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Sample records for postoperative pelvic radiation

  1. Pelvic radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation of the pelvis - discharge; Cancer treatment - pelvic radiation; Prostate cancer - pelvic radiation; Ovarian cancer - pelvic radiation; Cervical cancer - pelvic radiation; Uterine cancer - pelvic radiation; Rectal cancer - ...

  2. Adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiation for carcinoma of the uterine cervix: pattern of cancer recurrence in patients undergoing elective radiation following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, A.H.; Tong, D.Y.; Figge, D.C.; Tamimi, H.K.; Greer, B.E.; Elder, S.J.

    1984-02-01

    Thirty-seven patients with invasive cervical cancer have been referred to the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Patients at high-risk for tumor recurrence were selected for adjuvant pelvic irradiation because of adverse risk factors identified on pathological study of the hysterectomy specimen. All patients were treated because of possible residual, microscopic carcinoma. Fourteen patients (38%) developed recurrent cancer, of whom 10 (27%) manifested initial failure within the irradiated volume. Possible explanations for this observation are discussed.

  3. Prevention of pelvic radiation disease.

    PubMed

    Fuccio, Lorenzo; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Guido, Alessandra

    2015-02-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide. Treatment of patients requires a multidisciplinary approach that frequently includes radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity is a major complication and the transient or long-term problems, ranging from mild to very severe, arising in non-cancerous tissues resulting from radiation treatment to a tumor of pelvic origin, are actually called as pelvic radiation disease. The incidence of pelvic radiation disease changes according to the radiation technique, the length of follow up, the assessment method, the type and stage of cancer and several other variables. Notably, even with the most recent radiation techniques, i.e., intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the incidence of radiation-induced GI side effects is overall reduced but still not negligible. In addition, radiation-induced GI side effects can develop even after several decades; therefore, the improvement of patient life expectancy will unavoidably increase the risk of developing radiation-induced complications. Once developed, the management of pelvic radiation disease may be challenging. Therefore, the prevention of radiation-induced toxicity represents a reasonable way to avoid a dramatic drop of the quality of life of these patients. In the current manuscript we provide an updated and practical review on the best available evidences in the field of the prevention of pelvic radiation disease. PMID:25664197

  4. A prospective trial of postoperative vaginal radium/cesium for grade 1-2 less than 50% myometrial invasion and pelvic radiation therapy for grade 3 or deep myometrial invasion in surgical stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Piver, M.S.; Hempling, R.E. )

    1990-09-15

    A prospective trial was performed to evaluate the recurrence rate and 5-year disease-free survival rate in patients with surgical Stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma. Patients with Stage I, Grade 1 or 2 disease, less than 50% myometrial invasion, and no evidence of disease outside the corpus of the uterus were treated by hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and postoperative vaginal radium/cesium (Group 1). Patients with surgical Stage I, Grade 3 disease or deep myometrial invasion, and histologically negative paraaortic lymph nodes were treated with postoperative pelvic radiation therapy (5000-5040 cGY) (Group 2). Patients with malignant peritoneal cytologic findings also received progesterone therapy. Of the 92 Group 1 patients, there have been no recurrences and the 5-year estimated disease-free survival rate was 99%. Of the 41 Group 2 patients, there have been four (9.7%) recurrences but only one (2.4%) within the treated field (pelvis), and the 5-year estimated disease-free survival rate was 88%. Of the 133 patients, the 5-year estimated disease-free survival rate was 96%, and only one patient (0.7%) had a local pelvic recurrence. Of the 16 patients with malignant peritoneal cytologic findings who were treated with progesterone therapy, none has had a recurrence.

  5. Postoperative Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Solitary Fibrous Tumor With Malignant Transformation of the Pelvic

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Yong; Jing, Ming; Qu, Wei; Li, Jia; Zhao, Xiang-Rong; Yu, Yong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Solitary fibrous tumor of the pelvic is an uncommon neoplasm with nonspecific symptoms. Reports of malignant transformation are especially rare. We report a case of solitary fibrous tumor in pelvic. A unique feature of our case compared with previously reported is that this patient relapsed with malignant transformation and had significant response to radiotherapy. The patient was initially treated with surgery, followed by postoperative dimensional conformal intensity modulated radiation therapy (dynamic MLC VRIAN 23EX Linac, inversely optimized by the Eclipse system) to provide a radical cure for residual tumor. In this case, there were no signs of recurrence after six and a half years of further follow-up, indicating that postoperation radiotherapy may be an effective treatment for SFT with malignant transformation in pelvic. PMID:26765426

  6. Morbidity and survival patterns in patients after radical hysterectomy and postoperative adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorica, J.V.; Roberts, W.S.; Greenberg, H.; Hoffman, M.S.; LaPolla, J.P.; Cavanagh, D. )

    1990-03-01

    Morbidity and survival patterns were reviewed in 50 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiotherapy for invasive cervical cancer. Ninety percent of the patients were FIGO stage IB, and 10% were clinical stage IIA or IIB. Indications for adjuvant radiotherapy included pelvic lymph node metastasis, large volume, deep stromal penetration, lower uterine segment involvement, or capillary space involvement. Seventy-two percent of the patients had multiple high-risk factors. An average of 4700 cGy of whole-pelvis radiotherapy was administered. Ten percent of the patients suffered major gastrointestinal complications, 14% minor gastrointestinal morbidity, 12% minor genitourinary complications, one patient a lymphocyst, and one patient lymphedema. Of the five patients with major gastrointestinal morbidity, all occurred within 12 months of treatment. Three patients required intestinal bypass surgery for distal ileal obstructions and all are currently doing well and free of disease. All of the patients who developed recurrent disease had multiple, high-risk factors. The median time of recurrence was 12 months. All patients recurred within the radiated field. Actuarial survival was 90% and disease-free survival 87% at 70 months. It is our opinion that the morbidity of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy is acceptable, and benefit may be gained in such a high-risk patient population.

  7. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  8. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options.

    PubMed

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-12-10

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  9. Quality Assurance of Multifractionated Pelvic Interstitial Brachytherapy for Postoperative Recurrences of Cervical Cancers: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Pragya; Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Paul, Siji Nojin; Phurailatpam, Reena; SV, Jamema; Shrivastava, Shyam K.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate three-dimensional needle displacements during multifractionated interstitial brachytherapy (BT) for cervical cancers. Methods and Materials: Patients scheduled to undergo pelvic interstitial BT for postoperative and or postradiation vault recurrences were included from November 2009 to December 2010. All procedures were performed under spinal anesthesia. Postprocedure BT planning CT scans were obtained with patients in supine position with arms on the chest (interslice thickness of 3 mm). Thereafter, verification CT was repeated at every alternate fraction. Needle displacements were measured in reference to a relocatable bony point. The mean cranial, caudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral displacements were recorded. Statistical significance of mean interfraction displacements was evaluated with Wilcoxon Test. Results: Twenty patients were included. Seventeen received boost BT (20 Gy/5 fractions/3 days) after external radiation, three received radical BT alone (36 Gy/9 fractions/5-8 days). An average of three scans (range, 2-3) were available per patient, and 357 needle displacements were analyzed. For the entire study cohort, the average of mean needle displacement was 2.5 mm (range, 0-7.4), 17.4 mm (range, 0-27.9), 1.7 mm (range, 0-6.7), 2.1 mm (range, 0-9.5), 1.7 mm (range, 0-9.3), and 0.6 mm (range, 0-7.8) in cranial, caudal, anterior, posterior, right, and left directions, respectively. The mean displacement in the caudal direction was higher between Days 1 and 2 than that between Days 2 and 3 (13.4 mm vs. 3.8 mm; p = 0.01). The average caudal displacements were no different between reirradiation and boost cohort (15.2 vs. 17.8 mm). Conclusions: Clinically significant caudal displacements occur during multifractionated pelvic brachytherapy. Optimal margins need to be incorporated while preplanning brachytherapy to account for interfraction displacements.

  10. Pelvic radiation therapy: Between delight and disaster

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kirsten AL; Haboubi, Najib Y

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades radiotherapy was established as one of the best and most widely used treatment modalities for certain tumours. Unfortunately that came with a price. As more people with cancer survive longer an ever increasing number of patients are living with the complications of radiotherapy and have become, in certain cases, difficult to manage. Pelvic radiation disease (PRD) can result from ionising radiation-induced damage to surrounding non-cancerous tissues resulting in disruption of normal physiological functions and symptoms such as diarrhoea, tenesmus, incontinence and rectal bleeding. The burden of PRD-related symptoms, which impact on a patient’s quality of life, has been under appreciated and sub-optimally managed. This article serves to promote awareness of PRD and the vast potential there is to improve current service provision and research activities. PMID:26649150

  11. Enteric morbidity of postoperative pelvic external beam and brachytherapy for uterine cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Potish, R.A.; Dusenbery, K.E. )

    1990-05-01

    From 1970 through 1986, 219 women received postoperative pelvic external beam therapy and vaginal radium or cesium for uterine cancer. Prescribed external beam and total vaginal surface doses ranged from 38 to 51 Gy and from 70 to 119 Gy, respectively. Severe enteric morbidity developed in 7.8% of patients (15 small bowel, 1 sigmoid, 1 rectal). Complications occurred more frequently in patients with pelvic lymph node sampling at hysterectomy, abdominal surgery prior to hysterectomy, and low body weight. Logistic analysis demonstrated no significant effect of pelvic external beam dose, vaginal surface boost dose, or milligram hours. Five and 10-year overall survival rates were 85% and 74%, respectively. There were two proximal and one distal vaginal recurrences. Recommendations for avoiding complications are presented.

  12. Postoperative Imaging after Surgical Repair for Pelvic Floor Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Gaurav; Carmel, Maude E; Bailey, April A; Foreman, Melissa R; Brewington, Cecelia C; Zimmern, Philippe E; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction encompasses an extremely common set of conditions, with various surgical and nonsurgical treatment options. Surgical options include injection of urethral bulking agents, native tissue repair with or without bioabsorbable or synthetic graft material, placement of synthetic midurethral slings or use of vaginal mesh kits, and mesh sacrocolpopexy procedures. Numerous different synthetic products with varied imaging appearances exist, and some of these products may be difficult to identify at imaging. Patients often present with recurrent or new symptoms after surgery; and depending on the presenting complaint and the nature of the initial intervention, imaging with ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, voiding cystourethrography, or computed tomography (CT) may be indicated. US and MR imaging can both be used to image urethral bulking agents; US is often used to follow potential changes in bulking agent volume with time. Compared with MR imaging, US depicts midurethral slings better in the urethrovaginal space, and MR imaging is better than US for depiction of the arms in the retropubic space and obturator foramen. Mesh along the vaginal wall may be depicted with both US and MR imaging; however, the distal arms of the mesh traversing the sacrospinous ligaments or within the ischiorectal fossae (ischioanal fossae) are better depicted with MR imaging. Scarring can mimic slings and mesh at both US and MR imaging. MR imaging is superior to US for depiction of sacrocolpopexy mesh and associated complications. Voiding cystourethrography and CT are used less commonly because they rarely allow direct depiction of implanted material. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27399245

  13. Postoperative Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Solitary Fibrous Tumor With Malignant Transformation of the Pelvic: A Rare Case Report With Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Yong; Jing, Ming; Qu, Wei; Li, Jia; Zhao, Xiang-Rong; Yu, Yong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor of the pelvic is an uncommon neoplasm with nonspecific symptoms. Reports of malignant transformation are especially rare. We report a case of solitary fibrous tumor in pelvic. A unique feature of our case compared with previously reported is that this patient relapsed with malignant transformation and had significant response to radiotherapy. The patient was initially treated with surgery, followed by postoperative dimensional conformal intensity modulated radiation therapy (dynamic MLC VRIAN 23EX Linac, inversely optimized by the Eclipse system) to provide a radical cure for residual tumor.In this case, there were no signs of recurrence after six and a half years of further follow-up, indicating that postoperation radiotherapy may be an effective treatment for SFT with malignant transformation in pelvic. PMID:26765426

  14. Postoperative abdominopelvic radiation therapy for ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, N.; Peschel, R.E.

    1988-03-01

    From 1963 through 1984, 74 patients with Stage I, II, or III epithelial ovarian cancer who completed a total hysterectomy and debulking procedure and had less than 2 cm residual disease were treated with whole abdominal and pelvic boost radiation therapy (WAP) at Yale-New Haven Hospital. WAP consisted of a whole abdominal dose of 1750 to 2500 cGy (at 100-160 cGy per fraction) and a total pelvic dose of 4000-4600 cGy. Based on stage, amount of residual disease, pathologic type, and grade of tumor, the 74 patients were classified into a favorable group (FG) and an unfavorable group (UG) using the classification scheme developed at the Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH). The actuarial survival at 10 years for the FG patients was 77% (+/- 10%, 95% confidence limits) and for the UG patients was only 7% (+/- 13%). Local control of disease in the abdomen and pelvis was 87% in the FG and only 36% in the UG. Severe long-term complications occurred in 7% of the patients and consisted of small bowel obstruction. Our results strongly indicate that the PMH classification of FG and UG is useful in our patient population in determining which subgroup of patients should be offered WAP.

  15. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for colonic carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Willett, C G; Tepper, J E; Skates, S J; Wood, W C; Orlow, E C; Duttenhaver, J R

    1987-01-01

    One hundred thirty-three patients with Stage B2, B3, and C colonic carcinoma had resection for curative intent followed by adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy to the tumor bed. The 5-year actuarial local control and disease-free survival rates for these 133 patients were 82% and 61%, respectively. Stage for stage, the development of local regional failure was reduced for patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy compared with a historic control series. Local recurrence occurred in 8%, 21%, and 31% of patients with Stage B3, C2, and C3 tumors who had radiation therapy, respectively, whereas the local failure rates were 31%, 36%, and 53% in patients treated with surgery alone. There was a 13% and 12% improvement in the 5-year disease-free survival rate in the patients with Stage B3 and C3 lesions who had radiotherapy compared with the historic controls. For patients with Stage C disease, local control and disease-free survival rates decreased progressively with increasing nodal involvement; however, local control and disease-free survival rates were higher in the patients who had radiotherapy than in those who had surgery alone. Failure patterns in the patients who had radiotherapy did not show any notable changes compared with those for patients who had surgery alone. Postoperative radiation therapy for Stage B3, C2, and C3 colonic carcinoma is a promising treatment approach that deserves further investigation. PMID:3689006

  16. Percutaneous Transcatheter Ethanol Sclerotherapy and Catheter Drainage of Postoperative Pelvic Lymphoceles

    SciTech Connect

    Akhan, Okan Karcaaltincaba, Musturay; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akinci, Devrim; Karcaaltincaba, Deniz; Ayhan, Ali

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy and long-term results of percutaneous transcatheter ethanol sclerotherapy (PTES) for postoperative pelvic lymphocele treatment. Fifty-two patients who were referred for lymphocele treatment were included in this study. Sixty lymphoceles of 52 patients were treated by percutaneous treatment with or without ethanol sclerotherapy. Lymphoceles developed in 47 and 5 patients, who underwent gynecologic malignancy operation (31 ovarian cancer, 6 cervix cancer, 10 endometrial cancer) and renal transplantation, respectively. Lymphoceles were catheterized by ultrasonography and fluoroscopy guidance using the Seldinger technique. Lymphoceles smaller than 150 mL underwent single-session ethanol sclerotherapy and the others were treated by multiple-session ethanol scleortherapy. In 10 patients, percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy could not be performed and they were treated only by percutaneous catheter drainage. The mean lymphocele volume was 329 mL (15-2900 mL). The mean catheterization duration was 11.8 days (1-60 days). The mean follow up time was 25.8 months (2-64 months). The initial treatment was successful in 46 out of 50 (91%) lymphoceles treated with PTES and 7 out of 10 (70%) lymphoceles treated with percutaneous catheter drainage. Minor complications (secondary infection and catheter dislodgement) were noted in seven (11.6%) patients. Recurrence developed in four and three patients who were treated by PTES and percutaneous catheter drainage, respectively. Five of these patients were treated with PTES without further recurrence. Percutaneous transcatheter ethanol sclerotherapy is an effective and reliable method for the treatment of postoperative lymphoceles.

  17. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William Mell, Loren K.; Anderson, Penny; Creutzberg, Carien; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Schefter, Tracey; Iyer, Revathy; Varia, Mahesh; Winter, Kathryn M.S.; Mundt, Arno J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an atlas of the clinical target volume (CTV) definitions for postoperative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group led an international collaberation of cooperative groups in the development of the atlas. The groups included the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Gynecologic Oncology Group, National Cancer Institute of Canada, European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and American College of Radiology Imaging Network. The members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define the areas that were to be included in the CTV and to outline theses areas on individual computed tomography images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June 2005. Results: The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for postoperative therapy for endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of the vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node region. Conclusion: This report serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancer.

  18. Clinical Outcomes of Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselle, Michael D.; Rose, Brent S.; Kochanski, Joel D.; Nath, Sameer K.; Bafana, Rounak; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Hasan, Yasmin; Roeske, John C.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and toxicity in cervical cancer patients treated with pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: We included all patients with Stage I-IVA cervical carcinoma treated with IMRT at three different institutions from 2000-2007. Patients treated with extended field or conventional techniques were excluded. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to deliver 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy daily fractions to the planning target volume while minimizing dose to the bowel, bladder, and rectum. Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. Overall survival and disease-free survival were estimated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Pelvic failure, distant failure, and late toxicity were estimated by use of cumulative incidence functions. Results: The study included 111 patients. Of these, 22 were treated with postoperative IMRT, 8 with IMRT followed by intracavitary brachytherapy and adjuvant hysterectomy, and 81 with IMRT followed by planned intracavitary brachytherapy. Of the patients, 63 had Stage I-IIA disease and 48 had Stage IIB-IVA disease. The median follow-up time was 27 months. The 3-year overall survival rate and the disease-free survival rate were 78% (95% confidence interval [CI], 68-88%) and 69% (95% CI, 59-81%), respectively. The 3-year pelvic failure rate and the distant failure rate were 14% (95% CI, 6-22%) and 17% (95% CI, 8-25%), respectively. Estimates of acute and late Grade 3 toxicity or higher were 2% (95% CI, 0-7%) and 7% (95% CI, 2-13%), respectively. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is associated with low toxicity and favorable outcomes, supporting its safety and efficacy for cervical cancer. Prospective clinical trials are needed to evaluate the comparative efficacy of IMRT vs. conventional techniques.

  19. Three Distinct Urethral Fistulae 35 Years After Pelvic Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arindam; Kurtz, Michael P.; Eswara, Jairam R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: While the development of fistulae is a well-known complication of radiotherapy, such fistulae can often be challenging to manage. Case Presentation: We describe the case of a 37 year old male who developed in succession a urethrocutaneous fistula to the thigh, a rectourethral fistula and a peritoneo-urethral fistula 35 years after radiotherapy for pediatric pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma. These complications were managed successfully after multiple surgical procedures. Discussion: We subsequently discuss the different approaches currently employed for the management of radiation induced urinary fistulas and describe the rationale behind our approach towards their surgical management. PMID:24783170

  20. Postoperative radiation of open head and neck wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, J.H. Jr.; Thompson, W.B.; Cassisi, N.J.; Million, R.R.

    1987-03-01

    Complication rates are lower using postoperative radiation therapy and cure rates at least compatible to preoperative radiation therapy. However, one of the concerns with postoperative radiation treatment is the possibility of delay in beginning the treatment because of an unhealed surgical wound. A delay of more than 6 weeks is detrimental. In order to study the effect of radiation therapy on incompletely healed wounds, a retrospective chart review of such cases during the period 1977 to 1984 was undertaken. One hundred and eighty-five patients had planned postoperative radiation therapy, and 13 of these began radiation therapy with an unhealed wound or fistula. Six of 10 wounds closed spontaneously, 4 required surgical closure, and 3 failed to heal. Seven patients in this study died with cancer, 2 died of other causes, 3 are alive without disease, and 1 patient remains alive with disease. We conclude that giving radiation therapy to an open wound with appropriate precaution can be done without serious complications.

  1. Assessment of Organ Motion in Postoperative Endometrial and Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor E.R.; Latifi, Kujtim; Rusthoven, Chad; Javedan, Ken; Forster, Kenneth

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may be useful to reduce toxicity in gynecologic cancer patients requiring postoperative pelvic irradiation. This study was undertaken to quantify vaginal wall organ motion during the course of postoperative pelvic irradiation using pelvic IMRT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two consecutive patients treated with postoperative pelvic IMRT on helical tomotherapy had fiducial markers placed at the vaginal apex prior to simulation then daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) scans for positioning. The daily positions of the fiducials were registered and measured in reference to the initial CT scan to quantify the degree of vaginal wall organ motion during the entire course of therapy. Results: The total motion of the fiducials center of mass (COM) was a median of 5.8 mm (range, 0.6-20.2 mm), and 95% of all COM positions fell within 15.7 mm of their original position. Directional margins of 3.1 mm along the right-left axis, 9.5 mm along the superoinferior axis, and of 12.1 mm along the anteroposterior axis encompassed the vaginal fiducials in 95% of treatments. Mean organ deformation for all patients was 3.9 mm, (range, 0-27.5 mm; standard deviation, 3.1 mm), with significant distortions of greater than 10 mm in 17% of secondary image sets. Conclusions: These data suggest a planning target volume margin of 16 mm will account for maximal organ motion in the majority of gynecologic patients undergoing postoperative pelvic IMRT, and it may be possible to incorporate directional motion into the planning target volume margin.

  2. Pelvic radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancy in geriatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, P.T.; Jeffrey, J.F.; Fraser, R.C.; Tompkins, M.G.; Filbee, J.F.; Wong, O.S.

    1989-05-01

    Thirty-one patients, aged 75 years or older, who received pelvic radiation therapy as part of primary treatment for a gynecologic malignancy, were reviewed. Ten patients (32%) failed to complete their treatment and 4 patients (13%) died of treatment-related complications. The treatment-related complications were independent of increasing age, but did correlate closely with the patients' pretreatment ECOG performance status. Ten patients with performance levels of 2 or higher had a mortality rate of 30%, while 70% failed to complete treatment. Treatment fractions of greater than 220 cGy per day also resulted in unacceptably high complication rates. Alternative treatment formats should be considered in geriatric patients with poor initial performance levels.

  3. Colorectal resection in deep pelvic endometriosis: Surgical technique and post-operative complications

    PubMed Central

    Milone, Marco; Vignali, Andrea; Milone, Francesco; Pignata, Giusto; Elmore, Ugo; Musella, Mario; De Placido, Giuseppe; Mollo, Antonio; Fernandez, Loredana Maria Sosa; Coretti, Guido; Bracale, Umberto; Rosati, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of different surgical techniques on post-operative complications after colorectal resection for endometriosis. METHODS: A multicenter case-controlled study using the prospectively collected data of 90 women (22 with and 68 without post-operative complications) who underwent laparoscopic colorectal resection for endometriosis was designed to evaluate any risk factors of post-operative complications. The prospectively collected data included: gender, age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists risk class, endometriosis localization (from anal verge), operative time, conversion, intraoperative complications, and post-operative surgical complications such as anastomotic dehiscence, bleeding, infection, and bowel dysfunction. RESULTS: A similar number of complicated cases have been registered for the different surgical techniques evaluated (laparoscopy, single access, flexure mobilization, mesenteric artery ligation, and transvaginal specimen extraction). A multivariate regression analysis showed that, after adjusting for major clinical, demographic, and surgical characteristics, complicated cases were only associated with endometriosis localization from the anal verge (OR = 0.8, 95%CI: 0.74-0.98, P = 0.03). After analyzing the association of post-operative complications and each different surgical technique, we found that only bowel dysfunction after surgery was associated with mesenteric artery ligation (11 out of 44 dysfunctions in the mesenteric artery ligation group vs 2 out of 36 cases in the no mesenteric artery ligation group; P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Although further randomized clinical trials are needed to give a definitive conclusion, laparoscopic colorectal resection for deep infiltrating endometriosis appears to be both feasible and safe. Surgical technique cannot be considered a risk factor of post-operative complications. PMID:26715819

  4. Occult Pelvic Lymph Node Involvement in Bladder Cancer: Implications for Definitive Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Benjamin; Baumann, Brian C.; He, Jiwei; Tucker, Kai; Bekelman, Justin; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha; Vaughn, David; Keefe, Stephen M.; Guzzo, Thomas; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Christodouleas, John P.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To inform radiation treatment planning for clinically staged, node-negative bladder cancer patients by identifying clinical factors associated with the presence and location of occult pathologic pelvic lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: The records of patients with clinically staged T1-T4N0 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder undergoing radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy at a single institution were reviewed. Logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between preoperative clinical variables and occult pathologic pelvic or common iliac lymph nodes. Percentages of patient with involved lymph node regions entirely encompassed within whole bladder (perivesicular nodal region), small pelvic (perivesicular, obturator, internal iliac, and external iliac nodal regions), and extended pelvic clinical target volume (CTV) (small pelvic CTV plus common iliac regions) were calculated. Results: Among 315 eligible patients, 81 (26%) were found to have involved pelvic lymph nodes at the time of surgery, with 38 (12%) having involved common iliac lymph nodes. Risk of occult pathologically involved lymph nodes did not vary with clinical T stage. On multivariate analysis, the presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) on preoperative biopsy was significantly associated with occult pelvic nodal involvement (odds ratio 3.740, 95% confidence interval 1.865-7.499, P<.001) and marginally associated with occult common iliac nodal involvement (odds ratio 2.307, 95% confidence interval 0.978-5.441, P=.056). The percentages of patients with involved lymph node regions entirely encompassed by whole bladder, small pelvic, and extended pelvic CTVs varied with clinical risk factors, ranging from 85.4%, 95.1%, and 100% in non-muscle-invasive patients to 44.7%, 71.1%, and 94.8% in patients with muscle-invasive disease and biopsy LVI. Conclusions: Occult pelvic lymph node rates are substantial for all clinical subgroups, especially patients with LVI on biopsy. Extended

  5. EUS-guided drainage and stent placement for postoperative intra-abdominal and pelvic fluid collections in oncological surgery

    PubMed Central

    Vilar-Cao, Zenaida; Sardina-Ferreiro, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the role and benefits of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in the management of postoperative intra-abdominal fluid collections after attempted curative surgery for abdominal cancer. Methods: The authors retrospectively analysed the Endobase from 1 July 2007 to 30 January 2011 for patients with a postoperative intra-abdominal fluid collection who had undergone EUS-guided drainage and the placement of a stent. The data analysed included the demographics, type of surgery and clinical indications of each patient as well as their clinical and radiological findings. Results: Six patients (three men and three women; mean age, 61.8 years [range, 38–78 years]) with intra-abdominal and pelvic fluid collections after abdominal surgery for cancer had undergone EUS-guided internal drainage. All procedures had been performed using linear EUS guidance and 8-Fr stent drainage catheters (‘one step device’, Giovannini, NWOA system Needle-Wire, Cook). The collection types included perigastric abscess (n = 3), perigastric hematoma and rectal hematoma (n = 1), perirectal biloma (n = 1), and perirectal abscess (n = 1). Patients had undergone the following types of surgery: lower-anterior rectal resection (n = 2), Whipple’s duodenopancreatectomy type (n = 1), total gastrectomy (n = 1), splenectomy (n = 1), and distal pancreatectomy (n = 1). The number of stents inserted for each collection was one (five patients) and two (one patient). Conclusions: EUS-guided drainage and stenting provide another option for the management of postoperative collections. It allows access to areas that are difficult to reach with the CT-guided approach and it can be performed accurately, efficiently and safely. In addition to this, the internal nature of the drainage offers patients more comfort. PMID:22423258

  6. Comparing Postoperative Radiation Therapies for Brain Metastases

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with one to four brain metastases who have had at least one of the metastatic tumors removed surgically will be randomly assigned to undergo whole-brain radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery.

  7. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, Hiram A.; Barthold, H. Joseph; O'Meara, Elizabeth; Bosch, Walter R.; El Naqa, Issam; Al-Lozi, Rawan; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Lawton, Colleen; Lee, W. Robert; Sandler, Howard; Zietman, Anthony; Myerson, Robert; Dawson, Laura A.; Willett, Christopher; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Ryu, Janice; and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  8. The effects of early postoperative radiation on vascularized bone grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.B.; Brown, S.; Hurst, L.N. )

    1991-06-01

    The effects of early postoperative radiation were assessed in free nonvascularized and free vascularized rib grafts in the canine model. The mandibles of one-half of the dogs were exposed to a cobalt 60 radiation dose of 4080 cGy over a 4-week period, starting 2 weeks postoperatively. The patency of vascularized grafts was confirmed with bone scintigraphy. Histological studies, including ultraviolet microscopy with trifluorochrome labeling, and histomorphometric analyses were performed. Osteocytes persist within the cortex of the vascularized nonradiated grafts to a much greater extent than in nonvascularized, nonradiated grafts. Cortical osteocytes do not persist in either vascularized or nonvascularized grafts subjected to radiation. New bone formation is significantly retarded in radiated grafts compared with nonradiated grafts. Periosteum and endosteum remained viable in the radiated vascularized grafts, producing both bone union and increased bone turnover, neither of which were evident to any significant extent in nonvascularized grafts. Bone union was achieved in vascularized and non-vascularized nonradiated bone. In the radiated group of dogs, union was only seen in the vascularized bone grafts.

  9. Effect of Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy on Second Cancer Risk in the Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zwahlen, Daniel R. Ruben, Jeremy D.; Jones, Phillip; Gagliardi, Frank; Millar, Jeremy L.; Schneider, Uwe

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate and compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of second cancer risk (SCR) for postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: To estimate SCR, the organ equivalent dose concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau, and a linear dose-response model was applied to dose distributions, calculated in a planning computed tomography scan of a 68-year-old woman. Three plans were computed: four-field 18-MV 3DCRT and nine-field IMRT with 6- and 18-MV photons. SCR was estimated as a function of target dose (50.4 Gy/28 fractions) in organs of interest according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection Results: Cumulative SCR relative to 3DCRT was +6% (3% for a plateau model, -4% for a linear model) for 6-MV IMRT and +26% (25%, 4%) for the 18-MV IMRT plan. For an organ within the primary beam, SCR was +12% (0%, -12%) for 6-MV and +5% (-2%, -7%) for 18-MV IMRT. 18-MV IMRT increased SCR 6-7 times for organs away from the primary beam relative to 3DCRT and 6-MV IMRT. Skin SCR increased by 22-37% for 6-MV and 50-69% for 18-MV IMRT inasmuch as a larger volume of skin was exposed. Conclusion: Cancer risk after IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer is dependent on treatment energy. 6-MV pelvic IMRT represents a safe alternative with respect to SCR relative to 3DCRT, independently of the dose-response model. 18-MV IMRT produces second neutrons that modestly increase the SCR.

  10. Lack of benefit of pelvic radiation in prostate cancer patients with a high risk of positive pelvic lymph nodes treated with high-dose radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos Enrique; Galalae, Razavan; Demanes, Jeffrey; Harsolia, Asif; Meldolesi, Elisa; Nuernberg, Nils; Schour, Lionel; Martinez, Alvaro . E-mail: amartinez@beaumont.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: The use of pelvic radiation for patients with a high risk of lymph node (LN) metastasis (>15%) remains controversial. We reviewed the data at three institutions treating patients with a combination of external-beam radiation therapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy to address the prognostic implications of the use of the Roach formula and the benefit of pelvic treatment. Methods and Materials: From 1986 to 2003, 1,491 patients were treated with external-beam radiation therapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The Roach formula [2/3 prostate-specific antigen + (Gleason score -6) x 10] could be calculated for 1,357 patients. Group I consisted of patients having a risk of positive LN {<=}15% (n = 761), Group II had a risk >15% and {<=}30% (n = 422), and Group III had a risk of LN disease >30% (n 174). A >15% risk of having positive LN was found in 596 patients and was used to determine the benefit of pelvic radiation. The pelvis was treated at two of the cancer centers (n = 312), whereas at the third center (n = 284) radiation therapy was delivered to the prostate and seminal vesicles alone. Average biologic effective dose was {>=}100 Gy ({alpha}{beta} = 1.2). Biochemical failure was as per the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition. Statistics included the log-rank test as well as Cox univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: For all 596 patients with a positive LN risk >15%, median follow-up was 4.3 years, with a mean of 4.8 years. For all cases, median follow-up was 4 years and mean follow-up was 4.4 years. Five-year results for the three groups based on their risk of positive LN were significantly different in terms of biochemical failure (p < 0.001), clinical control (p < 0.001), disease-free survival excluding biochemical failure (p < 0.001), cause-specific survival (p < 0.001), and overall survival (p < 0.001). For all patients with a risk of positive LN >15% (n 596), Group II (>15-30% risk), or Group III (>30% risk

  11. Treatment of bulky stage IB and IIB cervical cancers with outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation and extrafascial hysterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nagell, J.R.; Maruyama, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Donaldson, E.S.; Hanson, M.B.; Gallion, H.H.; Powell, D.E.; Kryscio, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    From January, 1977, to December, 1982, twenty-nine patients with bulky (>4 cms diameter) Stage IB or IIB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of out-patient neutron brachytherapy (Cf-252) and external pelvic radiation followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. Residual tumor was present in the hysterectomy specimens of 25 per cent. Complications during and following radiation therapy and surgery were minimal and included vaginal stenosis, proctitis, and hemorrhagic cystitis. The mean duration of hospitalization for surgery in these patients was 6.6 days (range 5-15 days) and postoperative morbidity was low. No patient required blood transfusion. Four patients developed urinary tract infections and two had superficial wound separations. Following treatment, patients were seen at monthly intervals for one year, every three months for two years, and every six months thereafter. No patient has been lost to follow-up. Two patients (7 per cent) developed tumor recurrence and have died of disease (1 of distant metastases; 1 local). The remaining 27 patients (93 per cent) are alive and well with no evidence of disease 24-89 months (mean 48 months) after therapy. No radiogenic fistulae or bowel obstruction were observed. These preliminary results suggest that the combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation, and extrafascial hysterectomy for patients with Stage IB and IIB cervical cancer is well tolerated. Complications associated with this treatment regimen have been minimal, and the recurrence rate is low. The duration of intracavitary neutron brachytherapy was short, and outpatient therapy was well received by patients.

  12. Consensus Guidelines and Contouring Atlas for Pelvic Node Delineation in Prostate and Pelvic Node Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Victoria A.; Staffurth, John; Naismith, Olivia; Esmail, Alikhan; Gulliford, Sarah; Khoo, Vincent; Lewis, Rebecca; Littler, John; McNair, Helen; Sadoyze, Azmat; Scrase, Christopher; Sohaib, Aslam; Syndikus, Isabel; Zarkar, Anjali; Hall, Emma; Dearnaley, David

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to establish reproducible guidelines for delineating the clinical target volume (CTV) of the pelvic lymph nodes (LN) by combining the freehand Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) vascular expansion techniques. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with prostate cancer underwent standard planning computed tomography scanning. Four different CTVs (RMH, RTOG, modified RTOG, and Prostate and pelvIs Versus prOsTate Alone treatment for Locally advanced prostate cancer [PIVOTAL] trial) were created for each patient, and 6 different bowel expansion margins (BEM) were created to assess bowel avoidance by the CTV. The resulting CTVs were compared visually and by using Jaccard conformity indices. The volume of overlap between bowel and planning target volume (PTV) was measured to aid selection of an appropriate BEM to enable maximal LN yet minimal normal tissue coverage. Results: In total, 84 nodal contours were evaluated. LN coverage was similar in all groups, with all of the vascular-expansion techniques (RTOG, modified RTOG, and PIVOTAL), resulting in larger CTVs than that of the RMH technique (mean volumes: 287.3 cm{sup 3}, 326.7 cm{sup 3}, 310.3 cm{sup 3}, and 256.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively). Mean volumes of bowel within the modified RTOG PTV were 19.5 cm{sup 3} (with 0 mm BEM), 17.4 cm{sup 3} (1-mm BEM), 10.8 cm{sup 3} (2-mm BEM), 6.9 cm{sup 3} (3-mm BEM), 5.0 cm{sup 3} (4-mm BEM), and 1.4 cm{sup 3} (5-mm BEM) in comparison with an overlap of 9.2 cm{sup 3} seen using the RMH technique. Evaluation of conformity between LN-CTVs from each technique revealed similar volumes and coverage. Conclusions: Vascular expansion techniques result in larger LN-CTVs than the freehand RMH technique. Because the RMH technique is supported by phase 1 and 2 trial safety data, we proposed modifications to the RTOG technique, including the addition of a 3-mm BEM, which resulted in LN-CTV coverage similar

  13. A phase III randomized trial of postoperative pelvic irradiation in stage IB cervical carcinoma with poor prognostic features: Follow-up of a gynecologic oncology group study

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, Marvin . E-mail: mrotman@downstate.edu; Sedlis, Alexander; Piedmonte, Marion R.; Bundy, Brian; Lentz, Samuel S.; Muderspach, Laila I.; Zaino, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a phase III randomized trial, whether postoperative external-beam irradiation to the standard pelvic field improves the recurrence-free interval and overall survival (OS) in women with Stage IB cervical cancers with negative lymph nodes and certain poor prognostic features treated by radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had Stage IB cervical cancer with negative lymph nodes but with 2 or more of the following features: more than one third (deep) stromal invasion, capillary lymphatic space involvement, and tumor diameter of 4 cm or more. The study group included 277 patients: 137 randomized to pelvic irradiation (RT) and 140 randomized to observation (OBS). The planned pelvic dose was from 46 Gy in 23 fractions to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Results: Of the 67 recurrences, 24 were in the RT arm and 43 were in the OBS arm. The RT arm showed a statistically significant (46%) reduction in risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.54, 90% confidence interval [CI] = 0.35 to 0.81, p = 0.007) and a statistically significant reduction in risk of progression or death (HR = 0.58, 90% CI = 0.40 to 0.85, p = 0.009). With RT, 8.8% of patients (3 of 34) with adenosquamous or adenocarcinoma tumors recurred vs. 44.0% (11 of 25) in OBS. Fewer recurrences were seen with RT in patients with adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous histologies relative to others (HR for RT by histology interaction = 0.23, 90% CI = 0.07 to 0.74, p = 0.019). After an extensive follow-up period, 67 deaths have occurred: 27 RT patients and 40 OBS patients. The improvement in overall survival (HR = 0.70, 90% CI = 0.45 to 1.05, p = 0.074) with RT did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: Pelvic radiotherapy after radical surgery significantly reduces the risk of recurrence and prolongs progression-free survival in women with Stage IB cervical cancer. RT appears to be particularly beneficial for patients with adenocarcinoma or

  14. Pelvic and acetabular fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, D.C.; Rubash, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This treatise focuses primarily on the clinical aspects of diagnosis and treatments of pelvic and acetabular fractures. However, considerable attention is also paid to the radiographic diagnosis of trauma and postoperative effects. The book begins with a succinct review of pelvic and acetabular anatomy and pelvic biomechanics. It continues with a radiographic classification of pelvic injury, which will represent the major source of the book's interest for radiologists. The remainder of the book is concerned with clinical management of pelvic and acetabular trauma, including preoperative planning, surgical approaches, techniques of reduction, internal fixation, eternal fixation, post-operative care, and late problems. Even throughout this later portion of the book there are extensive illustrations, including plain radiographs, computed tomographic (CT) scans, reconstructed three-dimensional CT scans, and schematic diagrams of diverse pelvic and acetabular fractures and the elementary surgical techniques for their repair.

  15. Risk of Hypogonadism From Scatter Radiation During Pelvic Radiation in Male Patients With Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, Ivan; Vuong, Te Garant, Aurelie; Ducruet, Thierry; Doran, Patrick; Faria, Sergio; Liberman, Sender; Richard, Carole; Letellier, Francois; Charlebois, Patrick; Loungnarath, Rasmy; Stein, Barry; Devic, Slobodan

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have reported fluctuations in sex hormones during pelvic irradiation. The objective of this study was to observe the effects of radiation on hormonal profiles for two treatment modalities: conventional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) given neoadjuvantly for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Routine serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels were collected from 119 consecutive male patients receiving either EBRT, using 45.0-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy or HDRBT using 26 Gy in 4 fractions. Results: Thirty patients with initially abnormal profiles were excluded. Profiles included in this study were collected from 51 patients treated with EBRT and 38 patients treated with HDRBT, all of whom had normal hormonal profiles before treatment. Mean follow-up times were 17 months for the entire patient cohort-14 and 20 months, respectively-for the EBRT and HDRBT arms. Dosimetry results revealed a mean cumulative testicular dose of 1.24 Gy received in EBRT patients compared with 0.27 Gy in the HDRBT group. After treatment, FSH and LH were elevated in all patients but were more pronounced in the EBRT group. The testosterone-to-LH ratio was significantly lower (p = 0.0036) in EBRT patients for tumors in the lower third of the rectum. The 2-year hypogonadism rate observed was 2.6% for HDRBT compared with 17.6% for EBRT (p = 0.09) for tumors in the lower two thirds of the rectum. Conclusion: HDRBT allows better hormonal sparing than EBRT during neoadjuvant treatment of patients with rectal cancer.

  16. The preservation of ovarian function in young women undergoing pelvic radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Husseinzadeh, N.; Nahhas, W.A.; Velkley, D.E.; Whitney, C.W.; Mortel, R.

    1984-07-01

    Because cervical carcinoma rarely metastasizes to the ovaries, it became logical to preserve ovarian function by the method of lateral ovarian transposition as part of the management of young women with this disease. This technique prevents castration should subsequent radiation therapy be planned or become necessary. Forty patients with carcinoma of the cervix or vagina underwent unilateral or bilateral ovarian transposition. Eighteen patients received radiation therapy. Of these, 16 had gonadotropin measurements and only 6 (37%) had levels elevated to the postmenopausal range. If patients whose ovaries were not shielded or who received paraaortic radiotherapy are excluded, then only two (17%) had elevated gonadotropin values. It is concluded that, if properly performed, lateral ovarian transposition and ovarian shielding will protect ovarian function in patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy.

  17. Comparison of pre- and postoperative radiation in the combined treatment of carcinoma of maxillary sinus

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Hua, H.; Gui-Yi, T.; Yu-Qin, Q.; Guo-Shen, X.; Xui-Lin, W.; Wui-Ming, C.; De-Xin, Q.; Jei-Hua, Y.; Xian-Zhi, G.

    1982-06-01

    A series of 50 patients with cancer of the maxillary sinus treated by either preoperative or postoperative radiation from February 1958 to June, 1974 is presented. In the postoperative group the patients were either free from recurrence, or if there was recurrence, the tumor was less than 0.5 cm in diameter. In the preoperative group, 23 of 36 patients survived for more than five years (64%). In the postoperative group, 4 of 14 patients survived for more than five years (26%). There is an obvious superiority in the preoperative radiation group. The surgical complication rate in the preoperative group was 29% as compared to 14% in the postoperative group. Although the incidence of complications in the preoperative group is higher, we believe it is worth attempting in clincial practice because of the more favorable survival rates.

  18. Positive Surgical Margins in Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treated With Preoperative Radiation: Is a Postoperative Boost Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Al Yami, Ali; Griffin, Anthony M.; Ferguson, Peter C.; Catton, Charles N.; Chung, Peter W.M.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: For patients with an extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS) treated with preoperative radiotherapy and surgically excised with positive margins, we retrospectively reviewed whether a postoperative radiation boost reduced the risk of local recurrence (LR). Methods and Materials: A total of 216 patients with positive margins after resection of an extremity STS treated between 1986 and 2003 were identified from our institution's prospectively collected database. Patient demographics, radiation therapy parameters including timing and dose, classification of positive margin status, reasons for not administering a postoperative boost, and oncologic outcome were collected and evaluated. Results: Of the 216 patients with a positive surgical margin, 52 patients were treated with preoperative radiation therapy alone (50 Gy), whereas 41 received preoperative radiation therapy plus a postoperative boost (80% received 16 Gy postoperatively for a total of 66 Gy). There was no difference in baseline tumor characteristics between the two groups. Six of 52 patients in the group receiving preoperative radiation alone developed a LR compared with 9 of 41 in the boost group. Five-year estimated LR-free survivals were 90.4% and 73.8%, respectively (p = 0.13). Conclusions: We found that including the postoperative radiation boost after preoperative radiation and a margin-positive excision did not provide an advantage in preventing LR for patients treated with external beam radiotherapy. Given that higher radiation doses placed patients at greater risk for late complications such as fracture, fibrosis, edema, and joint stiffness, judicious avoidance of the postoperative boost while maintaining an equivalent rate of local control can reduce the risk of these difficult-to-treat morbidities.

  19. Radiation dose reduction in thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT using tube current modulation: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Mustafa, Zakira; Nassir, Khadijah Mohd; Hamid, Hamzaini Abdul; Sun, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    This phantom study was designed to compare the radiation dose in thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT scans with and without use of tube current modulation (TCM). Effective dose (ED) and size-specific dose estimation (SSDE) were calculated with the absorbed doses measured at selective radiosensitive organs using a thermoluminescence dosimeter-100 (TLD-100). When compared to protocols without TCM, the ED and SSDE were reduced significantly with use of TCM for both the thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT. With use of TCM, the ED was 6.50 ± 0.29 mSv for thoracic and 6.01 ± 0.20 mSv for the abdomen-pelvic CT protocols. However without use of TCM, the ED was 20.07 ± 0.24 mSv and 17.30 ± 0.41 mSv for the thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT protocols, respectively. The corresponding SSDE was 10.18 ± 0.48 mGy and 11.96 ± 0.27 mGy for the thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT protocols with TCM, and 31.56 ± 0.43 mGy and 33.23 ± 0.05 mGy for thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT protocols without TCM, respectively. The highest absorbed dose was measured at the breast with 8.58 ± 0.12 mGy in the TCM protocols and 51.52 ± 14.72 mGy in the protocols without TCM during thoracic CT. In the abdomen-pelvic CT, the absorbed dose was highest at the skin with 9.30 ± 1.28mGy and 29.99 ± 2.23 mGy in protocols with and without use of TCM, respectively. In conclusion, the TCM technique results in significant dose reduction; thus it is to be highly recommended in routine thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT. PMID:25679153

  20. The use of postoperative radiation after nipple sparing mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) is a surgical procedure designed to reduce the disabling psychological effects of radical mastectomy. The preservation of the nipple-areola complex (NAC) produces a better result of the breast reconstruction, but some concerns exist of increasing the risk for local recurrence (LR). To reduce this risk a restricted inclusion criteria is suggested. In case of patients with high or intermediate risk the use of radiation therapy (RT) is also recommended, but a current standard for radiation after NSM is not available. In the literature, with few exceptions, there are few reports detailing indication and technique of radiation after NSM. There is a general consensus that post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) should be considered for patients with four or more positive axillary lymph nodes, primary tumour size 5 cm or more, T4 disease for skin involvement and positive margin. Almost all of these patients are candidate to receive external beam radiotherapy to the chest wall and to the supraclavicular/axillary region, less to the internal mammary chain. PMRT could be omitted in elderly patients with poor clinical conditions or co-morbidities that substantially reduce the life expectancy. Because the indications of NSM have been progressively extended also to larger or multi-centric tumours, this procedure has been criticised because of the increased risk of recurrence behind the areola due to the remaining glandular tissue, especially the terminal ducts, kept to preserve its blood supply, and especially in case of more advanced tumours. To reduce this concern, adjuvant RT after NSM should be administered in high risk patients who meet the criteria for current recommendations, but in other cases, such as in patients with intermediate risk or lower stage, the indication should be discussed on individual. PMID:26855910

  1. The use of postoperative radiation after nipple sparing mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Orecchia, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) is a surgical procedure designed to reduce the disabling psychological effects of radical mastectomy. The preservation of the nipple-areola complex (NAC) produces a better result of the breast reconstruction, but some concerns exist of increasing the risk for local recurrence (LR). To reduce this risk a restricted inclusion criteria is suggested. In case of patients with high or intermediate risk the use of radiation therapy (RT) is also recommended, but a current standard for radiation after NSM is not available. In the literature, with few exceptions, there are few reports detailing indication and technique of radiation after NSM. There is a general consensus that post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) should be considered for patients with four or more positive axillary lymph nodes, primary tumour size 5 cm or more, T4 disease for skin involvement and positive margin. Almost all of these patients are candidate to receive external beam radiotherapy to the chest wall and to the supraclavicular/axillary region, less to the internal mammary chain. PMRT could be omitted in elderly patients with poor clinical conditions or co-morbidities that substantially reduce the life expectancy. Because the indications of NSM have been progressively extended also to larger or multi-centric tumours, this procedure has been criticised because of the increased risk of recurrence behind the areola due to the remaining glandular tissue, especially the terminal ducts, kept to preserve its blood supply, and especially in case of more advanced tumours. To reduce this concern, adjuvant RT after NSM should be administered in high risk patients who meet the criteria for current recommendations, but in other cases, such as in patients with intermediate risk or lower stage, the indication should be discussed on individual. PMID:26855910

  2. Bile Acid Malabsorption After Pelvic and Prostate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: An Uncommon but Treatable Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Victoria; Benton, Barbara; Sohaib, Aslam; Dearnaley, David; Andreyev, H. Jervoise N.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a significant therapeutic advance in prostate cancer, allowing increased tumor dose delivery and increased sparing of normal tissues. IMRT planning uses strict dose constraints to nearby organs to limit toxicity. Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a treatable disorder of the terminal ileum (TI) that presents with symptoms similar to radiation therapy toxicity. It has not been described in patients receiving RT for prostate cancer in the contemporary era. We describe new-onset BAM in men after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Diagnosis of new-onset BAM was established after typical symptoms developed, selenium-75 homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT) scanning showed 7-day retention of <15%, and patients' symptoms unequivocally responded to a bile acid sequestrant. The TI was identified on the original radiation therapy plan, and the radiation dose delivered was calculated and compared with accepted dose-volume constraints. Results: Five of 423 men treated in a prospective series of high-dose prostate and pelvic IMRT were identified with new onset BAM (median age, 65 years old). All reported having normal bowel habits before RT. The volume of TI ranged from 26-141 cc. The radiation dose received by the TI varied between 11.4 Gy and 62.1 Gy (uncorrected). Three of 5 patients had TI treated in excess of 45 Gy (equivalent dose calculated in 2-Gy fractions, using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3) with volumes ranging from 1.6 cc-49.0 cc. One patient had mild BAM (SeHCAT retention, 10%-15%), 2 had moderate BAM (SeHCAT retention, 5%-10%), and 2 had severe BAM (SeHCAT retention, <5%). The 3 patients whose TI received {>=}45 Gy developed moderate to severe BAM, whereas those whose TI received <45 Gy had only mild to moderate BAM. Conclusions: Radiation delivered to the TI during IMRT may cause BAM. Identification of the TI from unenhanced RT planning computed tomography scans is difficult and may impede accurate

  3. Pelvic Exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Exam, Pelvic Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... 1500x1230 View Download Large: 3000x2460 View Download Title: Exam, Pelvic Description: Pelvic exam; drawing shows a side ...

  4. Indiana pouch continent urinary reservoir in patients with previous pelvic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mannel, R.S.; Braly, P.S.; Buller, R.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Little information exists on the use of continent urinary reservoirs in patients with previous pelvic irradiation. We report the use of the Indiana pouch urinary reservoir in ten women with a history of pelvic irradiation for cervical cancer, of whom eight underwent a total pelvic exenteration for recurrent pelvic tumor and two had diversion for radiation-induced vesicovaginal fistula. All ten women achieved daytime continence, with a median time between catheterizations of 4.5 hours and a median pouch capacity of 500 mL. There was no evidence of leakage from the reservoir or significant ureteral reflux or obstruction on postoperative radiographic evaluation. No patient has required reoperation or had significant postoperative complications with the technique described.

  5. Setup errors in patients treated with intensity-modulated whole pelvic radiation therapy for gynecological malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Haslam, Joshua J.; Lujan, Anthony E.; Mundt, Arno J.; Bonta, Dacian V.; Roeske, John C. . E-mail: Roeske@rover.uchicago.edu

    2005-03-31

    Intensity-modulated whole pelvic radiation therapy (IM-WPRT) has decreased the incidence of gastrointestinal complications by reducing the volume of normal tissue irradiated in gynecologic patients. However, IM-WPRT plans result in steep dose gradients around the target volume, and thus accurate patient setup is essential. To quantify the accuracy of our patient positioning, we examined the weekly portal films of 46 women treated with IM-WPRT at our institution. All patients were positioned using a customized immobilization device that was indexed to the treatment table. Setup errors were evaluated by comparing portal images to simulation images using an algorithm that registers user-defined open curve segments drawn on both sets of film. The setup errors, which were separated into systematic and random components, ranged from 1.9 to 3.7 mm for the translations and 1.3 deg to 4.4 deg for the 2 in-plane translations. The systematic errors were all less than the respective random errors, with the largest error in the anterior/posterior direction. In addition, there was no correlation between the magnitude of these errors and patient-specific factors (age, weight, height). In the future, we will investigate the effect of these setup errors on the delivered dose distribution.

  6. Individualized Prediction of Overall Survival After Postoperative Radiation Therapy in Patients With Early-Stage Cervical Cancer: A Korean Radiation Oncology Group Study (KROG 13-03)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Jin; Han, Seungbong; Kim, Young Seok; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Jae Weon; Park, Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Kim, Jin Hee; Cha, Soon Do; Kim, Juree; Lee, Ki-Heon; Yoon, Mee Sun; and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: A nomogram is a predictive statistical model that generates the continuous probability of a clinical event such as death or recurrence. The aim of the study was to construct a nomogram to predict 5-year overall survival after postoperative radiation therapy for stage IB to IIA cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The clinical data from 1702 patients with early-stage cervical cancer, treated at 10 participating hospitals from 1990 to 2011, were reviewed to develop a prediction nomogram based on the Cox proportional hazards model. Demographic, clinical, and pathologic variables were included and analyzed to formulate the nomogram. The discrimination and calibration power of the model was measured using a concordance index (c-index) and calibration curve. Results: The median follow-up period for surviving patients was 75.6 months, and the 5-year overall survival probability was 87.1%. The final model was constructed using the following variables: age, number of positive pelvic lymph nodes, parametrial invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and the use of concurrent chemotherapy. The nomogram predicted the 5-year overall survival with a c-index of 0.69, which was superior to the predictive power of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system (c-index of 0.54). Conclusions: A survival-predicting nomogram that offers an accurate level of prediction and discrimination was developed based on a large multi-center study. The model may be more useful than the FIGO staging system for counseling individual patients regarding prognosis.

  7. The role of postoperative radiation therapy in carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com; Garcia, Joaquin; Bucci, M. Kara; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Eisele, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of postoperative radiation therapy on the clinical course of patients with carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 63 patients were treated with definitive surgery for carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland. Forty patients (63%) received postoperative radiation therapy to a median dose of 60 Gy (range, 45-71 Gy). Adenocarcinoma (29 patients), salivary duct carcinoma (16 patients), and adenoid cystic carcinoma (9 patients) were the most common malignant subtypes. Pathologic T -stage was: 16% T1, 33% T2, 32% T3, and 19% T4. Twenty-one patients (33%) had microscopically positive margins and 39 (62%) had perineural invasion. Median follow-up was 50 months (range, 2-96 months). Results: The use of postoperative therapy significantly improved 5-year local control from 49% to 75% (p = 0.005) and was associated with an improvement in survival among patients without evidence of cervical lymph node metastasis (p = 0.01). A Cox proportional hazard model identified pathologic involvement of cervical lymph nodes as an independent predictor of overall survival. Overall survival was 16% for patients with pathologic N-positive disease compared with 67% for those whose lymph node status was negative or unknown (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Surgery followed by postoperative radiation should be considered the standard of care for patients with carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma.

  8. Intensity-modulated pelvic radiation therapy and simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate area in patients with high-risk prostate cancer: a preliminary report of disease control.

    PubMed

    Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Marzi, Simona; Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Sara, Gomellini; Arcangeli, Stefano; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Pinnarò, Paola; Giordano, Carolina; Ferraro, Anna Maria; Strigari, Lidia

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to report the clinical results in patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated with pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the prostate area. A total of 110 patients entered our study, 37 patients presented with localized prostate cancer and radiological evidence of node metastases or ≥15% estimated risk of lymph node (LN) involvement, while 73 patients underwent postoperative adjuvant or salvage irradiation for biochemical or residual/recurrent disease, LN metastases, or high risk of harboring nodal metastases. All patients received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for 2 years. The median follow-up was 56.5 months. For the whole patient group, the 3- and 5-year freedom from biochemical failure were 82.6% and 74.6%, respectively, with a better outcome in patients treated with radical approach. The 3- and 5-year freedom from local failure were 94.4% and 90.2%, respectively, while the 3- and 5-year distant metastasis-free survival were 87.8% and 81.7%, respectively. For all study patients, the rate of freedom from G2 acute rectal, intestinal, and urinary toxicities was 60%, 77%, and 61%, respectively. There was no G3 acute toxicity, ≥G2 late intestinal toxicity, or G3 late urinary or rectal toxicity. The 3- and 5-year ≥G2 freedom from late rectal toxicity rate were 98% and 95%, respectively, while the 3- and 5-year ≥G2 freedom from late urinary toxicity rate were 95% and 88%, respectively. The study concludes that pelvic IMRT and SIB to the prostatic area in association with 2-year ADT was a well-tolerated technique, providing high disease control in patients with prostate cancer requiring LN treatment. PMID:24976538

  9. Intensity-modulated pelvic radiation therapy and simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate area in patients with high-risk prostate cancer: a preliminary report of disease control

    PubMed Central

    Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Marzi, Simona; Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Sara, Gomellini; Arcangeli, Stefano; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Pinnarò, Paola; Giordano, Carolina; Ferraro, Anna Maria; Strigari, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to report the clinical results in patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated with pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the prostate area. A total of 110 patients entered our study, 37 patients presented with localized prostate cancer and radiological evidence of node metastases or ≥15% estimated risk of lymph node (LN) involvement, while 73 patients underwent postoperative adjuvant or salvage irradiation for biochemical or residual/recurrent disease, LN metastases, or high risk of harboring nodal metastases. All patients received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for 2 years. The median follow-up was 56.5 months. For the whole patient group, the 3- and 5-year freedom from biochemical failure were 82.6% and 74.6%, respectively, with a better outcome in patients treated with radical approach. The 3- and 5-year freedom from local failure were 94.4% and 90.2%, respectively, while the 3- and 5-year distant metastasis-free survival were 87.8% and 81.7%, respectively. For all study patients, the rate of freedom from G2 acute rectal, intestinal, and urinary toxicities was 60%, 77%, and 61%, respectively. There was no G3 acute toxicity, ≥G2 late intestinal toxicity, or G3 late urinary or rectal toxicity. The 3- and 5-year ≥G2 freedom from late rectal toxicity rate were 98% and 95%, respectively, while the 3- and 5-year ≥G2 freedom from late urinary toxicity rate were 95% and 88%, respectively. The study concludes that pelvic IMRT and SIB to the prostatic area in association with 2-year ADT was a well-tolerated technique, providing high disease control in patients with prostate cancer requiring LN treatment. PMID:24976538

  10. Vaginal Motion and Bladder and Rectal Volumes During Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy After Hysterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingran, Anuja; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sam, Marianne; Levy, Larry; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variations in bladder and rectal volume and the position of the vaginal vault during a 5-week course of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after hysterectomy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients were instructed how to fill their bladders before simulation and treatment. These patients underwent computed tomography simulations with full and empty bladders and then underwent rescanning twice weekly during IMRT; patients were asked to have full bladder for treatment. Bladder and rectal volumes and the positions of vaginal fiducial markers were determined, and changes in volume and position were calculated. Results: The mean full and empty bladder volumes at simulation were 480 cc (range, 122-1,052) and 155 cc (range, 49-371), respectively. Bladder volumes varied widely during IMRT: the median difference between the maximum and minimum volumes was 247 cc (range, 96-585). Variations in rectal volume during IMRT were less pronounced. For the 16 patients with vaginal fiducial markers in place throughout IMRT, the median maximum movement of the markers during IMRT was 0.59 cm in the right-left direction (range, 0-0.9), 1.46 cm in the anterior-posterior direction (range, 0.8-2.79), and 1.2 cm in the superior-inferior direction (range, 0.6-2.1). Large variations in rectal or bladder volume frequently correlated with significant displacement of the vaginal apex. Conclusion: Although treatment with a full bladder is usually preferred because of greater sparing of small bowel, our data demonstrate that even with detailed instruction, patients are unable to maintain consistent bladder filling. Variations in organ position during IMRT can result in marked changes in the position of the target volume and the volume of small bowel exposed to high doses of radiation.

  11. Guidance: The practical management of the gastrointestinal symptoms of pelvic radiation disease

    PubMed Central

    Andreyev, H Jervoise N; Muls, Ann C; Norton, Christine; Ralph, Charlotte; Watson, Lorraine; Shaw, Clare; Lindsay, James O

    2015-01-01

    Background A recent randomised trial suggested that an algorithmic approach to investigating and managing gastrointestinal symptoms of pelvic radiation disease (PRD) is beneficial and that specially trained nurses can manage patients as effectively as a gastroenterologist. Aims The aim of the development and peer review of the guide was to make the algorithm used in the trial accessible to all levels of clinician. Methods Experts who manage patients with PRD were asked to review the guide, rating each section for agreement with the recommended measures and suggesting amendments if necessary. Specific comments were discussed and incorporated as appropriate, and this process was repeated for a second round of review. Results 34 gastroenterologists, 10 nurses, 9 dietitians, 7 surgeons and 5 clinical oncologists participated in round one. Consensus (defined prospectively as 60% or more panellists selecting ‘strongly agree’ or ‘agree’) was reached for 27 of the original 28 sections in the guide, with a median of 75% of panellists agreeing with each section. 86% of panellists agreed that the guide was acceptable for publication or acceptable with minor revisions. 55 of the original 65 panellists participated in round two. 89% agreed it was acceptable for publication after the first revision. Further minor amendments were made in response to round two. Conclusions Development of the guide in response to feedback included ▸ improvement of occasional algorithmic steps ▸ a more user-friendly layout ▸ clearer timeframes for referral to other teams ▸ expansion of reference list ▸ addition of procedures to the appendix. PMID:25580207

  12. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-Induced Vaginal Stenosis After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Rectal and Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Christina H.; Law, Ethel; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya P.; Yang, T. Jonathan; Riedel, Elyn; Wu, Abraham J.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Although vaginal stenosis (VS) is a recognized toxicity in women who receive pelvic radiation therapy (RT), the relationship between RT dose and the volume and extent of toxicity has not been analyzed. We modeled this relationship to identify predictors of VS. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 54 women, aged 29 to 78 years, who underwent pelvic RT for rectal or anal cancer during 2008 to 2011 and were enrolled in a prospective study evaluating vaginal dilator use. Maximum dilator size was measured before RT (baseline) and 1 month and 12 months after RT. Dilator use was initiated at 1 month. The difference (D) in dilator size before and after RT was recorded. Those with D ≤−1 were classified as having VS (n=35); those with D ≥0 were classified as having no VS (n=19 at 1 month). Dose-volume parameters were extracted, and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was used to build a predictive model. Results: The mean vaginal doses were 50.0 Gy and 36.8 Gy for anal and rectal cancer patients, respectively. One month after RT, a gEUD model using a wide range of a values suggests that sparing of vaginal volume to a low dose may be important. When gEUD (a = −1) was <35 Gy and the mean vaginal dose was <43 Gy, severe VS was reduced (P=.02). A 1-year analysis suggests increasingly negative D values with increasing mean dose. However, patients with compliance <40% were more likely to have toxicity. Conclusions: Vaginal stenosis is influenced by multiple RT dose-volume characteristics. Mean dose and gEUD constraints together may reduce the risk of severe VS. Patients receiving higher mean vaginal doses should have greater compliance with dilator therapy to minimize risk of toxicity. Further validation with independent datasets is needed.

  13. Complications of combined radical hysterectomy-postoperative radiation therapy in women with early stage cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, J.F.; Soong, S.J.; Shingleton, H.M.; Hatch, K.D.; Orr, J.W. Jr.

    1989-03-01

    Fifty patients with cervical cancer were treated with radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy followed by postoperative radiation therapy for high risk factors (nodal metastases, lymphvascular space invasion, close or involved margins) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center from 1969 to 1984. Fifteen (30%) of the patients treated had serious complications, 8 (16%) requiring an operation, and 1 (2%) dying as a result of treatment-related problems. This combined modality approach is associated with significant complications.

  14. Postoperative radiation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and target volume delineation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingming; Li, Minghuan; Kong, Li; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and patients who are treated with surgery alone, without neoadjuvant therapies, experience frequent relapses. Whether postoperative therapies could reduce the recurrence or improve overall survival is still controversial for these patients. The purpose of our review is to figure out the value of postoperative adjuvant therapy and address the disputes about target volume delineation according to published data. Based on the evidence of increased morbidity and disadvantages on patient survival caused by postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy (RT) alone provided by studies in the early 1990s, the use of postoperative adjuvant therapies in cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma has diminished substantially and has been replaced gradually by neoadjuvant chemoradiation. With advances in surgery and RT, accumulating evidence has recently rekindled interest in the delivery of postoperative RT or chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage T3/T4 or N1 (lymph node positive) carcinomas after radical surgery. However, due to complications with the standard radiation field, a nonconforming modified field has been adopted in most studies. Therefore, we analyze different field applications and provide suggestions on the optimization of the radiation field based on the major sites of relapse and the surgical non-clearance area. For upper and middle thoracic esophageal carcinomas, the bilateral supraclavicular and superior mediastinal areas remain common sites of recurrence and should be encompassed within the clinical target volume. In contrast, a consensus has yet to be reached regarding lower thoracic esophageal carcinomas; the “standard” clinical target volume is still recommended. Further studies of larger sample sizes should focus on different recurrence patterns, categorized by tumor locations, refined classifications, and differing molecular biology, to provide more information on the

  15. Postoperative vaginal radiation in endometrial cancer using a remote afterloading technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, L.; Nori, D.; Anderson, L.; Hilaris, B.

    1985-03-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract. In early stage endometrial cancer, surgery remains the primary mode of treatment while radiation therapy plays an adjuvant role. Prophylactic vaginal radiation has been shown to reduce significantly the incidence of vaginal recurrences. Between the years 1969-1976, 330 patients with FIGO Stages I and II endometrial cancer were treated according to a standard departmental policy in which 40 Gy of external radiation was given to high risk Stage I and II patients in combination with surgery and intravaginal radiation. With this regimen, the mucosal surface received a total equivalent dose of 40 Gy. These treatments were given on an outpatient basis without the need for any sedation or analgesics. The minimum follow-up was 5 years, with a median follow-up of 8.5 years. The overall pelvic and/or vaginal recurrence rate was 2.7%. The incidence of vaginal complications was 3.7%. The advantages of a remote after loading technique in delivering vaginal vault radiation in endometrial cancer are discussed.

  16. Predictive factors for acute radiation pneumonitis in postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yaqin; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Shu; Wu, Qiang; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Jin; Li, Zhiping; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Ying Jie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is a common side reaction in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. There are few reports about RP in esophageal cancer patients receiving postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). This study aims to analyze clinical or dosimetric factors associated with RP, and provides data for radiotherapy planning. Methods We reviewed 68 postoperative esophageal cancer patients who were treated with radiotherapy at the West China Hospital from October 2010 to November 2012 to identify any correlation between the clinical or dosimetric parameters and acute radiation pneumonitis (ARP) or severe acute radiation pneumonitis (SARP) by t-test, chi-square test, and logistic regression analysis. Results Of the 68 patients, 33 patients (48.5%) developed ARP, 13 of which (19.1%) developed SARP. Of these 33 patients, 8 (11.8%), 12 (17.6%), 11 (16.2%), and 2 (2.9%) patients were grade 1, 2, 3, and 4 ARP, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that lung infection during radiotherapy, use of VMAT, mean lung dose (MLD), and dosimetric parameters (e.g. V20, V30) are significantly correlated with RP. Multivariate analysis found that lung infection during radiotherapy, MLD ≥ 12 Gy, and V30 ≥ 13% are significantly correlated with an increased risk of RP. Conclusion Lung infection during radiotherapy and low radiation dose volume distribution were predictive factors associated with RP and should be accounted for during radiation planning. PMID:26273335

  17. Protective effects of nutritional supplementation with arginine and glutamine on the penis of rats submitted to pelvic radiation.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, J L; Costa, W S; Felix-Patricio, B; Sampaio, F J B; Cardoso, L E M

    2014-11-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used to treat pelvic malignancies, but normal tissues near the target tumour are often affected. Our aims were thus to determine whether the structural organization of the rat penis is altered by radiation, and whether supplementation with L-arginine (ARG) or L-glutamine (GLN) would have protective effects against these alterations. Groups of rats were treated with: no intervention (CONTR); pelvic radiation, followed by sacrifice 7 (RAD7) or 15 (RAD15) days later; and pelvic radiation, daily supplementation with ARG or GLN, followed by sacrifice 7 (RAD7+ARG, RAD7+GLN) or 15 (RAD15+ARG, RAD15+GLN) days after radiation. Structural components in the corpus cavernosum (CC), tunica albuginea of the corpus spongiosum (TACS) and urethral epithelium (UE) were analysed using stereological and immunohistochemical methods. The results showed that in the CC, connective tissue was increased by 18% in RAD15 (p < 0.04), but this change was partially prevented in RAD15+GLN (p < 0.05) and RAD15+ARG (p < 0.04). The fibrous matrix of the CC trabeculae stained evenly for collagen type I. In RAD15, the intensity of the labelling was increased, whereas in RAD15+GLN and RAD15+ARG the staining was similar to that of CONTR. No staining changes were seen in the groups that were sacrificed 7 days after radiation. Cavernosal elastic fibre content in RAD15 was increased by 61% (p < 0.004), and this was prevented in RAD15+ARG (p < 0.004) but not in RAD15+GLN. In TACS, the amino acids protected (p < 0.02) against the radiation-induced 92% increase in elastic fibre content, but only in RAD15. Cell density in the UE, as well as UE thickness, were reduced by 30% in RAD15 (p < 0.004), and there were protective effects of both amino acids. In conclusion, radiation-induced alterations in penile structures tend to be more pronounced 15 days after radiation session. Both ARG and GLN have protective effects against these changes, with the former being slightly more effective. PMID

  18. NRG ONCOLOGY/RTOG 0921: A PHASE II STUDY OF POSTOPERATIVE INTENSITY MODULATED RADIATION THERAPY (IMRT) WITH CONCURRENT CISPLATIN AND BEVACIZUMAB FOLLOWED BY CARBOPLATIN AND PACLITAXEL FOR PATIENTS WITH ENDOMETRIAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Moughan, Jennifer; Miller, Brigitte E.; Xiao, Ying; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Bosch, Walter; Matulonis, Ursula; Horowitz, Neil; Mannel, Robert S.; Souhami, Luis; Erickson, Beth; Winter, Kathryn; Small, William; Gaffney, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess acute and late adverse events (AEs), overall survival (OS), pelvic failure (PF), regional failure, distant failure, and disease-free survival (DFS) in a prospective phase II clinical trial of bevacizumab (Bev) and pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with chemotherapy in high-risk endometrial-cancer patients. Materials/Methods Patients had a hysterectomy, lymph node removal, and ≥1 of the following high-risk factors: grade 3 carcinoma with >50% myometrial invasion; grade 2 or 3 disease with any cervical stromal invasion; or known extrauterine extension confined to the pelvis. Treatment included pelvic IMRT and concurrent cisplatin on days 1 and 29 of radiation and Bev (5 mg/kg on days 1, 15 and 29 of radiation) followed by adjuvant carboplatin and paclitaxel for 4 cycles. The primary endpoint was grade ≥3 AEs in the first 90 days. Results Thirty-four patients were accrued from November 2009 through December 2011, 30 of whom were eligible and received study treatment. Seven out of 30 patients (23.3%, 90% CI: 10.6%-36.0%) had grade ≥3 treatment-related non-hematologic toxicities within 90 days; an additional 6 patients had grade ≥3 toxicities between 90 and 365 days after treatment. Two-year OS was 96.7% and DFS was 79.1%. No patient developed a within-field PF and no patients with stage I-IIIA disease relapsed after a median follow-up of 26 months. Conclusion Postoperative Bev added to chemotherapy and pelvic IMRT is well tolerated and results in high overall survival rates at 2 years for patients with high-risk endometrial carcinoma. PMID:25847373

  19. Insufficiency Fractures After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer: An Analysis of Subjects in a Prospective Multi-institutional Trial, and Cooperative Study of the Japan Radiation Oncology Group (JAROG) and Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG)

    SciTech Connect

    Tokumaru, Sunao; Toita, Takafumi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kato, Shingo; Niibe, Yuzuru; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kodaira, Takeshi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Shikama, Naoto; Kenjo, Masahiro; Yamauchi, Chikako; Suzuki, Osamu; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Teshima, Teruki; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Nakano, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; and others

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate pelvic insufficiency fractures (IF) after definitive pelvic radiation therapy for early-stage uterine cervical cancer, by analyzing subjects of a prospective, multi-institutional study. Materials and Methods: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 59 eligible patients were analyzed. The median age was 73 years (range, 37-84 years). The International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics stages were Ib1 in 35, IIa in 12, and IIb in 12 patients. Patients were treated with the constant method, which consisted of whole-pelvic external-beam radiation therapy of 50 Gy/25 fractions and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy of 24 Gy/4 fractions without chemotherapy. After radiation therapy the patients were evaluated by both pelvic CT and pelvic MRI at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Diagnosis of IF was made when the patients had both CT and MRI findings, neither recurrent tumor lesions nor traumatic histories. The CT findings of IF were defined as fracture lines or sclerotic linear changes in the bones, and MRI findings of IF were defined as signal intensity changes in the bones, both on T1- and T2-weighted images. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months. The 2-year pelvic IF cumulative occurrence rate was 36.9% (21 patients). Using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, grade 1, 2, and 3 IF were seen in 12 (21%), 6 (10%), and 3 patients (5%), respectively. Sixteen patients had multiple fractures, so IF were identified at 44 sites. The pelvic IF were frequently seen at the sacroileal joints (32 sites, 72%). Nine patients complained of pain. All patients' pains were palliated by rest or non-narcotic analgesic drugs. Higher age (>70 years) and low body weight (<50 kg) were thought to be risk factors for pelvic IF (P=.007 and P=.013, Cox hazard test). Conclusions: Cervical cancer patients with higher age and low body weight may be at some risk for the development of pelvic IF after pelvic radiation therapy.

  20. Prospective Study of Functional Bone Marrow-Sparing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Pelvic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Yun; Bydder, Mark; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Rose, Brent S.; Cornell, Mariel; Hoh, Carl K.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Einck, John; Saenz, Cheryl; Fanta, Paul; Mundt, Arno J.; Bydder, Graeme M.; and others

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can reduce radiation dose to functional bone marrow (BM) in patients with pelvic malignancies (phase IA) and estimate the clinical feasibility and acute toxicity associated with this technique (phase IB). Methods and Materials: We enrolled 31 subjects (19 with gynecologic cancer and 12 with anal cancer) in an institutional review board-approved prospective trial (6 in the pilot study, 10 in phase IA, and 15 in phase IB). The mean age was 52 years; 8 of 31 patients (26%) were men. Twenty-one subjects completed {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging by use of quantitative IDEAL (IDEAL IQ; GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). The PET/CT and IDEAL IQ were registered, and BM subvolumes were segmented above the mean standardized uptake value and below the mean fat fraction within the pelvis and lumbar spine; their intersection was designated as functional BM for IMRT planning. Functional BM-sparing vs total BM-sparing IMRT plans were compared in 12 subjects; 10 were treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT per protocol. Results: In gynecologic cancer patients, the mean functional BM V{sub 10} (volume receiving {>=}10 Gy) and V{sub 20} (volume receiving {>=}20 Gy) were 85% vs 94% (P<.0001) and 70% vs 82% (P<.0001), respectively, for functional BM-sparing IMRT vs total BM-sparing IMRT. In anal cancer patients, the corresponding values were 75% vs 77% (P=.06) and 62% vs 67% (P=.002), respectively. Of 10 subjects treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT, 3 (30%) had acute grade 3 hematologic toxicity or greater. Conclusions: IMRT can reduce dose to BM subregions identified by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT and IDEAL IQ. The efficacy of BM-sparing IMRT is being tested in a phase II trial.

  1. Influence of Preoperative Radiation Field on Postoperative Leak Rates in Esophageal Cancer Patients after Trimodality Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Juloori, Aditya; Tucker, Susan L.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Correa, Arlene M.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Lin, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative morbidities, such as anastomotic leaks, are common after trimodality therapy (chemoradiation followed by surgery) for esophageal cancer. We investigated for factors associated with an increased incidence of anastomotic leaks. Methods Data from 285 esophageal cancer patients treated from 2000–2011 with trimodality therapy was analyzed. Anastomotic location relative to preoperative radiation field was assessed using postoperative computed tomographic imaging. Logistic regression was used to evaluate for factors associated with any or clinically relevant (CR) (≥ grade 2) leaks. Results Overall anastomotic leak rate was 11% (31/285), and CR leak rate was 6% (17/285). Multivariable analysis identified body mass index (BMI) (OR 1.09, 95%CI 1.00–1.17; OR 1.11, 95%CI 1.01–1.22), three-field surgery (OR 10.01, 95%CI 3.83–26.21; OR 4.83, 95%CI 1.39–16.71), and within radiation field (“in-field”) anastomosis (OR 5.37, 95%CI 2.21–13.04; OR 8.63, 95%CI 2.90–25.65) as independent predictors of both all grade and CR leaks, respectively. While patients with distal esophageal tumors and Ivor-Lewis surgery had the lowest incidence of all grade (6.5%) and CR leaks (4.2%), most of the leaks were associated with the anastomosis constructed within the field of radiation (in-field: 39% and 30% versus out-of-field: 2.6% and 1.0%, respectively, for total and CR leaks, p<0.0001, Fisher’s Exact test). Conclusions Esophagogastric anastomosis placed within the preoperative radiation field was a very strong predictor for anastomotic leaks in esophageal cancer patients treated with trimodality therapy, among other factors. Surgical planning should include a critical evaluation of the preoperative radiation fields to ensure proper anastomotic placement after chemoradiation therapy. PMID:24736077

  2. The effect of interferon gamma on conventional fractionated radiation-induced damage and fibrosis in the pelvic tissue of rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunyi; Liu, Zi; Wang, Juan; Chai, Yanlan; Su, Jin; Shi, Fan; Wang, Jiquan; Che, Shao Min

    2016-01-01

    We aim to investigate the effect of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) on conventional fractionated radiation–induced damage and fibrosis in ureter and colorectal mucosa. Fifty-two rabbits were randomly divided into three groups comprising a conventional radiation group, an IFN-γ group, and a control group. X-rays were used to irradiate the pelvic tissues of the rabbits in the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. Five days after radiation exposure, the rabbits in the IFN-γ group were administered 250,000 U/kg IFN-γ intramuscularly once a week for 5 weeks. The rabbits in the conventional radiation group received 5.0 mL/kg saline. The rabbits were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, and the rectal and ureteral tissues within the radiation areas were collected. The results showed that the morphology of rectal and ureteral tissues was changed by X-ray radiation. The degree of damage at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, but not at 16 weeks, postradiation was significantly different between the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. The expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA in the ureter and colorectal mucosa of the IFN-γ group was significantly lower than that in the conventional radiation group at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, but it was still higher than that in the control group. There were significant differences in the expression of collagen III among the three groups. IFN-γ can inhibit the radiation-induced upregulation of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA and collagen III protein in the ureter and colorectal mucosa and attenuate radiation-induced damage and fibrosis. PMID:27274263

  3. Pelvic Support Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... correct pelvic support problems? • Glossary What are pelvic support problems? The pelvic organs include the vagina , cervix , uterus , bladder , urethra , small intestines, and rectum . The pelvic ...

  4. [Importance of sonography in the diagnostics of functional disorders of the female pelvic floor].

    PubMed

    Albrich, S; Bauer, R M; Haberer, E; Skala, C; Naumann, G

    2013-04-01

    Ultrasound now plays an indispensible role in urogynecological diagnostics. Sonographic imaging of the female pelvic floor allows depiction of the urethra, bladder neck, bladder, anorectum and the levator ani muscle and is currently an important clinical component for the diagnostics of functional disorders in the region of the female pelvic floor. Essential aspects in sonography of the female pelvic floor are the dynamic depiction and direct imaging of alloplastic implants. For these reasons sonographic imaging is of great clinical importance especially for the diagnostics of recurrent or postoperative complications. A further important factor which supports the success of ultrasound in the diagnostics of functional disorders of the female pelvic floor is the wide availability of ultrasound devices in patient care. Furthermore, the method is noninvasive, comparatively inexpensive and does not involve radiation. PMID:23483273

  5. Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancers: Surgery Alone Versus Surgery Plus Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gwak, Hee Keun; Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Hun Jung; Park, Jeong Hoon

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the role of radiotherapy after curative-intent surgery in the management of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancers. Methods and Materials: From 1997 through 2005, 78 patients with EHBD cancer were surgically staged. These patients were stratified by the absence of adjuvant radiation (n = 47, group I) versus radiation (n = 31, group II) after resection. Pathology examination showed 27 cases in group I and 20 cases in group II had microscopically positive resection margins. The patients in group II received 45 to 54 Gy of external beam radiotherapy. The primary endpoints of this study were overall survival, disease-free survival, and prognostic factors. Results: There were no differences between the 5-year overall survival rates for the two groups (11.6% in group I vs. 21% in group II). However, the patients with microscopically positive resection margins who received adjuvant radiation therapy had higher median disease-free survival rates than those who underwent surgery alone (21 months vs. 10 months, respectively, p = 0.042). Decreasing local failure was found in patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (61.7% in group I and 35.6% in group II, p = 0.02). Outcomes of the patients with a positive resection margin and lymph node metastasis who received postoperative radiation therapy were doubled compared to those of patients without adjuvant radiotherapy. Resection margin status, lymph node metastasis, and pathology differentiation were significant prognostic factors in disease-free survival. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy might be useful in patients with EHBD cancer, especially for those patients with microscopic residual tumors and positive lymph nodes after resection for increasing local control.

  6. MRI simulation: end-to-end testing for prostate radiation therapy using geometric pelvic MRI phantoms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jidi; Dowling, Jason; Pichler, Peter; Menk, Fred; Rivest-Henault, David; Lambert, Jonathan; Parker, Joel; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Martin, Jarad; Denham, James W; Greer, Peter B

    2015-04-21

    To clinically implement MRI simulation or MRI-alone treatment planning requires comprehensive end-to-end testing to ensure an accurate process. The purpose of this study was to design and build a geometric phantom simulating a human male pelvis that is suitable for both CT and MRI scanning and use it to test geometric and dosimetric aspects of MRI simulation including treatment planning and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation.A liquid filled pelvic shaped phantom with simulated pelvic organs was scanned in a 3T MRI simulator with dedicated radiotherapy couch-top, laser bridge and pelvic coil mounts. A second phantom with the same external shape but with an internal distortion grid was used to quantify the distortion of the MR image. Both phantoms were also CT scanned as the gold-standard for both geometry and dosimetry. Deformable image registration was used to quantify the MR distortion. Dose comparison was made using a seven-field IMRT plan developed on the CT scan with the fluences copied to the MR image and recalculated using bulk electron densities. Without correction the maximum distortion of the MR compared with the CT scan was 7.5 mm across the pelvis, while this was reduced to 2.6 and 1.7 mm by the vendor's 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. Within the locations of the internal organs of interest, the distortion was <1.5 and <1 mm with 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. The dose at the prostate isocentre calculated on CT and MRI images differed by 0.01% (1.1 cGy). Positioning shifts were within 1 mm when setup was performed using MRI generated DRRs compared to setup using CT DRRs.The MRI pelvic phantom allows end-to-end testing of the MRI simulation workflow with comparison to the gold-standard CT based process. MRI simulation was found to be geometrically accurate with organ dimensions, dose distributions and DRR based setup within acceptable limits compared to CT. PMID:25803177

  7. MRI simulation: end-to-end testing for prostate radiation therapy using geometric pelvic MRI phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jidi; Dowling, Jason; Pichler, Peter; Menk, Fred; Rivest-Henault, David; Lambert, Jonathan; Parker, Joel; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Martin, Jarad; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2015-04-01

    To clinically implement MRI simulation or MRI-alone treatment planning requires comprehensive end-to-end testing to ensure an accurate process. The purpose of this study was to design and build a geometric phantom simulating a human male pelvis that is suitable for both CT and MRI scanning and use it to test geometric and dosimetric aspects of MRI simulation including treatment planning and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. A liquid filled pelvic shaped phantom with simulated pelvic organs was scanned in a 3T MRI simulator with dedicated radiotherapy couch-top, laser bridge and pelvic coil mounts. A second phantom with the same external shape but with an internal distortion grid was used to quantify the distortion of the MR image. Both phantoms were also CT scanned as the gold-standard for both geometry and dosimetry. Deformable image registration was used to quantify the MR distortion. Dose comparison was made using a seven-field IMRT plan developed on the CT scan with the fluences copied to the MR image and recalculated using bulk electron densities. Without correction the maximum distortion of the MR compared with the CT scan was 7.5 mm across the pelvis, while this was reduced to 2.6 and 1.7 mm by the vendor’s 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. Within the locations of the internal organs of interest, the distortion was <1.5 and <1 mm with 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. The dose at the prostate isocentre calculated on CT and MRI images differed by 0.01% (1.1 cGy). Positioning shifts were within 1 mm when setup was performed using MRI generated DRRs compared to setup using CT DRRs. The MRI pelvic phantom allows end-to-end testing of the MRI simulation workflow with comparison to the gold-standard CT based process. MRI simulation was found to be geometrically accurate with organ dimensions, dose distributions and DRR based setup within acceptable limits compared to CT.

  8. Discordance Between Preoperative and Postoperative Bladder Cancer Location: Implications for Partial-Bladder Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Benjamin; Tucker, Kai; Conway, Robert Greg; He, Jiwei; Guzzo, Thomas; Bekelman, Justin; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Christodouleas, John

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: There is strong interest in partial-bladder radiation whether as a boost or definitive therapy to limit long-term toxicity. It is unclear that a standard preoperative examination can accurately identify all sites of disease within the bladder. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between preoperative localization of bladder tumors with postoperative findings to facilitate partial-bladder radiation techniques when appropriate. Methods and Materials: We examined patients with clinically staged T1-T4 invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) or TCC with variant histology with no history of radiation or partial cystectomy undergoing radical cystectomy. Patients were scored as “under-detected” if a bladder site was involved with invasive disease (≥T1) at the time of cystectomy, but not identified preoperatively. Patients were additionally scored as “widely under-detected” if they had postoperative lesions that were not identified preoperatively in a given site, nor in any adjacent site. Rates of under-detected and widely under-detected lesions, as well as univariate and multivariate association between clinical variables and under-detection, were evaluated using logistic regression. Results: Among 222 patients, 96% (213/222) had at least 1 area of discordance. Fifty-eight percent of patients were under-detected in at least 1 location, whereas 12% were widely under-detected. Among 24 patients with a single site of disease on preoperative evaluation, 21/24 (88%) had at least 1 under-detected lesion and 14/24 (58%) were widely under-detected. On multivariate analysis, only solitary site of preoperative disease was associated with increased levels of under-detection of invasive disease (OR = 4.161, 95% CI, 1.368-12.657). Conclusion: Our study shows a stark discordance between preoperative and postoperative localization of bladder tumors. From a clinical perspective, incomplete localization of all sites of disease within the bladder

  9. External Pelvic and Vaginal Irradiation Versus Vaginal Irradiation Alone as Postoperative Therapy in Medium-Risk Endometrial Carcinoma-A Prospective Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sorbe, Bengt; Horvath, Gyoergy; Andersson, Hakan; Boman, Karin; Lundgren, Caroline; Pettersson, Birgitta

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of adjuvant external beam pelvic radiotherapy as adjunct to vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) in medium-risk endometrial carcinoma, with regard to locoregional tumor control, recurrences, survival, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Consecutive series of 527 evaluable patients were included in this randomized trial. Median follow-up for patients alive was 62 months. The primary study endpoints were locoregional recurrences and overall survival. Secondary endpoints were recurrence-free survival, recurrence-free interval, cancer-specific survival, and toxicity. Results: Five-year locoregional relapse rates were 1.5% after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus VBT and 5% after vaginal irradiation alone (p = 0.013), and 5-year overall survival rates were 89% and 90%, respectively (p = 0.548). Endometrial cancer-related death rates were 3.8% after EBRT plus VBT and 6.8% after VBT (p = 0.118). Pelvic recurrences (exclusively vaginal recurrence) were reduced by 93% by the addition of EBRT to VBT. Deep myometrial infiltration was a significant prognostic factor in this medium-risk group of endometrioid carcinomas but not International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade or DNA ploidy. Combined radiotherapy was well tolerated, with serious (Grade 3) late side effects of less than 2%. However, there was a significant difference in favor of VBT alone. Conclusions: Despite a significant locoregional control benefit with combined radiotherapy, no survival improvement was recorded, but increased late toxicity was noted in the intestine, bladder, and vagina. Combined RT should probably be reserved for high-risk cases with two or more high-risk factors. VBT alone should be the adjuvant treatment option for purely medium-risk cases.

  10. Parapharyngeal space hemangiopericytoma treated with surgery and postoperative radiation--a case report.

    PubMed

    Fareed, Muhammad Mohsin; Al Amro, Abdullah Suleiman Mazaed; Akasha, Rashad; Al Assiry, Mansour; Al Asiri, Mushabbab; Tonio, Mutahir; Bayoumi, Yasser

    2012-01-01

    Hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is a rare tumor of uncertain malignant potential arising from mesenchymal cells with pericytic differentiation. It accounts for 3-5% of soft tissue sarcomas and 1% of vascular tumors. It usually presents in 5th to 6th decade of life. Most common sites are limbs, pelvis and head and neck. About 20% of all hemangiopericytomas are seen in head and neck, mostly in adults. Usually it presents in orbit, nasal cavity, oral cavity, jaw, parotid gland, parapharyngeal space, masticator space and jugular foramen. Long term follow up is important because of imprecise nature of the histological criteria for prediction of biologic behavior.We report herein a case of HPC in 66-year-old man, who presented in our department with headache, nasal obstruction and dysphagia. A neck computer tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging showed a large left parapharyngeal mass bulging into nasopharynx and oropharynx with extension to pharyngeal mucosal surface and causing narrowing of airways and total obstruction of left posterior nostril. Angiography showed a highly vascular neoplasm. Initially he was managed as a case of schwannoma and embolization was done but with no response. An attempt to do complete surgical resection was made, but due to its critical position, it was not possible. During surgery, highly vascularised tumor was found. The histopathologic examination revealed a vascular tumor consistent with hemangiopericytoma G-II. The patient had normal postoperative course of healing and was given adjuvant radiation. He is on regular follow up without signs of recurrence or metastases.In summary, parapharyngeal space is a rare site of presentation for hemangiopericytoma which is highly vascular tumor, requiring extensive work up including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography scan and angiography. Complete surgical excision should be attempted. Postoperative radiation is indicated in cases of incomplete resection. PMID:22480217

  11. Technique and complications of reconstruction of the pelvic floor with polyglactin mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Sener, S.F.; Imperato, J.P.; Blum, M.D.; Ignatoff, J.M.; Soper, T.G.; Winchester, D.P.; Meiselman, M.

    1989-06-01

    A polyglactin mesh sling was used to reconstruct the pelvis in eight patients after colorectal or urologic resections in preparation for postoperative radiation therapy. There were three perioperative complications--a pelvic abscess requiring percutaneous drainage, a wound dehiscence and a herniation of the small intestine between the pelvic sidewall and mesh requiring small intestinal resection. There were two delayed complications, both partial small intestinal obstructions. One occurred just after the conclusion of radiation treatment and the other occurred five months after the conclusion of radiation therapy. Both obstructions responded to conservative management. None of the common acute radiation effects occurred during radiotherapy. One patient with delayed partial small intestinal obstruction had possible late radiation effects. The median follow-up period after radiation therapy was 12.5 months. Despite the complications described in this report, the use of a polyglactin mesh sling as an adjunct to resection of carcinoma of the pelvis has merit and should be studied further.

  12. A Phase II Study of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis for Postoperative Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 0418

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingran, Anuja; Winter, Kathryn; Portelance, Lorraine; Miller, Brigitte; Salehpour, Mohammad; Gaur, Rakesh; Souhami, Luis; Small, William; Berk, Lawrence; Gaffney, David

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with endometrial cancer in a multi-institutional setting and to determine whether this treatment is associated with fewer short-term bowel adverse events than standard radiation therapy. Methods: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium treated with pelvic radiation therapy alone were eligible. Guidelines for target definition and delineation, dose prescription, and dose-volume constraints for the targets and critical normal structures were detailed in the study protocol and a web-based atlas. Results: Fifty-eight patients were accrued by 25 institutions; 43 were eligible for analysis. Forty-two patients (98%) had an acceptable IMRT plan; 1 had an unacceptable variation from the prescribed dose to the nodal planning target volume. The proportions of cases in which doses to critical normal structures exceeded protocol criteria were as follows: bladder, 67%; rectum, 76%; bowel, 17%; and femoral heads, 33%. Twelve patients (28%) developed grade {>=}2 short-term bowel adverse events. Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT for endometrial cancer is feasible across multiple institutions with use of a detailed protocol and centralized quality assurance (QA). For future trials, contouring of vaginal and nodal tissue will need continued monitoring with good QA and better definitions will be needed for organs at risk.

  13. Overall Survival Benefit From Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Organ-Confined, Margin-Positive Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, Robert O.; Hafer, Russell; Cox, Craig; McClure, Stephanie E.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Radical prostatectomy for invasive prostate cancer is associated with positive margin rates in 10% to 50% of resected specimens. Postoperative radiation therapy may benefit patients who have organ-confined prostate cancer with positive margins. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis to examine whether adjunctive radiation therapy enhanced long-term survival for prostate cancer patients who underwent prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer but with positive margins. We used the Hoag Cancer Center database to identify patients diagnosed with invasive prostate cancer. Relative and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Among 1,474 patients diagnosed with localized invasive prostate cancer during the years 1990 to 2006 and undergoing prostatectomy, 113 (7.7%) were identified who had positive margins and did not have local extension of disease, positive lymph nodes, or distant metastases. A total of 17 patients received adjunctive radiation therapy (Group A), whereas 96 did not (Group B; 3 received hormonal therapy). Both groups had a median age of 64 years and median follow-up of 7.5 years. In Group A, no patients have died as of last follow-up, but in Group B, 18 have died. Estimated 10-year and 15-year overall survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 85% and 57% respectively for Group B (p{sub 2} = 0.050, log rank). Relative 10- and 15 year survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 100% and 79% respectively for Group B. Conclusions: This retrospective analysis suggests that prostate cancer patients with localized disease but positive margins do derive a survival benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy.

  14. Delineation of radiation therapy target volumes for patients with postoperative glioblastoma: a review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fen; Li, Minghuan; Kong, Li; Zhang, Guoli; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive and lethal primary malignancy of the brain, and radiotherapy (RT) is a fundamental part of its treatment. However, the optimal radiation treatment conditions are still a matter of debate, and there is no clear consensus concerning the inclusion of peritumoral edema in the clinical target volume calculation. Target delineation calculations that use postoperative residual tumor and cavity volumes plus 2 cm margins result in smaller volumes of normal brain receiving high-dose irradiation, compared to calculations that include expanded edema. Smaller RT fields may be more appropriate than larger RT fields, possibly reducing the risk of late neurological deterioration, especially in patients with significant peritumoral edema. This review focuses on the factors influencing target delineation, such as peritumoral edema, failure patterns, and prognostic factors (clinical and pathological characteristics) of patients with glioblastoma. Based on this information, we make three suggestions for radiation oncologists to refer to in daily practice. Further study is necessary to investigate the unresolved problems related to routine clinical application of RT. PMID:27313465

  15. Pelvic exenterations for gynecological malignancies: twenty-year experience at Roswell Park Cancer Institute.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Odunsi, K; Driscoll, D; Lele, S

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to review the experience with pelvic exenterations for gynecological malignancies at our cancer institute. Charts of 48 women who underwent a pelvic exenteration between January 1980 and December 1999 were reviewed, and several outcomes were analyzed. Majority of patients had received prior radiation therapy. The median survival was 35 months, and the disease-free survival was 32 months. Mortality from the procedure was 4.2%. Early and late postoperative complication rates were 27% and 75%, respectively. Recurrence rate was 60%. Eight patients received intraoperative radiation. Median survival in this group was 11.3 vs 35 months (P = 0.003). Univariate analysis failed to show an association between type of pelvic exenteration, type of fecal and urinary diversion, outcome, need for reoperation, and recurrence. Contemporary pelvic exenterations are associated with a low mortality and a potential for long-term survival in a subset of patients who historically have been given a poor prognosis. In patients with recurrent gynecological cancer confined centrally to the pelvis, pelvic exenteration still remains the choice of therapy as response to chemotherapy to a centrally recurrent tumor in radiated area continues to be poor. Intraoperative radiation in select few patients needs to be further studied. PMID:15882172

  16. Whole-Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy in the Context of Hypofractionation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients: A Step Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Kaidar-Person, Orit; Roach, Mack; Créhange, Gilles

    2013-07-15

    Given the low α/β ratio of prostate cancer, prostate hypofractionation has been tested through numerous clinical studies. There is a growing body of literature suggesting that with high conformal radiation therapy and even with more sophisticated radiation techniques, such as high-dose-rate brachytherapy or image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy, morbidity associated with shortening overall treatment time with higher doses per fraction remains low when compared with protracted conventional radiation therapy to the prostate only. In high-risk prostate cancer patients, there is accumulating evidence that either dose escalation to the prostate or hypofractionation may improve outcome. Nevertheless, selected patients who have a high risk of lymph node involvement may benefit from whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). Although combining WPRT with hypofractionated prostate radiation therapy is feasible, it remains investigational. By combining modern advances in radiation oncology (high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy with an improved image guidance for soft-tissue sparing), it is hypothesized that WPRT could take advantage of recent results from hypofractionation trials. Moreover, the results from hypofractionation trials raise questions as to whether hypofractionation to pelvic lymph nodes with a high risk of occult involvement might improve the outcomes in WPRT. Although investigational, this review discusses the challenging idea of WPRT in the context of hypofractionation for patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

  17. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reviewed: 04/12/2013 Related A-Z Topics Endometriosis Menstruation and Menstrual Problems Pelvic Floor Disorders All related topics NICHD News and Spotlights Endometriosis linked to increased risk for heart disease, NIH- ...

  18. Toxicity of definitive and post-operative radiation following ipilimumab in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Matthew J; Gu, Lin; Wang, Xiaofei; Kelsey, Chris R; Yoo, David S; Onaitis, Mark W; Dunphy, Frank R; Crawford, Jeffrey; Ready, Neal E; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-08-01

    To determine the feasibility and toxicity of radiation therapy, delivered either as definitive treatment or following surgery, following neo-adjuvant immune checkpoint inhibition for locally advanced NSCLC sixteen patients who received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy including ipilimumab as part of a phase II study were identified. Patients were analyzed by intent of radiation and toxicity graded based on CTCAE 4.0. There were seven patients identified who received definitive radiation and nine who received post-operative radiation. There was no grade 3 or greater toxicity in the definitive treatment group although one patient stopped treatment early due to back pain secondary to progression outside of the treatment field. In the post-operative treatment group, one patient required a one week break due to grade 2 odynophagia and no grade 3 or greater toxicity was observed. In this study of radiation as definitive or post-operative treatment following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy including ipilimumab for locally advanced NSCLC was feasible and well tolerated with limited toxicity. PMID:27393510

  19. Radiation-Related Predictors of Hematologic Toxicity After Concurrent Chemoradiation for Cervical Cancer and Implications for Bone Marrow-Sparing Pelvic IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, Kevin; Giangreco, David; Morrison, Courtney; Siddiqui, Mohammed; Sinacore, Jim; Potkul, Ronald; Roeske, John

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To determine factors predictive for hematologic toxicity (HT) associated with concurrent chemoradiation for Stage II through IV cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 40 women receiving concurrent chemoradiation for cervical cancer were reviewed. Hematologic toxicity was defined by use of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0). Variables predicting for HT including age, body mass index, transfusions, and bone marrow volumes irradiated were included in the data analysis. Results: Of the patients, 13 (32.5%) had Grade 0 or 1 HT and 27 (67.5%) had Grade 2 through 4 HT (HT2+). Multiple logistic regression analysis of potential predictors showed that only the volume of bone receiving 20 Gy (V20) for whole pelvic bone tended toward significance for predicting HT2+. A strong correlation was noted between HT2+ and V20 (r = 0.8, p < 0.0001). A partitioning analysis to predict HT2+ showed a cutoff value of 79.42% (approximately 80%) for V20 of whole pelvic bone. That is, if the V20 of the whole pelvis exceeds 80%, the risk of HT2+ developing increases by a factor (odds ratio) of 4.5 (95%, confidence interval, 1.08-18.69) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: We have shown a correlation between bone marrow volume radiated and development of HT. This has implications for use of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy, which can potentially decrease the volume of bone marrow radiated.

  20. Postoperative Single-Fraction Radiation for Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification of the Elbow

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Clifford G.; Polster, Joshua M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Lyons, Janice A.; Evans, Peter J.; Lawton, Jeffrey N.; Graham, Thomas J.; Suh, John H.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO) about the elbow has been described after surgery, trauma, and burns. Even limited deposits can lead to significant functional deficits. Little data exist regarding outcomes of patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) after elbow surgery. We report here the Cleveland Clinic experience with single-fraction radiation following surgery to the elbow. The primary endpoint was the rate of new HO after RT. Secondary endpoints were range of motion, functional compromise, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: From May 1993 to July 2006, 36 patients underwent elbow surgery followed by single-fraction RT. Range of motion data were collected before and during surgery and at last follow-up. Radiographs were reviewed for persistent or new HO. Patient and treatment factors were analyzed for correlation with development of HO or functional compromise. Results: Median follow-up was 8.7 months, median age was 42 years, and 75% of patients were male. Twenty-six (72%) patients had HO prior to surgery. All patients had significant limitations in flexion/extension or pronation/supination at baseline. Thirty-one (86%) patients had prior elbow trauma, and 26 (72%) patients had prior surgery. RT was administered a median of 1 day postoperatively (range, 1-4 days). Thirty-four patients received 700 cGy, and 2 patients received 600 cGy. Three (8%) patients developed new HO after RT. All patients had improvement in range of motion from baseline. No patient or treatment factors were significantly associated with the development of HO or functional compromise. Conclusions: Single-fraction RT after surgery to the elbow is associated with favorable functional and radiographic outcomes.

  1. The value of pelvic radiation therapy after hysterectomy for early endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Eifel, Patricia J

    2013-10-01

    Although endometrial carcinoma is one of the most common cancers affecting women, most cases are detected at an early stage and are cured with hysterectomy alone. Most recurrences occur in the relatively small subset of patients whose surgical specimens reveal multiple risk factors. Clinicians have sought to define adjuvant treatments that can improve the outcome of treatment for these higher-risk patients. Although randomized trials have demonstrated that radiation therapy improves local control, they have failed to demonstrate an improvement in survival with radiation therapy. In this review, the results and limitations of studies concerning adjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy for endometrial cancer will be discussed, focusing on evidence that can help to guide treatment decisions. PMID:24367856

  2. Optimization of patient radiation protection in pelvic X-ray examination in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ofori, Eric K; Antwi, William K; Scutt, Diane N; Ward, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Pelvis X-ray examinations inevitably involve exposure of the gonads to ionizing radiation. In line with the principle of keeping doses as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP), accurate patient dose measurement is vital if we are to ascertain that these exposures are fully optimized. The study aimed to provide patient dose estimates for pelvis examination being undertaken at 10 separate hospitals in Ghana in order to provide an initial quantitative indication of each site's typically achievable radiation safety and quality standards. The method employed was adapted from established methods and peer reviewed literature, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) publications on optimization of the radiological protection of patients undergoing radiography, fluoroscopy, and computed tomography examinations in some countries in Africa, Asia, and Eastern Europe. Dose measurements were calculated on 323 patients (137 (42%) male, 186 (58%) female, ages, 38.56 yr ± 9.0; range 20-68). The entrance surface dose (ESD) was determined by an indirect method, using the patient's anatomical data and exposure parameters utilized for the specific examination. The Quality Assurance Dose Database software (QADDs) developed by Integrated Radiological Services Ltd. in Liverpool, UK was used to generate the ESD values. The study identified variations in the technique factors used compared with the recommendations in the European Commission (EC) quality criteria. Eighty percent of the hospitals recorded lower ESD values below IAEA recommended diagnostic reference levels (10 mGy) and 40% of the hospitals exceeded the UK national reference value (4 mGy). However, one hospital consistently recorded higher ESDs than the other hospitals. The variations in the data recorded demonstrate the importance of creating awareness by the radiographic staff on quality assurance and standardization of protocols to ensure satisfactory standards and optimized radiation dose to patients and

  3. Postoperative Radiation Therapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy for Node-Positive Thoracic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Junqiang; Pan, Jianji; Liu, Jian; Li, Jiancheng; Zhu, Kunshou; Zheng, Xiongwei; Chen, Mingqiang; Chen, Ming; Liao, Zhongxing

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy plus RT (CRT) for the postoperative treatment of node-positive thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TESCC) and to determine the incidence and severity of toxic reactions. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed data from 304 patients who had undergone esophagectomy with 3-field lymph node dissection for TESCC and were determined by postoperative pathology to have lymph node metastasis without distant hematogenous metastasis. Of these patients, 164 underwent postoperative chemotherapy (cisplatin 80 mg/m{sup 2}, average days 1-3, plus paclitaxel 135 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1; 21-day cycle) plus RT (50 Gy), and 140 underwent postoperative RT alone. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for the CRT and RT groups were 47.4% and 38.6%, respectively (P=.030). The distant metastasis rate, the mixed (regional lymph node and distant) metastasis rate, and the overall recurrence rate were significantly lower in the CRT group than in the RT group (P<.05). However, mild and severe early toxic reactions, including neutropenia, radiation esophagitis, and gastrointestinal reaction, were significantly more common in the CRT group than in the RT group (P<.05). No significant differences in incidence of late toxic reactions were found between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Our results show that in node-positive TESCC patients, postoperative CRT is significantly more effective than RT alone at increasing the overall survival and decreasing the rates of distant metastasis, mixed metastasis, and overall recurrence. Severe early toxic reactions were more common with CRT than with RT alone, but patients could tolerate CRT.

  4. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  5. Quality of Life after Post-Prostatectomy Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Pelvic Nodal Irradiation Is Not Associated with Worse Bladder, Bowel, or Sexual Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Melotek, James M.; Liao, Chuanhong; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Limited data exist regarding toxicity and quality of life (QOL) after post-prostatectomy intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and whether pelvic nodal RT influences these outcomes. Methods 118 men were treated with curative-intent RT after radical prostatectomy. 69 men (58%) received pelvic nodal RT. QOL data and physician-assigned toxicity were prospectively collected. Changes in QOL from baseline were assessed with Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and risk factors associated with each domain were identified with generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. Late freedom from (FF) toxicity was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and comparisons were tested using the log-rank test. Results Urinary irritation/obstruction, bowel, and sexual domain scores declined at 2 months (all P ≤ 0.01) but were no different than baseline at subsequent visits through 4 years of follow-up. At 4 years, FF grade 2+ GI toxicity was 90% and FF grade 2+ GU toxicity was 89%. On GEE analysis, pelvic nodal RT was associated with decreased bowel function (P = 0.09) and sexual function (P = 0.01). On multivariate analysis, however, there was no significant association with either decreased bowel (P = 0.31) or sexual (P = 0.84) function. There was also no association with either FF grade 2+ GI toxicity (P = 0.24) or grade 2+ GU toxicity (P = 0.51). Conclusions Receipt of pelvic nodal RT was not associated with inferior QOL or toxicity compared to prostate bed alone RT. For the entire cohort, RT was associated with only temporary declines in patient-reported urinary, bowel, or sexual QOL. PMID:26512986

  6. Phase I trial of pelvic radiation, weekly cisplatin, and 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP, NSC #663249) for locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kunos, Charles A.; Waggoner, Steven; von Gruenigen, Vivian; Eldermire, Elisa; Pink, John; Dowlati, Afshin; Kinsella, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the safety/tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and clinical activity of three-times weekly intravenous 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP, NSC #663249) in combination with once weekly intravenous cisplatin and daily pelvic radiation in patients with gynecologic malignancies. 3-AP is a novel small molecule inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) and is being tested as a potential radiosensitizer and chemosensitizer. Experimental Design Patients with stage IB2-IVB cervical cancer (n=10) or recurrent uterine sarcoma (n=1) were assigned to dose-finding cohorts of 2-hour 3-AP infusions during five weeks of cisplatin chemoradiation. Pharmacokinetic and methemoglobin samples and tumor biopsy for RNR activity were obtained on days 1 and 10. Clinical response was assessed. Results The maximum tolerated 3-AP dose is 25mg/m2 given three-times weekly during cisplatin and pelvic radiation. Two patients experienced manageable 3-AP-related grade 3 or 4 electrolyte abnormalities. 3-AP pharmacokinetics showed a 2-hour half-life, with median peak plasma concentrations of 277ng/mL (25mg/m2) and 467ng/mL (50mg/m2). Median methemoglobin levels peaked at 1% (25mg/m2) and 6% (50mg/m2) at 4 hours after initiating 3-AP infusions. No change in RNR activity was found on day 1 versus 10 in six early complete responders, while elevated RNR activity was seen on day 10 as compared to day 1 in four late complete responders (P =0.02). Ten (100%) patients with stage IB2-IVB cervical cancer achieved complete clinical response and remain without disease relapse with a median 18 months of follow-up (6-32 months). Conclusions 3-AP was well tolerated at a three-times weekly intravenous 25mg/m2 dose during cisplatin and pelvic radiation. PMID:20145183

  7. Comparison of surface matching and target matching for image-guided pelvic radiation therapy for both supine and prone patient positions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Wang, Brian; Sarkar, Vikren; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema; Huang, Y Jessica; Szegedi, Martin; Huang, Long; Gonzalez, Victor; Salter, Bill

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the difference between surface matching and target matching for pelvic radiation image guidance. The uniqueness of our study is that all patients have multiple CT-on-rails (CTOR) scans to compare to corresponding AlignRT images. Ten patients receiving pelvic radiation were enrolled in this study. Two simulation CT scans were performed in supine and prone positions for each patient. Body surface contours were generated in treatment planning system and exported to AlignRT to serve as reference images. During treatment day, the patient was aligned to treatment isocenter with room lasers, and then scanned with both CTOR and AlignRT. Image-guidance shifts were calculated for both modalities by com-parison to the simulation CT and the differences between them were analyzed for both supine and prone positions, respectively. These procedures were performed for each patient once per week for five weeks. The difference of patient displace-ment between AlignRT and CTOR was analyzed. For supine position, five patients had an average difference of displacement between AlignRT and CTOR along any direction (vertical, longitudinal, and lateral) greater than 0.5 cm, and one patient greater than 1 cm. Four patients had a maximum difference greater than 1 cm. For prone position, seven patients had an average difference greater than 0.5 cm, and three patients greater than 1 cm. Nine patients had a maximum difference greater than 1 cm. The difference of displacement between AlignRT and CTOR was greater for the prone position than for the supine position. For the patients studied here, surface matching does not appear to be an advisable image-guidance approach for pelvic radiation therapy for patients with either supine or prone position. There appears to be a potential for large alignment discrepancies (up to 2.25 cm) between surface matching and target matching. PMID:27167254

  8. Factors Associated With Neurological Recovery of Brainstem Function Following Postoperative Conformal Radiation Therapy for Infratentorial Ependymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Chitti, Ramana M.; Li Chenghong; Xiong Xiaoping; Sanford, Robert A.; Khan, Raja B.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To identify risk factors associated with incomplete neurological recovery in pediatric patients with infratentorial ependymoma treated with postoperative conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods: The study included 68 patients (median age +- standard deviation of 2.6 +- 3.8 years) who were followed for 5 years after receiving CRT (54-59.4 Gy) and were assessed for function of cranial nerves V to VII and IX to XII, motor weakness, and dysmetria. The mean (+- standard deviation) brainstem dose was 5,487 (+-464) cGy. Patients were divided into four groups representing those with normal baseline and follow-up, those with abnormal baseline and full recovery, those with abnormal baseline and partial or no recovery, and those with progressive deficits at 12 (n = 62 patients), 24 (n = 57 patients), and 60 (n = 50 patients) months. Grouping was correlated with clinical and treatment factors. Results: Risk factors (overall risk [OR], p value) associated with incomplete recovery included gender (male vs. female, OR = 3.97, p = 0.036) and gross tumor volume (GTV) (OR/ml = 1.23, p = 0.005) at 12 months, the number of resections (>1 vs. 1; OR = 23.7, p = 0.003) and patient age (OR/year = 0.77, p = 0.029) at 24 months, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting (Yes vs. No; OR = 21.9, p = 0.001) and GTV volume (OR/ml = 1.18, p = 0.008) at 60 months. An increase in GTV correlated with an increase in the number of resections (p = 0.001) and CSF shunting (p = 0.035); the number of resections correlated with CSF shunting (p < 0.0001), and male patients were more likely to undergo multiple tumor resections (p = 0.003). Age correlated with brainstem volume (p < 0.0001). There were no differences in outcome based on the absolute or relative volume of the brainstem that received more than 54 Gy. Conclusions: Incomplete recovery of brainstem function after CRT for infratentorial ependymoma is related to surgical morbidity and the volume and the extent of tumor.

  9. Clinical trial evaluating cholestyramine to prevent diarrhea in patients maintained on low-fat diets during pelvic radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chary, S.; Thomson, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    A prospective randomized trial to determine the value of a low fat diet with or without cholestyramine in the treatment of acute intestinal complications of pelvic irradiation is presented. A total of 35 patients receiving pelvic irradiation were entered in the study and all patients had received a 40 gm fat diet. The group was then randomized to receive either placebo (17 patients) or cholestyramine (18 patients). Diarrhea occurred in six out of 16 evaluable patients in the control group and only one of the 17 evaluable patients in the cholestyramine group. The frequency of diarrhea and the diarrhea scale remained high in the placebo group in the entire observation period. Statistical analysis had revealed better diarrhea control in the cholestyramine group. In this report mechanism by which diarrhea occurs following pelvic irradiation is discussed. The adverse effects associated with the use of cholestyramine have been presented. It was concluded that cholestyramine is effective in preventing acute diarrhea induced by pelvic irradiation in patients receiving a low fat diet but is associated with side effects.

  10. Clinical Response of Pelvic and Para-aortic Lymphadenopathy to a Radiation Boost in the Definitive Management of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rash, Dominique L.; Lee, Yongsook C.; Kashefi, Amir; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Mathai, Mathew; Valicenti, Richard; Mayadev, Jyoti S.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Optimal treatment with radiation for metastatic lymphadenopathy in locally advanced cervical cancer remains controversial. We investigated the clinical dose response threshold for pelvic and para-aortic lymph node boost using radiographic imaging and clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2011, 68 patients were treated for locally advanced cervical cancer; 40 patients had clinically involved pelvic and/or para-aortic lymph nodes. Computed tomography (CT) or 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scans obtained pre- and postchemoradiation for 18 patients were reviewed to assess therapeutic radiographic response of individual lymph nodes. External beam boost doses to involved nodes were compared to treatment response, assessed by change in size of lymph nodes by short axis and change in standard uptake value (SUV). Patterns of failure, time to recurrence, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were determined. Results: Sixty-four lymph nodes suspicious for metastatic involvement were identified. Radiation boost doses ranged from 0 to 15 Gy, with a mean total dose of 52.3 Gy. Pelvic lymph nodes were treated with a slightly higher dose than para-aortic lymph nodes: mean 55.3 Gy versus 51.7 Gy, respectively. There was no correlation between dose delivered and change in size of lymph nodes along the short axis. All lymph nodes underwent a decrease in SUV with a complete resolution of abnormal uptake observed in 68%. Decrease in SUV was significantly greater for lymph nodes treated with ≥54 Gy compared to those treated with <54 Gy (P=.006). Median follow-up was 18.7 months. At 2 years, OS and DFS for the entire cohort were 78% and 50%, respectively. Locoregional control at 2 years was 84%. Conclusions: A biologic response, as measured by the change in SUV for metastatic lymph nodes, was observed at a dose threshold of 54 Gy. We recommend that involved lymph nodes be treated to this minimum dose.

  11. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prosthetics Urogynecologic Surgical Mesh Implants Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... What is Pelvic Organ Prolapse? Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) occurs when the tissue and muscles of the ...

  12. The Role of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma—Experience From the SEER Database

    SciTech Connect

    Stessin, Alexander M.; Sison, Cristina; Nieto, Jaime; Raifu, Muri; Li, Baoqing

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) on cause-specific survival in patients with meningeal hemangiopericytomas. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 1990-2008 was queried for cases of surgically resected central nervous system hemangiopericytoma. Patient demographics, tumor location, and extent of resection were included in the analysis as covariates. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to analyze cause-specific survival. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine which factors were associated with cause-specific survival. Results: The mean follow-up time is 7.9 years (95 months). There were 76 patients included in the analysis, of these, 38 (50%) underwent gross total resection (GTR), whereas the other half underwent subtotal resection (STR). Postoperative RT was administered to 42% (16/38) of the patients in the GTR group and 50% (19/38) in the STR group. The 1-year, 10-year, and 20-year cause-specific survival rates were 99%, 75%, and 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, postoperative RT was associated with significantly better survival (HR = 0.269, 95% CI 0.084-0.862; P=.027), in particular for patients who underwent STR (HR = 0.088, 95% CI: 0.015-0.528; P<.008). Conclusions: In the absence of large prospective trials, the current clinical decision-making of hemangiopericytoma is mostly based on retrospective data. We recommend that postoperative RT be considered after subtotal resection for patients who could tolerate it. Based on the current literature, the practical approach is to deliver limited field RT to doses of 50-60 Gy while respecting the normal tissue tolerance. Further investigations are clearly needed to determine the optimal therapeutic strategy.

  13. Incidence, Causative Mechanisms, and Anatomic Localization of Stroke in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Treated With Postoperative Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, Margriet G.A.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Schers, Henk J.; Berg, Gerrit van den; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den; Beek, André P. van

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical Center Groningen in The Netherlands was studied. Radiation therapy was administered in 236 patients. The TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) and the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification methods were used to determine causative mechanism and anatomic localization of stroke. Stroke incidences in patients treated with RT were compared with that observed after surgery alone. Risk factors for stroke incidence were studied by log–rank test, without and with stratification for other significant risk factors. In addition, the stroke incidence was compared with the incidence rate in the general Dutch population. Results: Thirteen RT patients were diagnosed with stroke, compared with 12 surgery-alone patients. The relative risk (RR) for stroke in patients treated with postoperative RT was not significantly different compared with surgery-alone patients (univariate RR 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-1.35, P=.23). Stroke risk factors were coronary or peripheral artery disease (univariate and multivariate RR 10.4, 95% CI 4.7-22.8, P<.001) and hypertension (univariate RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.8, P=.002). There was no difference in TOAST and Oxfordshire classification of stroke. In this pituitary adenoma cohort 25 strokes were observed, compared with 16.91 expected (standard incidence ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.00-1.96, P=.049). Conclusions: In pituitary adenoma patients, an increased incidence of stroke was observed compared with the general population. However, postoperative RT was not associated with an increased incidence of stroke or differences in causative mechanism or anatomic localization of stroke compared with surgery alone. The primary stroke risk

  14. Pelvic floor ultrasonography: an update.

    PubMed

    Shek, K L; Dietz, H-P

    2013-02-01

    Female pelvic floor dysfunction encompasses a number of highly prevalent clinical conditions such as female pelvic organ prolapse, urinary and fecal incontinence, and sexual dysfunction. The etiology and pathophysiology of those conditions are, however, not well understood. Recent technological advances have seen a surge in the use of imaging, both in research and clinical practice. Among the techniques available such as sonography, X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound is superior for pelvic floor imaging, especially in the form of perineal or translabial imaging. The technique is safe with no radiation, simple, cheap, easily accessible and provides high spatial and temporal resolutions. Translabial or perineal ultrasound is useful in determining residual urinary volume, detrusor wall thickness, bladder neck mobility and in assessing pelvic organ prolapse as well as levator function and anatomy. It is at least equivalent to other imaging techniques in diagnosing, such diverse conditions as urethral diverticula, rectal intussusception and avulsion of the puborectalis muscle. Ultrasound is the only imaging method capable of visualizing modern slings and mesh implants and may help selecting patients for implant surgery. Delivery-related levator injury seems to be the most important etiological factor for pelvic organ prolapse and recurrence after prolapse surgery, and it is most conveniently diagnosed by pelvic floor ultrasound. This review gives an overview of the methodology. Its main current uses in clinical assessment and research will also be discussed. PMID:23412016

  15. Need for High Radiation Dose (>=70 Gy) in Early Postoperative Irradiation After Radical Prostatectomy: A Single-Institution Analysis of 334 High-Risk, Node-Negative Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Montorsi, Francesco; Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Bolognesi, Angelo; Da Pozzo, Luigi Filippo; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Freschi, Massimo; Roscigno, Marco; Scattoni, Vincenzo; Rigatti, Patrizio; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the clinical benefit of high-dose early adjuvant radiotherapy (EART) in high-risk prostate cancer (hrCaP) patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy plus pelvic lymphadenectomy. Patients and Methods: The clinical outcome of 334 hrCaP (pT3-4 and/or positive resection margins) node-negative patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy plus pelvic lymphadenectomy before 2004 was analyzed according to the EART dose delivered to the prostatic bed, <70.2 Gy (lower dose, median 66.6 Gy, n = 153) or >=70.2 Gy (median 70.2 Gy, n = 181). Results: The two groups were comparable except for a significant difference in terms of median follow-up (10 vs. 7 years, respectively) owing to the gradual increase of EART doses over time. Nevertheless, median time to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure was almost identical, 38 and 36 months, respectively. At univariate analysis, both 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were significantly higher (83% vs. 71% [p = 0.001] and 94% vs. 88% [p = 0.005], respectively) in the HD group. Multivariate analysis confirmed EART dose >=70 Gy to be independently related to both bRFS (hazard ratio 2.5, p = 0.04) and DFS (hazard ratio 3.6, p = 0.004). Similar results were obtained after the exclusion of patients receiving any androgen deprivation. After grouping the hormone-naive patients by postoperative PSA level the statistically significant impact of high-dose EART on both 5-year bRFS and DFS was maintained only for those with undetectable values, possibly owing to micrometastatic disease outside the irradiated area in case of detectable postoperative PSA values. Conclusion: This series provides strong support for the use of EART doses >=70 Gy after radical retropubic prostatectomy in hrCaP patients with undetectable postoperative PSA levels.

  16. A female pelvic bone shape model for air/bone separation in support of synthetic CT generation for radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lianli; Cao, Yue; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Jolly, Shruti; Balter, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Separating bone from air in MR data is one of the major challenges in using MR images to derive synthetic CT. The problem is further complicated when the anatomic regions filled with air are altered across scans due to air mobility, for instance, in pelvic regions, thereby the air regions estimated using an ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence are invalid in other image series acquired for multispectral classification. This study aims to develop and investigate a female pelvic bone shape model to identify low intensity regions in MRI where air is unlikely to be present in support of synthetic CT generation without UTE imaging. CT scans of 30 patients were collected for the study, 17 of them also have corresponding MR scans. The shape model was built from the CT dataset, where the reference image was aligned to each of the training images using B-spline deformable registration. Principal component analysis was performed on B-spline coefficients for a compact model where shape variance was described by linear combination of principal modes. The model was applied to identify pelvic bone in MR images by deforming the corresponding MR data of the reference image to target MR images, where the search space of the deformation process was constrained within the subspace spanned by principal modes. The local minima in the search space were removed effectively by the shape model, thus supporting an efficient binary search for the optimal solution. We evaluated the model by its efficacy in identifying bone voxels and excluding air regions. The model was tested across the 17 patients that have corresponding MR scans using a leave-one-out cross validation. A simple model using the first leading principal mode only was found to achieve reasonable accuracy, where an averaged 87% of bone voxels were correctly identified. Finally dilation of the optimally fit bone mask by 5 mm was found to cover 96% of bone voxels while minimally impacting the overlap with air (below 0.4%).

  17. Defining the “Hostile Pelvis” for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: The Impact of Anatomic Variations in Pelvic Dimensions on Dose Delivered to Target Volumes and Organs at Risk in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Whole Pelvic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yirmibeşoğlu Erkal, Eda; Karabey, Sinan; Karabey, Ayşegül; Hayran, Mutlu; Erkal, Haldun Şükrü

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of variations in pelvic dimensions on the dose delivered to the target volumes and the organs at risk (OARs) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) to be treated with whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) in an attempt to define the hostile pelvis in terms of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: In 45 men with high-risk PCa to be treated with WPRT, the target volumes and the OARs were delineated, the dose constraints for the OARs were defined, and treatment plans were generated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0924 protocol. Six dimensions to reflect the depth, width, and height of the bony pelvis were measured, and 2 indexes were calculated from the planning computed tomographic scans. The minimum dose (D{sub min}), maximum dose (D{sub max}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}) for the target volumes and OARs and the partial volumes of each of these structures receiving a specified dose (V{sub D}) were calculated from the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The data from the DVHs were correlated with the pelvic dimensions and indexes. Results: According to an overall hostility score (OHS) calculation, 25 patients were grouped as having a hospitable pelvis and 20 as having a hostile pelvis. Regarding the OHS grouping, the DVHs for the bladder, bowel bag, left femoral head, and right femoral head differed in favor of the hospitable pelvis group, and the DVHs for the rectum differed for a range of lower doses in favor of the hospitable pelvis group. Conclusions: Pelvimetry might be used as a guide to define the challenging anatomy or the hostile pelvis in terms of treatment planning for IMRT in patients with high-risk PCa to be treated with WPRT.

  18. Combined surgery and postoperative radiation therapy for advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Mirimanoff, R.O.; Wang, C.C.; Doppke, K.P.

    1985-03-01

    The survival, pattern of failure and complications in 47 patients with Stage III and IV cancers of the glottis, supraglottis and hypopharynx treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy using a new treatment technique referred to as mini-mantle were analyzed. The absolute survival probability of the entire group was 53 and 31% at 3 and 5 years. The local control probability at 3 and 5 years was 63 and 58%, and was higher for the supraglottic/hypopharyngeal than for glottic carcinomas. Five patients developed complications requiring surgical correction, but none experienced mortality. Moderate complications were treated conservatively without lasting sequelae. This technique is a reasonable safe and efficient procedure and can be effectively employed for the management of advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas after definitive surgery.

  19. Postoperative Treatment of Primary Glioblastoma Multiforme With Radiation and Concomitant Temozolomide in Elderly Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E. Wagner, Johanna; Bischof, Marc; Welzel, Thomas; Wagner, Florian; Debus, Juergen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate efficacy and toxicity in elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with postoperative radiochemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ). Patients and Methods: Forty-three patients aged 65 years or older were treated with postoperative with radiochemotherapy using TMZ for primary GBM. Median age at primary diagnosis was 67 years; 14 patients were female, 29 were male. A complete surgical resection was performed in 12 patients, subtotal resection in 17 patients, and biopsy only in 14 patients. Radiotherapy was applied with a median dose of 60 Gy, in a median fractionation of 5 x 2 Gy/wk. Thirty-five patients received concomitant TMZ at 50 mg/m{sup 2}, and in 8 patients 75 mg/m{sup 2} of TMZ was applied. Adjuvant cycles of TMZ were prescribed in 5 patients only. Results: Median overall survival was 11 months in all patients; the actuarial overall survival rate was 48% at 1 year and 8% at 2 years. Median overall survival was 18 months after complete resection, 16 months after subtotal resection, and 6 months after biopsy only. Median progression-free survival was 4 months; the actuarial progression-free survival rate was 41% at 6 months and 18% at 12 months. Radiochemotherapy was well tolerated in most patients and could be completed without interruption in 38 of 43 patients. Four patients developed hematologic side effects greater than Common Terminology Criteria Grade 2, which led to early discontinuation of TMZ in 1 patient. Conclusions: Radiochemotherapy is safe and effective in a subgroup of elderly patients with GBM and should be considered in patients without major comorbidities.

  20. Impact of Chemotherapy on Normal Tissue Complication Probability Models of Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Patients Receiving Pelvic Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, Jose G.; Luxton, Gary; Kozak, Margaret M.; Anderson, Eric M.; Hancock, Steven L.; Kapp, Daniel S.; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine how chemotherapy agents affect radiation dose parameters that correlate with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in patients treated with pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (P-IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We assessed HT in 141 patients who received P-IMRT for anal, gynecologic, rectal, or prostate cancers, 95 of whom received concurrent chemotherapy. Patients were separated into 4 groups: mitomycin (MMC) + 5-fluorouracil (5FU, 37 of 141), platinum ± 5FU (Cis, 32 of 141), 5FU (26 of 141), and P-IMRT alone (46 of 141). The pelvic bone was contoured as a surrogate for pelvic bone marrow (PBM) and divided into subsites: ilium, lower pelvis, and lumbosacral spine (LSS). The volumes of each region receiving 5-40 Gy were calculated. The endpoint for HT was grade ≥3 (HT3+) leukopenia, neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Normal tissue complication probability was calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model. Logistic regression was used to analyze association between HT3+ and dosimetric parameters. Results: Twenty-six patients experienced HT3+: 10 of 37 (27%) MMC, 14 of 32 (44%) Cis, 2 of 26 (8%) 5FU, and 0 of 46 P-IMRT. PBM dosimetric parameters were correlated with HT3+ in the MMC group but not in the Cis group. LSS dosimetric parameters were well correlated with HT3+ in both the MMC and Cis groups. Constrained optimization (0

  1. Therapeutic effects of minimally invasive adjustable and locking compression plate for unstable pelvic fractures via posterior approach

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xu; Lv, Hong-Zhi; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Unstable pelvic fractures are clinically complex injuries. Selecting appropriate treatment remains a challenging problem for orthopedic physicians. The aim of this study is to compare the clinical effects of minimally invasive adjustable plate and locking compression plate in treatment of unstable pelvic fractures via posterior approach. Methods: From January 2009 to June 2012, fifty-six patients with unstable pelvic fractures were included. After at least 12-month follow-up, forty-four patients treated with two methods were enrolled in the study and divided into two groups: minimally invasive adjustable plate (group A) and locking compression plate (group B). Preoperative and postoperative radiography was taken to assess the fracture displacement and reduction quality. The size of incision, operation duration, blood loss, duration of X-ray exposures, Majeed postoperative functional evaluation and Lindahl postoperative reduction evaluation were analyzed. Results: The mean follow-up in group A was 27.3 months (range, 13-48 months), and that in group B was 21.8 months (range, 12-42 months). There were no iatrogenic neurovascular injuries during the operations in the two groups. In group B, malunion was observed in one patient, and infection of incision was observed in one case. The operation duration, blood loss, and size of incision of group A were significantly less than that of group B. There was no significant difference in the duration of X-ray exposures between the two groups. The Majeed functional evaluation score in group A was significantly higher than that in group B. The difference of the imaging score of the retained displacement was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Both the two methods can effectively stabilize the unstable pelvic fractures. However, the minimally invasive adjustable plate has the advantages of minimally invasive, less radiation exposure, technically safe and time saving. Minimally invasive adjustable plate is a

  2. [Postoperative warming therapy in the recovery room. A comparison of radiative and convective warmers].

    PubMed

    Weyland, W; Fritz, U; Fabian, S; Jaeger, H; Crozier, T; Kietzmann, D; Braun, U

    1994-10-01

    Hypothermia (Tcore < 36 degrees C) can be observed in 60%-80% of all admissions to the post-anaesthetic recovery unit. Effective warming devices may accelerate rewarming, improve patient comfort, and suppress shivering thermogenesis. This study was designed to compare the efficiency of warming devices in extubated postoperative patients and their effect on postoperative oxygen uptake (VO2). METHODS. Thirty-five ASA I and II patients after laparoscopic hernioplastic repair with core temperatures < 36 degrees C were randomly assigned to either postoperative nursing under a radiant heater (group R, n = 11, Aragona Thermal Ceilings CTC X, Aragona Medical AB, Täby, Sweden), a forced air system (group L, n = 12, Bair Hugger, Augustine Medical Inc., Eden Prairie, Minnesota, USA), or a normal cotton hospital blanket (group K, n = 12). Anaesthesia was conducted totally intravenously with propofol, alfentanil, and vecuronium. Mean body temperature and total body heat were calculated from urinary bladder temperature and four subcutaneous temperature measurements. The rate of thermogenesis was calculated from continuous measurement of VO2 (Datex Deltatrac Metabolic Monitor, Datex Instrumentarium Corp., Helsinki, Finland). Heat balance was derived from the increase in total body heat minus body heat production. Heart rate and noninvasive blood pressure were measured by the Cardiocap (Datex Instrumentarium Corp., Helsinki, Finland). All data were transferred to an IBM-compatible computer at 60-s intervals. Measurements were stopped when core temperature reached 37 degrees C. The rate of change was calculated for each variable for the period 15 min after the beginning of rewarming to attainment of 37 degrees C. Data are presented as median, minima, and maxima (min<==>max); the Mann-Whitney U test was used to test for significance of group differences. RESULTS. All groups were comparable for body weight, height, age, and amount of postoperative infusions. Temperatures at

  3. Pelvic Fractures in Children Results from the German Pelvic Trauma Registry: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Zwingmann, Jörn; Aghayev, Emin; Südkamp, Norbert P; Neumann, Mirjam; Bode, Gerrit; Stuby, Fabian; Schmal, Hagen

    2015-12-01

    As pelvic fractures in children and adolescents are very rare, the surgical management is not well delineated nor are the postoperative complications. The aim of this study using the prospective data from German Pelvic Trauma Registry study was to evaluate the various treatment approaches compared to adults and delineated the differences in postoperative complications after pelvic injuries.Using the prospective pelvic trauma registry established by the German Society of Traumatology and the German Section of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO), International in 1991, patients with pelvic fractures over a 12-year time frame submitted by any 1 of the 23 member level I trauma centers were reviewed.We identified a total of 13,525 patients including pelvic fractures in 13,317 adults and 208 children aged ≤14 years and compared these 2 groups. The 2 groups' Injury Severitiy Score (ISS) did not differ statistically. Lethality in the pediatric group was 6.3%, not statistically different from the adults' 4.6%. In all, 18.3% of the pediatric pelvic fractures were treated surgically as compared to 22.7% in the adult group. No child suffered any thrombosis/embolism, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), multiorgan failure (MOF), or neurologic deficit, nor was any septic MOF detected. The differences between adults and children were statistically significant in that the children suffered less frequently from thrombosis/embolism (P = 0.041) and ARDS and MOF (P = 0.006).This prospective multicenter study addressing patients with pelvic fractures reveals that the risk for a thrombosis/embolism, ARDS, and MOF is significant lower in pediatric patients than in adults. No statistical differences could be found in the ratios of operative therapy of the pelvic fractures in children compared to adults. PMID:26705223

  4. Pelvic Fractures in Children Results from the German Pelvic Trauma Registry

    PubMed Central

    Zwingmann, Jörn; Aghayev, Emin; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Neumann, Mirjam; Bode, Gerrit; Stuby, Fabian; Schmal, Hagen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As pelvic fractures in children and adolescents are very rare, the surgical management is not well delineated nor are the postoperative complications. The aim of this study using the prospective data from German Pelvic Trauma Registry study was to evaluate the various treatment approaches compared to adults and delineated the differences in postoperative complications after pelvic injuries. Using the prospective pelvic trauma registry established by the German Society of Traumatology and the German Section of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO), International in 1991, patients with pelvic fractures over a 12-year time frame submitted by any 1 of the 23 member level I trauma centers were reviewed. We identified a total of 13,525 patients including pelvic fractures in 13,317 adults and 208 children aged ≤14 years and compared these 2 groups. The 2 groups’ Injury Severitiy Score (ISS) did not differ statistically. Lethality in the pediatric group was 6.3%, not statistically different from the adults’ 4.6%. In all, 18.3% of the pediatric pelvic fractures were treated surgically as compared to 22.7% in the adult group. No child suffered any thrombosis/embolism, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), multiorgan failure (MOF), or neurologic deficit, nor was any septic MOF detected. The differences between adults and children were statistically significant in that the children suffered less frequently from thrombosis/embolism (P = 0.041) and ARDS and MOF (P = 0.006). This prospective multicenter study addressing patients with pelvic fractures reveals that the risk for a thrombosis/embolism, ARDS, and MOF is significant lower in pediatric patients than in adults. No statistical differences could be found in the ratios of operative therapy of the pelvic fractures in children compared to adults. PMID:26705223

  5. Protocol for a phase III randomised trial of image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy for late small bowel toxicity reduction after postoperative adjuvant radiation in Ca cervix

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Misra, Shagun; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N; Kannan, Sadhna; Kerkar, Rajendra; Maheshwari, Amita; Shylasree, TS; Ghosh, Jaya; Gupta, Sudeep; Thomas, Biji; Singh, Shalini; Sharma, Sanjiv; Chilikuri, Srinivas; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2012-01-01

    Introduction External beam radiation followed by vaginal brachytherapy (±chemotherapy) leads to reduction in the risk of local recurrence and improves progression-free survival in patients with adverse risk factors following Wertheim's hysterectomy albeit at the risk of late bowel toxicity. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) results in reduction in bowel doses and has potential to reduce late morbidity, however, needs to be confirmed prospectively in a randomised trial. The present randomised trial tests reduction if any in late small bowel toxicity with the use of IMRT in postoperative setting. Methods and analysis Patients more than 18 years of age who need adjuvant (chemo) radiation will be eligible. Patients with residual pelvic or para-aortic nodal disease, history of multiple abdominal surgeries or any other medical bowel condition will be excluded. The trial will randomise patients into standard radiation or IMRT. The primary aim is to compare differences in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity between the two arms. The secondary aims of the study focus on evaluating correlation of dose–volume parameters and late toxicity and quality of life. The trial is planned as a multicentre randomised study. The trial is designed to detect a 13% difference in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity with an α of 0.05 and β of 0.80. A total of 240 patients will be required to demonstrate the aforesaid difference. Ethics and dissemination The trial is approved by institutional ethics review board and will be routinely monitored as per standard guidelines. The study results will be disseminated via peer reviewed scientific journals, conference presentations and submission to regulatory authorities. Registration The trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01279135). PMID:23242243

  6. A female pelvic bone shape model for air/bone separation in support of synthetic CT generation for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lianli; Cao, Yue; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Jolly, Shruti; Balter, James M

    2016-01-01

    Separating bone from air in MR data is one of the major challenges in using MR images to derive synthetic CT. The problem is further complicated when the anatomic regions filled with air are altered across scans due to air mobility, for instance, in pelvic regions, thereby the air regions estimated using an ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence are invalid in other image series acquired for multispectral classification. This study aims to develop and investigate a female pelvic bone shape model to identify low intensity regions in MRI where air is unlikely to be present in support of synthetic CT generation without UTE imaging. CT scans of 30 patients were collected for the study, 17 of them also have corresponding MR scans. The shape model was built from the CT dataset, where the reference image was aligned to each of the training images using B-spline deformable registration. Principal component analysis was performed on B-spline coefficients for a compact model where shape variance was described by linear combination of principal modes. The model was applied to identify pelvic bone in MR images by deforming the corresponding MR data of the reference image to target MR images, where the search space of the deformation process was constrained within the subspace spanned by principal modes. The local minima in the search space were removed effectively by the shape model, thus supporting an efficient binary search for the optimal solution. We evaluated the model by its efficacy in identifying bone voxels and excluding air regions. The model was tested across the 17 patients that have corresponding MR scans using a leave-one-out cross validation. A simple model using the first leading principal mode only was found to achieve reasonable accuracy, where an averaged 87% of bone voxels were correctly identified. Finally dilation of the optimally fit bone mask by 5 mm was found to cover 96% of bone voxels while minimally impacting the overlap with air (below 0.4%). PMID

  7. Squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil managed by conventional surgery and postoperative radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, Rahmatullah; Dogan, Snjezana; Pyke, Owen; Palmer, Frank; Awad, Mahmoud; Lee, Nancy; Kraus, Dennis H.; Shah, Jatin P.; Patel, Snehal G.; Ganly, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to report the long-term outcome of patients with squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the tonsil managed by surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy (PORT). Methods Eighty-eight patients treated between 1985 and 2005 were analyzed. Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were determined by the Kaplan–Meier method. Factors predictive of outcome were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results Forty-eight percent of patients had T3 to T4 disease and 75% had a positive neck. Five-year OS, DSS, and RFS were 66%, 82%, and 80%, respectively. The status of the neck was not predictive of outcome (DSS 80% for N0 vs 82% for N+; p = .97). Lymphovascular invasion was an independent predictor of OS, DSS, and RFS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion Lymphovascular invasion but not pathological stage of the neck is an independent predictor of outcome in patients with tonsillar SCC. PMID:24616252

  8. The “Pelvic Harness”: a skeletonized mesh implant for safe pelvic floor reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Natalia, Sumerova; Menahem, Neuman; Haim, Krissi; Dmitri, Pushkar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the feasibility, safety and surgical results of skeletonized mesh implants to form a pelvic harness for pelvic floor reconstruction surgery. Study design Patients with advanced pelvic floor prolapse were enrolled to this study. Study model was a kit mesh, reduced to 75% of the original surface area by cutting out mesh material from the central mesh body. Patients were evaluated at the end of the 1st and 6th post-operative months and interviewed at the study conclusion. Results Ninety-five women with advanced pelvic floor prolapse had this implant. Mean follow-up duration was 9 months (6-12 months). The POP-Q point’s measurements showed marked and statistically significant improvements. Bladder over-activity symptoms, fecal incontinence, pelvic pain and constipation rates were all reduced as well. No adverse effects related to the dissection or mesh implantation were marked. The first and sixth post-operative month follow-up records as well as the study conclusion interview findings were satisfactory in terms of subjective and objective cure and adverse effects occurrence. Conclusion This study data proposes that skeletonizing meshes might be safely and successfully implanted for potentially improved pelvic floor reconstruction. PMID:27286114

  9. [Imaging of acute pelvic pain in women].

    PubMed

    Genevois, A; Marouteau, N; Lemercier, E; Dacher, J N; Thiebot, J

    2008-01-01

    Acute pelvic pain in women is a routine situation in any emergency unit. The radiologist should know how to explore the patient with regards to the history and clinical findings. Ultrasonography is the primary and sometimes the only necessary imaging tool in the assessment of acute pelvic pain in women. MRI is the preferred technique in pregnant or young women. CT is more valuable for assessing nongynecologic disorders or post-partum and post-operative infections. This article reviews the contribution of each imaging technique in this clinical situation. Emphasis is put on the importance of age and clinical findings in the diagnostic strategy. PMID:18288036

  10. Optimizing postoperative sexual function after radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tutolo, Manuela; Briganti, Alberto; Suardi, Nazareno; Gallina, Andrea; Abdollah, Firas; Capitanio, Umberto; Bianchi, Marco; Passoni, Niccolò; Nini, Alessandro; Fossati, Nicola; Rigatti, Patrizio

    2012-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the complications associated with pelvic surgery. The significance of ED as a complication following pelvic surgery, especially radical prostatectomy (RP), lies in the negative impact that it has on patients’ sexual and overall life. In the literature, rates of ED following RP range from 25% to 100%. Such variety is associated with pelvic dissection and conservation of neurovascular structures. Another important factor impacting on postoperative ED is the preoperative erectile function of the patient. Advances in the knowledge of pelvic anatomy and pathological mechanisms led to a refinement of pelvic surgical techniques, with attention to the main structures that if damaged compromise erectile function. These improvements resulted in lower postoperative ED rates and better erectile recovery, especially in patients undergoing RP. Furthermore, surgery alone is not sufficient to prevent this complication, and thus, several medical strategies have been tested with the aim of maximizing erectile function recovery. Indeed it seems that prevention of postoperative ED must be addressed by a multimodal approach. The aim of this review is to give a picture of recent knowledge, novel techniques and therapeutic approaches in order to reach the best combination of treatments to reduce the rate of ED after pelvic surgery. PMID:23205061

  11. Postoperative Stereotactic Radiosurgery Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: Potential Role of Preoperative Tumor Size

    SciTech Connect

    Hartford, Alan C.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Spire, William J.; Li, Zhongze; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Fadul, Camilo E.; Erkmen, Kadir; Friedman, Jonathan; Gladstone, David J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Roberts, David W.; Simmons, Nathan E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy following resection of a brain metastasis increases the probability of disease control at the surgical site. We analyzed our experience with postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), with an emphasis on identifying factors that might predict intracranial disease control and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed all patients through December 2008, who, after surgical resection, underwent SRS to the tumor bed, deferring WBRT. Multiple factors were analyzed for time to intracranial recurrence (ICR), whether local recurrence (LR) at the surgical bed or “distant” recurrence (DR) in the brain, for time to WBRT, and for OS. Results: A total of 49 lesions in 47 patients were treated with postoperative SRS. With median follow-up of 9.3 months (range, 1.1-61.4 months), local control rates at the resection cavity were 85.5% at 1 year and 66.9% at 2 years. OS rates at 1 and 2 years were 52.5% and 31.7%, respectively. On univariate analysis (preoperative) tumors larger than 3.0 cm exhibited a significantly shorter time to LR. At a cutoff of 2.0 cm, larger tumors resulted in significantly shorter times not only for LR but also for DR, ICR, and salvage WBRT. While multivariate Cox regressions showed preoperative size to be significant for times to DR, ICR, and WBRT, in similar multivariate analysis for OS, only the graded prognostic assessment proved to be significant. However, the number of intracranial metastases at presentation was not significantly associated with OS nor with other outcome variables. Conclusions: Larger tumor size was associated with shorter time to recurrence and with shorter time to salvage WBRT; however, larger tumors were not associated with decrements in OS, suggesting successful salvage. SRS to the tumor bed without WBRT is an effective treatment for resected brain metastases, achieving local control particularly for tumors up to

  12. Feasibility Study of Radiation Dose Reduction in Adult Female Pelvic CT Scan with Low Tube-Voltage and Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinlian; Chen, Jianghong; Hu, Zhihai; Zhao, Liqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate image quality of female pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans reconstructed with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) technique combined with low tube-voltage and to explore the feasibility of its clinical application. Materials and Methods Ninety-four patients were divided into two groups. The study group used 100 kVp, and images were reconstructed with 30%, 50%, 70%, and 90% ASIR. The control group used 120 kVp, and images were reconstructed with 30% ASIR. The noise index was 15 for the study group and 11 for the control group. The CT values and noise levels of different tissues were measured. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) was calculated. A subjective evaluation was carried out by two experienced radiologists. The CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) was recorded. Results A 44.7% reduction in CTDIvol was observed in the study group (8.18 ± 3.58 mGy) compared with that in the control group (14.78 ± 6.15 mGy). No significant differences were observed in the tissue noise levels and CNR values between the 70% ASIR group and the control group (p = 0.068-1.000). The subjective scores indicated that visibility of small structures, diagnostic confidence, and the overall image quality score in the 70% ASIR group was the best, and were similar to those in the control group (1.87 vs. 1.79, 1.26 vs. 1.28, and 4.53 vs. 4.57; p = 0.122-0.585). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was detected between the study group and the control group (42/47 vs. 43/47, p = 1.000). Conclusion Low tube-voltage combined with automatic tube current modulation and 70% ASIR allowed the low CT radiation dose to be reduced by 44.7% without losing image quality on female pelvic scan. PMID:26357499

  13. PELVIC ACTINOMYCOSIS MIMICKING A LOCALLY ADVANCED PELVIC MALIGNANCY--CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Velenciuc, Natalia; Velenciuc, I; Makkai Popa, S; Roată, C; Ferariu, D; Luncă, S

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a former user of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) for 10 years, diagnosed with a bulky, fixed pelvic tumor involving the internal genital organs and the recto sigmoid, causing luminal narrowing of the rectum, interpreted as locally advanced pelvic malignancy, probably of genital origin. Intraoperatively, a high index of suspicion made us collect a sample from the fibrous wall of the tumor mass, large Actinomyces colonies were thus identified. Surgery consisted in debridement, removal of a small amount of pus and appendectomy, thus avoiding a mutilating and useless surgery. Specific antibiotic therapy was administered for 3 months, with favorable postoperative and long-term outcomes. Pelvic actinomycosis should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of pelvic tumors in women using an IUD. The association of long-term antibiotic treatment is essential to eradicate the infection and prevent relapses. PMID:27483724

  14. Results of curative surgery and postoperative chemoradiation for rectal adenocarcinoma in British Columbia, 1985 to 1994

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Roy; Phang, P. Terry

    2001-01-01

    Objective To assess factors affecting survival and pelvic recurrence after surgery and postoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer in order to design improved management strategies. Design A chart review. Setting The British Columbia Cancer Agency. Patients One hundred and ninety-one consecutive patients who had rectal cancer treated between 1985 and 1994. Median follow-up was 39 months. Interventions Surgical excision of the cancer with intent to cure followed by chemoradiation. Outcome measures Multivariate analysis, to determine whether survival and pelvic recurrence were affected by tumour stage, nodal status, type of surgical procedure and presence of residual disease, and the quality of pathology reporting with respect to evaluation of radial resection margins and number of lymph nodes examined. Results Overall 5-year disease-specific survival was 60% and pelvic recurrence was 25%. Survival was affected by tumour stage (p < 0.02), nodal status (p < 0.001), type of surgical procedure (p < 0.04), presence of residual disease (p < 0.02) and pelvic recurrence (p < 0.0001). Pelvic recurrence was affected by the presence of residual disease (p < 0.001) but not by tumour stage (p < 0.14), nodal status (p < 0.37) or type of surgcial procedure (p < 0.20). Radial margins were evaluated in 44% of pathology reports and the median number of lymph nodes assessed was 6. Conclusions Survival was most significantly affected by pelvic recurrence. Strategies to minimize pelvic recurrence including pre-operative radiation and the principle of careful mesorectal excision to maximize the achievement of negative radial resection margins and negative residual disease are recommended. Also needed are standards for evaluating radial margins and lymph nodes to improved pathology reports. PMID:11603752

  15. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and layers of connective tissue, which are called fascia, become weakened, stretched, or are torn the pelvic ... delivery) can cause injury to the muscles or fascia of the pelvic floor. The increased pressure of ...

  16. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)

    MedlinePlus

    ... see what else may be causing your symptoms. Appendicitis or pockets of infection around your tubes and ... pelvic organs. This can lead to: Chronic pelvic pain Ectopic pregnancy Infertility Tuboovarian abscess If you have ...

  17. Pelvic laparoscopy - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hysterectomy Ovarian Cysts Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Pelvic Pain Uterine Fibroids A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  18. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... found. How is chronic pelvic pain diagnosed? Your health care provider will ask about your medical history. You will have a physical exam, including a pelvic exam . Tests also may be done to find the cause. ...

  19. A Dosimetric Comparison of Tomotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquier, David; Cavillon, Fabrice; Lacornerie, Thomas; Touzeau, Claire; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. Results: For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 43.9 {+-} 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 49.1 {+-} 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 {+-} 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 {+-} 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 {+-} 0.1 vs 7.4 {+-} 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 {+-} 0.05 vs 3.7 {+-} 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. Conclusion: VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time.

  20. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck treated by surgery with or without postoperative radiation therapy: Prognostic features of recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Bucci, M. Kara . E-mail: mkbucci@mdanderson.org; Weinberg, Vivian; Garcia, Joaquin; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Schechter, Naomi R.; Phillips, Theodore L.; Fu, Karen K.; Eisele, David W.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: This study sought to review a single-institution experience with the management of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 140 patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with definitive surgery. Ninety patients (64%) received postoperative radiation to a median dose of 64 Gy (range, 54-71 Gy). Distribution of T stage was: 26% T1, 28% T2, 20% T3, and 26% T4. Seventy-eight patients (56%) had microscopically positive margins. Median follow-up was 66 months (range, 7-267 months). Results: The 5- and 10-year rate estimates of local control were 88% and 77%, respectively. A Cox proportional hazards model identified T4 disease (p = 0.0001), perineural invasion (p = 0.008), omission of postoperative radiation (p = 0.007), and major nerve involvement (p = 0.02) as independent predictors of local recurrence. Radiation dose lower than 60 Gy (p = 0.0004), T4 disease (p 0.005), and major nerve involvement (p = 0.02) were predictors of local recurrence among those treated with surgery and postoperative radiation. The 10-year overall survival and distant metastasis-free survival were 64% and 66%, respectively. Conclusion: Combined-modality therapy with surgery followed by radiation to doses in excess of 60 Gy should be considered the standard of care for adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck.

  1. Intracranial meningiomas: Prognostic factors and treatment outcome in patients undergoing postoperative radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anvari, Kazem; Hosseini, Sare; Rahighi, Saeid; Toussi, Mehdi Seilanian; Roshani, Nasrin; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meningioma constitutes 20% of the intracranial neoplasms. Followed by surgery as the primary treatment for most patients, radiotherapy becomes indicated in high-grade tumors with incomplete surgical removal. We evaluated the prognostic factors and overall outcome in meningioma patients who underwent radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective analysis, data from all patients with documented diagnosis of meningioma who referred to the Omid and Ghaem Oncology Centers (Mashhad, Iran) from 2002 to 2013 were included. We calculated the overall survival rates using the Kaplan–Meier method and compared the survival curves between groups by the log-rank test. Results: Eighty-three patients with a median age of 50 years (ranging: 16–84) were included. Grade I, II, and III meningiomas were seen in 40 (48%), 31 (37%), and 12 (15%) patients, respectively. Radiation therapy was indicated due to tumor recurrence, incomplete excision, or tumor grade in 32, 8, and 43 patients, respectively. Tumor grade had a significant effect on the overall survival with a 3-year overall survival of 76.7%, 43.5%, and 13.3% in Grade I, II, and III, respectively (P < 0.001). Gender, age, and tumor location were not correlated with the overall survival. Moreover, patients with Grade II and III who underwent total resection had a significantly higher overall survival than those with subtotal resection or biopsy alone (5-year survival rates of 82% vs. 17.1%, respectively; P = 0.008). Conclusion: Tumor grade was the most important prognostic factor in meningioma patients undergoing radiation therapy. In patients with Grade II and III tumors, the extent of surgical resection is significantly correlated with the overall survival. PMID:27274498

  2. Pelvic Organ Prolapse-Associated Cystitis.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Rizwan; Losco, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary tract infection (UTI) are important problems, estimated to affect around 14 and 40 % of women, respectively, at some point in their lives. Positive urine culture in the presence of symptoms is the cornerstone of diagnosis of UTI and should be performed along with ultrasound assessment of postvoid residual (PVR) in all women presenting with POP and UTI. PVR over 30 mL is an independent risk factor for UTI, although no specific association with POP and UTI has been demonstrated. The use of prophylactic antibiotics remains controversial. The major risk factors for postoperative UTI are postoperative catheterisation, prolonged catheterisation, previous recurrent UTI and an increased urethro-anal distance-suggesting that global pelvic floor dysfunction may play a role. PMID:25170365

  3. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Guidelines for the Delineation of the Clinical Target Volume in the Postoperative Treatment of Pancreatic Head Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Karyn A.; Regine, William F.; Dawson, Laura A.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Haustermans, Karin; Bosch, Walter R.; Turian, Julius; Abrams, Ross A.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines to be used in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0848, a Phase III randomized trial evaluating the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiation in patients with resected head of pancreas cancer. Methods and Materials: A consensus committee of six radiation oncologists with expertise in gastrointestinal radiotherapy developed stepwise contouring guidelines and an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV) in the postoperative treatment of pancreas cancer, based on identifiable regions of interest and margin expansions. Areas at risk for subclinical disease to be included in the CTV were defined, including nodal regions, anastomoses, and the preoperative primary tumor location. Regions of interest that could be reproducibly contoured on postoperative imaging after a pancreaticoduodenectomy were identified. Standardized expansion margins to encompass areas at risk were developed after multiple iterations to determine the optimal margin expansions. Results: New contouring recommendations based on CT anatomy were established. Written guidelines for the delineation of the postoperative CTV and normal tissues, as well as a Web-based atlas, were developed. Conclusions: The postoperative abdomen has been a difficult area for effective radiotherapy. These new guidelines will help physicians create fields that better encompass areas at risk and minimize dose to normal tissues.

  4. Genomic Prostate Cancer Classifier Predicts Biochemical Failure and Metastases in Patients After Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Den, Robert B.; Feng, Felix Y.; Showalter, Timothy N.; Mishra, Mark V.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Gomella, Leonard G.; Kelly, W. Kevin; Birbe, Ruth C.; McCue, Peter A.; Ghadessi, Mercedeh; Yousefi, Kasra; Davicioni, Elai; Knudsen, Karen E.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that a genomic classifier (GC) would predict biochemical failure (BF) and distant metastasis (DM) in men receiving radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: Among patients who underwent post-RP RT, 139 were identified for pT3 or positive margin, who did not receive neoadjuvant hormones and had paraffin-embedded specimens. Ribonucleic acid was extracted from the highest Gleason grade focus and applied to a high-density-oligonucleotide microarray. Receiver operating characteristic, calibration, cumulative incidence, and Cox regression analyses were performed to assess GC performance for predicting BF and DM after post-RP RT in comparison with clinical nomograms. Results: The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the Stephenson model was 0.70 for both BF and DM, with addition of GC significantly improving area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to 0.78 and 0.80, respectively. Stratified by GC risk groups, 8-year cumulative incidence was 21%, 48%, and 81% for BF (P<.0001) and for DM was 0, 12%, and 17% (P=.032) for low, intermediate, and high GC, respectively. In multivariable analysis, patients with high GC had a hazard ratio of 8.1 and 14.3 for BF and DM. In patients with intermediate or high GC, those irradiated with undetectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA ≤0.2 ng/mL) had median BF survival of >8 years, compared with <4 years for patients with detectable PSA (>0.2 ng/mL) before initiation of RT. At 8 years, the DM cumulative incidence for patients with high GC and RT with undetectable PSA was 3%, compared with 23% with detectable PSA (P=.03). No outcome differences were observed for low GC between the treatment groups. Conclusion: The GC predicted BF and metastasis after post-RP irradiation. Patients with lower GC risk may benefit from delayed RT, as opposed to those with higher GC; however, this needs prospective validation. Genomic-based models

  5. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  6. Evaluation of acute pelvic pain in women.

    PubMed

    Kruszka, Paul S; Kruszka, Stephen J

    2010-07-15

    Diagnosis of pelvic pain in women can be challenging because many symptoms and signs are insensitive and nonspecific. As the first priority, urgent life-threatening conditions (e.g., ectopic pregnancy, appendicitis, ruptured ovarian cyst) and fertility-threatening conditions (e.g., pelvic inflammatory disease, ovarian torsion) must be considered. A careful history focusing on pain characteristics, review of systems, and gynecologic, sexual, and social history, in addition to physical examination helps narrow the differential diagnosis. The most common urgent causes of pelvic pain are pelvic inflammatory disease, ruptured ovarian cyst, and appendicitis; however, many other diagnoses in the differential may mimic these conditions, and imaging is often needed. Transvaginal ultrasonography should be the initial imaging test because of its sensitivities across most etiologies and its lack of radiation exposure. A high index of suspicion should be maintained for pelvic inflammatory disease when other etiologies are ruled out, because the presentation is variable and the prevalence is high. Multiple studies have shown that 20 to 50 percent of women presenting with pelvic pain have pelvic inflammatory disease. Adolescents and pregnant and postpartum women require unique considerations. PMID:20642266

  7. Pelvic Nodal Dosing With Registration to the Prostate: Implications for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kishan, Amar U. Lamb, James M.; Jani, Shyam S.; Kang, Jung J.; Steinberg, Michael L.; King, Christopher R.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether image guidance with rigid registration (RR) to intraprostatic markers (IPMs) yields acceptable coverage of the pelvic lymph nodes in the context of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) regimen. Methods and Materials: Four to seven kilovoltage cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) from 12 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were analyzed, allowing approximation of an SBRT regimen. The nodal clinical target volume (CTV{sub N}) and bladder were contoured on all kilovoltage CBCTs. The V{sub 100} CTV{sub N}, expressed as a ratio to the same parameter on the initial plan, and the magnitude of translational shift between RR to the IPMs versus RR to the pelvic bones, were computed. The ability of a multimodality bladder filling protocol to minimize bladder height variation was assessed in a separate cohort of 4 patients. Results: Sixty-five CBCTs were assessed. The average V{sub 100} CTV{sub N} was 92.6%, but for a subset of 3 patients the average was 80.0%, compared with 97.8% for the others (P<.0001). The average overall and superior–inferior axis magnitudes of the bony-to-fiducial translations were significantly larger in the subgroup with suboptimal nodal coverage (8.1 vs 3.9 mm and 5.8 vs 2.4 mm, respectively; P<.0001). Relative bladder height changes were also significantly larger in the subgroup with suboptimal nodal coverage (42.9% vs 18.5%; P<.05). Use of a multimodality bladder-filling protocol minimized bladder height variation (P<.001). Conclusion: A majority of patients had acceptable nodal coverage after RR to IPMs, even when approximating SBRT. However, a subset of patients had suboptimal nodal coverage. These patients had large bony-to-fiducial translations and large variations in bladder height. Nodal coverage should be excellent if the superior–inferior axis bony-to-fiducial translation and the relative bladder height change (both easily measured on CBCT) are kept to a minimum. Implementation of a strict bladder filling

  8. Outcomes of laparoscopic removal of the Essure sterilization device for pelvic pain: a case series.

    PubMed

    Casey, James; Aguirre, Francisco; Yunker, Amanda

    2016-08-01

    The following presents a case series of 29 referral patients who underwent laparoscopic Essure removal for the indication of suspected Essure-related pelvic pain and to describe patient characteristics, intraoperative findings and postoperative pain outcomes. Laparoscopic removal for Essure-associated pelvic pain is a safe and effective treatment. PMID:27063056

  9. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are a series of exercises designed to strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor. ... Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are recommended for: Women ... Men with urinary stress incontinence after prostate surgery ...

  10. Long-Term Follow-Up of Preoperative Pelvic Radiation Therapy and Concomitant Boost Irradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Multi-Institutional Phase II Study (KROG 04-01)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Nam, Taek-Keun; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Lee, Doo Seok; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Chang, Hee Jin; Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Jang, Hong Seok

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To perform a prospective phase II study to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative pelvic radiation therapy and concomitant small-field boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, mid-to-lower rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled. They had received preoperative chemoradiation therapy and total mesorectal excision. Pelvic radiation therapy of 43.2 Gy in 24 fractions plus concomitant boost radiation therapy of 7.2 Gy in 12 fractions was delivered to the pelvis and tumor bed for 5 weeks. Two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin were administered for 3 days in the first and fifth week of radiation therapy. The pathologic response, survival outcome, and treatment toxicity were evaluated for the study endpoints. Results: Of 69 patients, 8 (11.6%) had a pathologically complete response. Downstaging rates were 40.5% for T classification and 68.1% for N classification. At the median follow-up of 69 months, 36 patients have been followed up for more than 5 years. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival rates were 66.0% and 75.3%, respectively. Higher pathologic T (P = .045) and N (P = .032) classification were significant adverse prognostic factors for DFS, and high-grade histology was an adverse prognostic factor for both DFS (P = .025) and overall survival (P = .031) on the multivariate analysis. Fifteen patients (21.7%) experienced grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity, and 7 patients (10.1%) had long-term toxicity. Conclusion: Preoperative pelvic radiation therapy with concomitant boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks showed acceptable acute and long-term toxicities. However, the benefit of concomitant small-field boost irradiation for 5 weeks in rectal cancer patients was not demonstrated beyond conventional irradiation for 6 weeks in terms of tumor response and

  11. Early Clinical Outcomes and Toxicity of Intensity Modulated Versus Conventional Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervix Carcinoma: A Prospective Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Sharma, Daya Nand; Rath, Goura Kisor; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Subramani, Vellaiyan; Sharma, Seema; Manigandan, Durai; Laviraj, M.A.; Kumar, Sunesh; Thulkar, Sanjay

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) treated with whole pelvic conventional radiation therapy (WP-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (WP-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2010 and January 2012, 44 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO 2009) stage IIB-IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were randomized to receive 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions delivered via either WP-CRT or WP-IMRT with concurrent weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, and late toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. The primary and secondary endpoints were acute gastrointestinal toxicity and disease-free survival, respectively. Results: Of 44 patients, 22 patients received WP-CRT and 22 received WP-IMRT. In the WP-CRT arm, 13 patients had stage IIB disease and 9 had stage IIIB disease; in the IMRT arm, 12 patients had stage IIB disease and 10 had stage IIIB disease. The median follow-up time in the WP-CRT arm was 21.7 months (range, 10.7-37.4 months), and in the WP-IMRT arm it was 21.6 months (range, 7.7-34.4 months). At 27 months, disease-free survival was 79.4% in the WP-CRT group versus 60% in the WP-IMRT group (P=.651), and overall survival was 76% in the WP-CRT group versus 85.7% in the WP-IMRT group (P=.645). Patients in the WP-IMRT arm experienced significantly fewer grade ≥2 acute gastrointestinal toxicities (31.8% vs 63.6%, P=.034) and grade ≥3 gastrointestinal toxicities (4.5% vs 27.3%, P=.047) than did patients receiving WP-CRT and had less chronic gastrointestinal toxicity (13.6% vs 50%, P=.011). Conclusion: WP-IMRT is associated with significantly less toxicity compared with WP-CRT and has a comparable clinical outcome. Further studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up times are warranted to justify

  12. Physical activity and the pelvic floor.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Ingrid E; Shaw, Janet M

    2016-02-01

    women. However, future research is needed to fill the many gaps in our knowledge. Prospective studies are needed in all populations, including potentially vulnerable women, such as those with high genetic risk, levator ani muscle injury, or asymptomatic pelvic organ prolapse, and on women during potentially vulnerable life periods, such as the early postpartum or postoperative periods. PMID:26348380

  13. Pelvic Congestion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Janette D.; Machan, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Patients with pelvic congestion syndrome present with otherwise unexplained chronic pelvic pain that has been present for greater than 6 months, and anatomic findings that include pelvic venous insufficiency and pelvic varicosities. It remains an underdiagnosed explanation for pelvic pain in young, premenopausal, usually multiparous females. Symptoms include noncyclical, positional lower back, pelvic and upper thigh pain, dyspareunia, and prolonged postcoital discomfort. Symptoms worsen throughout the day and are exacerbated by activity or prolonged standing. Examination may reveal ovarian tenderness and unusual varicosities—vulvoperineal, posterior thigh, and gluteal. Diagnosis is suspected by clinical history and imaging that demonstrates pelvic varicosities. Venography is usually necessary to confirm ovarian vein reflux, although transvaginal ultrasound may be useful in documenting this finding. Endovascular therapy has been validated by several large patient series with long-term follow-up using standardized pain assessment surveys. Embolization has been shown to be significantly more effective than surgical therapy in improving symptoms in patients who fail hormonal therapy. Although there has been variation in approaches between investigators, the goal is elimination of ovarian vein reflux with or without direct sclerosis of enlarged pelvic varicosities. Symptom reduction is seen in 70 to 90% of the treated females despite technical variation. PMID:24436564

  14. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for colorectal carcinoma above the peritoneal reflection. II. Antimesenteric wall ascending and descending colon and cecum

    SciTech Connect

    Kopelson, G.

    1983-08-15

    From 1970 to 1981, 50 patients had curative surgery for carcinoma of the cecum, ascending, or descending colon and were Stage greater than or equal to B2. In 15 cases, the lesion originated on the antimesenteric (posterolateral) bowel wall. Of seven cases (with minimum three-year follow-up) not receiving adjuvant postoperative regional irradiation, four recurred in the tumor bed/abdominal wall versus 0/3 irradiated patients. Similarly, the five-year survival was improved in the irradiated group (2/3) versus only 2/9 in the unirradiated group. Patients with transmural extension of right or left colon cancers originating on the anti mesenteric (posterolateral) bowel wall may have a high incidence of postoperative regional failure which may be decreased by adjuvant postoperative regional irradiation.

  15. POSTOPERATIVE DELIRIUM

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Elizabeth L.; Vannucci, Andrea; Avidan, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Delirium is an unfortunately common complication seen during the postoperative course. Because of its significant association with physical and cognitive morbidity, clinicians should be aware of evidence-based practices relating to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of postoperative delirium. Here, we review selected recent literature pertaining to the epidemiology and impact of the condition, perioperative risk factors for its development and/or exacerbation, and strategies for management of delirium, with additional attention to the intensive care unit population. PMID:21483389

  16. Hematologic Toxicity in RTOG 0418: A Phase 2 Study of Postoperative IMRT for Gynecologic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Klopp, Ann H.; Moughan, Jennifer; Portelance, Lorraine; Miller, Brigitte E.; Salehpour, Mohammad R.; Hildebrandt, Evangeline; Nuanjing, Jenny; D'Souza, David; Souhami, Luis; Small, William; Gaur, Rakesh; Jhingran, Anuja

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), compared with conventional 4-field treatment, can reduce the volume of bone marrow irradiated. Pelvic bone marrow sparing has produced a clinically significant reduction in hematologic toxicity (HT). This analysis investigated HT in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0418, a prospective study to test the feasibility of delivering postoperative IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer in a multiinstitutional setting. Methods and Materials: Patients in the RTOG 0418 study were treated with postoperative IMRT to 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics and vagina. Endometrial cancer patients received IMRT alone, whereas patients with cervical cancer received IMRT and weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}). Pelvic bone marrow was defined within the treatment field by using a computed tomography density-based autocontouring algorithm. The volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow were correlated with HT, graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Results: Eighty-three patients were eligible for analysis (43 with endometrial cancer and 40 with cervical cancer). Patients with cervical cancer treated with weekly cisplatin and pelvic IMRT had grades 1-5 HT (23%, 33%, 25%, 0%, and 0% of patients, respectively). Among patients with cervical cancer, 83% received 5 or more cycles of cisplatin, and 90% received at least 4 cycles of cisplatin. The median percentage volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy in all 83 patients, respectively, was 96%, 84%, 61%, and 37%. Among cervical cancer patients with a V40 >37%, 75% had grade 2 or higher HT compared with 40% of patients with a V40 less than or equal to 37% (P =.025). Cervical cancer patients with a median bone marrow dose of >34.2 Gy also had higher rates of grade ≥2 HT than did those with a dose of ≤34.2 Gy (74% vs 43%, P=.049). Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT with weekly cisplatin is

  17. Changing aspects of radiation enteropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Morgenstern, L.; Hart, M.; Lugo, D.; Friedman, N.B.

    1985-11-01

    Fifty-two patients with radiation enteropathy secondary to radiation for abdominal or pelvic malignant neoplasms are described. This series (1977 to 1984) is compared with a series of 50 patients from the same institution over an earlier period (1961 to 1977). Intestinal obstruction was the principal complication in both series; 96% of the patients underwent either intestinal resection or anastomotic bypass of the affected segment. Changes that have occurred since the last report are as follows: changes in source of radiation energy (linear accelerator); less evidence of mucosal damage; increased serosal reaction (''serosal peel''); and increased use of elemental diets, parenteral nutrition, and long intestinal tubes in surgical management. Since postoperative radiation injury occurs most frequently in the pelvis, new developments for the exclusion of small bowel from the pelvis during radiation are reviewed. Changes in fractionation of radiation dosage should also be considered in patients with enteric symptoms during radiation therapy.

  18. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection and inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, and other female reproductive organs. It causes scarring ... United States. Gonorrhea and chlamydia, two sexually transmitted diseases, are the most common causes of PID. Other ...

  19. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. PMID:25108498

  20. Evidence-based recommendations of postoperative radiotherapy in lung cancer from Oncologic Group for the Study of Lung Cancer (Spanish Radiation Oncology Society).

    PubMed

    Gómez, A; González, J A; Couñago, F; Vallejo, C; Casas, F; de Dios, N Rodríguez

    2016-04-01

    Locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a diversified illness in which postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) for complete resection with positive hiliar (pN1) and/or mediastinal (pN2) lymph nodes is controversial. Although several studies have shown that PORT has beneficial effects, randomized trials are needed to demonstrate its impact on overall survival. In this review, the Spanish Radiation Oncology Group for Lung Cancer describes the most relevant literature on PORT in NSCLC patients stage pN1-2. In addition, we have outlined the current recommendations of different national and international clinical guidelines and have also specified practical issues regarding treatment volume definition, doses and fractionation. PMID:26280402

  1. The association of pelvic organ prolapse severity and improvement in overactive bladder symptoms after surgery for pelvic organ prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Sun; Lee, Gee Hoon; Na, Eun Duc; Jang, Ji Hyon

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) repair on overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in women with POP and the effect of baseline POP severity on improvement in OAB after surgical repair of POP. And we also tried to identify any preoperative factors for persistent postoperative OAB symptoms. Methods A total of 87 patients with coexisting POP and OAB who underwent surgical correction of POP were included and retrospectively analyzed and postoperative data was obtained by telephone interview. OAB was defined as an affirmative response to item no. 15 (urinary frequency) and item no. 16 (urge incontinence) of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory. POP severity was dichotomized by Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification stage 1 to 2 (n=22) versus stage 3 to 4 (n=65). Results OAB symptoms were significantly improved after surgical treatment (P<0.001). But there was no significant differences in postoperative improvement of frequency and urge incontinence between stage 1 to 2 group versus stage 3 to 4 group. Preoperative demographic factors (age, parity, and POP stage) were not significantly related to persistent postoperative OAB symptoms. Conclusion Women with coexisting POP and OAB who undergo surgical repair experience significant improvement in OAB symptoms after surgery, but severity of POP had no significant difference in improvement of OAB symptoms. Postoperative persistent OAB symptoms were not related to age, parity, body mass index, and POP stage. PMID:27200312

  2. Predictors of Grade 3 or Higher Late Bowel Toxicity in Patients Undergoing Pelvic Radiation for Cervical Cancer: Results From a Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, Supriya; Dora, Tapas; Chinnachamy, Anand N.; Thomas, Biji; Kannan, Sadhna; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N.; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The present study investigates relationship between dose–volume parameters and severe bowel toxicity after postoperative radiation treatment (PORT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2010 to December 2012, a total of 71 patients undergoing PORT were included. Small bowel (SB) and large bowel (LB) loops were contoured 2 cm above the target volume. The volume of SB and LB that received 15 Gy, 30 Gy, and 40 Gy was calculated (V15 SB, V15 LB, V30 SB, V30 LB, V40 SB, V 40 LB). On follow-up, bowel toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. A reciever operating characteristic (ROC) curve identified volume thresholds that predicted for grade 3 or higher toxicity with highest specificity. All data was dichotomized across these identified cut-off values. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed using SPSS, version 15. Results: The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-65 years). Of the 71 patients, 46 received image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy, and 25 received conformal radiation (50 Gy in 25 fractions for 5 weeks). Overall, 63 of 71 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. On a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 8-29 months), grade 2 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 22 of 71 patients (30.9%) and grade 3 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 9 patients (12.6%). On univariate analysis, V15 SB <275 cc (P=.01), V30 SB <190 cc (P=.02), V40 SB <150 cc (P=.01), and V15 LB <250 cc (P=.03), and V40 LB <90 cc (P=.04) predicted for absence of grade 3 or higher toxicity. No other patient- or treatment-related factors were statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, only V15 SB (P=.002) and V15 LB (P=.03) were statistically significant. Conclusions: V 15 Gy SB and LB are independent predictors of late grade 3 or higher toxicity. Restricting V15 SB and V15 LB to <275 cc and <250 cc can reduce grade 3 or higher toxicity to less than 5%.

  3. The Surgical Treatment of Pelvic Bone Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Daniel A.; Capanna, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic bone metastases are a growing concern in the field of orthopedic surgery. Patients with pelvic metastasis are individually different with different needs of treatment in order to attain the best possible quality of life despite the advanced stage of disease. A holistic collaboration among the oncologist, radiation therapist, and orthopedic surgeon is mandatory. Special attention has to be directed to osteolytic lesions in the periacetabular region as they can provoke pathological fractures and subsequent functional impairment. Different reconstruction techniques for the pelvis are available; the choice depends on the patient's prognosis, size of the bone defect, and response of the tumor to adjuvant treatment. If all the conservative treatments are exhausted and the patient is not eligible for surgery, one of the various percutaneous ablation procedures can be considered. We propose a pelvic analogue to the treatment algorithm in long bone metastasis and a scoring system in pelvic metastasis. This algorithm aims to simplify the teamwork and to avoid under- or overtreatment of pelvic bone metastases. PMID:25810925

  4. Pelvic Organ Prolapse: New Concepts in Pelvic Floor Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Pedro A; Wai, Clifford Y

    2016-03-01

    As the field of reconstructive pelvic surgery continues to evolve, with descriptions of new procedures to repair pelvic organ prolapse, it remains imperative to maintain a functional understanding of pelvic floor anatomy and support. The goal of this review was to provide a focused, conceptual approach to differentiating anatomic defects contributing to prolapse in the various compartments of the vagina. Rather than provide exhaustive descriptions of pelvic floor anatomy, basic pelvic floor anatomy is reviewed, new and historical concepts of pelvic floor support are discussed, and relevance to the surgical management of specific anatomic defects is addressed. PMID:26880505

  5. Pelvic Insufficiency Fracture After Pelvic Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer: Analysis of Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Dongryul; Huh, Seung Jae Nam, Heerim; Park, Won; Han, Youngyih; Lim, Do Hoon; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lee, Jeong Won; Kim, Byoung Gie; Bae, Duk Soo; Lee, Je Ho

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF) after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Medical records and imaging studies, including bone scintigraphy, CT, and MRI of 557 patients with cervical cancer who received whole-pelvic RT between January 1998 and August 2005 were reviewed. Results: Eighty-three patients were diagnosed as having PIF after pelvic RT. The 5-year cumulative incidence of PIF was 19.7%. The most commonly involved site was the sacroiliac joint. Pelvic pain developed in 48 patients (57.8%) at diagnosis. Eleven patients (13.3%) needed admission or narcotics because of severe pain, and others had good relief of symptoms with conservative management. In univariate analysis, age {>=}55 years (p < 0.001), anteroposterior/posteroanterior parallel opposing technique (p = 0.001), curative treatment (p < 0.001), and radiation dose {>=}50.4 Gy (p = 0.005) were the predisposing factors for development of PIF. Concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.78) was not significant. Multivariate analysis showed that age {>=}55 years (p < 0.001), body weight <55 kg (p = 0.02), curative treatment (p = 0.03), and radiation dose {>=}50.4 Gy (p = 0.04) were significant predisposing factors for development of PIF. Conclusion: The development of PIF is not rare after pelvic RT. The use of multibeam arrangements to reduce the volume and dose of irradiated pelvic bone can be helpful to minimize the risk of fracture, especially in elderly women with low body weight.

  6. Treatment of Unstable Pelvic Ring Injuries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic fractures are classified according to the stability of the pelvic ring. Unlike stable pelvic fractures, which heal without complications, unstable fractures may lead to pelvic ring deformities, which cause severe complications. An orthopedic surgeon must determine the stability of the pelvic ring by radiography and physical examination of the patient in order to ensure early, prompt treatment. This article includes anatomy of the pelvic ring, classification of pelvic ring injuries, its treatment algorithm, and corresponding cases involving unstable pelvic ring injury.

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Postoperative Gynecologic Cancer: Are They Covering the Same Planning Target Volume?

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Nikhilesh; D'souza, David; Millman, Barbara; Yaremko, Brian P; Leung, Eric; Whiston, Frances; Hajdok, George; Wong, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: This study compares dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and organs at risk (OAR) sparing when postoperative radiotherapy for gynecologic cancers is delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus a four-field (4FLD) box technique. Material and Methods: From July to December 2012, women requiring postoperative radiation for gynecologic cancers were treated with a standardized VMAT protocol. Two sets of optimized 4FLD plans were retrospectively generated: one based on standard anatomical borders (4FLD) and one based on the clinical target volume (CTV) created for VMAT with a 2 cm expansion guiding field border placement (4FLD+2). Ninety-five percent isodose curves were generated to evaluate PTV coverage. Results: VMAT significantly improved dose conformity compared with 4FLD and 4FLD+2 plans (p < 0.001) and provided additional coverage of the PTV posteriorly and superiorly, corresponding to coverage of the presacral and proximal iliac vessels. There was a significant reduction in dose to all OARs with VMAT, including a 58% reduction in the volume of the small bowel receiving more than 45 Gy (p=0.005). Conclusions: Despite treating a larger volume, radiotherapy using a 4FLD technique is less homogenous and provides inferior coverage of the PTV compared with VMAT. With meticulous treatment planning and delivery, VMAT effectively encompasses the PTV and minimizes dose to OARs. PMID:26973802

  8. Surgery for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as pain during sex, pelvic pain, or urinary incontinence . What are the types of surgery for pelvic ... performed through the abdomen. A procedure to prevent urinary incontinence may be done at the same time. • Anterior ...

  9. Development of RTOG Consensus Guidelines for the Definition of the Clinical Target Volume for Postoperative Conformal Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Jeff M.; Lawton, Colleen; El Naqa, Issam; Ritter, Mark; O'Meara, Elizabeth C.; Seider, Michael J.; Lee, W. Robert; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Pisansky, Thomas; Catton, Charles; Valicenti, Richard K.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Bosch, Walter R.; Sandler, Howard; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Menard, Cynthia

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To define a prostate fossa clinical target volume (PF-CTV) for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials using postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: An RTOG-sponsored meeting was held to define an appropriate PF-CTV after radical prostatectomy. Data were presented describing radiographic failure patterns after surgery. Target volumes used in previous trials were reviewed. Using contours independently submitted by 13 radiation oncologists, a statistical imputation method derived a preliminary 'consensus' PF-CTV. Results: Starting from the model-derived CTV, consensus was reached for a CT image-based PF-CTV. The PF-CTV should extend superiorly from the level of the caudal vas deferens remnant to >8-12 mm inferior to vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA). Below the superior border of the pubic symphysis, the anterior border extends to the posterior aspect of the pubis and posteriorly to the rectum, where it may be concave at the level of the VUA. At this level, the lateral border extends to the levator ani. Above the pubic symphysis, the anterior border should encompass the posterior 1-2 cm of the bladder wall; posteriorly, it is bounded by the mesorectal fascia. At this level, the lateral border is the sacrorectogenitopubic fascia. Seminal vesicle remnants, if present, should be included in the CTV if there is pathologic evidence of their involvement. Conclusions: Consensus on postoperative PF-CTV for RT after prostatectomy was reached and is available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG website. This will allow uniformity in defining PF-CTV for clinical trials that include postprostatectomy RT.

  10. Postoperative Spot-Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma in Children and Adolescents: Initial Experience at Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, Hans Peter Weber, Damien C.; Goitein, Gudrun; Ares, Carmen; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J.; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, Adolf; Hug, Eugen B.; Timmermann, Beate

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate postoperative spot-scanning proton radiation therapy (PT) and intensity-modulated PT (IMPT) for chordoma and chondrosarcoma in pediatric patients. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2005, 10 patients (six male patients, four female patients; six chordomas, four chondrosarcomas), aged 10-20 years (median, 16 years), were treated at our institute. Tumor sites were in the brain (one case), skull base (five cases), cervical (three cases), and lumbar spine (one case). Three children had complete resections. In seven children, resection was incomplete, leaving residual tumor behind (range, 2.3-46.3 mL). PT was delivered using spot scanning, with (three patients) or without (seven patients) IMPT. Total dose was 74.0 cobalt Gray equivalents (CGE) for chordoma, and 63.2-68.0 CGE for chondrosarcoma (median, 66.0), depending on histopathological grading and whether the patient had concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 8-77 months). Radiation treatment was well tolerated. All patients remained failure-free at their last follow-up. Late adverse events were reported in three patients and were mild (neurosensory in one patient; alopecia and hypoaccusis in one patient) to moderate (one patient, Grade 2 pituitary insufficiency). Conclusions: Postoperative spot-scanning PT, delivered in combination with and without IMPT, for chordoma and chondrosarcoma in children and adolescents was tolerated without unacceptable adverse event and initial outcome is perfectly satisfactory in this small cohort. Longer follow-up time and larger cohort are needed to more fully assess tumor control, adverse events, as well as functional and cosmetic outcome.

  11. Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Graeme B.; Grobéty, Jocelyne; Majno, Guido

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of peritoneal adhesions, in the rat, based on two relatively minor accidents that may occur during abdominal surgery in man: drying of the serosa, and bleeding. Drying alone had little effect; drying plus bleeding consistently produced adhesions to the dried area. Fresh blood alone produced adhesions between the three membranous structures [omentum and pelvic fat bodies (PFBs)]. The formation of persistent adhesions required whole blood. Preformed clots above a critical size induced adhesions even without previous serosal injury; they were usually captured by the omentum and PFBs. If all three membranous structures were excised, the clots caused visceral adhesions. The protective role of the omentum, its structure, and the mechanism of omental adhesions, are discussed. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of post-operative adhesions in man. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 13Fig 1Fig 2Fig 14Fig 15Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:5315369

  12. Clinical results of an EPID-based in-vivo dosimetry method for pelvic cancers treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, J; Mazurier, J; Franck, D; Dudouet, P; Latorzeff, I; Franceries, X

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of our work was to investigate the feasibility of using an EPID-based in-vivo dosimetry method initially designed for conformal fields on pelvic dynamic IMRT fields. The method enables a point dose delivered to the patient to be calculated from the transit signal acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). After defining a set of correction factors allowing EPID pixel values to be converted into absolute doses, several tests on homogeneous water-equivalent phantoms were performed to estimate the validity of the method in reference conditions. The effects of different treatment parameters, such as delivered dose, field size dependence and patient thickness were also studied. The model was first evaluated on a group of 53 patients treated by 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and then on 92 patients treated by IMRT, both for pelvic cancers. For each measurement, the dose was reconstructed at the isocenter (DREC) and compared with the dose calculated by our treatment planning system (DTPS). Excellent agreement was found between DREC and DTPS for both techniques. For 3DCRT treatments, the mean deviation between DREC and DTPS for the 211 in-vivo dose verifications was equal to -1.0  ±  2.2% (1SD). Concerning IMRT treatments, the averaged deviation for the 418 fields verified was equal to -0.3 ± 2.6% (1SD) proving that the method is able to reconstruct a dose for dynamic IMRT pelvic fields. Based on these results, tolerance criteria and action levels were established before its implementation in clinical routine. PMID:24656798

  13. [PELVIC FLOOR RECONSTRUCTION AFTER PELVIC EVISCERATION USING GRACILIS MUSCULOCUTANEOUS FLAP].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, V N; Bakirov, A A; Kabirov, I R; Izmajlov, A A; Kutlijarov, L M; Safiullin, R L; Urmancev, M F; Sultanov, I M; Abdrahimov, R V

    2015-01-01

    Evisceration of the pelvic organs (EPO) is a fairly uncommon surgical treatment that removes all organs from a patient's pelvic cavity. We use gracilis musculocutaneous flap to repair pelvic floor after EPO. Over the period from November 2013 to December 2014 we carried out EPO with reconstructive repair of the pelvic floor with gracilis musculocutaneous flap in 10 patients with locally advanced pelvic tumors. We describe the surgical procedure and surgical outcomes in these patients. Mean age of the patients was 55 years. Mean duration of EPO with the pelvic floor repair was 285 min., mean blood loss--595 mL and the average length of hospital stay--19 days. Gracilis musculocutaneous flap has a sufficient arterial supply and mobility for pelvic floor reconstruction. Necrosis of flap's distal edge occurred in one of the 10 clinical cases, while the remaining flaps were fully preserved. Complete healing of wounds with no signs of weakening of the pelvic floor muscles was observed in all cases. Pelvic floor reconstruction is an essential procedure in order to reduce complications associated with the evisceration of the pelvic organs. The Gracilis musculocutaneous flap is the logical alternative to repair pelvic floor defect. It does not contribute to complications like functional deficiency of the lower limbs, complications of stoma formation or weakening of the muscles of the anterior abdominal wall. PMID:26390558

  14. Computerized Tomography: Its Role in Interstitial Brachytherapy of Pelvic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Taylor, Judith; Jones, E.O.; McAnulty, Bruce

    1986-01-01

    The advantages of computerized tomography (CT) in the treatment planning of external beam radiation therapy have been shown in several studies. The authors extended the use of CT to the interstitial brachytherapy treatment planning of pelvic malignancies. CT was found to be invaluable in localizing pelvic tumors, selecting implant techniques, and checking the accuracy of the implant. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:3950985

  15. Pelvic Floor Disorders Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... to develop and perform research studies related to women with pelvic floor disorders. In this way, studies can be done more quickly than if the medical centers were working alone. Doctors, nurses, other health care workers, and support staff all play important roles.The ...

  16. Role of pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy in endometrial cancer: Current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Bogani, Giorgio; Dowdy, Sean C.; Cliby, William A.; Ghezzi, Fabio; Rossetti, Diego; Mariani, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current evidence on the role of pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy in endometrial cancer. In 1988, the International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology recommended surgical staging for endometrial cancer patients. However, 25 years later, the role of lymph node dissection remains controversial. Although the findings of two large independent randomized trials suggested that pelvic lymphadenectomy provides only adjunctive morbidity with no clear influence on survival outcomes, the studies have many pitfalls that limit interpretation of the results. Theoretically, lymphadenectomy may help identify patients with metastatic dissemination, who may benefit from adjuvant therapy, thus reducing radiation-related morbidity. Also, lymphadenectomy may eradicate metastatic disease. Because lymphatic spread is relatively uncommon, our main effort should be directed at identifying patients who may potentially benefit from lymph node dissection, thus reducing the rate of unnecessary treatment and associated morbidity. This review will discuss the role of lymphadenectomy in endometrial cancer, focusing on patient selection, extension of the surgical procedure, postoperative outcomes, quality of life and costs. The need for new surgical studies and efficacious systemic drugs is recommended. PMID:24472047

  17. [Pelvic floor muscle training and pelvic floor disorders in women].

    PubMed

    Thubert, T; Bakker, E; Fritel, X

    2015-05-01

    Our goal is to provide an update on the results of pelvic floor rehabilitation in the treatment of urinary incontinence and genital prolapse symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle training allows a reduction of urinary incontinence symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle contractions supervised by a healthcare professional allow cure in half cases of stress urinary incontinence. Viewing this contraction through biofeedback improves outcomes, but this effect could also be due by a more intensive and prolonged program with the physiotherapist. The place of electrostimulation remains unclear. The results obtained with vaginal cones are similar to pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback or electrostimulation. It is not known whether pelvic floor muscle training has an effect after one year. In case of stress urinary incontinence, supervised pelvic floor muscle training avoids surgery in half of the cases at 1-year follow-up. Pelvic floor muscle training is the first-line treatment of post-partum urinary incontinence. Its preventive effect is uncertain. Pelvic floor muscle training may reduce the symptoms associated with genital prolapse. In conclusion, pelvic floor rehabilitation supervised by a physiotherapist is an effective short-term treatment to reduce the symptoms of urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:25921509

  18. Long-term results of post-operative radiation therapy following mastectomy with or without chemotherapy in Stage I--III breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Uematsu, Minoru; Bornstein, B.A.; Recht, A.; Abner, A.; Silver, B. ); Come, S.E. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Shulman, L.N. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Harris, J.R.

    1993-04-02

    The purpose of this work was to determine the risk of local-regional failure following post-mastectomy radiotherapy and the incidence of complications associated with such treatment. The authors retrospectively analyzed the results in 309 patients with Stage I--III invasive breast cancer treated with post-mastectomy radiation therapy between 1975 and 1985. The median radiotherapy dose was 45 Gy in 1.8 to 2.25 Gy fractions. One hundred forty-seven (48%) of the patients received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy with 115 (78%) of these receiving a CMF-based or doxorubicin-containing regime. The median follow-up time of surviving patients was 130 months (range, 28 to 191 months) after mastectomy. Seventeen patients (6%) developed a local-regional failure at an interval of 4 to 87 months after radiotherapy. Moderate or severe complications related to radiotherapy and requiring treatment were uncommon. Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis occurred in four patients (1.3%), arm edema in 18 (5.8%), and brachial plexopathy in 2 (0.6%). The authors conclude that post-operative radiotherapy is a safe and effective means of reducing local-regional failure following mastectomy. The efficacy of post-mastectomy radiotherapy in improving survival should be addressed in new large randomized controlled studies. 33 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Postoperative hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ayach, Taha; Nappo, Robert W; Paugh-Miller, Jennifer L; Ross, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    Hyperkalemia occurs frequently in hospitalized patients and is of particular concern for those who have undergone surgery, with postoperative care provided by clinicians of many disciplines. This review describes the normal physiology and how multiple perioperative factors can disrupt potassium homeostasis and lead to severe elevations in plasma potassium concentration. The pathophysiologic basis of diverse causes of hyperkalemia was used to broadly classify etiologies into those with altered potassium distribution (e.g. increased potassium release from cells or other transcellular shifts), reduced urinary excretion (e.g. reduced sodium delivery, volume depletion, and hypoaldosteronism), or an exogenous potassium load (e.g. blood transfusions). Surgical conditions of particular concern involve: rhabdomyolysis from malpositioning, trauma or medications; bariatric surgery; vascular procedures with tissue ischemia; acidosis; hypovolemia; and volume or blood product resuscitation. Certain acute conditions and chronic co-morbidities present particular risk. These include chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, many outpatient preoperative medications (e.g. beta blockers, salt substitutes), and inpatient agents (e.g. succinylcholine, hyperosmolar volume expanders). Clinicians need to be aware of these pathophysiologic mechanisms for developing perioperative hyperkalemia as many of the risks can be minimized or avoided. PMID:25698564

  20. Pelvic aneurysmal bone cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sharifah, MIA; Nor Hazla, MH; Suraya, A; Tan, SP

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an extremely rare case of a huge aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) in the pelvis, occurring in the patient’s 5th decade of life. The patient presented with a history of painless huge pelvic mass for 10 years. Plain radiograph and computed tomography showed huge expansile lytic lesion arising from the right iliac bone. A biopsy was performed and histology confirmed diagnosis of aneurysmal bone cyst. Unfortunately, the patient succumbed to profuse bleeding from the tumour. PMID:22279501

  1. Intrapelvic prosthesis to prevent injury of the small intestine with high dosage pelvic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sugarbaker, P.H.

    1983-09-01

    The major complication to delivering tumoricidal dosages of radiation to the pelvis is radiation damage to the loops of the small intestine located within the radiation field. To exclude the small intestine from the pelvis after extensive pelvic surgical treatment, prosthetic materials are used. A transabdominal baffle made of prosthetic mesh separates pelvic and abdominal cavities. A Silastic implant, usually used in the reconstruction of the breast, is used in the pelvis to occupy space. In so doing, all of the small intestine can be excluded from the pelvic cavity and dosages of radiation to 6,500 rads can be administered.

  2. Postoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Cetuximab for High-Risk Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group RTOG-0234

    PubMed Central

    Harari, Paul M.; Harris, Jonathan; Kies, Merrill S.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Jordan, Richard C.; Gillison, Maura L.; Foote, Robert L.; Machtay, Mitchell; Rotman, Marvin; Khuntia, Deepak; Straube, William; Zhang, Qiang; Ang, Kian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report results of a randomized phase II trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group RTOG-0234) examining concurrent chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab in the postoperative treatment of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) with high-risk pathologic features. Patients and Methods Eligibility required pathologic stage III to IV SCCHN with gross total resection showing positive margins and/or extracapsular nodal extension and/or two or more nodal metastases. Patients were randomly assigned to 60 Gy radiation with cetuximab once per week plus either cisplatin 30 mg/m2 or docetaxel 15 mg/m2 once per week. Results Between April 2004 and December 2006, 238 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 4.4 years, 2-year overall survival (OS) was 69% for the cisplatin arm and 79% for the docetaxel arm; 2-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 57% and 66%, respectively. Patients with p16-positive oropharynx tumors showed markedly improved survival outcome relative to patients with p16-negative oropharynx tumors. Grade 3 to 4 myelosuppression was observed in 28% of patients in the cisplatin arm and 14% in the docetaxel arm; mucositis was observed in 56% and 54%, respectively. DFS in this study was compared with that in the chemoradiotherapy arm of the RTOG-9501 trial (Phase III Intergroup Trial of Surgery Followed by Radiotherapy Versus Radiochemotherapy for Resectable High Risk Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck), which had a hazard ratio of 0.76 for the cisplatin arm versus control (P = .05) and 0.69 for the docetaxel arm versus control (P = .01), reflecting absolute improvement in 2-year DFS of 2.5% and 11.1%, respectively. Conclusion The delivery of postoperative chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab to patients with SCCHN is feasible and tolerated with predictable toxicity. The docetaxel regimen shows favorable outcome with improved DFS and OS relative to historical controls and has commenced formal testing in a phase II/III trial

  3. Pelvic Fasciae in Urology

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, B; Cahill, D

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Despite the vast literature on pelvic fascia, there is confusion over the periprostatic structures and their nomenclature, including their orientation, the neurovascular bundles and the existence of the prostatic ‘capsule’. In this review, we seek to clarify some of these issues. MATERIALS AND METHODS Review of published medical literature relating to the anatomy of the pelvic fascia including a Pubmed search using the terms – pelvic fascia, Denonvilliers' fascia, prostate capsule, neurovascular bundle of Walsh, pubo-prostatic ligament and the detrusor apron. CONCLUSIONS The findings of the study were as follows: The ‘capsule’ of the prostate does not exist. Rather, the fibromuscular band surrounding the prostate forms an integral part of the gland.The prostate is surrounded by fascial structures – anteriorly/anterolaterally by the prostatic fascia and posteriorly by the Denonvilliers' fascia. Laterally, the prostatic fascia merges with the endopelvic fascia.The posterior longitudinal fascia of the detrusor comprises a ‘posterior layer’ of the detrusor apron, extending from the bladder neck to the prostate base.The neurovascular structures tend to be located posterolaterally, but may not always form a bundle. A significant proportion of fibres may lie away from the main nerve structures, along the lateral/posterior aspects of the prostate. PMID:18828961

  4. Late Consequential Surgical Bed Soft Tissue Necrosis in Advanced Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated With Transoral Robotic Surgery and Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, J. Nicholas; Lin, Alexander; Gamerman, Victoria; Mitra, Nandita; Grover, Surbhi; McMenamin, Erin M.; Weinstein, Gregory S.; O'Malley, Bert W.; Cohen, Roger B.; Orisamolu, Abimbola; Ahn, Peter H.; Quon, Harry

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: A subset of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP-SCC) managed with transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) developed soft tissue necrosis (STN) in the surgical bed months after completion of PORT. We investigated the frequency and risk factors. Materials and Methods: This retrospective analysis included 170 consecutive OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT between 2006 and 2012, with >6 months' of follow-up. STN was defined as ulceration of the surgical bed >6 weeks after completion of PORT, requiring opioids, biopsy, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Results: A total of 47 of 170 patients (28%) had a diagnosis of STN. Tonsillar patients were more susceptible than base-of-tongue (BOT) patients, 39% (41 of 104) versus 9% (6 of 66), respectively. For patients with STN, median tumor size was 3.0 cm (range 1.0-5.6 cm), and depth of resection was 2.2 cm (range 1.0-5.1 cm). Median radiation dose and dose of fraction to the surgical bed were 6600 cGy and 220 cGy, respectively. Thirty-one patients (66%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Median time to STN was 2.5 months after PORT. All patients had resolution of STN after a median of 3.7 months. Multivariate analysis identified tonsillar primary (odds ratio [OR] 4.73, P=.01), depth of resection (OR 3.12, P=.001), total radiation dose to the resection bed (OR 1.51 per Gy, P<.01), and grade 3 acute mucositis (OR 3.47, P=.02) as risk factors for STN. Beginning May 2011, after implementing aggressive avoidance of delivering >2 Gy/day to the resection bed mucosa, only 8% (2 of 26 patients) experienced STN (all grade 2). Conclusions: A subset of OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT are at risk for developing late consequential surgical bed STN. Risk factors include tonsillar location, depth of resection, radiation dose to the surgical bed, and severe mucositis. STN risk is significantly decreased with carefully avoiding a radiation dosage of >2 Gy/day to the

  5. Guidelines for the Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention of Postoperative Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hager, W. David; Livengood, Charles H.; Hoyme, Udo

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of the operative site is a common occurrence in obstetrics and gynecology. The widespread use of antibiotic prophylaxis has reduced but not eliminated serious postoperative infections. For most operations, a single dose of a limited-spectrum drug has been as effective as a multidose regimen. In the differential diagnosis it is important to consider cellulitis, abscess, necrotizing fasciitis and septic pelvic thrombophlebitis. Abscess and necrotizing fasciitis are expected to require invasive therapy in addition to antibiotics, while cellulitis and septic pelvic thrombophlebitis should respond to medical management alone. Although a postoperative fever is a warning sign of possible infection, it may also be caused by the antibiotics that are given for treatment. The use of prolonged courses of antibiotics once the patient is clinically well is discouraged. While clinical guidelines are provided for use in the diagnosis and management of postoperative infections, these recommendations are intended for general direction and not as an exclusive management plan. PMID:12839635

  6. Patterns of nodal relapse after surgery and postoperative radiation therapy for carcinomas of the major and minor salivary glands: What is the role of elective neck irradiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com; Garcia, Joaquin; Lee, Nancy Y.; Bucci, M. Kara; Eisele, David W.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of nodal relapses from carcinomas of the salivary glands among patients with clinically negative necks in an attempt to determine the potential utility of elective neck irradiation (ENI). Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 251 patients with clinically N0 carcinomas of the salivary glands were treated with surgery and postoperative radiation therapy. None of the patients had undergone previous neck dissection. Histology was: adenoid cystic (84 patients), mucoepidermoid (60 patients), adenocarcinoma (58 patients), acinic cell (21 patients), undifferentiated (11 patients), carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (7 patients), squamous cell (7 patients), and salivary duct carcinoma (3 patients); 131 patients (52%) had ENI. Median follow-up was 62 months (range, 3-267 months). Results: The 5- and 10-year actuarial estimates of nodal relapse were 11% and 13%, respectively. The 10-year actuarial rates of nodal failure were 7%, 5%, 12%, and 16%, for patients with T1, T2, T3, and T4 disease, respectively (p = 0.11). The use of ENI reduced the 10-year nodal failure rate from 26% to 0% (p = 0.0001). The highest crude rates of nodal relapse among those treated without ENI were found in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (67%), undifferentiated carcinoma (50%), adenocarcinoma (34%), and mucoepidermoid carcinoma (29%). There were no nodal failures observed among patients with adenoid cystic or acinic cell histology. Conclusion: ENI effectively prevents nodal relapses and should be used for select patients at high risk for regional failure.

  7. Outcome and Predictive Factors in Uterine Carcinosarcoma Using Postoperative Radiotherapy: A Rare Cancer Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Zwahlen, Daniel R.; Schick, Ulrike; Bolukbasi, Yasemin; Thariat, Juliette; Abdah-Bortnyak, Roxolyana; Kuten, Abraham; Igdem, Sefik; Caglar, Hale; Ozsaran, Zeynep; Loessl, Kristina; Belkaaloul, Kaouthar Khanfir; Villette, Sylviane; Vees, Hansjörg

    2016-01-01

    Uterine carcinosarcomas (UCS) are rare tumors. Consensus regarding therapeutic management in non-metastatic disease is lacking. This study reports on outcome and predictive factors when using postoperative radiotherapy. We analyzed a retrospective analysis in 124 women treated between 1987-2007 in the framework of the Rare-Cancer-Network. Median follow-up was 27 months. Postoperative pelvic EBRT was administered in 105 women (85%) and 92 patients (74%) received exclusive or additional vaginal brachytherapy. Five-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), cancer specific survival (CSS) and locoregional control (LRC) were 51.6% (95% CI 35-73%), 53.7% (39-71%), 58.6% (38-74%) and 48% (38-67%). Multivariate analysis showed that external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) >50Gy was an independent prognostic factor for better OS (P=0.03), CSS (P=0.02) and LRC (P=0.01). Relative risks (RR) for better OS (P=0.02), DFS (P=0.04) and LRC (P=0.01) were significantly associated with younger age (≤60 years). Higher brachytherapy (BT)-dose (>9Gy) improved DFS (P=0.04) and LRC (P=0.008). We concluded that UCS has high systemic failure rate. Local relapse was reduced by a relative risk factor of over three in all stages of diseases when using higher doses for EBRT and brachytherapy. Postoperative RT was most effective in UCS stage I/II-diseases. PMID:27441069

  8. Outcome and Predictive Factors in Uterine Carcinosarcoma Using Postoperative Radiotherapy: A Rare Cancer Network Study.

    PubMed

    Zwahlen, Daniel R; Schick, Ulrike; Bolukbasi, Yasemin; Thariat, Juliette; Abdah-Bortnyak, Roxolyana; Kuten, Abraham; Igdem, Sefik; Caglar, Hale; Ozsaran, Zeynep; Loessl, Kristina; Belkaaloul, Kaouthar Khanfir; Villette, Sylviane; Vees, Hansjörg

    2016-06-28

    Uterine carcinosarcomas (UCS) are rare tumors. Consensus regarding therapeutic management in non-metastatic disease is lacking. This study reports on outcome and predictive factors when using postoperative radiotherapy. We analyzed a retrospective analysis in 124 women treated between 1987-2007 in the framework of the Rare-Cancer-Network. Median follow-up was 27 months. Postoperative pelvic EBRT was administered in 105 women (85%) and 92 patients (74%) received exclusive or additional vaginal brachytherapy. Five-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), cancer specific survival (CSS) and locoregional control (LRC) were 51.6% (95% CI 35-73%), 53.7% (39-71%), 58.6% (38-74%) and 48% (38-67%). Multivariate analysis showed that external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) >50Gy was an independent prognostic factor for better OS (P=0.03), CSS (P=0.02) and LRC (P=0.01). Relative risks (RR) for better OS (P=0.02), DFS (P=0.04) and LRC (P=0.01) were significantly associated with younger age (≤60 years). Higher brachytherapy (BT)-dose (>9Gy) improved DFS (P=0.04) and LRC (P=0.008). We concluded that UCS has high systemic failure rate. Local relapse was reduced by a relative risk factor of over three in all stages of diseases when using higher doses for EBRT and brachytherapy. Postoperative RT was most effective in UCS stage I/II-diseases. PMID:27441069

  9. An Ectopic Pelvic Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Bhoil, Rohit; Sood, Dinesh; Singh, Yash Paul; Nimkar, Kshama; Shukla, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background If a kidney does not ascend as it should in normal fetal development, it remains in the pelvic area and is called a pelvic kidney. Often a person with a pelvic kidney will go through his/her whole life unaware of this condition, unless it is discovered during neonatal kidney ultrasound screening or if complications arise later in life due to this or a completely different reason and the condition is noted during investigations. Generally, this is not a harmful condition but it can lead to complications like in our case. With appropriate testing and treatment, if needed, an ectopic kidney should cause no serious long-term health complications and all that may be required for the patient is reassurance with advice to follow up at regular intervals. Case Report A 28-year-old male presented with recurrent pain in his lower left abdomen for one month and an episode of hematuria 3 days earlier accompanied by an attack of acute pain lasting for 3–4 hours. He gave a history of passing 2 small (about 5 mm each) calculi in his urine after the occurrence of hematuria, following which pain decreased in intensity. No history of fever was present. Conclusions Although a simple ectopic kidney seldom causes symptoms, the association of malrotation of the renal pelvis with calculus increases the risk of hematuria and/or hydronephrosis, presenting with colicky pain as in the present case. The clinician should be aware of these in such a case. If asymptomatic, no treatment is required. However, the patient should be advised to have follow-up ultrasounds at regular intervals to detect complications like calculus, hydronephrosis, etc. With appropriate testing and treatment, if required, an ectopic kidney should not cause serious long-term health complications. PMID:26413178

  10. Changes in Sexual Function and Comparison of Questionnaires Following Surgery for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Rim; Moon, Yeo Jung; Kim, Sei Kwang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of surgical repair of pelvic organ prolapse on female sexual function and to assess correlations between the two using two current standardized questionnaires. Materials and Methods From October 2009 to September 2010, 143 patients with posterior compartment or combined vaginal prolapse were included. We assessed surgical outcomes according to anatomical change in the vagina and results of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function questionnaire (PISQ-12) both pre- and postoperatively. Results Among the 143 preoperative patients, 99 and 84 patients responded to the PISQ-12 and FSFI, respectively. The mean PISQ-12 score increased after surgery (p<0.001). Specifically, postoperative scores for questions 8 and 12 were higher than their respective preoperative scores (p<0.001). Postoperatively, mean FSFI score changed only slightly (p=0.76), and only the score for the satisfaction domain was improved (p=0.023). In regards to vaginal anatomy, vaginal length was significantly greater postoperatively (6.99±0.18 vs. 7.56±1.08, p<0.001), and postoperative vaginal caliber was narrowed to a two-finger width. Conclusion In this study, surgery for pelvic organ prolapse was shown to affect female sexual function. Moreover, menopause was associated with a change in postoperative sexual function. PMID:24339303

  11. [Urinary diversion in patients treated with pelvic irradiation: transverse colon conduit revisited].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshiyuki; Kanematsu, Akihiro; Negoro, Hiromitsu; Kobayashi, Takashi; Terada, Naoki; Sugino, Yoshio; Yamasaki, Toshinari; Inoue, Takahiro; Kamba, Tomomi; Yoshimura, Koji; Ogawa, Osamu

    2014-08-01

    In patients receiving pelvic irradiation for gynecological or genitourinary malignancies, urinary diversion is sometimes required for complete resection of malignancies or treatment of urological complications by irradiation. We report our attempts to promote healing and prevent complications by urinary diversion using a transverse colon conduit in cases in which urinary reconstruction was performed with irradiated lower abdominal organs such as small intestine or distal ureters. Between 2008 and 2012, 9 patients with pelvic irradiation received transverse colon conduit urinary diversion. Six patients received diversion for genitourinary complications, while 3 patients received complete resection of pelvic malignancies. Colostomy formation and lithotripsy of vesical stones were simultaneously performed in 4 cases. Wallace method was adopted for ureterointestinal anastomosis. There was no operative mortality. Although acute pyelonephritis, ileus, wound dehiscence and pelvic abscess formation were seen as postoperative complications, all but two improved without any additional procedure. Cases of pelvic abscess or wound dehiscence were treated by abscess drainage. In observation periods, no patients required urinary stent placement and none suffered from defecation problems. We think that transverse colon conduit can be a viable option for patients with pelvic irradiation history, affording them reasonable quality of life postoperatively. PMID:25179985

  12. New developed DR detector performs radiographs of hand, pelvic and premature chest anatomies at a lower radiation dose and/or a higher image quality.

    PubMed

    Precht, Helle; Tingberg, Anders; Waaler, Dag; Outzen, Claus Bjørn

    2014-02-01

    A newly developed Digital Radiography (DR) detector has smaller pixel size and higher fill factor than earlier detector models. These technical advantages should theoretically lead to higher sensitivity and higher spatial resolution, thus making dose reduction possible without scarifying image quality compared to previous DR detector versions. To examine whether the newly developed Canon CXDI-70C DR detector provides an improved image quality and/or allows for dose reductions in hand and pelvic bone examinations as well as premature chest examinations, compared to the previous (CXDI-55C) DR detector version. A total of 450 images of a technical Contrast-Detail phantom were imaged on a DR system employing various kVp and mAs settings, providing an objective image quality assessment. In addition, 450 images of anthropomorphic phantoms were taken and analyzed by three specialized radiologists using Visual Grading Analysis (VGA). The results from the technical phantom studies showed that the image quality expressed as IQFINV values was on average approximately 45 % higher with the CXDI-70C detector compared to the CXDI-55C detector. Consistently, the VGA results from the anatomical phantom studies indicated that by using the CXDI-70C detector, diagnostic image quality could be maintained at a dose reduction of in average 30 %, depending on anatomy and kVp level. This indicates that the CXDI-70C detector is significantly more sensitive than the previous model, and supports a better clinical image quality. By using the newly developed DR detector a significant dose reduction is possible while maintaining image quality. PMID:24221693

  13. Fatigue and other adverse effects in men treated by pelvic radiation and long-term androgen deprivation for locally advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lilleby, Wolfgang; Stensvold, Andreas; Dahl, Alv A

    2016-07-01

    Background We compared the development of adverse effects and psychosocial measures from baseline to 36-month follow-up in patients with prostate cancer (T1-3 M0) referred to our department for definitive radiotherapy encompassing the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes (RAD + IMRT) or radiotherapy to the prostatic gland only (RAD), applied with standard adjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) in all patients. Few studies have explored the impact of fatigue on patients' reported quality of life (QoL) after combined therapy for prostate cancer. Material and methods The 206 consecutive eligible men (RAD + IMRT = 64 and RAD = 142) completed the UCLA-PCI questionnaire for adverse effects at baseline, 12, 24, and 36 months. QoL, anxiety and depression, and fatigue were rated at the same time points. Between-group and longitudinal within-group changes at different time points were reported. At 36 months variables associated with fatigue were analyzed with regression analyses. Results Our main novel finding is the long-term high level of fatigue and high prevalence of chronic fatigue, affecting patients receiving radiotherapy combined with long-term AD. Except for urinary bother in the RAD + IMRT group all functions and the other bothers mean scores were significantly worse at 36 months compared to baseline. In multivariable analyses only physical QoL remained significantly associated with fatigue at 36-months follow-up. Conclusions Fatigue and impaired QoL in patients considered to curative irradiation with long-term AD should be addressed when counseling men to combined treatment. PMID:26959297

  14. Obstetric and gynecological outcome in a patient with traumatic pelvic fracture and perineal injuries.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Deepti; Kochhar, Puneet Kaur; Suri, Tarun; Zutshi, Vijay; Batra, Swaraj

    2012-08-01

    A 19-year-old woman presented with pelvic trauma following a road accident. She was hemodynamically stable. Examination revealed perineal injuries and type C pelvic fracture, which was stabilized with an external fixator. The broken ends of the pubic bone were brought together by an orthopedic wire. The detached vaginal wall and torn anal sphincter were surgically repaired after making a diverting colostomy. The postoperative period was uneventful. Colostomy was reversed after 3 months. Postoperatively the patient developed a cystocele, dyspareunia and vaginal pain. She conceived spontaneously and was planned for an elective cesarean at 37 weeks gestation; however, she presented in labor at 36 weeks and had a normal vaginal delivery. Pelvic fractures may be associated with genitourinary and anal sphincter injuries, which require management by a multidisciplinary team. On recovery the patient may develop prolapse, dyspareunia and persistent local pain. Spontaneous conception and normal vaginal delivery are nevertheless possible. PMID:22540310

  15. [Results of surgical treatment of pelvic fractures in polytraumatized patients].

    PubMed

    Roder, J D; Stübinger, B; Gmeinwieser, J; Müller, E; Claudi, B F

    1988-06-01

    High-speed accidents involving automobiles and two-wheeled vehicles with resultant entrapment and crush injuries have led to an ever-increasing incidence of pelvic fracture within the realm of multiple trauma. Between the years 1982 and 1986 ninety-eight cases of pelvic fracture were operatively stabilised by the Department of Surgery and the Outpatient Department of the Technical University, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich, West Germany. This paper is a report on fifty-five of these patients who were discovered to have suffered additional multitrauma. Independent from those patients found to have sustained multitraumatisation, twenty-four cases of isolated acetabulum fracture as well as four instances of pelvic ring fracture and one fracture of the pelvic brim were also documented. Combinations of the above mentioned fractures were uncovered in twenty-six patients. With fifty-four of the fracture injuries, osteosynthesis was carried out while in one case primary alloarthroplasty was deemed necessary. Following a mean post-treatment period of twenty-six months forty-five of the patients were objectively evaluated for results of treatment according to the methodology of Merle d'Aubigne. 70% of those patients assessed were rated with a "good" result. At the time of follow-up thirty-five (78%) of the forty-five reexamined individuals reported to be once again employed. Early operative treatment along with internal stabilisation and prompt initiation of physiotherapy have proved decisive in obtaining a favourable postoperative result. PMID:2900595

  16. Extraovarian pelvic yolk sac tumor: case report and review of published work.

    PubMed

    Pasternack, Tanya; Shaco-Levy, Ruthy; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Piura, Benjamin

    2008-08-01

    Extraovarian pelvic yolk sac tumors are rare, with only nine cases documented previously in the published work. We report a case of extraovarian pelvic yolk sac tumor occurring synchronously with breast carcinoma. The patient underwent resection of the pelvic tumor and hepatic implant, omentectomy and breast lumpectomy with sentinel axillary lymph node biopsy. The uterus and bilateral adnexa were preserved. Postoperative adjuvant therapy for the yolk sac tumor included three cycles of the bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin (BEP) regimen. This was followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for the breast carcinoma. It is concluded that in women with extraovarian pelvic yolk sac tumor who wish to preserve childbearing capacity, fertility-saving surgery followed by fertility-preserving cisplatin-based chemotherapy is adequate and appropriate treatment. PMID:18840194

  17. [Prevention of intraoperative incidental injuries during sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer and management of postoperative complication].

    PubMed

    Han, Fanghai; Li, Hongming

    2016-06-01

    Prevention of intraoperative incidental injuries during radical operation for rectal cancer and management of postoperative complication are associated with successful operation and prognosis of patients. This paper discusses how to prevent such intraoperative incidental injuries and how to manage postoperative complication. (1) Accurate clinical evaluation should be performed before operation and reasonable treatment decision should be made, including determination of the distance from transection to lower margin of the tumor, T and M staging evaluated by MRI, fascia invasion of mesorectum, metastasis of lateral lymph nodes, metastatic station of mesentery lymph node, association between levator ani muscle and anal sphincter, course and length of sigmoid observed by Barium enema, length assessment of pull-through bowel. Meanwhile individual factors of patients and tumors must be realized accurately. (2) Injury of pelvic visceral fascia should be avoided during operation. Negative low and circumference cutting edge must be ensured. Blood supply and adequate length of pull-down bowel must be also ensured. Urinary system injury, pelvic bleeding and intestinal damage should be avoided. Team cooperation and anesthesia procedure should be emphasized. Capacity of handling accident events should be cultivated for the team. (3) intraoperative incidental injuries during operation by instruments should be avoided, such as poor clarity of camera due to spray and smog, ineffective instruments resulted from repeated usage. (4) As to the prevention and management of postoperative complication of rectal cancer operation, prophylactic stoma should be regularly performed for rectal cancer patients undergoing anterior resection, while drainage tube placement does not decrease the morbidities of anastomosis and other complications. After sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer, attentions must be paid to the occurrence of anastomotic bleeding, pelvic bleeding, anastomotic

  18. Magnetic Resonance of Pelvic and Gastrointestinal Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Kaewlai, Rathachai; Dattwyler, Matthew; Abujudeh, Hani H; Singh, Ajay K

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is gaining increased acceptance in the emergency setting despite the continued dominance of computed tomography. MR has the advantages of more precise tissue characterization, superior soft tissue contrast, and a lack of ionizing radiation. Traditional barriers to emergent MR are being overcome by streamlined imaging protocols and newer rapid-acquisition sequences. As the utilization of MR imaging in the emergency department increases, a strong working knowledge of the MR appearance of the most commonly encountered abdominopelvic pathologies is essential. In this article, MR imaging protocols and findings of acute pelvic, scrotal, and gastrointestinal pathologies are discussed. PMID:27150327

  19. Outcome of hysterectomy for pelvic pain in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Tay, S K; Bromwich, N

    1998-02-01

    The outcome of abdominal hysterectomy for pelvic pain in premenopausal women was studied retrospectively in 228 women. In 17 women, pelvic pain was the sole indication while in the others, pelvic pain was one of the contributory indications for hysterectomy. The most common surgical histopathological diagnoses were uterine leiomyoma (73.9%), uterine adenomyosis (40.4%), benign ovarian cyst (19.3%) and endometriosis (7.9%); 118 (51.8%) patients had single pathology and 48.2% had multiple pathologies. The agreement between operative clinical diagnosis and histopathological diagnosis was 66.1% for leiomyoma, 57.1% for uterine adenomyosis and 30% for endometriosis. The incidence of early postoperative complication was 20.6%, mainly minor morbidities including urinary tract infection (3.9%), wound infection (3.1%) and unexplained fever (6.0%). These complications significantly prolonged the duration of hospital stay from an average of 7 days to 9-17 days. Of 98 patients with pain as the sole or the most predominant indication for hysterectomy, 72% responded to an outcome survey 12 or more months after hysterectomy. Of these, 62 (87%) were satisfied with the operation, 8 were unsure and 1 was dissatisfied; 68 (95.8%) patients reported relief of their symptoms. Relief of symptoms did not correlate with the patient's report of her satisfaction with hysterectomy. Pain in the abdominal wound a year or more after surgery was one of the commonest reasons cited for dissatisfaction with hysterectomy. We conclude that in well-selected cases, hysterectomy is an appropriate and satisfactory treatment for premenopausal women with pelvic pain irrespective of clinical evidence of associated pathology. Effective measures to reduce postoperative complications and wound pain are needed to further improve the outcome of abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:9521396

  20. Reassessing the Annual Pelvic Exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... recommendation released Tuesday, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said it couldn't weigh in for or ... pelvic exams based on current evidence. "The Task Force is calling for more research to better understand ...

  1. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22258946 . Dumoulin C, Hay-Smith J. Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20091581 . Herderschee R, Hay-Smith EJC, Herbison GP, Roovers JP, Heineman MJ. Feedback ...

  2. CT-guided Perineural Injections for Chronic Pelvic Pain.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Scott, Kelly M; Rozen, Shai; Starr, Adam J; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a disabling condition that affects a large number of men and women. It may occur after a known inciting event, or it could be idiopathic. A common cause of pelvic pain syndrome is neuropathy of the pelvic nerves, including the femoral and genitofemoral nerves, ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerves, pudendal nerve, obturator nerve, lateral and posterior femoral cutaneous nerves, inferior cluneal nerves, inferior rectal nerve, sciatic nerve, superior gluteal nerve, and the spinal nerve roots. Pelvic neuropathy may result from entrapment, trauma, inflammation, or compression or may be iatrogenic, secondary to surgical procedures. Imaging-guided nerve blocks can be used for diagnostic and therapeutic management of pelvic neuropathies. Ultrasonography (US)-guided injections are useful for superficial locations; however, there can be limitations with US, such as its operator dependence, the required skill, and the difficulty in depicting various superficial and deep pelvic nerves. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided injections are radiation free and lead to easy depiction of the nerve because of the superior soft-tissue contrast; although the expense, the required skill, and the limited availability of MR imaging are major hindrances to its widespread use for this purpose. Computed tomography (CT)-guided injections are becoming popular because of the wide availability of CT scanners, the lower cost, and the shorter amount of time required to perform these injections. This article outlines the technique of perineural injection of major pelvic nerves, illustrates the different target sites with representative case examples, and discusses the pitfalls. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618322

  3. Post partum pelvic floor changes.

    PubMed

    Fonti, Ylenia; Giordano, Rosalba; Cacciatore, Alessandra; Romano, Mattea; La Rosa, Beatrice

    2009-10-01

    Pelvic-perineal dysfunctions, are the most common diseases in women after pregnancy. Urinary incontinence and genital prolapsy, often associated, are the most important consequences of childbirth and are determined by specific alterations in the structure of neurological and musculo-fascial pelvic support.Causation is difficult to prove because symptom occur remote from delivery.Furthermore it is unclear whether changes are secondary to the method of childbirth or to the pregnancy itself.This controversy fuels the debate about whether or not women should be offered the choice of elective caesarean delivery to avoid the development of subsequent pelvic floor disfunction.But it has been demonstrated that pregnancy itself, by means of mechanical changes of pelvic statics and changes in hormones, can be a significant risk factor for these diseases. Especially is the first child to be decisive for the stability of the pelvic floor.During pregnancy, the progressive increase in volume of the uterus subject perineal structures to a major overload. During delivery, the parties present and passes through the urogenital hiatus leading to growing pressure on the tissues causing the stretching of the pelvic floor with possible muscle damage, connective tissue and / or nervous.In this article we aim to describe genitourinary post partum changes with particular attention to the impact of pregnancy or childbirth on these changes. PMID:22439048

  4. Obesity and Pelvic Floor Disorders: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Pomian, Andrzej; Lisik, Wojciech; Kosieradzki, Maciej; Barcz, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are becoming a worldwide health problem associated with numerous co-morbidities. National costs of obesity and pelvic flor disorders have been rising since the 1950s across the world. Obesity is thought to have a very strong effect on pelvic floor disorders, and, considering the high prevalence of both problems worldwide, it is of utmost importance to evaluate the association between these pathologies as well as the impact of obesity on treatment efficacy. This review is based on a selection of reports in the literature (PubMed search), including guidelines and Cochrane reviews. Obesity seems to be a well-documented risk factor for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and is a predictor of exacerbation of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and overactive bladder (OAB). Weight loss is also associated with improvement or resolution of SUI and OAB. In the case of pelvic organ prolapse (POP), weight loss is associated with improvement in quality of life. Although obesity is associated with POP in general, the exact role of obesity in symptomatic POP remains uncertain. While outcomes of anti-incontinence surgery among obese women are similar to those in non-obese women, postoperative urge incontinence is more likely to occur. It seems that obesity is not a risk factor for postoperative complications or short-term efficacy of POP surgical treatment. Long-term effects are still uncertain. Obesity is a strong risk factor for LUTS, but in most cases it does not affect efficacy of operative treatment. It may be associated with some post-operative complications. Weight loss in many cases allows avoiding surgical intervention. PMID:27255341

  5. Obesity and Pelvic Floor Disorders: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pomian, Andrzej; Lisik, Wojciech; Kosieradzki, Maciej; Barcz, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are becoming a worldwide health problem associated with numerous co-morbidities. National costs of obesity and pelvic flor disorders have been rising since the 1950s across the world. Obesity is thought to have a very strong effect on pelvic floor disorders, and, considering the high prevalence of both problems worldwide, it is of utmost importance to evaluate the association between these pathologies as well as the impact of obesity on treatment efficacy. This review is based on a selection of reports in the literature (PubMed search), including guidelines and Cochrane reviews. Obesity seems to be a well-documented risk factor for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and is a predictor of exacerbation of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and overactive bladder (OAB). Weight loss is also associated with improvement or resolution of SUI and OAB. In the case of pelvic organ prolapse (POP), weight loss is associated with improvement in quality of life. Although obesity is associated with POP in general, the exact role of obesity in symptomatic POP remains uncertain. While outcomes of anti-incontinence surgery among obese women are similar to those in non-obese women, postoperative urge incontinence is more likely to occur. It seems that obesity is not a risk factor for postoperative complications or short-term efficacy of POP surgical treatment. Long-term effects are still uncertain. Obesity is a strong risk factor for LUTS, but in most cases it does not affect efficacy of operative treatment. It may be associated with some post-operative complications. Weight loss in many cases allows avoiding surgical intervention. PMID:27255341

  6. [The use of low-energy lasers for preventing and treating postoperative and radiation-induced complications in patients with head and neck tumors].

    PubMed

    Kitsmaniuk, Z D; DëmochkoVB; Popovich, V I

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of low-energy helium-neon and copper vapor lasers for prevention and treatment of postoperative and irradiation complications was assessed in 195 patients with locally advanced tumors of the head and neck. The control group included 118 patients. Intravenous laser irradiation of the blood was associated with a higher percentage of wound healing by first intention and better course of the postoperative period. Laser treatment of skin irradiation fields was shown to improve skin tolerance to the neutron beam. The study failed to establish tumor growth stimulation by the laser irradiation in terms of recurrence and metastasis development. The data obtained showed low-energy laser irradiation to offer promise for prevention and treatment of postoperative and irradiation complications. PMID:1300810

  7. Primary Malignant Melanoma of Vagina Treated by Total Pelvic Exenteration.

    PubMed

    Rema, P; Suchetha, S; Ahmed, Iqbal

    2016-02-01

    Primary malignant melanoma of vagina is a rare variant of melanoma and usually associated with a grave prognosis. Radical surgery is the only treatment option with reasonable loco regional control. A case of primary malignant melanoma involving whole of vagina infiltrating urethra and reaching up to vulva was treated by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. The tumor was infiltrating bladder and rectum reaching the anal sphincter. Total pelvic exenteration was done to achieve tumor-free surgical margins. One year after treatment, patient is disease free. PMID:27186045

  8. Surgical aspects of intestinal injury due to pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, P.A.; Thomson, H.J.; Ludgate, S.N.; Small, W.P.; Smith, A.N.

    1985-04-01

    Seventy-one patients with intestinal injury secondary to pelvic irradiation had predominantly large bowel lesions. Seventeen cases were treated conservatively and 54 came to surgery, 28 patients having more than one operation. Following this essentially salvage surgery there were more ileal than colonic anastomotic leaks. Thirty-four patients died during the follow-up period (2-12 years), 19 from recurrent malignancy, and nine as a result of continuing radiation effects. Seventy per cent of the patients who had a radiation fistula died as a result of malignancy. Of 42000 cases of pelvic malignancy treated by irradiation over the decade 1972-1982, surgical referrals for complications constituted 1.7%, with an overall radiation-related mortality of 0.2%. It is our opinion that colostomy alone has little part to play in this condition, and a policy based on excisional surgery is suggested.

  9. Treatment of stage D bladder cancer with adjuvant doxorubicin hydrochloride and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, A.J.; Grayhack, J.T.; Merrill, J.M.; Bulkley, G.J.; Shetty, R.M.

    1982-10-01

    pathologic Stage D bladder cancer was recognized in 16 patients by evaluation tissue obtained by radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy (7), pelvic lymph node dissection (3) or biopsies (3), ileal conduit and pelvic lymph node biopsy (1), or transurethral biopsy of the bladder and prostate (2). Treatment of these patients with radiation preceded and followed by doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin) was initiated three to four weeks postoperatively. The treatment regimen consisted of the following: (1) doxorubicin 60 mg/M2 intravenously every three weeks for three cycles; (2) 5,000 rad external radiation to the whole pelvis in five to six weeks; and (3) doxorubicin for five cycles. The mean survival was twenty-three months. The survival rate was as follows: one year, 10 of 15 patients at risk; two years, 6 of 11; three years, 5 of 9; four years, 1 of 4; and five years, 0 of 2. Ten patients died six to thirty-six months (mean 13.6) postoperatively. In 6 of the patients significant obstruction of small bowel developed. These preliminary observations indicate encouraging therapeutic results with an acceptable morbidity for this regimen.

  10. Voiding trial outcome following pelvic floor repair without incontinence procedures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Won, Sara; Haviland, Miriam J.; Bargen, Emily Von; Hacker, Michele R.; Li, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Our aim was to identify predictors of postoperative voiding trial failure among patients who had a pelvic floor repair without a concurrent incontinence procedure in order to identify low-risk patients in whom postoperative voiding trials may be modified. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent pelvic floor repair without concurrent incontinence procedures at two institutions from 1 November 2011 through 13 October 2013 after abstracting demographic and clinical data from medical records. The primary outcome was postoperative retrograde voiding trial failure. We used modified Poisson regression to calculate the risk ratio (RR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI). Results Of the 371 women who met eligibility criteria, 294 (79.2 %) had complete data on the variables of interest. Forty nine (16.7%) failed the trial, and those women were less likely to be white (p = 0.04), more likely to have had an anterior colporrhaphy (p = 0.001), and more likely to have had a preoperative postvoid residual (PVR) ≥150 ml (p = 0.001). After adjusting for race, women were more likely to fail their voiding trial if they had a preoperative PVR of ≥150 ml (RR: 1.9; 95 % CI: 1.1–3.2); institution also was associated with voiding trial failure (RR: 3.0; 95 % CI: 1.6–5.4). Conclusions Among our cohort, postoperative voiding trial failure was associated with a PVR of ≥150 ml and institution at which the surgery was performed. PMID:26886553

  11. A simple method of alignment for pelvic irradiation in obese patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sweigart, Kenneth

    2002-12-31

    Administering radiation therapy to obese pelvic patients can pose a difficult challenge to even the veteran radiation therapist. Daily reproducibility can be achieved with the sacrifice of additional time and filming. We have developed a technique which has shown consistent reproducibility of the radiation treatments with a minimum of inconvenience to busy schedules.

  12. Screening Pelvic Examination in Nonpregnant Adult Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Screening Pelvic Examination in Nonpregnant Adult Women: Recommendations From the American ... Physicians The full report is titled “Screening Pelvic Examination in Adult Women: A Clinical Practice Guideline From ...

  13. Kegel Exercises for Your Pelvic Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... control until after 6 to 12 weeks of daily exercises. Still, most women notice an improvement after just ... Weak pelvic muscles often lead to urine leakage. Daily exercises can strengthen pelvic muscles. These exercises often improve ...

  14. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Treatment and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Herpes Gonorrhea Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease ... is pelvic inflammatory disease treated? Several types of antibiotics can cure PID. Antibiotic treatment does not, however, reverse any ...

  15. Management of Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life is adversely affected by pelvic organ prolapse, the prevalence of which is increasing because of the persistently growing older population. Today, the tension-free vaginal mesh kit has grown in popularity owing to its comparable cure rate to traditional reconstructive surgery and the feasibility of an early return to normal life. However, significant debate remains over the long-term cure rate and the safety of tension-free vaginal mesh in the United States. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends obtaining informed consent about the safety and cure rate when the patient chooses surgery using the tension-free vaginal mesh kit or meshes before surgery. The goal of surgery for pelvic organ prolapse is the restoration of anatomic defects. This review article provides an overview of basic surgical techniques and the results, advantages, and disadvantages of surgery for pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:25405010

  16. Microbiota and Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Harsha; Tal, Reshef; Clark, Natalie A.; Segars, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Female genital tract microbiota play a crucial role in maintaining health. Disequilibrium of the microbiota has been associated with increased risk of pelvic infections. In recent years, culture-independent molecular techniques have expanded understanding of the composition of genital microbiota and the dynamic nature of the microbiota. There is evidence that upper genital tract may not be sterile and may harbor microflora in the physiologic state. The isolation of bacterial vaginosis-associated organisms in women with genital infections establishes a link between pelvic infections and abnormal vaginal flora. With the understanding of the composition of the microbiota in healthy and diseased states, the next logical step is to identify the function of the newly identified microbes. This knowledge will further expand our understanding of the causation of pelvic infections, which may lead to more effective prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:24390920

  17. Postoperative irradiation in carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Pilepich, M.V.; Walz, B.J.; Baglan, R.J.

    1984-10-01

    Twenty-eight patients received postoperative radiotherapy with curative intent following either radical prostatectomy (18 patients) or enucleative prostatectomy (10 patients). In patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, the indications for postoperative radiotherapy included positive margins in 13, close margins in 2, and seminal vesicle involvement in 3 patients. The majority of patients (82%) received total dose to the prostatic bed in excess of 6500 rad. In over 80% of the patients, the pelvic lymphatics are also treated (to a total dose of 4000-5000 rad). All of the patients irradiated after radical prostatectomy clinically remained disease-free locally. Approximately one-half of the patients in both the enucleation and radial prostatectomy groups developed evidence of distant metastases. The complications of treatment have been comparable to those in patients treated with radiotherapy only. The continence status has not been affected significantly. All patients with incontinence following completion of radiotherapy had documented impairment of continence prior to radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy administered following either radical or enucleative prostatectomy was tolerated well and resulted in excellent local control.

  18. Pathophysiology and prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Arung, Willy; Meurisse, Michel; Detry, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal adhesions represent an important clinical challenge in gastrointestinal surgery. Peritoneal adhesions are a consequence of peritoneal irritation by infection or surgical trauma, and may be considered as the pathological part of healing following any peritoneal injury, particularly due to abdominal surgery. The balance between fibrin deposition and degradation is critical in determining normal peritoneal healing or adhesion formation. Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are a major cause of morbidity resulting in multiple complications, many of which may manifest several years after the initial surgical procedure. In addition to acute small bowel obstruction, peritoneal adhesions may cause pelvic or abdominal pain, and infertility. In this paper, the authors reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis and various prevention strategies of adhesion formation, using Medline and PubMed search. Several preventive agents against postoperative peritoneal adhesions have been investigated. Their role aims in activating fibrinolysis, hampering coagulation, diminishing the inflammatory response, inhibiting collagen synthesis or creating a barrier between adjacent wound surfaces. Their results are encouraging but most of them are contradictory and achieved mostly in animal model. Until additional findings from future clinical researches, only a meticulous surgery can be recommended to reduce unnecessary morbidity and mortality rates from these untoward effects of surgery. In the current state of knowledge, pre-clinical or clinical studies are still necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of the several proposed prevention strategies of postoperative peritoneal adhesions. PMID:22147959

  19. Fluid dynamic modelling of renal pelvic pressure during endoscopic stone removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oratis, Alexandros; Subasic, John; Bird, James; Eisner, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic kidney stone removal procedures are known to increase internal pressure in the renal pelvis, the kidney's urinary collecting system. High renal pelvic pressure incites systemic absorption of irrigation fluid, which can increase the risk of postoperative fever and sepsis or the unwanted absorption of electrolytes. Urologists choose the appropriate surgical procedure based on patient history and kidney stone size. However, no study has been conducted to compare the pressure profiles of each procedure, nor is there a precise sense of how the renal pelvic pressure scales with various operational parameters. Here we develop physical models for the flow rates and renal pelvic pressure for various procedures. We show that the results of our models are consistent with existing urological data on each procedure and that the models can predict pressure profiles where data is unavailable.

  20. Cecal rupture after continent ileocecal urinary diversion during total pelvic exenteration

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, E. )

    1991-09-01

    Continent ureteral diversion at the time of pelvic exenteration avoids an external appliance and allows patients to retain bladder reservoir function. The technical difficulty of this procedure requires meticulous attention to operative and perioperative care, particularly after pelvic irradiation. A patient with recurrent stage IIIB carcinoma of the cervix underwent total pelvic exenteration with reconstructive procedures including low rectal anastomosis, neovagina formation, and ileocecal (Indiana) continent diversion. Early catheterization of the reservoir began 2 weeks postoperatively. One week later cecal rupture occurred, not related to suture line (technical) failure. Because of the high wall tension and reduced compliance in the irradiated cecum, the authors do not recommend catheterization of the urinary reservoir before 4-6 weeks. In order for continent diversion to become the standard diversion in exenteration patients, the major complication rate must remain comparable to that of noncontinent diversion.

  1. Functional Rudimentary Horn as a Rare Cause of Pelvic Pain: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Maliheh; Mehdighalb, Sepideh; Khosravi, Donya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pelvic pain results from many causes such as primary dysmenorrhea, uterine anomalies, menstrual outflow obstruction, endometriosis, myoma and adenomyosis. This study reports on a rare case of non-communicating functional rudimentary horn. Case Presentations: A 15-year-old nulligravida young woman with a history of severe intermittent pelvic pain presented a 4-5 centimeter mass. A surgical procedure for appendicitis was previously performed on this patient. Per-operative diagnosis was myoma and suspicion of leismus sarcoma. Laparotomy revealed left rudimentary horn, non-communication was confirmed by postoperative hysterosalpingogram (HSG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Resection of mass and left fallopian tube was done during the second surgery. Conclusions: Rudimentary horn should be considered in differentiation of pelvic pain and mass in young females. Early diagnosis and horn resection prevents emergency surgery and reliefs pain. PMID:25763218

  2. [Fibrosis of the pelvic floor].

    PubMed

    Beernaerts, A; Hirsch, F

    1984-01-01

    A pelvic pain is sometimes extremely difficult to define and to treat. The origin of this pain was said to be due to either neurological, psychosomatic, urological or orthopaedic factors. It was in fact an unilateral fibrosis of the perineal transverse muscle. A surgical section has definitively cured the patient. PMID:6539549

  3. Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women.

    PubMed

    Speer, Linda M; Mushkbar, Saudia; Erbele, Tara

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is defined as persistent, noncyclic pain perceived to be in structures related to the pelvis and lasting more than six months. Often no specific etiology can be identified, and it can be conceptualized as a chronic regional pain syndrome or functional somatic pain syndrome. It is typically associated with other functional somatic pain syndromes (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome, nonspecific chronic fatigue syndrome) and mental health disorders (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder, depression). Diagnosis is based on findings from the history and physical examination. Pelvic ultrasonography is indicated to rule out anatomic abnormalities. Referral for diagnostic evaluation of endometriosis by laparoscopy is usually indicated in severe cases. Curative treatment is elusive, and evidence-based therapies are limited. Patient engagement in a biopsychosocial approach is recommended, with treatment of any identifiable disease process such as endometriosis, interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, and comorbid depression. Potentially beneficial medications include depot medroxyprogesterone, gabapentin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists with add-back hormone therapy. Pelvic floor physical therapy may be helpful. Behavioral therapy is an integral part of treatment. In select cases, neuromodulation of sacral nerves may be appropriate. Hysterectomy may be considered as a last resort if pain seems to be of uterine origin, although significant improvement occurs in only about one-half of cases. Chronic pelvic pain should be managed with a collaborative, patient-centered approach. PMID:26926975

  4. Pelvic Organ Prolapse--Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... on PFDs Videos Bookmark These Websites Helpful Organizations Patient Privacy Concerns Community Find a Provider Break Free Upcoming ... Download Preparing for Surgery (PDF) Mesh Information for Patients with Pelvic Floor Disorders ... Us | Privacy Policy Accredited © 2016 American Urogynecologic Society. All rights ...

  5. Postoperative Spine Infections.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit Yuvaraj; Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  6. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  7. Innovative non-surgical management of pelvic and anterior vaginal wall abscess following vaginal surgery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nisha; Negi, Neha; Kumar, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    Surgical site infections remain a common cause of morbidity following gynaecological surgery. The widespread implementation of antibiotic prophylaxis prior to surgery, as well as cognizance of modifiable risk factors for postoperative infection, has led to a significant reduction in postoperative infection rates. However, in low resource settings where sepsis and infections are common, surgical site infections following vaginal hysterectomy are sometimes encountered. It is a challenge to treat these infections with minimal intervention avoiding repeat surgery. We report here a unique situation following vaginal hysterectomy and then laparotomy; where a pelvic abscess communicated with the vesicovaginal space and drained through an opening into the anterior vaginal wall. An innovative technique was used to drain this anterior vaginal wall abscess connecting to pelvic cavity using a 40 cm long disposable urinary catheter (made of polyvinyl chloride), which was inserted into the vaginal opening under ultrasound guidance. PMID:27571911

  8. Lung collapse secondary to mucus plug in a gynecologic patient after reconstructive pelvic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, George; Slavin, Stephen; Cui, Nuan; Mitchell, Kaitlyn

    2014-01-01

    This is the case of a 45-year-old woman with a history of asthma and smoking who developed complete left lung and right upper lobe collapse secondary to mucus plugs that developed immediately postoperatively after an uncomplicated reconstructive pelvic surgery. This rare intraoperative complication was successfully treated in the recovery room with bedside fiber-optic bronchoscopy. This resulted in complete resolution of her pulmonary findings within 24 hours of bronchoscopy. PMID:24566216

  9. Can the Volume of Pelvic Osteolysis be Calculated without Using Computed Tomography?

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Hiroshi; Beykirch, Sarah E.; Hopper, Robert H.; Engh, C. Anderson; Engh, Charles A.

    2008-01-01

    The most common method to diagnose and monitor osteolysis is the standard anteroposterior radiograph. Unfortunately, plain radiographs underestimate the incidence and extent of osteolysis. CT scans are more sensitive and accurate but also more expensive and subject patients to more radiation. To determine whether the volume of pelvic osteolysis could be accurately estimated without a CT scan, we evaluated the relationships between CT volume measurements and other variables that may be related to the size of pelvic osteolytic lesions in 78 THAs. Only the area of pelvic osteolysis measured on radiographs, heavy patient activity level, and total volume of wear were associated with the pelvic osteolysis volume measured on CT in the context of the multivariate regression analysis. Despite a strong correlation (r = 0.93, r2 = 0.87) between these three variables and the volume of pelvic osteolysis measured on CT, estimates of pelvic osteolysis volume deviated from the actual volume measured on CT by more than 10 cm3 among eight of the 78 THAs in this study. CT images remain our preferred modality when accurate assessments of pelvic osteolysis volume are required. Level of Evidence: Level III, diagnostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18820985

  10. Pelvic Muscle Exercises Using A Home Trainer for Pelvic Muscle Dysfunction: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic muscle exercises can help improve symptoms of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. This article describes the case of a 66-year-old woman with moderate pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and mild urinary incontinence (UI) who initiated pelvic muscle exercises with the assistance of a novel, at-home trainer equipped with a vaginal sensor and accompanying smartphone app software, the PeriCoach system (Analytica, 2015). After 8 weeks of training with the device, she showed improvements in strength, endurance, and disability, as measured by manual muscle test, electromyography, and Pelvic Floor Disability Index scores. Older women can use biofeedback technology to improve pelvic floor muscle function successfully at home. PMID:27281865

  11. Successful Treatment of a Large Pelvic Abscess Using Intraluminal VAC: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Abbas; Kiziltan, Remzi; Yilmaz, Özkan; Kotan, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The most feared complication of the surgical treatment of rectal cancer is anastomotic leakage, which is related to high rates of mortality and morbidity. Here, we present a patient who could not be treated with surgical drainage but treated by intraluminal Vacuum Associated Closure (VAC). A 34-year-old male patient was treated for rectal cancer by low anterior resection, colorectal anastomosis, and diverting ileostomy following neoadjuvant CRT. The patient reported with a postoperative anastomotic disruption and a large pelvic abscess. Due to the continuation of foul-smell drainage inspite of perianal incision and drainage, intraluminal VAC was applied and the pelvic abscess and the foul-smell were successfully treated. The presence of an adequate anal sphincter tonus is a disadvantage in anastomotic leakage, since it prevents the emptying of the intestinal content and also precludes the drainage of the pelvic abscess. The endoluminal application of VAC, similar to the results of application of VAC in open wounds, has been demonstrated to decrease fibrin and necrotic tissue in the pelvic cavity and increase granulation tissue. VAC, which has long been used in the treatment of open wounds, is a promising method in the treatment of large pelvic abscesses due to anastomotic leakage following rectum resection. PMID:27190889

  12. Treatment Outcomes of Open Pelvic Fractures Associated with Extensive Perineal Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem

    2013-01-01

    Background The main causes of death in patients with open pelviperineal injuries are uncontrollable bleeding and pelvic sepsis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the management outcomes of open pelvic fractures associated with extensive perineal injuries. Methods We retrospectively studied 15 cases with open pelvic fractures associated with extensive perineal injuries (urethral and anal canal laceration) admitted between August 2006 and September 2010. Mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score, associated injuries, hemodynamic status on arrival, resuscitation and transfusion requirements, operative techniques, intra- and postoperative complications, length of intensive care unit and hospital stay, and mortality were recorded in a computerised database for further evaluation and analysis. Results The male to female ratio was 12:3 with an average age of 38.6 years (ranged, 11 to 65 years). The average packed red blood cell units used were 8 units (ranged, 4 to 21 units). All patients were initially transferred to the operating room for colostomy, radical debridement and fixation of the pelvic fracture by an external fixator. One patient had acute renal failure, which improved with medical treatment and 2 patients (13.3%) died, one with type III anteroposterior compression fracture due to hemorrhagic shock and the other due to septicemia. Conclusions Open pelvic fractures with extensive perineal injuries are associated with high mortality rates. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, including reanimation, colostomy, cystostomy, vigorous and repeated irrigation and debridement, and fixation by an external fixator can improve the outcomes and reduce the mortality rate. PMID:24340145

  13. [Ultrasonography in acute pelvic pain].

    PubMed

    Kupesić, Sanja; Aksamija, Alenka; Vucić, Niksa; Tripalo, Ana; Kurjak, Asim

    2002-01-01

    Acute pelvic pain may be the manifestation of various gynecologic and non-gynecologic disorders from less alarming rupture of the follicular cyst to life threatening conditions such as rupture of ectopic pregnancy or perforation of inflamed appendix. In order to construct an algorithm for differential diagnosis we divide acute pelvic pain into gynecologic and non-gynecologic etiology, which is than subdivided into gastrointestinal and urinary causes. Appendicitis is the most common surgical emergency and should always be considered in differential diagnosis if appendix has not been removed. Apart of clinical examination and laboratory tests, an ultrasound examination is sensitive up to 90% and specific up to 95% if graded compression technique is used. Still it is user-depended and requires considerable experience in order to perform it reliably. Meckel's diverticulitis, acute terminal ileitis, mesenteric lymphadenitis and functional bowel disease are conditions that should be differentiated from other causes of low abdominal pain by clinical presentation, laboratory and imaging tests. Dilatation of renal pelvis and ureter are typical signs of obstructive uropathy and may be efficiently detected by ultrasound. Additional thinning of renal parenchyma suggests long-term obstructive uropathy. Ruptured ectopic pregnancy, salpingitis and hemorrhagic ovarian cysts are three most commonly diagnosed gynecologic conditions presenting as an acute abdomen. Degenerating leiomyomas and adnexal torsion occur less frequently. For better systematization, gynecologic causes of acute pelvic pain could be divided into conditions with negative pregnancy test and conditions with positive pregnancy test. Pelvic inflammatory disease may be ultrasonically presented with numerous signs such as thickening of the tubal wall, incomplete septa within the dilated tube, demonstration of hyperechoic mural nodules, free fluid in the "cul-de-sac" etc. Color Doppler ultrasound contributes to more

  14. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF UNSTABLE PELVIC RING FRACTURE IN SKELETALLY IMMATURE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Joao Antonio Matheus; de Souza Portes Meirelles, Ricardo; Júnior, Luiz Augusto Peçanha Tavares; Goldsztajn, Flávio; Rocha, Tito; Mendes, Pedro Henrique Barros

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To present the outcomes from definitive surgical treatment for unstable fractures of the pelvic ring in children undergoing surgical reduction and stabilization. Methods: We studied 10 patients with immature skeletons who suffered unstable fractures of the pelvic ring and were treated between March 2004 and January 2008. The study was retrospective, based on clinical and radiographic evaluations. Results: The mean age at the time of the trauma was 8.8 years (2 to 13 years). Seven patients were female and three was male. There were eight cases of trauma caused by being run over, and one case each of a motorcycle accident and falling from a height. Five patients had other associated injuries such as fractures of the clavicle, femoral diaphysis, proximal humerus, lower leg bones, olecranon and bladder injury. All the patients evaluated showed an excellent clinical outcome. The pelvic asymmetry before surgery ranged from 0.7 to 2.9 cm (mean 1.45 cm), and dropped to values between 0.2 and 0.9 cm (mean 0.39 cm) after reduction. In no case was any change observed in pelvic asymmetry measured in the immediate postoperative period and at the end of follow-up. Conclusion: Pelvic ring fractures in skeletally immature patients are rare and surgical treatment is unusual. Several authors have questioned conservative treatment because of the complications encountered. Bone remodeling does not seem enough to cause an improvement in pelvic asymmetry, and this justifies the choice of surgical treatment for reduction and correction of pelvic ring deformities. PMID:27026968

  15. Postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Nett, Michael P

    2010-09-01

    Although the long-term results following traditional total joint arthroplasty are excellent, postoperative pain management has been suboptimal. Under-treatment of pain is a focus of growing concern to the orthopedic community. Poorly controlled postoperative pain leads to undesirable outcomes, including immobility, stiffness, myocardial ischemia, atelectasis, pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis, anxiety, depression, and chronic pain. Over the past decade, the attempt to minimize postoperative complications, combined with the move toward minimally invasive surgery and early postoperative mobilization, has made pain management a critical aspect of joint replacement surgery. Effective protocols are currently available; all include a multimodal approach. Debate continues regarding the ideal approach; however, reliance on narcotic analgesia alone is suboptimal. PMID:20839719

  16. Absence of bile acid malabsorption as a late effect of pelvic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, J.J.; Stryker, J.A.; Demers, L.M.; Mortel, R.

    1986-09-01

    The pathophysiology of chronic radiation-induced diarrhea was evaluated in 28 patients who had undergone pelvic irradiation for gynecologic neoplasms 2 to 7 years previously. Twenty-seven patients undergoing radiotherapy with techniques that did not require abdominal or pelvic irradiation served as controls. The glycine conjugates of cholic acid (GC) were measured in serum by radioimmunoassay. Fasting and 2 hr. pp GC levels for the pelvic irradiated patients were 11.0 +/- 11.1 (mean +/- SD) and 24.8 +/- 17.3 micrograms/dl. Fasting and 2 hr. pp GC levels for controls were 12.6 +/- 7.4 and 28.0 +/- 14.7. There were no significant differences in the post-prandial increases in serum GC between pelvic irradiated patients and controls (p = .23, Type II error probability = .13). There was also no significant difference in the 2 hr. pp and fasting GC ratio (p = .39). There was significant difference between the stool frequency (p less than .01) and the prevalence of diarrhea (p less than .02) between pelvic irradiated patients and controls. The data suggest that bile acid malabsorption due to ileal dysfunction is not an inevitable late complication of pelvic irradiation and is not the major determinant in the pathophysiology of chronic radiation-induced diarrhea.

  17. Pelvic floor ultrasound: a review.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Hans Peter

    2010-04-01

    Imaging currently plays a limited role in the investigation of pelvic floor disorders. It is obvious that magnetic resonance imaging has limitations in urogynecology and female urology at present due to cost and access limitations and due to the fact that it is generally a static, not a dynamic, method. However, none of those limitations apply to sonography, a diagnostic method that is very much part of general practice in obstetrics and gynecology. Translabial or transperineal ultrasound is helpful in determining residual urine; detrusor wall thickness; bladder neck mobility; urethral integrity; anterior, central, and posterior compartment prolapse; and levator anatomy and function. It is at least equivalent to other imaging methods in visualizing such diverse conditions as urethral diverticula, rectal intussusception, mesh dislodgment, and avulsion of the puborectalis muscle. Ultrasound is the only imaging method able to visualize modern mesh slings and implants and may predict who actually needs such implants. Delivery-related levator trauma is the most important known etiologic factor for pelvic organ prolapse and not difficult to diagnose on 3-/4-dimensional and even on 2-dimensional pelvic floor ultrasound. It is likely that this will be an important driver behind the universal use of this technology. This review gives an overview of the method and its main current uses in clinical assessment and research. PMID:20350640

  18. Chronic pelvic pain: An imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Juhan, V

    2015-10-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is defined as disabling pain of at least six months duration. Chronic pelvic pain has often multiple causative factors. Careful analysis of clinical history and detailed clinical examination must be carried out to guide further imaging investigations. Endometriosis is a common cause of chronic pelvic pain, although there is no correlation between the severity of lesions and pain intensity. Pelvic ultrasonography should be the first line imaging examination to search for causative conditions that include endometriosis, adenomyosis, pelvic varices and chronic infection. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful for making the positive diagnosis and assessing the spread of endometriosis. MRI is more accurate than ultrasonography for the diagnosis of tubo-ovarian abscess when an adnexal mass is identified. Duplex and color Doppler ultrasonography as well as MR angiography are the best imaging technique for the diagnosis of pelvic congestion syndrome. In patients with pudendal neuralgia, cross-sectional imaging help exclude nerve compression. PMID:26441020

  19. Recommendations on routine screening pelvic examination

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Marcello; Gorber, Sarah Connor; Moore, Ainsley; Thombs, Brett D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the 2014 American College of Physicians (ACP) guideline on the use of pelvic examinations to screen for cancer (other than cervical), pelvic inflammatory disease, or other benign gynecologic conditions to determine whether the ACP guideline on routine pelvic examinations was consistent with Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (CTFPHC) standards and could be adapted or adopted. Methods The SNAP-IT (Smooth National Adaptation and Presentation of Guidelines to Improve Thrombosis Treatment) method was used to determine whether the ACP guideline was consistent with CTFPHC standards and could be adapted or adopted. Recommendations The CTFPHC recommends not performing a screening pelvic examination to screen for noncervical cancer, pelvic inflammatory disease, or other gynecological conditions in asymptomatic women. This is a strong recommendation with moderate-quality evidence. Conclusion The CTFPHC adopts the recommendation on screening pelvic examination as published by the ACP in 2014. PMID:26975912

  20. Pelvic floor hypertonic disorders: identification and management.

    PubMed

    Butrick, Charles W

    2009-09-01

    Patients with hypertonic pelvic floor disorders can present with pelvic pain or dysfunction. Each of the various syndromes will be discussed including elimination disorders, bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), vulvodynia, vaginismus, and chronic pelvic pain. The symptoms and objective findings on physical examination and various diagnostic studies will be reviewed. Therapeutic options including physical therapy, pharmacologic management, and trigger point injections, as well as botulinum toxin injections will be reviewed in detail. PMID:19932423

  1. Female Pelvic Floor Anatomy: The Pelvic Floor, Supporting Structures, and Pelvic Organs

    PubMed Central

    Herschorn, Sender

    2004-01-01

    The development of novel, less invasive therapies for stress urinary incontinence in women requires a thorough knowledge of the relationship between the pathophysiology of incontinence and anatomy. This article provides a review of the anatomy of the pelvic floor and lower urinary tract. Also discussed is the hammock hypothesis, which describes urethral support within the pelvis and provides an explanation of the continence mechanism. PMID:16985905

  2. A Rare Reason for Pelvic Pain in Pregnancy: Infectious Sacroiliitis

    PubMed Central

    Cekmez, Yasemin; Göçmen, Ahmet; Arslan, Oğuz; Şanlıkan, Fatih; Bağcı Türkmen, Simge

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Although the incidence of pregnancy-associated sacroiliitis is low, it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Timely diagnosis of the disease is confusing due to its nonspecific clinical features. Case. A 28-year-old woman at 34 weeks of gestation with severe pain in her right buttock radiating down the backside of the right thigh was admitted to our hospital. White blood cell (WBC) count and C-reactive protein (CRP) were elevated. The pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed right sacroiliitis. Conclusion. Infectious sacroiliitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis even in low-risk women who present with debilitating pelvic pain in pregnancy and medical treatment should not be delayed. PMID:26064130

  3. A Rare Reason for Pelvic Pain in Pregnancy: Infectious Sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Cekmez, Yasemin; Göçmen, Ahmet; Arslan, Oğuz; Şanlıkan, Fatih; Bağcı Türkmen, Simge

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Although the incidence of pregnancy-associated sacroiliitis is low, it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Timely diagnosis of the disease is confusing due to its nonspecific clinical features. Case. A 28-year-old woman at 34 weeks of gestation with severe pain in her right buttock radiating down the backside of the right thigh was admitted to our hospital. White blood cell (WBC) count and C-reactive protein (CRP) were elevated. The pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed right sacroiliitis. Conclusion. Infectious sacroiliitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis even in low-risk women who present with debilitating pelvic pain in pregnancy and medical treatment should not be delayed. PMID:26064130

  4. The Role of Transcatheter Arterial Embolization in Traumatic Pelvic Hemorrhage: Not Only Pelvic Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Zatelli, Marianna; Haglmuller, Thomas; Bonatti, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The most common life-threatening complication of pelvic trauma is bleeding. Arterial bleedings frequently require active management, preferably with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). Hemodynamic instability and/or contrast extravasation at computer tomography (CT) examination are reliable indicators of arterial injury. Unstable pelvic fractures are much more hemorrhagic than stable fractures. Nevertheless, an absent or isolated pelvic fracture does not exclude pelvic hemorrhage. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on our institutional database by collecting data of patients who underwent pelvic angiography and/or embolization due to pelvic blunt trauma in the period between August 2010 and August 2015. Results: In a period of five years, 39 patients with traumatic pelvic bleeding underwent angiography at our institution. Thirty-six of the 39 (92%) patients did show CT signs of active pelvic bleeding. Nineteen of 39 (49%) patients were hemodynamically unstable at presentation. Three of the 39 patients did not require embolization. Technical success was 35/36 (97%), and overall mortality was 3/39 (8%). Notably, 5/39 (13%) patients did not have any pelvic fracture at presentation, and 18/39 (46%) had only isolated or stable pelvic ring fracture. Conclusions: TAE is an effective technique to treat arterial pelvic bleeding after trauma. The absence of a major pelvic fracture does not exclude the risk of active bleeding requiring prompt treatment. PMID:27625908

  5. Recognizing Myofascial Pelvic Pain in the Female Patient with Chronic Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Elizabeth Anne; Katzman, Wendy B.

    2012-01-01

    Myofascial pelvic pain (MFPP) is a major component of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and often is not properly identified by healthcare providers. The hallmark diagnostic indicator of MFPP is myofascial trigger points in the pelvic floor musculature that refer pain to adjacent sites. Effective treatments are available to reduce MFPP, including myofascial trigger point release, PMID:22862153

  6. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  7. A life of pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Berkley, Karen J

    2005-10-15

    Pelvic pain associated with menstruation, i.e., dysmenorrhea, is a chronic pelvic pain that not only interferes with a woman's wellbeing for a large part of her life but also often co-occurs with other chronic painful conditions such as interstitial cystitis and irritable bowel syndrome and others. Little has been known about mechanisms underlying these chronic pelvic pains. This paper reviews 37 years of research in my laboratory at Florida State University on such mechanisms. Our research, mostly on rats, has contributed to the following findings: (1) Female reproductive organs are innervated in a topographic fashion by afferents in the pelvic (vagina/cervix) and hypogastric (cervix/uterine horn) nerves. (2) The input contributes to uterine and vaginal perceptions (nociception) that are modified by reproductive status. (3) Throughout the CNS, neurons responsive to stimulation of the reproductive tract also respond to stimulation of skin and other internal organs, in a manner modifiable by reproductive status and peripheral pathophysiology. (4) This dynamic physiological convergence may reflect extensive anatomical divergence of and interconnections between pathways entering the CNS via gateways through the spinal cord, dorsal column nuclei, and solitary nucleus. (5) The convergence also indicates the existence of extensive cross-system, viscero-visceral interactions within the CNS, that, while organized for coherent bodily functioning, serves as a substrate by which pathophysiology in one organ can influence physiology and responses to pathophysiology in other organs. (6) Some cross-system effects observed so far include: (a) Bladder inflammation reduces the rate of uterine contractions and the effects of drugs on the uterus. (b) Colon inflammation produces signs of inflammation in the otherwise healthy bladder and uterus. (c) A surgical model of endometriosis produces vaginal hyperalgesia, exacerbates pain behaviors induced by a ureteral stone, and reduces

  8. 38 CFR 4.67 - Pelvic bones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pelvic bones. 4.67 Section 4.67 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.67 Pelvic bones. The variability of...

  9. 38 CFR 4.67 - Pelvic bones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pelvic bones. 4.67 Section 4.67 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.67 Pelvic bones. The variability of...

  10. Pelvic joint fusion in patients with severe pelvic girdle pain – a prospective single-subject research design study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The fusion of the pelvic joints in patients with severe pelvic girdle pain (PGP) is a controversial and insufficiently studied procedure. The aims of this study were to evaluate physical function and pain after sacroiliac joint (SIJ) fusion. Methods A single-subject research design study with repeated measurements was conducted; pre-operatively and at 3, 6 and 12 months post-operatively. The outcome measures considered were the Oswestry disability index (ODI), visual analogue scale (VAS), and SF-36. Eight patients with severe PGP received open-accessed unilateral anterior SIJ fusion and fusion of the pubic symphysis. Results Seven patients reported positive results from the surgery. At 1 year post-operation, significant (p < 0.001) reductions in ODI (54 to 37) and VAS (82 to 57) were reported. The physical functioning, bodily pain, and social functioning scores in the SF-36 were also improved. Conclusion Positive and significant changes in disability and pain at 1 year after SIJ fusion were observed. Despite these positive results, open accessed anterior fusion of the SIJ was associated with adverse events and complications such as infection and nerve damage. PMID:24629145

  11. Atlas-Based Segmentation Improves Consistency and Decreases Time Required for Contouring Postoperative Endometrial Cancer Nodal Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Amy V.; Wortham, Angela; Wernick, Iddo; Evans, Andrew; Ennis, Ronald D.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Accurate target delineation of the nodal volumes is essential for three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for endometrial cancer adjuvant therapy. We hypothesized that atlas-based segmentation ('autocontouring') would lead to time savings and more consistent contours among physicians. Methods and Materials: A reference anatomy atlas was constructed using the data from 15 postoperative endometrial cancer patients by contouring the pelvic nodal clinical target volume on the simulation computed tomography scan according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0418 trial using commercially available software. On the simulation computed tomography scans from 10 additional endometrial cancer patients, the nodal clinical target volume autocontours were generated. Three radiation oncologists corrected the autocontours and delineated the manual nodal contours under timed conditions while unaware of the other contours. The time difference was determined, and the overlap of the contours was calculated using Dice's coefficient. Results: For all physicians, manual contouring of the pelvic nodal target volumes and editing the autocontours required a mean {+-} standard deviation of 32 {+-} 9 vs. 23 {+-} 7 minutes, respectively (p = .000001), a 26% time savings. For each physician, the time required to delineate the manual contours vs. correcting the autocontours was 30 {+-} 3 vs. 21 {+-} 5 min (p = .003), 39 {+-} 12 vs. 30 {+-} 5 min (p = .055), and 29 {+-} 5 vs. 20 {+-} 5 min (p = .0002). The mean overlap increased from manual contouring (0.77) to correcting the autocontours (0.79; p = .038). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that autocontouring leads to increased consistency and time savings when contouring the nodal target volumes for adjuvant treatment of endometrial cancer, although the autocontours still required careful editing to ensure that the lymph nodes at risk of recurrence are properly included in the target

  12. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Newman, Diane K

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle exercises have been recommended for urinary incontinence since first described by obstetrician gynecologist Dr. Arnold Kegel more than six decades ago. These exercises are performed to strengthen pelvic floor muscles, provide urethral support to prevent urine leakage, and suppress urgency. In clinical urology practice, expert clinicians also teach patients how to relax the muscle to improve bladder emptying and relieve pelvic pain caused by muscle spasm. When treating lower urinary tract symptoms, an exercise training program combined with biofeedback therapy has been recommended as first-line treatment. This article provides clinical application of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback as a technique to enhance pelvic floor muscle training. PMID:25233622

  13. The relationship between pelvic alignment and dysmenorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-jeong; Baek, Il-hun; Goo, Bong-oh

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between pelvic alignment and dysmenorrhea in general women. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred two females participated in this study. They were divided into a dysmenorrhea group and a normal group based on the results of a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) assessment of pain and the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ). The survey data was collecting from 5th July to 20th September, 2014. Formetric 4D was used to measure the pelvic alignment, including the values of Trunk Imbalance, Pelvic Tilt, Surface Rotation, Lateral Deviation, Kyphosis Angle, Lordosis Angle. [Results] There was a difference in the spine alignments of each group. The value of pelvic torsion was 2.4 ± 1.8 degree in those with dysmenorrhea, while it was 1.7 ± 1.1 degree in those without. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the results suggest that there is a relationship between menstrual pain and pelvic torsion. PMID:27134354

  14. Brachytherapy in pelvic malignancies: a review for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Vicens, Rafael A; Rodriguez, Joshua; Sheplan, Lawrence; Mayo, Cody; Mayo, Lauren; Jensen, Corey

    2015-10-01

    Brachytherapy, also known as sealed source or internal radiation therapy, involves placement of a radioactive source immediately adjacent to or within tumor, thus enabling delivery of a localized high dose of radiation. Compared with external beam radiation which must first pass through non-target tissues, brachytherapy results in less radiation dose to normal tissues. In the past decade, brachytherapy use has markedly increased, thus radiologists are encountering brachytherapy devices and their associated post-treatment changes to increasing degree. This review will present a variety of brachytherapy devices that radiologists may encounter during diagnostic pelvic imaging with a focus on prostate and gynecologic malignancies. The reader will become familiar with the function, correct position, and potential complications of brachytherapy devices in an effort to improve diagnostic reporting and communication with clinicians. PMID:25820802

  15. Endometrial cancers occurring 10 or more years after pelvic irradiation for carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.; Hart, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Fifteen patients who developed cancer of the endometrium 10 or more years after pelvic irradiation for carcinoma were selected for study from a group of 64 cases of postirradiation malignant pelvic tumors diagnosed during a 48-year span. The average interval between radiotherapy and diagnosis of the subsequent endometrial cancer was 17.2 years. Irradiation initially had been done for squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix in 13 cases (87%) and for ovarian tumors in two instances. Almost all patients had received megavoltage external radiation combined with radium implants. Two-thirds of the tumors were adenocarcinomas and one-third were carcinosarcomas (either homologous or heterologous). Although the risk of second primary malignant tumors following therapeutic irradiation for pelvic tumors probably is very low, the emergence of new genital tract cancers in long-term survivors must be anticipated, regardless of whether the postirradiation cancers are spontaneous or radiation-induced.

  16. Management of Postoperative Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Michael S; Berfield, Kathleen S; Abbaszadeh, Ryan V

    2015-11-01

    Despite best efforts, postoperative complications such as postoperative respiratory failure may occur and prompt recognition of the process and management is required. Postoperative respiratory failure, such as postoperative pneumonia, postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress-like syndromes, and pulmonary embolism, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The causes of these complications are multifactorial and depend on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, some of which are modifiable. The article identifies some of the risk factors, causes, and treatment strategies for successful management of the patient with postoperative respiratory failure. PMID:26515943

  17. [Avoidance of complications in oncological surgery of the pelvic region : combined oncosurgical and plastic reconstruction measures].

    PubMed

    Beier, J P; Croner, R S; Lang, W; Arkudas, A; Schmitz, M; Göhl, J; Hohenberger, W; Horch, R E

    2015-03-01

    Prevention of perioperative and postoperative complications resulting from surgical oncology in the pelvic region remains a major interdisciplinary challenge. With modern interdisciplinary concepts joining forces of various surgical specialties, tumor resection can be sufficiently carried out with wide margins and the patients benefit from reduced morbidity even in complex situations. As an example chronic fistulation and secretion from the presacral cavity and sinus may result as potential sequelae from intra-abdominal and intrapelvic tumor resection, especially when neoadjuvant multimodal therapies have been applied. This can be prevented by simultaneous transplantation of for example transpelvic vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous (VRAM) flap transfer, while extensive perineal skin and soft tissue defects may also be simultaneously reconstructed. In cases of malignant soft tissue tumors in the pelvic region a staged surgical procedure can be performed with a period of time between tumor resection and reconstruction. Thus, a histological R0 status can be secured prior to plastic reconstruction surgery in order to increase oncological safety. In cases of postresectional exposition of e. g. pelvic or femoral vessels or intrapelvic and intra-abdominal organs simultaneous flap procedure is mandatory.The reconstructive armamentarium of the plastic surgeon should contain not only pedicled but also free microsurgical flaps so that no compromise in terms of the extent of the oncological resection has to be accepted. At the same time perioperative and postoperative complications may be avoided and the patient quality of life can be preserved even in more complex cases. PMID:25620285

  18. Reappraisal of the role of postoperative radiation therapy in patients with pIIIa-N2 non-small cell lung cancer: A propensity score matching analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qinchen; Zhang, Baozhong; Zhao, Lujun; Wang, Changli; Gong, Liqun; Wang, Jun; Pang, Qingsong; Li, Kai; Liu, Weishuai; Li, Xue; Wang, Peng; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Reappraisal of the role of postoperative radiotherapy in pN2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients according to N1 lymph node involvement. Methods A total of 218 pIIIa-N2 NSCLC patients who underwent complete surgical resection with systematic nodal dissections were enrolled. Propensity scores were used for matching N1 involvement. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were analyzed retrospectively. Results After matching, pN2b patients without N1 involvement (pN0N2b) exhibited better prognoses than those with N1 involvement (pN1N2b) (5-year OS: 37.5% vs. 7.1%, P = 0.008; 5-year DFS: 31.8% vs. 4.6%, P = 0.004). Similar results were not detected in pN2a disease (5-year OS: 37.8% vs. 31.0%, P = 0.517; 5-year DFS: 27.1% vs. 20.2%, P = 0.788). The five-year OS of patients who received no adjuvant therapy (22 pN2a cases, 7 pN0N2b, 5 pN1N2b), adjuvant chemotherapy alone (74 pN2a cases, 11 pN0N2b, 17 pN1N2b) or chemoradiotherapy (25 pN2a cases, 7 pN0N2b, 6 pN1N2b) were compared (pN2a: 31.3%, 37.0%, and 32.0%, P = 0.808; pN0N2b: 0.0%, 18.2%, and 71.4%, P = 0.108; pN1N2b: 0.0%, 0.0%, and 33.3%, P < 0.0001). The five-year DFS was also analyzed (pN2a: 31.6%, 24.0%, and 18.3%, P = 0.410; pN0N2b: 0.0%, 11.1%, and 57.1%, P = 0.192; pN1N2b: 0.0%, 0.0%, and 16.7%, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the novel classification based on N1 involvement and pN2a/pN2b staging was an independent prognostic factor of OS and DFS. Conclusion N1 involvement significantly impacted the prognosis of pN2b NSCLC patients. The benefit of adjuvant therapy in pN2a and pN0N2b patients requires confirmation by further study. PMID:26445605

  19. Total pelvic floor ultrasound for pelvic floor defaecatory dysfunction: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, Alison J; Solanki, Deepa; Schizas, Alexis M P; Williams, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Total pelvic floor ultrasound is used for the dynamic assessment of pelvic floor dysfunction and allows multicompartmental anatomical and functional assessment. Pelvic floor dysfunction includes defaecatory, urinary and sexual dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse and pain. It is common, increasingly recognized and associated with increasing age and multiparity. Other options for assessment include defaecation proctography and defaecation MRI. Total pelvic floor ultrasound is a cheap, safe, imaging tool, which may be performed as a first-line investigation in outpatients. It allows dynamic assessment of the entire pelvic floor, essential for treatment planning for females who often have multiple diagnoses where treatment should address all aspects of dysfunction to yield optimal results. Transvaginal scanning using a rotating single crystal probe provides sagittal views of bladder neck support anteriorly. Posterior transvaginal ultrasound may reveal rectocoele, enterocoele or intussusception whilst bearing down. The vaginal probe is also used to acquire a 360° cross-sectional image to allow anatomical visualization of the pelvic floor and provides information regarding levator plate integrity and pelvic organ alignment. Dynamic transperineal ultrasound using a conventional curved array probe provides a global view of the anterior, middle and posterior compartments and may show cystocoele, enterocoele, sigmoidocoele or rectocoele. This pictorial review provides an atlas of normal and pathological images required for global pelvic floor assessment in females presenting with defaecatory dysfunction. Total pelvic floor ultrasound may be used with complementary endoanal ultrasound to assess the sphincter complex, but this is beyond the scope of this review. PMID:26388109

  20. Transvaginal Drainage of Pelvic Abscesses and Collections Using Transabdominal Ultrasound Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate clinical outcomes following transvaginal catheter placement using transabdominal ultrasound guidance for management of pelvic fluid collections. Methods. A retrospective review was performed for all patients who underwent transvaginal catheter drainage of pelvic fluid collections utilizing transabdominal ultrasound guidance between July 2008 and July 2013. 24 consecutive patients were identified and 24 catheters were placed. Results. The mean age of patients was 48.1 years (range = 27–76 y). 88% of collections were postoperative (n = 21), 8% were from pelvic inflammatory disease (n = 2), and 4% were idiopathic (n = 1). Of the 24 patients, 83% of patients (n = 20) had previously undergone a hysterectomy and 1 patient (4%) was pregnant at the time of drainage. The mean volume of initial drainage was 108 mL (range = 5 to 570). Catheters were left in place for an average of 4.3 days (range = 1–17 d). Microbial sampling was performed in all patients with 71% (n = 17) returning a positive culture. All collections were successfully managed percutaneously. There were no technical complications. Conclusions. Transvaginal catheter drainage of pelvic fluid collections using transabdominal ultrasound guidance is a safe and clinically effective procedure. Appropriate percutaneous management can avoid the need for surgery. PMID:26113862

  1. Gut microbial dysbiosis may predict diarrhea and fatigue in patients undergoing pelvic cancer radiotherapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aiping; Ling, Zongxin; Yang, Zhixiang; Kiela, Pawel R; Wang, Tao; Wang, Cheng; Cao, Le; Geng, Fang; Shen, Mingqiang; Ran, Xinze; Su, Yongping; Cheng, Tianmin; Wang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue and diarrhea are the most frequent adverse effects of pelvic radiotherapy, while their etiologies are largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlations between fatigue, diarrhea, and alterations in gut microbiota induced by pelvic radiotherapy. During the 5-week treatment of pelvic radiotherapy in 11 cancer patients, the general fatigue score significantly increased and was more prominent in the patients with diarrhea. The fatigue score was closely correlated with the decrease of serum citrulline (an indicator of the functional enterocyte mass) and the increases of systemic inflammatory proteins, including haptoglobin, orosomuoid, α1-antitrypsin and TNF-α. Serum level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was also elevated, especially in the patients with diarrhea indicating epithelial barrier breach and endotoxemia. Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene revealed that microbial diversity, richness, and the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio were significantly altered prior to radiotherapy in patients who later developed diarrhea. Pelvic radiotherapy induced further changes in fecal microbial ecology, some of which were specific to the patients with or without diarrhea. Our results indicate that gut microbial dysbiosis prior to radiation therapy may be exploited to predict development of diarrhea and to guide preventive treatment options. Radiation-induced dysbiosis may contribute to pelvic radiation disease, including mucositis, diarrhea, systemic inflammatory response, and pelvic radiotherapy-associated fatigue in cancer patients. PMID:25955845

  2. Physical therapy for female pelvic floor disorders.

    PubMed

    Bourcier, A P

    1994-08-01

    Non-surgical, non-pharmacological treatment for female pelvic floor dysfunction is represented by rehabilitation in urogynecology. Since Kegel, in 1948, who proposed the concept of functional restoration of the perineal muscles, no specific term has actually been established. Owing to the number of specialists involved in the management of female pelvic floor disorders (such as gynecologists, urologists, coloproctologists, and neurologists) and the different types of health care providers concerned (such as physicians, physical therapists, nurses, and midwives), it is difficult to make the proper choice between 'physical therapy for pelvic floor', 'pelvic floor rehabilitation', 'pelvic muscle re-education', and 'pelvic floor training'. Because muscle re-education is under the control of physical therapists, we have chosen the term of physical therapy for female pelvic floor disorders. Muscle re-education has an important role in the primary treatment of lower urinary tract dysfunction. A multidisciplinary collaboration may be of particular interest, and a thorough evaluation is useful for a proper selection of patients. PMID:7742496

  3. Postoperative pain management

    PubMed Central

    Kolettas, Alexandros; Lazaridis, George; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Karavergou, Anastasia; Pataka, Athanasia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a very important issue for several patients. Indifferent of the surgery type or method, pain management is very necessary. The relief from suffering leads to early mobilization, less hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An individual approach should be applied for pain control, rather than a fix dose or drugs. Additionally, medical, psychological, and physical condition, age, level of fear or anxiety, surgical procedure, personal preference, and response to agents given should be taken into account. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is minimizing the dose of medications to lessen side effects while still providing adequate analgesia. Again a multidisciplinary team approach should be pursued planning and formulating a plan for pain relief, particularly in complicated patients, such as those who have medical comorbidities. These patients might appear increase for analgesia-related complications or side effects. PMID:25774311

  4. Chronic pelvic pain after laser prostatectomy: treatment by resection of the perineal branches of the pudendal nerve.

    PubMed

    Dellon, A Lee; Wright, E James; Manson, Paul N

    2014-10-01

    Development of chronic pelvic pain after laser resection for benign prostatic hypertrophy has not been described previously (Clavien IIIb complication). The etiology of this chronic pain, which persisted despite medical chronic pain and urologic management for 5 years, was proven to be of pudendal nerve origin by local anesthetic blockade of the pudendal nerves bilaterally at the ischial spines. Surgical treatment was based upon the anatomic proximity of the perineal and dorsal branches of the pudendal nerve to the site of laser therapy on the pelvic side of the urogenital diaphragm. Treatment required resection of the perineal branches of the pudendal nerve bilaterally and neurolysis of the dorsal nerve to the penis bilaterally through incisions overlying the inferior pubic ramus. Relief of perineal pain and pain with micturition occurred in the immediate postoperative period. Pain relief and resumption of all normal activity occurred by 3 months postoperatively and continues 13 months following the surgery. PMID:24535673

  5. Endometriosis and Chronic Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bloski, Terri; Pierson, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Nurses often encounter patients with chronic pelvic pain associated with endometriosis, which is a puzzling and problematic gynecologic condition that has continued to plague women and baffle doctors and researchers worldwide since it was first identified by Dr. J. Sampson in the 1920s (Sampson, 1940). Endometriosis is defined as the growth, adhesion and progression of endometrial glands and stroma outside of the uterine cavity, with cellular activity evident in lesions, nodules, cysts or endometriomas (Audebert et al., 1992). Although it typically appears benign on histopathology, endometriosis has been likened to a malignant tumor since the lesions grow, infiltrate and adhere to adjacent tissues and interfere with physiologic processes (Kitawaki et al., 2002; Noble, Simpson, Johns, & Bulun, 1996). Ectopic endometriotic growths respond to cyclic changes of estrogen and proliferate and shed in a manner similar to eutopic endometrium. This cyclic ectopic activity results in internal bleeding, formation of scar tissue, inflammation and sometimes debilitating chronic pain (Kitawaki et al.). PMID:18837717

  6. Whole Abdominal-Pelvic Radiotherapy in the Management of Primary Ewing Sarcoma of the Peritoneal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Garant, Aurelie; Shakir, Shakir; Brossard, Josee; Garde-Granger, Perrine; Freeman, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma of the abdomen is a rare entity in pediatric oncology and represents a technical challenge both for surgeons and radiation oncologists. We document the case of a young female patient with primary disseminated, intraperitoneal Ewing sarcoma who after an excellent response to chemotherapy received preoperative whole abdominal-pelvic radiotherapy with good tolerance. PMID:26918223

  7. Postoperative Nomogram Predicting the 9-Year Probability of Prostate Cancer Recurrence After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Using Radiation Dose as a Prognostic Variable

    SciTech Connect

    Potters, Louis; Roach, Mack; Davis, Brian J.; Stock, Richard G.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Stone, Nelson N.; Fearn, Paul A.; Yu Changhong; Shinohara, Katsuto; Kattan, Michael W.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To report a multi-institutional outcomes study on permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) to 9 years that includes postimplant dosimetry, to develop a postimplant nomogram predicting biochemical freedom from recurrence. Methods and Materials: Cox regression analysis was used to model the clinical information for 5,931 patients who underwent PPB for clinically localized prostate cancer from six centers. The model was validated against the dataset using bootstrapping. Disease progression was determined using the Phoenix definition. The biological equivalent dose was calculated from the minimum dose to 90% of the prostate volume (D90) and external-beam radiotherapy dose using an alpha/beta of 2. Results: The 9-year biochemical freedom from recurrence probability for the modeling set was 77% (95% confidence interval, 73-81%). In the model, prostate-specific antigen, Gleason sum, isotope, external beam radiation, year of treatment, and D90 were associated with recurrence (each p < 0.05), whereas clinical stage was not. The concordance index of the model was 0.710. Conclusion: A predictive model for a postimplant nomogram for prostate cancer recurrence at 9-years after PPB has been developed and validated from a large multi-institutional database. This study also demonstrates the significance of implant dosimetry for predicting outcome. Unique to predictive models, these nomograms may be used a priori to calculate a D90 that likely achieves a desired outcome with further validation. Thus, a personalized dose prescription can potentially be calculated for each patient.

  8. Informed Consent for Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Alam, Pakeeza; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-03-01

    Informed consent is the process in which a patient makes a decision about a surgical procedure or medical intervention after adequate information is relayed by the physician and understood by the patient. This process is critical for reconstructive pelvic surgeries, particularly with the advent of vaginal mesh procedures. In this article, we review the principles of informed consent, the pros and cons of different approaches in reconstructive pelvic surgery, the current legal issues surrounding mesh use for vaginal surgery, and tips on how to incorporate this information when consenting patients for pelvic floor surgery. PMID:26880513

  9. Three-dimensional ultrasound appearance of pelvic floor in nulliparous women and pelvic organ prolapse women.

    PubMed

    Ying, Tao; Li, Qin; Xu, Lian; Liu, Feifei; Hu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the morphology and structure of pelvic floor in 50 nulliparous and 50 pelvic organ prolapse (POP) women using translabial three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound. The levator hiatus in POP women was significantly different from that in nullipara women. In POP women, the size of pelvic floor increased, with a circular shape, and the axis of levator hiatus departed from the normal position in 36 (72%) cases. The puborectalis was avulsed in 18 (36%) cases and the pelvic organs arranged abnormally in 23 (46%) cases. In summary, 3D ultrasound is an effective tool to detect the pelvic floor in POP women who presented with abnormalities in the morphology and structure of pelvic floor. PMID:23155363

  10. Three-dimensional Ultrasound Appearance of Pelvic Floor in Nulliparous Women and Pelvic Organ Prolapse Women

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tao; Li, Qin; Xu, Lian; Liu, Feifei; Hu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the morphology and structure of pelvic floor in 50 nulliparous and 50 pelvic organ prolapse (POP) women using translabial three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound. The levator hiatus in POP women was significantly different from that in nullipara women. In POP women, the size of pelvic floor increased, with a circular shape, and the axis of levator hiatus departed from the normal position in 36 (72%) cases. The puborectalis was avulsed in 18 (36%) cases and the pelvic organs arranged abnormally in 23 (46%) cases. In summary, 3D ultrasound is an effective tool to detect the pelvic floor in POP women who presented with abnormalities in the morphology and structure of pelvic floor. PMID:23155363