceived pain intensity and the local peak amplitude of the N1 and N2 (but not of P2) LEPs, and increased the latency of the N2 component. Importantly, for the first time, the present study reports an association between the analgesic effect of oxytocin (reduction in subjective pain ratings) and the oxytocin-induced modulation of cortical activity after noxious stimulation (attenuation of the N2 LEP). These effects indicate that oxytocin modulates neural processes contributing to pain perception. The present study reports preliminary evidence that is consistent with electrophysiological studies in rodents showing that oxytocin specifically modulates Aδ/C-fibre nociceptive afferent signalling at the spinal level and provides further specificity to evidence obtained in humans indicating that oxytocin may be modulating pain experience by modulating activity in the cortical areas involved in pain processing. PMID:26660859

  2. Role of Ketamine in Acute Postoperative Pain Management: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Radvansky, Brian M.; Shah, Khushbu; Parikh, Anant; Sifonios, Anthony N.; Le, Vanny; Eloy, Jean D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this narrative review was to examine the usage of ketamine as a postoperative analgesic agent across a wide variety of surgeries. Design. A literature search was performed using the phrases “ketamine” and “postoperative pain.” The authors analyzed the studies that involved testing ketamine's effectiveness at controlling postoperative pain. Effectiveness was assessed through various outcomes such as the amount of opiate consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, and persistent postoperative pain at long-term follow-up. Results. While many different administration protocols were evaluated, delivering ketamine both as a pre- or perioperative bolus and postoperative infusion for up to 48 hours appeared to be the most effective. These effects are dose-dependent. However, a number of studies analyzed showed no benefit in using ketamine versus placebo for controlling postoperative pain. While ketamine is a safe and well-tolerated drug, it does have adverse effects, and there are concerns for possible neurotoxicity and effects on memory. Conclusions. In a number of limited situations, ketamine has shown some efficacy in controlling postoperative pain and decreasing opioid consumption. More randomized controlled trials are necessary to determine the surgical procedures and administrations (i.e., intravenous, epidural) that ketamine is best suited for. PMID:26495312

  3. IMMEDIATE RESCUE DESIGNS IN PEDIATRIC ANALGESIC TRIALS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Berde, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Designing analgesic clinical trials in pediatrics requires a balance between scientific, ethical and practical concerns. A previous consensus group recommended immediate-rescue designs using opioid sparing as a surrogate measure of analgesic efficacy. We summarize the performance of rescue analgesic designs in pediatric trials of four commonly used classes of analgesics: opioids, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and local anesthetics. Methods Medline, Embase, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library and Web of science were searched in April 2013. The 85 studies selected were randomized or controlled clinical trials using immediate rescue paradigms in postoperative pain settings. A random effects meta-analysis was used to synthesize predefined outcomes using Hedges’ G. Difference between the means of the treatment arms were also expressed as a percentage of the corresponding value in the placebo group (placebo-treatment/placebo). Distributions of pain scores in study and control groups and relationships between opioid sparing and pain scores were examined. Results For each of the four study drug classes, significant opioid sparing was demonstrated in a majority of studies by one or more of the following endpoints: (1) total dose (mg/kg/h), (2) percentage of children requiring rescue medication and (3) time to first rescue medication (minutes). Pain scores averaged 2.4/10 in study groups, 3.4/10 in control groups. Conclusions Opioid sparing is a feasible pragmatic endpoint for pediatric pain analgesic trials. This review serves to guide future research in pediatric analgesia trials, which could test whether some specific design features may improve assay sensitivity while minimizing the risk of unrelieved pain. PMID:25222831

  4. Intraperitoneal pre-insufflation of 0.125% bupivaciane with tramadol for postoperative pain relief following laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Aslam; Usmani, Hammad; Khan, Mohd Mozaffar; Rizvi, Amjad Ali; Siddiqi, Mohd Masood Hussain; Aslam, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is associated with a fairly high incidence of postoperative discomfort which is more of visceral origin than somatic. Studies have concluded that the instillation of local anesthetic with opioid around gall bladder bed provides more effective analgesia than either local anesthetic or opioid alone. Material and Methods: The study included 90 American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients of age 16-65 years scheduled for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. The patients received the study drugs at the initiation of insufflation of CO2 in the intraperitoneal space by the operating surgeon under laparoscopic camera guidance over the gallbladder bed. Patients in Group T received tramadol 2 mg/kg in 30 ml normal saline, in Group B received bupivacaine 30 ml of 0.125% and in Group BT received tramadol 2 mg/kg in 30 ml of 0.125% bupivacaine intraperitoneally. Postoperative pain assessment was done at different time intervals in the first 24 h using Visual Analog Scale of 0-10 (0 = No pain, 10 = Worst pain imagined). Time to first dose of rescue analgesic and total analgesics required in the first 24 h postoperatively were also recorded. The incidence of side effects during the postoperative period was recorded. Results: Reduction in postoperative pain was elicited, at 4 and 8 h postoperatively when Group BT (bupivacaine-tramadol group) was compared with Group T (tramadol group) or Group B (bupivacaine group) (P < 0.01). There was a significantly lower requirement of analgesics during first 24 h postoperatively in Group BT compared to Group B or T but no significant difference in the intake of analgesics was noted between Groups B Group T. Time to first dose of rescue analgesic was also significantly prolonged in Group BT compared to Group B or T. The incidence of nausea and vomiting was comparable in all the study groups. Conclusions: Intraperitoneal application of bupivacaine with tramadol was a more

  5. Novel Associations between FAAH Genetic Variants and Postoperative Central Opioid related Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sadhasivam, Senthilkumar; Zhang, Xue; Chidambaran, Vidya; Mavi, Jagroop; Pilipenko, Valentina; Mersha, Tesfaye B.; Meller, Jaroslaw; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Martin, Lisa J.; McAuliffe, John

    2014-01-01

    Opioid effects are potentiated by cannabinoid agonists including anandamide, an endocannabinoid. Inter-individual variability in responses to opioids is a major clinical problem. Multiple deaths and anoxic brain injuries occur every year in due to opioid induced respiratory depression in surgical patients and drug abusers of opioids and cannabinoids. This study aimed to determine specific associations between genetic variants of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and postoperative central opioid adverse effects in children undergoing tonsillectomy. This is a prospective genotype blinded observational study 259 healthy children between 6 and 15 years that received standard perioperative care with a standard anesthetic and an intraoperative dose of morphine were enrolled. Associations between frequent polymorphisms of FAAH and central postoperative opioid adverse effects including, respiratory depression (RD), postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and prolonged stay in Post Anesthesia Recovery Room (PACU) due to RD and PONV were analyzed. Five specific FAAH SNPs had significant associations with more than 2 fold increased risk for refractory PONV (adjusted p<0.0018), and nominal associations (p<0.05) with RD and prolonged PACU stay in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. FAAH SNP, rs324420 is a missense mutation with altered FAAH function and it is linked with other FAAH SNPs associated with PONV and RD in our cohort; association between PONV and rs324420 was confirmed in our extended cohort with additional 66 white children. Specific FAAH polymorphisms are associated with refractory PONV, opioid-related respiratory depression, and prolonged PACU stay due to opioid adverse effects in white children undergoing tonsillectomy. PMID:25558980

  6. Postoperative sleep disruptions: a potential catalyst of acute pain?

    PubMed

    Chouchou, Florian; Khoury, Samar; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Denis, Ronald; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2014-06-01

    Despite the substantial advances in the understanding of pain mechanisms and management, postoperative pain relief remains an important health care issue. Surgical patients also frequently report postoperative sleep complaints. Major sleep alterations in the postoperative period include sleep fragmentation, reduced total sleep time, and loss of time spent in slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep. Clinical and experimental studies show that sleep disturbances may exacerbate pain, whereas pain and opioid treatments disturb sleep. Surgical stress appears to be a major contributor to both sleep disruptions and altered pain perception. However, pain and the use of opioid analgesics could worsen sleep alterations, whereas sleep disruptions may contribute to intensify pain. Nevertheless, little is known about the relationship between postoperative sleep and pain. Although the sleep-pain interaction has been addressed from both ends, this review focuses on the impact of sleep disruptions on pain perception. A better understanding of the effect of postoperative sleep disruptions on pain perception would help in selecting patients at risk for more severe pain and may facilitate the development of more effective and safer pain management programs. PMID:24074687

  7. Topical piroxicam in vitro release and in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects from palm oil esters-based nanocream

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkarim, Muthanna F; Abdullah, Ghassan Z; Chitneni, Mallikarjun; Salman, Ibrahim M; Ameer, Omar Z; Yam, Mun F; Mahdi, Elrashid S; Sattar, Munavvar A; Basri, Mahiran; Noor, Azmin M

    2010-01-01

    Introduction During recent years, there has been growing interest in use of topical vehicle systems to assist in drug permeation through the skin. Drugs of interest are usually those that are problematic when given orally, such as piroxicam, a highly effective anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic, and analgesic, but with the adverse effect of causing gastrointestinal ulcers. The present study investigated the in vitro and in vivo pharmacodynamic activity of a newly synthesized palm oil esters (POEs)-based nanocream containing piroxicam for topical delivery. Methods A ratio of 25:37:38 of POEs: external phase: surfactants (Tween 80:Span 20, in a ratio 80:20), respectively was selected as the basic composition for the production of a nanocream with ideal properties. Various nanocreams were prepared using phosphate-buffered saline as the external phase at three different pH values. The abilities of these formulae to deliver piroxicam were assessed in vitro using a Franz diffusion cell fitted with a cellulose acetate membrane and full thickness rat skin. These formulae were also evaluated in vivo by comparing their anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities with those of the currently marketed gel. Results After eight hours, nearly 100% of drug was transferred through the artificial membrane from the prepared formula F3 (phosphate-buffered saline at pH 7.4 as the external phase) and the marketed gel. The steady-state flux through rat skin of all formulae tested was higher than that of the marketed gel. Pharmacodynamically, nanocream formula F3 exhibited the highest anti- inflammatory and analgesic effects as compared with the other formulae. Conclusion The nanocream containing the newly synthesized POEs was successful for trans-dermal delivery of piroxicam. PMID:21116332

  8. Analgesics in ophthalmic practice: a review of the oral non-narcotic agent tramadol.

    PubMed

    Gaynes, B I; Barkin, R L

    1999-07-01

    This report reviews the causes of ocular pain and discusses the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, adverse effects, and dosage of tramadol, a novel non-narcotic oral analgesic. Tramadol is a synthetic analog of codeine with a dual mechanism of action that involves agonist activity at the mu opioid receptor, as well as inhibition of monoaminergic (norepinephrine and serotonin) re-uptake. Unlike opiate analgesics, tramadol has very low propensity toward physical dependence. Common dose-related adverse effects of tramadol include dizziness, nausea, vomiting, dry mouth, and/or drowsiness. Clinically, tramadol has been shown to be equivalent to acetaminophen (325 mg)-codeine (30 mg) combinations for the treatment of moderate or severe nonocular pain. Tramadol appears to be an effective analgesic agent for pain control due to postoperative surgical trauma, as well as in various chronic malignant and nonmalignant disease states. Tramadol has shown variable effectiveness in the control of pain related to dental procedures. The usefulness of tramadol in pain states from ophthalmic origin has yet to be clinically established. PMID:10445636

  9. A comparison between intravenous paracetamol plus fentanyl and intravenous fentanyl alone for postoperative analgesia during laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Choudhuri, Anirban Hom; Uppal, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: our study compared the effect of fentanyl alone with fentanyl plus intravenous Paracetamol for analgesic efficacy, opioid sparing effects, and opioid-related side effects after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: eighty patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized into two groups, who were given either an IV placebo or an IV injection of 1g paracetamol just before induction. Both groups received fentanyl during induction and IM diclofenac for pain relief every 8 hourly for 24 h after surgery. The postoperative pain relief was evaluated by a visual analog scale (VAS) and consumption of fentanyl as rescue analgesic in the postoperative period for 24 h after surgery was measured. The incidence of PONV and sedation scores was also measured in the postoperative period. Results: the mean VAS score in first and second hour after surgery was less in the group receiving IV Paracetamol (3.3±0.4* vs. 5.2±0.9; 3.1±0.4* vs. 4.3±0.3); the fentanyl consumption over first 24 h was also less in the group receiving IV paracetamol (50±14.9 vs. 150±25.8). The time requirement of first dose of rescue analgesic in the postoperative period was also significantly prolonged in the group receiving IV paracetamol (76±24.7 vs. 48±15.8). There was no difference in the sedation scores and in the incidence of PONV in the two groups. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the usefulness of intravenous paracetamol as pre-emptive analgesic in the treatment of postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:25885388

  10. Analgesic Effects of Tramadol, Tramadol–Gabapentin, and Buprenorphine in an Incisional Model of Pain in Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    McKeon, Gabriel P; Pacharinsak, Cholawat; Long, Charles T; Howard, Antwain M; Jampachaisri, Katechan; Yeomans, David C; Felt, Stephen A

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative pain management in laboratory animals relies heavily on a limited number of drug classes, such as opioids and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Here we evaluated the effects of saline, tramadol, tramadol with gabapentin, and buprenorphine (n = 6 per group) in a rat model of incisional pain by examining thermal hyperalgesia and weight-bearing daily for 6 d after surgery. All drugs were administered preemptively and continued for 2 consecutive days after surgery. Rats treated with saline or with tramadol only showed thermal hyperalgesia on days 1 through 4 and 1 through 3 after surgery, respectively. In contrast, buprenorphine-treated rats showed no thermal hyperalgesia on days 1 and 2 after surgery, and rats given tramadol with gabapentin showed reduced thermal hyperalgesia on days 2 and 4. For tests of weight-bearing, rats treated with saline or with tramadol only showed significantly less ipsilateral weight-bearing on day 1 after surgery, whereas rats given either buprenorphine or tramadol with gabapentin showed no significant change in ipsilateral weight-bearing after surgery. These data suggest that tramadol alone provides insufficient analgesia in this model of incisional pain; buprenorphine and, to a lesser extent, tramadol with gabapentin provide relief of thermal hyperalgesia and normalize weight-bearing. PMID:21439212

  11. The formalin test: a quantitative study of the analgesic effects of morphine, meperidine, and brain stem stimulation in rats and cats.

    PubMed

    Dubuisson, D; Dennis, S G

    1977-12-01

    A method for assessing pain and analgesia in rats and cats is described. The procedure involves subcutaneous injection of dilute formalin into the forepaw, after which the animal's responses are rated according to objective behavioral criteria. The formalin test is a statistically valid technique which has two advantages over other pain tests: (1) little or no restraint is necessary, permitting unhindered observation of the complete range of behavioral responses; and (2) the pain stimulus is continuous rather than transient, thus bearing greater resemblance to most clinical pain. The analgesic effects of morphine, meperidine, and stimulation of the periaqueductal grey matter are evaluated using this test. PMID:564014

  12. Continuous Postoperative Pericardial Flushing: A Pilot Study on Safety, Feasibility, and Effect on Blood Loss

    PubMed Central

    Manshanden, Johan S.J.; Gielen, Chantal L.I.; de Borgie, Corianne A.J.M.; Klautz, Robert J.M.; de Mol, Bas A.J.M.; Koolbergen, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged or excessive blood loss is a common complication after cardiac surgery. Blood remnants and clots, remaining in the pericardial space in spite of chest tube drainage, induce high fibrinolytic activity that may contribute to bleeding complications. Continuous postoperative pericardial flushing (CPPF) with an irrigation solution may reduce blood loss by preventing the accumulation of clots. In this pilot study, the safety and feasibility of CPPF were evaluated and the effect on blood loss and other related complications was investigated. Methods Between November 2011 and April 2012 twenty-one adult patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) received CPPF from sternal closure up to 12 h postoperative. With an inflow Redivac drain that was inserted through one of the chest tube incision holes, an irrigation solution (NaCl 0.9% at 38 °C) was delivered to the pericardial cavity using a volume controlled flushing system. Safety aspects, feasibility issues and complications were registered. The mean actual blood loss in the CPPF group was compared to the mean of a retrospective group (n = 126). Results CPPF was successfully completed in 20 (95.2%) patients, and no method related complications were observed. Feasibility was good in this experimental setting. Patients receiving CPPF showed a 30% (P = 0.038) decrease in mean actual blood loss 12 h postoperatively. Conclusions CPPF after cardiac surgery was found to be safe and feasible in this experimental setting. The clinically relevant effect on blood loss needs to be confirmed in a randomized clinical trial. PMID:26501121

  13. The Effect of Intravenous Magnesium Sulfate on Post-Operative Analgesia During Laminectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffaripour, Sina; Eghbal, Hossein; Rahimi, Ashkan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Post-operative pain control is an important concern for both patients and physicians. Magnesium is being used as an adjuvant for anesthesia and analgesia during and after various surgeries. We aimed to investigate the effects of intravenous magnesium sulfate on post-operative analgesia after laminectomy. Methods Materials: In this randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial, we enrolled 40 adult patients aged 18-60 with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)  Class I-II who were candidates for elective laminectomy. The patients were randomly assigned in two control groups and were similarly anesthetized. In the case group, after the induction of anesthesia, a loading dose of magnesium sulfate (30 mg/kg) was administered within five to 10 minutes followed by a maintenance dose of 10 mg/kg/hr up to the end of the surgery; while, the patients in the control group received the same volume of saline. After the surgery, all patients received a patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) pump containing morphine. The first time of using PCA, the amount of consumed morphine during the first 24 hours, and pain score were recorded at 6,12,18 and 24 hours in the post-operative period. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the amount of morphine consumed in 24 hours after the surgery (P value =0.23), the first time of using of PCA pump (P value =0.79) and pain intensity (P value=0.52). Conclusion: The infusion of Magnesium Sulfate during laminectomy had no effect on patients’ pain and opioid requirement during the first 24 hours after the surgery. PMID:27433405

  14. Evolution in pharmacologic thinking around the natural analgesic palmitoylethanolamide: from nonspecific resistance to PPAR-α agonist and effective nutraceutical

    PubMed Central

    Hesselink, Jan M Keppel

    2013-01-01

    The history of development of new concepts in pharmacology is a highly interesting topic. This review discusses scientific insights related to palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and its progression over a period of six decades, especially in light of the work of the science sociologists, Ludwig Fleck and Thomas Kuhn. The discovery of the cannabis receptors and the nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors was the beginning of a completely new understanding of many important homeostatic physiologic mechanisms in the human body. These discoveries were necessary for us to understand the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of PEA, a body-own fatty amide. PEA is a nutrient known already for more than 50 years. PEA is synthesized and metabolized in animal cells via a number of enzymes and has a multitude of physiologic functions related to metabolic homeostasis. PEA was identified in the 1950s as a therapeutic principle with potent anti-inflammatory properties. Since 1975, its analgesic properties have been noted and explored in a variety of chronic pain states. Since 2008, PEA has been available as a nutraceutical under the brand names Normast® and PeaPure®. A literature search on PEA meanwhile has yielded over 350 papers, all referenced in PubMed, describing the physiologic properties of this endogenous modulator and its pharmacologic and therapeutic profile. This review describes the emergence of concepts related to the pharmacologic profile of PEA, with an emphasis on the search into its mechanism of action and the impact of failing to identify such mechanism in the period 1957–1993, on the acceptance of PEA as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic compound. PMID:23964161

  15. Single dose oral ibuprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This review updates a 1999 Cochrane review showing that ibuprofen at various doses was effective in postoperative pain in single dose studies designed to demonstrate analgesic efficacy. New studies have since been published. Ibuprofen is one of the most widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) analgesics both by prescription and as an over-the-counter medicine. Ibuprofen is used for acute and chronic painful conditions. Objectives To assess analgesic efficacy of ibuprofen in single oral doses for moderate and severe postoperative pain in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to May 2009. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered ibuprofen (any formulation) in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into the dichotomous outcome of number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, from which relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) were calculated. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals were collected. Main results Seventy-two studies compared ibuprofen and placebo (9186 participants). Studies were predominantly of high reporting quality, and the bulk of the information concerned ibuprofen 200 mg and 400 mg. For at least 50% pain relief compared with placebo the NNT for ibuprofen 200 mg (2690 participants) was 2.7 (2.5 to 3.0) and for ibuprofen 400 mg (6475 participants) it was 2.5 (2.4 to 2.6). The proportion with at least 50% pain relief was 46% with 200 mg and 54% with 400 mg. Remedication within 6 hours was less

  16. Effects of different anesthetic approaches on postoperative complications in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W W; Wang, Y P; Wang, Y Q; Ji, X M; Zhang, M Y

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three different methods of anesthesia on patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, which could lead to an improvement in postoperative outcomes in these patients. A total of 90 patients undergoing an operation while being treated for an HIV infection were included in this study. Patients were divided into three groups (N = 30/group) based on the type of anesthesia administered: general anesthesia, local anesthesia, and combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA). The effects of local infiltration of anesthesia and peripheral nerve block local anesthesia were examined in the local anesthesia group. The CSEA group examined the effects of spinal anesthesia in HIV-infected patients. We compared the vital signs of the three groups during the preoperative period, at incision, and during the postoperative recovery period. The CSEA group had a significantly higher mean preoperative CD4(+) T lymphocyte count compared with the general anesthesia and local anesthesia groups (P < 0.05). We found that the three kinds of anesthesia methods administered to HIV-infected patients could be used with considerable safety and can be selected according to the clinical need and type of surgical procedure. PMID:26345845

  17. Effects of various enteral nutrition solutions on bacterial translocation and intestinal morphology during the postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Aydogan, Akin; Kismet, Kemal; Kilicoglu, Bulent; Erel, Serap; Ozcan, Ali Haldun; Gollu, Avni; Yildiz, Eda; Akkus, Mehmet Ali

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial translocation is the passage of bacteria or endotoxins from the gastrointestinal tract to extraintestinal sites, such as mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and bloodstream. In this study, the investigators examined the effects of various enteral nutrients on bacterial translocation and intestinal morphology during the postoperative period. Sixty rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, each of which included 12 animals; cecal mobilization was performed in all groups. Group I rats were fed rat chow and water; group II was given standard enteral nutrients; group III, high-energy enteral nutrients; group IV, enteral nutrients supplemented with fiber; and group V, immunonutrients. Bacterial translocation was detected in mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and blood cultures. Changes in the terminal ileum were scored from 0 to 4 with the morphologic scoring system. Bacterial translocation was predominantly detected in mesenteric lymph nodes. Rats fed immunonutrients (group V) showed a significant reduction in bacterial translocation compared with other groups. Although minor morphologic alterations in the villi were observed in groups IV and V, the histologic scores of these groups were not statistically different from the scores of control group members. In the present study, investigators evaluated the effects of various enteral nutritional solutions on bacterial translocation and intestinal morphology during the postoperative period. Enteral diets supplemented with arginine, nucleotides, and omega-3 fatty acids were found to reduce bacterial translocation. The investigators concluded that this effect might be related to improvement in immune function resulting from the use of immunonutrients. PMID:17526460

  18. Analgesic Effect of the Newly Developed S(+)‐Flurbiprofen Plaster on Inflammatory Pain in a Rat Adjuvant‐Induced Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yoshihisa; Hori, Miyuki; Mitani, Akiko; Ichihara, Takahiro; Sekine, Shingo; Hirose, Takuya; Endo, Hiromi; Futaki, Nobuko; Kaku, Shinsuke; Otsuka, Noboru; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Preclinical Research This article describes the properties of a novel topical NSAID (Nonsteroidal anti‐inflammatory drug) patch, SFPP (S(+)‐flurbiprofen plaster), containing the potent cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, S(+)‐flurbiprofen (SFP). The present studies were conducted to confirm human COX inhibition and absorption of SFP and to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of SFPP in a rat adjuvant‐induced arthritis (AIA) model. COX inhibition by SFP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen was evaluated using human recombinant COX proteins. Absorption of SFPP, ketoprofen and loxoprofen from patches through rat skin was assessed 24 h after application. The AIA model was induced by injecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis followed 20 days later by the evaluation of the prostaglandin PGE2 content of the inflamed paw and the pain threshold. SFP exhibited more potent inhibitory activity against COX‐1 (IC50 = 8.97 nM) and COX‐2 (IC50 = 2.94 nM) than the other NSAIDs evaluated. Absorption of SFP was 92.9%, greater than that of ketoprofen and loxoprofen from their respective patches. Application of SFPP decreased PGE2 content from 15 min to 6 h and reduced paw hyperalgesia compared with the control, ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches. SFPP showed analgesic efficacy, and was superior to the ketoprofen and loxoprofen patches, which could be through the potent COX inhibitory activity of SFP and greater skin absorption. The results suggested SFPP can be expected to exert analgesic effect clinically. Drug Dev Res 76 : 20–28, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26763139

  19. Postoperative analgesia in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Falzone, Elisabeth; Hoffmann, Clément; Keita, Hawa

    2013-02-01

    Elderly people represent the fastest-growing segment of our society and undergo surgery more frequently than other age groups. Effective postoperative analgesia is essential in these patients because inadequate pain control after surgery is associated with adverse outcomes in elderly patients. However, management of postoperative pain in older patients may be complicated by a number of factors, including a higher risk of age- and disease-related changes in physiology and disease-drug and drug-drug interactions. Physiological changes related to aging need to be carefully considered because aging is individualized and progressive. Assessment of pain management needs to include chronological age, biological age with regard to renal, liver and cardiac functions, and the individual profile of pathology and prescribed medications. In addition, ways in which pain should be assessed, particularly in patients with cognitive impairment, must be considered. Cognitively intact older patients can use most commonly used unidimensional pain scales such as the visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), numeric rating scale (NRS) and facial pain scale (FPS). VRS and NRS are the most appropriate pain scales for the elderly. In older patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment, the VRS is a better tool. For severe cognitively impaired older patients, behavioural scales validated in the postoperative context, such as Doloplus-2 or Algoplus, are appropriate. For postoperative pain treatment, most drugs (e.g. paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, nefopam, tramadol, codeine, morphine, local anaesthetics), techniques (e.g. intravenous morphine titration, subcutaneous morphine, intravenous or epidural patient-controlled analgesia, intrathecal morphine, peripheral nerve block) and strategies (e.g. anticipated intraoperative analgesia or multimodal analgesia) used for acute pain management can be used in older patients. However, in view of pharmacokinetic

  20. Regulation of Neurotrophin-3 and Interleukin-1β and Inhibition of Spinal Glial Activation Contribute to the Analgesic Effect of Electroacupuncture in Chronic Neuropathic Pain States of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wenzhan; Wang, Wansheng; Xi, Haiyan; He, Rong; Gao, Liping; Jiang, Songhe

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that neurotrophin-3, interleukin-1β, and spinal glia are involved in neuropathic pain derived from dorsal root ganglia to spinal cord. Electroacupuncture is widely accepted to treat chronic pain, but the precise mechanism underlying the analgesic effect of EA has not been fully demonstrated. In this study, the mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were recorded. We used immunofluorescence and western blots methods to investigate the effect of EA on the expression of NT-3 and IL-1β in DRG and spinal cord of CCI rats; we also examined the expression of spinal GFAP and OX-42 in spinal cord. In present study, the MWT and TWL of CCI group rats were lower than those in the Sham CCI group rats, but EA treatment increased the pain thresholds. Furtherly, we found that EA upregulates the expression of NT-3 in DRG and spinal cord of CCI rats, while EA downregulates the expression of IL-1β. Additionally, immunofluorescence exhibited that CCI-induced activation of microglia and astrocytes was inhibited significantly by EA treatment. These results demonstrated that the analgesic effect of EA may be achieved through promoting the neural protection of NT-3 as well as the inhibition of IL-1β production and spinal glial activity. PMID:26161124

  1. Selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists LP 44 and LP 211 elicit an analgesic effect on formalin-induced orofacial pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    DEMİRKAYA, Kadriye; AKGÜN, Özlem Martı; ŞENEL, Buğra; ÖNCEL TORUN, Zeynep; SEYREK, Melik; LACİVİTA, Enza; LEOPOLDO, Marcello; DOĞRUL, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The most recently identified serotonin (5-HT) receptor is the 5-HT7 receptor. The antinociceptive effects of a 5-HT7 receptor agonist have been shown in neuropathic and inflammatory animal models of pain. A recent study demonstrated the functional expression of 5-HT7 receptors in the substantia gelatinosa (SG) of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis, which receives and processes orofacial nociceptive inputs. Objective To investigate the antinociceptive effects of pharmacological activation of 5-HT7 receptors on orofacial pain in mice. Material and Methods Nociception was evaluated by using an orofacial formalin test in male Balb-C mice. Selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists, LP 44 and LP 211 (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg), were given intraperitoneally 30 min prior to a formalin injection. A bolus of 10 µl of 4% subcutaneous formalin was injected into the upper lip of mice and facial grooming behaviors were monitored. The behavioral responses consisted of two distinct periods, the early phase corresponding to acute pain (Phase I: 0–12 min) and the late phase (Phase II: 12–30 min). Results LP 44 and LP 211 (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg) produced an analgesic effect with reductions in face rubbing time in both Phase I and Phase II of the formalin test. Conclusion Our results suggest that 5-HT7 receptor agonists may be promising analgesic drugs in the treatment of orofacial pain. PMID:27383702

  2. Comparison of the analgesic efficacy of oral ketorolac versus intramuscular tramadol after third molar surgery: A parallel, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario-Alberto; Martinez-Rider, Ricardo; Perez-Urizar, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Background Preemptive analgesia is considered an alternative for treating the postsurgical pain of third molar removal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preemptive analgesic efficacy of oral ketorolac versus intramuscular tramadol after a mandibular third molar surgery. Material and Methods A parallel, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out. Thirty patients were randomized into two treatment groups using a series of random numbers: Group A, oral ketorolac 10 mg plus intramuscular placebo (1 mL saline solution); or Group B, oral placebo (similar tablet to oral ketorolac) plus intramuscular tramadol 50 mg diluted in 1 mL saline solution. These treatments were given 30 min before the surgery. We evaluated the time of first analgesic rescue medication, pain intensity, total analgesic consumption and adverse effects. Results Patients taking oral ketorolac had longer time of analgesic covering and less postoperative pain when compared with patients receiving intramuscular tramadol. Conclusions According to the VAS and AUC results, this study suggests that 10 mg of oral ketorolac had superior analgesic effect than 50 mg of tramadol when administered before a mandibular third molar surgery. Key words:Ketorolac, tramadol, third molar surgery, pain, preemptive analgesia. PMID:27475688

  3. The effect of postoperative pain management program on improving nurses' knowledge and attitudes toward pain.

    PubMed

    Abdalrahim, Maysoon S; Majali, Sawsan A; Stomberg, Margareta Warrén; Bergbom, Ingegerd

    2011-07-01

    Effective postoperative pain treatment is an essential component to good quality of care. The purpose of this study was to explore nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward pain in surgical wards before and after implementation of a postoperative management program at a university hospital in Jordan. The program consisted of an education program for nurses, and its effect was evaluated by using a pre- and post-intervention design. Sixty five registered nurses were asked to respond to a 21 items questionnaire, and a total of 240 patients' records were audited. After implementation of the program, the mean scores for all the questionnaire items were found to increase to 75%, with an average of 16/21 for the correct answers. There was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between the number of correct answers between nurses' responses in the pre-intervention phase and their responses in the post-intervention phase for most of the questionnaire items. Also, there was a statistically significant improvement in the documentation of patients' care in 85% of the audited patients' records. It was recommended to introduce an acute pain services (APS) using a well established and safe pain management routines to increase the quality of care. PMID:21186139

  4. Clinical Curative Effect of Mesalt Combined with Mepilex Dressing in Postoperative Infection of Inguinal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenjun; Xiong, Zhonghua; Wu, Jiayu; Wang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background Inguinal hernia is a common surgical disease. Tension-free hernioplasty is currently commonly used for its treatment, with multiple advantages such as simple surgical method, low recurrence rate, and ability to be performed in primary care hospitals, but the risk of incision infection still exists. Mild infection can be cured by local washing, dressing, and systemic antibiotics. If the infection is severe, the wound may not heal after removing the patch, and secondary suturing is needed. Material/Methods A total of 60 patients with postoperative infection after tension-free repair of inguinal hernia were randomly divided into control (n=30) and treatment (n=30) groups. Patients in the treatment group received Mesalt combined with Mepilex for dressing while the patients in the control group received conventional gauze for dressing. Pain degree, wound healing time, and dressing times were observed. Results The clinical therapeutic effect in the treatment group was significantly better than in the control group. The treatment group exhibited significantly less pain when patients receive dressing, shorter wounds healing time (15±3.5 vs. 30±5.0), and less dressing frequency (10±2.1 vs. 20±2.4). Conclusions Mesalt combined with Mepilex can effectively improve postoperative infection after inguinal hernia treatment, obviously reducing pain, shorting wound healing time, and decreasing dressing frequency. It can be widely used in clinical practice. PMID:25854191

  5. Comparing etoricoxib and celecoxib for preemptive analgesia for acute postoperative pain in patients undergoing arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The efficacy of selective cox-2 inhibitors in postoperative pain reduction were usually compared with conventional non-selective conventional NSAIDs or other types of medicine. Previous studies also used selective cox-2 inhibitors as single postoperative dose, in continued mode, or in combination with other modalities. The purpose of this study was to compare analgesic efficacy of single preoperative administration of etoricoxib versus celecoxib for post-operative pain relief after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods One hundred and two patients diagnosed as anterior cruciate ligament injury were randomized into 3 groups using opaque envelope. Both patients and surgeon were blinded to the allocation. All of the patients were operated by one orthopaedic surgeon under regional anesthesia. Each group was given either etoricoxib 120 mg., celecoxib 400 mg., or placebo 1 hour prior to operative incision. Post-operative pain intensity, time to first dose of analgesic requirement and numbers of analgesic used for pain control and adverse events were recorded periodically to 48 hours after surgery. We analyzed the data according to intention to treat principle. Results Among 102 patients, 35 were in etoricoxib, 35 in celecoxib and 32 in placebo group. The mean age of the patients was 30 years and most of the injury came from sports injury. There were no significant differences in all demographic characteristics among groups. The etoricoxib group had significantly less pain intensity than the other two groups at recovery room and up to 8 hours period but no significance difference in all other evaluation point, while celecoxib showed no significantly difference from placebo at any time points. The time to first dose of analgesic medication, amount of analgesic used, patient's satisfaction with pain control and incidence of adverse events were also no significantly difference among three groups. Conclusions Etoricoxib is more effective

  6. Opioid analgesics: does potency matter?

    PubMed

    Passik, Steven D; Webster, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics with a wide range of potencies are currently used for the treatment of chronic pain. Yet understanding the clinical relevance and therapeutic consequences of opioid potency remains ill defined. Both patients and clinicians alike have misperceptions about opioid potency, expecting that less-potent opioids will be less effective or fearing that more-potent opioids are more dangerous or more likely to be abused. In this review, common myths about the potency of opioid analgesics will be discussed. Clinicians should understand that pharmacologic potency per se does not necessarily imply more effective analgesia or higher abuse liability. Published dose conversion tables may not accurately calculate the dose for effective and safe rotation from one opioid to another in patients receiving long-term opioid therapy because they are based on limited data that may not apply to chronic pain. Differences in pharmacologic potency are largely accounted for by the actual doses prescribed, according to individualized patient need. Factors for achieving effective analgesia and reducing the risks involved with opioid use include careful medication selection based on patient characteristics, appropriate dosing titration and opioid rotation practices, knowledge of product formulation characteristics (eg, extended release, immediate release, and tamper-resistant features), and an awareness of differences in opioid pharmacokinetics and metabolism. Clinicians should remain vigilant in monitoring patients on any opioid medication, regardless of classification along the opioid potency continuum. PMID:25162606

  7. Comparison between Transdermal Buprenorphine and Transdermal Fentanyl for Postoperative Pain Relief after Major Abdominal Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Zia; Gautam, Shefali; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Opioid is generally regarded as an important part of multimodal, perioperative analgesia, especially for moderate to severe pain. Amongst the various modes of delivery transdermal route has several potential benefits over oral and parentral administration. These include noninvasive dosing, better absorption and lack of first-pass metabolism. A transdermal drug delivery system provides steady and continuous drug delivery resulting in steady plasma concentration. Bolus dosing of systemic analgesic results in supra and sub therapeutic plasma resulting in toxic and sub analgesic plasma drug concentration. It also improves patient compliance. Materials and Methods Sixty patients undergoing major abdominal surgery under GA were randomly divided in two groups (n=30). Group A received buprenorphine 10 mcg/h TDS and group B received 25 mcg/h fentanyl TDS, 6 hours prior to surgery. Patients were followed for three days for postoperative pain relief and adverse effects. Results Baseline and demographic variables are comparable in both groups. The mean level of VAS was significantly lower in group B as compared to group A at Day 1, 2 and 3. The mean level of sedation score was significantly lower in Group B than Group A. Haemodynamic variables in both groups (SBP, DBP and HR), shows comparable values in both groups and no significant difference was observed. Five out of 30 (16.7%) patients in group A required single dose of rescue analgesic while 0 out of 30 patients (0.00%) in group B required rescue analgesic. This difference in rescue analgesic requirement in not quiet statistically significant (p-value 0.0522). Twenty percent patient in fentanyl group and 16.7% patients in buprenorphine group experienced some adverse effects. Nausea and vomiting were main side effects of the drugs. The incidence of nausea and vomiting were 6.7% and 10% in buprenorphine and fentanyl group respectively. Conclusion Fentanyl and buprenorphine TDS were effective and safe in

  8. Effects of surgical wound infiltration with bupivacaine on postoperative analgesia in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Özge Turna; Toydemir, T Seval Fatma; Kirşan, İsmail; Dokuzeylul, Banu; Gunay, Zeynep; Karacam, Esra

    2014-12-01

    The analgesic effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine was evaluated in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy. Twenty-one female cats with mammary gland tumors were anesthetized with propofol and oxygen-isoflurane anesthesia following premedication with atropine. In the trial group (Group I; n=11), 30 ml of saline containing 2 mg/kg of bupivacaine was infiltrated topically into the surgical wound right after removal of the mammary glands, whereas only saline solution was infiltrated in the control group (Group II; n=10). At the same time, carprofen (4 mg/kg) was also administered subcutaneously in both groups. Behavioral signs of pain were monitored during the recovery period after general anesthesia. In order to examine the behavioral changes associated with acute pain, a questionnaire was prepared and given to the owners to be completed 4 hr and then 10 hr after the operation. According to the owners' anwers to the questionnaire, a pain score was specified using a "numerical rating scale" for each cat. Although some cats showed mild to moderate pain, the pain score recorded at 4 hr after the operation was significantly lower in Group I (P<0.001). No significant difference was found at 10 hr after the operation between the groups. The incidence of vocalization, aggression and convulsion within 2 hr after the operation was also lower in Group I. In conclusion, wound infiltration with bupivacaine before incisional closure provided reliable analgesia at least 4 hr after bilateral radical mastectomy in cats. PMID:25649941

  9. Effects of Surgical Wound Infiltration with Bupivacaine on Postoperative Analgesia in Cats Undergoing Bilateral Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    YILMAZ, Özge Turna; TOYDEMIR, T. Seval Fatma; KIRŞAN, İsmail; DOKUZEYLUL, Banu; GUNAY, Zeynep; KARACAM, Esra

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine was evaluated in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy. Twenty-one female cats with mammary gland tumors were anesthetized with propofol and oxygen-isoflurane anesthesia following premedication with atropine. In the trial group (Group I; n=11), 30 ml of saline containing 2 mg/kg of bupivacaine was infiltrated topically into the surgical wound right after removal of the mammary glands, whereas only saline solution was infiltrated in the control group (Group II; n=10). At the same time, carprofen (4 mg/kg) was also administered subcutaneously in both groups. Behavioral signs of pain were monitored during the recovery period after general anesthesia. In order to examine the behavioral changes associated with acute pain, a questionnaire was prepared and given to the owners to be completed 4 hr and then 10 hr after the operation. According to the owners’ anwers to the questionnaire, a pain score was specified using a “numerical rating scale” for each cat. Although some cats showed mild to moderate pain, the pain score recorded at 4 hr after the operation was significantly lower in Group I (P<0.001). No significant difference was found at 10 hr after the operation between the groups. The incidence of vocalization, aggression and convulsion within 2 hr after the operation was also lower in Group I. In conclusion, wound infiltration with bupivacaine before incisional closure provided reliable analgesia at least 4 hr after bilateral radical mastectomy in cats. PMID:25649941

  10. Impact of Internet Pharmacy Regulation on Opioid Analgesic Availability*

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Edward W.; Wines, James D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Access to prescription opioid analgesics has made Internet pharmacies the object of increased regulatory scrutiny, but the effectiveness of regulatory changes in curtailing availability of opioid analgesics from online sources has been not assessed. As part of an ongoing investigation into the relationship between the Internet and substance abuse, we examined the availability of prescription opioid analgesics from online pharmacies. Method: From a pharmacy watch Web site, we constructed a data set of postings entered every 3 months beginning November 1, 2005, that were related to the purchase of prescription opioid analgesics. Trained examiners assessed whether the final post described accessibility of pain medications that was increasing or decreasing. Results: We identified 45 threads related to the availability of opioid analgesics from Internet pharmacies. Of the 41 (91%) threads describing the declining availability of opioid analgesic agents from Internet pharmacies, 34 (82%) received posts on November 1, 2007. Despite the subjective nature of the research question, there was high interobserver agreement between coders (κ = .845) that availability of opioid analgesics from online pharmacies had decreased. This finding was supported by a dramatic rise in the number of pageviews (an accepted measure of Web site visitor interest in a page's content) of Web pages describing decreased availability of opioid analgesics. Conclusions: These data suggest striking decreases in the availability of prescription opioid analgesic pharmaceuticals. This self-reported change in drug availability may be related to increased regulation of and law enforcement operations directed against Internet pharmacies. PMID:18781245

  11. Paracetamol and analgesic nephropathy: Are you kidneying me?

    PubMed Central

    Waddington, Freya; Naunton, Mark; Thomas, Jackson

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Analgesic nephropathy is a disease resulting from the frequent use of combinations of analgesic medications over many years, leading to significant impairment of renal function. The observation of a large number of cases of renal failure in patients abusing analgesic mixtures containing phenacetin led to the initial recognition of the nephrotoxicity from the use of analgesics. Phenacetin was subsequently exclusively blamed for this disease. However, the role of a single analgesic as a sole cause of analgesic nephropathy was challenged, and a number of researchers have since attempted to determine the extent of involvement of other analgesics including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin, and paracetamol. Case presentation We present the case of an 83-year-old woman with a history of NSAID-induced nephropathy with poor pain control and reluctance to use paracetamol. We attempt to briefly review the evidence of paracetamol being implicated in the development of analgesic-induced nephropathy. Conclusion There is a lack of concrete data regarding causative analgesics, including paracetamol. Patients should therefore not be withheld paracetamol, an effective and commonly recommended agent, for fear of worsening renal function. PMID:25548527

  12. Effectiveness of Postoperative Wound Drains in One- and Two-Level Cervical Spine Fusions

    PubMed Central

    Poorman, Caroline E.; Bianco, Kristina M.; Boniello, Anthony; Yang, Sun; Gerling, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical drains have historically been used to avoid postoperative wound and respiratory complications such as excessive edema, hematoma, infection, re-intubation, delayed extubation, or respiratory distress. Recently, some surgeons have ceased using drains because they may prolong hospital stay, operative time, or patient discomfort. The objective of this retrospective case-control series is to investigate the effectiveness of postoperative drains following one- and two-level cervical fusions. Methods A chart review was conducted at a single institution from 2010-2013. Outcome measures included operative time, hospital stay, estimated blood loss and incidence of wound complications (infection, hematoma, edema, and complications with wound healing or evacuation), respiratory complications (delayed extubation, re-intubation, and respiratory treatment), and overall complications (wound complications, respiratory complications, dysphagia, and other complications). Statistical analyses including independent samples t-test, chi-square, analysis of covariance, and linear regression were used to compare patients who received a postoperative drain to those who did not. Results The study population included 39 patients who received a postoperative drain and 42 patients who did not. There were no differences in demographics between the two groups. Patients with drains showed increased operative time (100.1 vs 69.3 min, p < 0.001), hospital stay (38.9 vs. 31.7 hrs, p = 0.021), and blood loss (62.7 vs 29.1 mL, p < 0.001) compared to patients without drains. The frequency of wound complications, respiratory complications, and overall complications did not vary significantly between groups. Conclusions/Level of Evidence Cervical drains may not be necessary for patients undergoing one- and two-level cervical fusion. While there were no differences in incidence of complications between groups, patients treated with drains had significantly longer operative time and

  13. Analgesic efficacy and side-effect profile of paracetamol/codeine and paracetamol/dextropropoxyphene after surgical removal of a lower wisdom tooth.

    PubMed

    Sagne, S; Henrikson, P A; Kahnberg, K E; Thilander, H; Bertilson, S O

    1987-01-01

    A double-blind randomized analgesic trial was carried out on 180 patients undergoing surgical removal of an impacted lower wisdom tooth. The patients took their first dose of either 1000 mg paracetamol plus 60 mg codeine or 650 mg paracetamol plus 65 mg dextropropoxyphene when pain appeared after the decline of the local anaesthesia. If needed, another two doses were available during the observation period (less than or equal to 10 h). The analgesic efficacy of paracetamol/codeine was overall superior to paracetamol/dextropropoxyphene in all variables. Sufficient pain relief was obtained in most patients. The pain reduction after the first dose was 64% in the group receiving paracetamol/codeine compared with 53% in the group receiving paracetamol/dextropropoxyphene and the mean durations of effect of the first dose were 6.6 and 5.8 h, respectively. Side-effects appeared in all patient groups but were most frequent in women taking paracetamol/codeine. PMID:3556263

  14. Analgesics, allergy and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Szczeklik, Andrew

    1980-01-01

    1 Recent studies of idiosyncratic reactions to analgesics have revealed several clinical patterns with a different pathogenesis. 2 In the pathogenesis of a common type of asthma precipitated by aspirin, inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase leading to disturbances in metabolism of arachidonic acid is of fundamental importance. 3 In some patients with urticaria/angioedema, symptoms are due to inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase by analgesics; in others the cause might be impurities in commercial preparations of aspirin; and in others the mechanisms are still unknown. 4 There is a distinct group of patients who develop anaphylactic shock or urticaria following administration of pyrazolone drugs, but who tolerate aspirin and other cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. This type of hypersensitivity seems to have an immunological background. PMID:7002192

  15. [New analgesics in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Avez-Couturier, Justine; Wood, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of different types of analgesics in paediatrics. They must be used in accordance with the situation, the type of pain and the characteristics of the child. In all cases, strict compliance with the posology and the instructions for use is essential to avoid any risk of error. Finally, pharmacological, physical and psychological treatments are employed in a complementary manner, for the biopsychosocial management of the child's care. PMID:27177483